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n. phi•lan•thro•py an act or gift done or made for humanitarian purposes v. makes a to cause to happen to or be experienced by someone n. dif•fer•ence a significant change in or effect on a situation

The Impact Report 2013


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2013 Impact Report


I MPACT :

Getting There Together

$966,855 raised in 2012-13 l increasing graduation rates l meeting workforce needs l realizing dreams

Every supporter and every donation to Reynolds accelerates the speed of regional progress through: increased degree completion rates l often made possible through scholarship assistance, resulting in l larger numbers of highly-skilled workers to meet local employer needs and lure industry to our region, creating l economic growth, greater personal fulfillment, and community well-being Every Reynolds donor is a mover and a shaker, because every contribution generates the kind of economic momentum resulting in and created by a more highly skilled and satisfied workforce. It starts with students. We have some of the best and brightest on our campuses, taught by a faculty passionate about their fields of study. Contributions can support programs that help people see a new world, literally. Our Opticianry students provided free vision screenings for children in the City of Richmond and traveled to Jamaica for a 10-day humanitarian eye-care project. Rachel, a 2011 Caroline County High School graduate, said about the trip, “With the work being hands-on, we are now better trained to fix the problem and not just identify it. By working with the people of Jamaica, I have definitely become a better person.” Every gift has a fascinating story behind it: the story of the giver. In this impact Report, you will meet individuals who made the decision to support J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College. Why? Please read on….

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

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A longtime resident of Hanover County, Jerry Owen is pictured at Historic Polegreen Church in Mechanicsville, Virginia.

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2013 Impact Report


I MPACT :

Jerry Owen I had the opportunity to attend the groundbreaking ceremony at the Parham Road Campus in the early 1970’s. I was serving on the Hanover School Board at the time. Later I was a member of the Hanover Board of Supervisors from 1976 to 1983. The Hanover Rotary sponsored a scholarship, and I was connected with Reynolds that way. After deciding not to seek a third term on the Hanover Board, Bud Burnette, president at the time, asked if I would consider serving on the College Board. I told him that was the one thing I would be interested in doing now that I would no longer be in politics. I enjoyed doing this from 1984 to 1988.

Reynolds conferred 1,320 degrees and certificates in the 2012-13 academic year. According to the Georgetown Public Policy Institute, 30% of job openings through 2020 will require an associate’s degree or some college coursework. The Owen Family Endowed Scholarship ensures future Reynolds students can graduate and compete for these jobs.

That was the whole success of my company, getting the right people. I owned a high volume, direct marketing production company. The first thing I looked for? Customer service. Attitude. The world doesn’t owe anyone anything. You have to prove your worth and give more than 100%. In a business, there’s a certain professionalism and energy that feeds on itself. When I consider that quality, I think about Ukrop’s, Lexus of Richmond, and I think about Reynolds. There’s an attitude that filters from top to bottom and back up. You can’t buy that dynamism with dollars and cents. You have to care about other people.

In those earlier days, you’d hear a remark like, “Well, we may end up having to send him to Reynolds,” or something to that effect. That attitude was way back, many years ago. Now, the reputation of the school is up there. A student knows, I may go from here to work, or I may go on to another school. But now, people take pride in coming here. It’s a definite attitude change in parents and young people.

Everyone isn’t wired to be an executive. I believe everyone needs some higher education, but not necessarily a four-year degree. Reynolds fills that gap for people who want to improve their lives. If your attitude is right, you can seize the opportunity. I like that the programs are oriented to actually prepare people for life and what you need to learn to make a better living.

There’s a vibrancy at Reynolds. Gary Rhodes is a dynamo!

I have felt so richly blessed in my life. I have to give back. I support

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

many organizations, international, national, and local. Reynolds helps kids in this area. I tell you, the icing on the cake for me was meeting the students we helped at the Scholarship Luncheon. I didn’t know what they looked like, had never seen them before. Mary and I went and enjoyed it so much. I keep that photo in my office. I’m amazed at people who have so much and still want more and more. For what? You can’t take it with you. What you take with you is good memories – good memories of people, the people you’ve helped and the work you’ve done.

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Back row, left to right: Deanne Williams, Tracy Aiello, Terry Festa, Maddie Albright, Scott Burrell, Betsy Trice

Front row, left to right: David Seward, Terry Lynn Smith, Toni Gregory, Linda Toller

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2013 Impact Report


I MPACT :

Feeding a Community: Organic Garden at Goochland Campus Toni Gregory, Horticulture Faculty and 2012 Horticulture Alum It is always impressive to me how the smallest beginnings can yield great things. All of what we are doing in the Organic Vegetable Garden began as tiny seeds in packs that would not have even filled a plastic baggie! Now, we are pulling average harvests of 50-100 pounds weekly. Our hope is the program can be replicated in other communities. What you produce in your own space is that much less you need from the grocery store, that much less fossil fuel needed. Terry Lynn Smith, Goochland Free Clinic & Family Services Goochland County is made up of very diverse social demographics. While there are million dollar plus homes here, there are also houses without indoor plumbing. We have over 100 families that depend on the Food Pantry every week for food stability. The organic garden is an amazing resource for the Food Pantry. Our families are so thankful to have such super fresh vegetables, just picked the day before. All of this is bringing our community together, a prime example of neighbors helping neighbors.

The organic garden at Reynolds’ Goochland Campus feeds more than 100 families a week. The weekly harvest is delivered to the Food Pantry of Goochland Free Clinic and Family Services. Financial donations to the Horticulture Program help to offset labor and production costs.

David Seward, Program Head, Horticulture The coolest thing about my job is finding people of like mind, with the same passion to make things happen. A few years ago, landscaping in front of the building was nearly nil; all that changed when Scott Burrell came on board. Betsy Trice and her mom, Cindy Conner, had been teaching sustainable subject matter for years; we now have a Career Studies Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture. For this project, I pulled in Toni to manage the garden and Betsy to lead the curriculum. It’s a big project, but you’d be amazed at the work people put in when they know what it’s going for. The master gardeners who volunteer with us are incredible. Everyone is of like mind: they like to grow, harvest, and give back.

Betsy Trice, Horticulture Faculty Why is teaching sustainable agriculture so important? It empowers people. Being able to grow even a portion of your own food is a huge thing. The seed library on campus is a great community resource and we hope folks take advantage of it. We have actual seeds for sharing and advice on planting – and, it’s free. The thing that keeps me going is when students come back after the class a year or two later, or they’ll me an email to say thank you. What they’ve learned in class has taken them on a journey. They’ve met people and made connections they wouldn’t have made otherwise.

Maddie, Student I don’t have a garden at home, and this is my way to get experience in the dirt. I’m glad that people can eat fresh food because of what we’re doing.

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

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Mary Jo Moton is pictured in front of the Sydnor & Hundley building on East Grace Street, where classes (separated by partitions, not walls) were held in the early 1970s. Reynolds now has three campuses. The Sydnor & Hundley building now houses converted apartments, mostly for Virginia Commonwealth University students.

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2013 Impact Report


I MPACT :

Mary Jo Moton I was born in 1934. The thinking of most African-American families at that time was to, at least, have their children finish high school. There wasn’t much planning beyond that because so many didn’t have the money. Also, you had to be accepted by the college. The uniqueness of the community college was you could go there, get started, and get enough training to earn a decent living. Your options weren’t limited to working as a domestic or shining shoes; for my people, it was a new opportunity. I’ve been with the Virginia Community College System since 1967. I had direct experience with students and their daily lives through my work at Reynolds, where I served as director of counseling, retiring in 1999. Most of the students I worked with hadn’t planned to go to college, or their families weren’t prepared to send them. Particularly for older adults, it was so exciting. They never thought they could take one class, much less more. That’s part of the reason I started my scholarship. I think particularly of women students who may need extra

For the 2012-13 academic year, $434,600 in scholarship monies were made available, helping 264 students either complete their program and graduate or remain enrolled. Like Mary Jo Moton, donors to the Educational Foundation open a gateway of opportunity for students who could not afford a college education otherwise.

financial help, perhaps with childcare or transportation. They’re riding the city bus and trying to pay for nursery school. They need that extra income that’s beyond what financial aid can do. When I was a student at Hampton Institute, now Hampton University, I called or wrote home and my family sent me what I needed. These young people don’t have that option. It helps a person to know there’s someone out there who cares. It’s encouragement, and it makes me feel very good. I’d rather give it to a young lady trying to manage her family than give it to Uncle Sam. I’ve asked my children to continue my scholarship and they’ve agreed. The smartest girl in my junior high school couldn’t go to high school. Her mother couldn’t afford the bus fare from the east side to the city where we lived to the west side, where the one high school was located. I’ve spent my life wondering what happened to her. A lot of people don’t know those kinds of stories, but those things motivate me.

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

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Jean Holman and her husband, Dave, live in Church Hill, where he is the mastermind behind their beautiful garden.

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2013 Impact Report


I MPACT :

Jean Perkinson Holman My interest in the community college system and Reynolds all began with my mom, Pat Perkinson. I inherited it from her. She wanted more opportunities for students, especially in rural areas like Middlesex County where she grew up. There, the only options for young people to continue their education were to leave the area to go to college or a trade school. My mother graduated from Richmond Professional Institute, now VCU, and during her career became involved with and committed to the community college system. She worked for Governor Mills Godwin when the Virginia Community College System was formed, then for the first chancellor of the System, and some years later at J. Sargeant Reynolds. She was an energetic supporter of Rappahannock Community College, which was established near where she grew up and eventually retired. She and my dad created a scholarship there. Several years ago, I created the Pat Perkinson Memorial Scholarship

Jean Holman and Virginia Credit Union are among the Middle College’s earliest and most loyal supporters. Since 2003, the program has enrolled more than 800 students, with 76% of students earning their GED, and nearly half of graduates pursuing college coursework or training.

to honor her. My mother would have loved meeting the scholarship recipients at Reynolds and hearing their stories. It’s their stories that really connect with me, as they would have with her. I like that the scholarship helps students who have found a field they truly want to pursue. It may not always be what they’re doing now, but they have gained a clearer idea of what will be meaningful to them in a career. I would like to think I can help change a life – even a number of lives over the years.

empowerment it creates, are why I give a personal donation each year. The Credit Union has a matching gift program for employee contributions, which makes it even better.

There seems to be a synergy in why I give. I work at Virginia Credit Union, and it was there that I learned about the Middle College program. Getting students back on track and prepared for meaningful and fulfilling work resonates with me. I am a practical person, raised by practical parents. Reynolds offers students a practical education. Virginia Credit Union helps people with practical services and financial education. It all fits together. My belief in the purpose of the Middle College, and the

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

I have enjoyed living in the City of Richmond for most of my adult life. I’ve seen the progress and the opportunities. Reynolds has been part of that progress. What I give – and plan to give when I’m gone – is a drop in the bucket for what’s needed. It’s joining forces, the contributions of many people that really make a difference.

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Gary L. Rhodes (left & bottom right), President, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Jerry P. Fox (bottom left), Board of Directors, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation Bess Littlefield (bottom center), Executive Director, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation

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2013 Impact Report


The Foundation for Success. Mr. Fox, you’ve finished your tenure as President of the Educational Foundation Board, and you are now chairing the Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce. What does business need to know about community college and vice versa? Jerry Fox:  In the area of workforce development, we need to continue to get our story out and let businesses know what a great resource we are. With the workforce initiatives in our region, Reynolds is a natural fit, whether it’s people going right into the workforce or on to higher education. We play a vital role. Has that perception changed over the years? Does the business community take us more seriously now? Jerry Fox:  No question. With Gary’s chairing the Chamber a few years ago and the relationships he’s developed. There’s a much greater awareness of what Reynolds does for the community. Gary Rhodes:  I was recently talking with a healthcare provider who told me that Reynolds is on their “A” list for graduates. Not every organization is on that list. When Eugene Trani was president of VCU, he shared an interesting fact with me. On average, 48 percent of VCU freshmen graduate in a six year window; for students who take

30 credits or more and then transfer from Reynolds and then transfer to VCU, nearly 70 percent complete in the same six-year window. Reynolds filters those students most likely to succeed into VCU.

Reynolds before I arrived who were focused on making those business and workforce connections. Ms. Littlefield, the Foundation’s assets have grown tremendously under your leadership: nearly $9 million in assets, more than 40 endowed funds. The Major Gifts Campaign completed in 2010 raised $15.7 million, recordbreaking for a community college in Virginia. What’s the secret to this success?

Jerry Fox:  Another benefit is that so many of our students stay in Richmond after graduating from Reynolds. The Chamber has a huge emphasis on attracting young people and keeping that talent here.

Bess Littlefield:  In part, it’s being unapologetic about the mission of Reynolds. We have a great college with excellent faculty and students. So, we have to think big, and that includes the important role of our Foundation in philanthropy and the community. Alongside of that is leadership. When you’re successful raising money, it’s because of the leaders at the table. We have that in Dr. Rhodes and our board leadership, too. We have an outstanding board that brings people, ideas, and resources to the table.

Dr. Rhodes, You’re now in your 11th year as president. The business community, in particular, has gotten to know you and the mission of the college. Talk a little about the decision, and how you did it, of getting Reynolds increasingly “at the table” with business and industry. Gary Rhodes:  In the term “community college” what stands out is “community.” We’re investing in the community and it is investing in us. Reaching out to business leaders was natural and the right thing to do. Frankly, community colleges that aren’t engaged aren’t succeeding. As Jerry mentioned, serving as board chair of the Greater Richmond Chamber was very valuable. I had the opportunity to listen and learn firsthand what needs our programs and graduates should be meeting. There were certainly people at

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

Jerry Fox:  Bess, I agree. I don’t think I’ve ever served on a board with this kind of commitment. They care and love what the college is doing. You can see that in what they say and even more in what they do. Gary Rhodes:  A lesson I learned many years ago is that you don’t

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go with your hand out. You develop relationships and focus on what needs to be fixed. It’s not asking for money, but for help with solutions.

there was a blanket separating the kitchen and the living quarters. There were six people in that one small space. I remember thinking, even then, that we have to do something as a society to make sure people have an opportunity at a better life. If you work for it, you can have a better life.

Individually, what shaped your ideas about philanthropy? Any early memories or lessons you can recall? Jerry Fox:  Growing up on a farm, I have many fond memories, things my father instilled in me. You’d always share with people who may not have had the crops you were growing. I remember taking potatoes and cabbage from Boone to Columbia. Once, my father brought 100 watermelons back from the market to share with my third grade class. Later in life, I tried to teach my own kids the same lesson about sharing. We’d adopt two or three families at Christmas, and I’d be sure to take my kids, Julie and Rich, to deliver the gifts. It made a huge impression on them. So often, we ignore people in need. They’re all around us, yet we never see them.

Gary Rhodes:  And, what goes along with that is learning to appreciate the things we do have. If we’re lucky, we’ll get better at this lesson. More isn’t always the answer. Every day on my Outlook calendar, I have this note: AWYAH. It stands for “Appreciate What You Already Have.” It’s looking after our world and appreciating what’s in it. Even if that means that I’m late for work because I have to walk a little turtle from the road back into the woods. It’s the same principle, appreciating and caring for what we have and finding ways to give back. A question for the three of you: Your leadership has helped get us to this point. What do you want next for Reynolds and the Foundation?

Bess Littlefield:  My early memories are of my grandparent’s very modest farm; yet, they didn’t seem poor to me. Looking back now, I have a better understanding. I do have one memory that’s stayed with me. I was in my church youth group, maybe in the fourth grade, and we were delivering gifts during the holidays. One of our stops was in a public housing community. I remember in one of the units

Jerry Fox:  I want to see the Foundation continue to grow and reach more people. And, we need to continue getting better at telling our story. We have a wonderful story to tell. The better we communicate it, the more success we’ll have.

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Bess Littlefield:  To that point, I want every donor who helps us grow and become more successful to know how much we appreciate them and what, exactly, their gift is helping us accomplish. Every donor’s generosity is part of the Reynolds story. At this year’s Scholarship Luncheon, a student, an adult learner, was holding back tears thanking me for the scholarship she’d received. Ultimately, $3,000 was the deciding factor on whether she’d become a nurse. I want to make sure all students willing to work hard to reach their goals can do it. Dr. Rhodes, the same question for you. Where would you like to see us grow? How do we make your next 11 years as fruitful as the last 11? Gary Rhodes:  Continuing to listen and respond to the community’s needs will remain at the core of what we do. Ultimately, I’d like us to be regarded as the go-to organization for workforce. I look at community leadership as a symphony. We’re all playing different instruments. When we need to, we can break into smaller pieces, like a string quartet. We have the whole community observing as our audience. The point is to strive to become better in our roles, as different as they are. When all of the pieces of that symphony come together, it’s beautiful music.

2013 Impact Report


To learn more about the Educational Foundation, please contact Executive Director Bess Littlefield at 804-523-5812 blittlefield@reynolds.edu or

2013–2014 Board of Directors J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc. Board of Directors President  E. Massie Valentine, Jr. Vice President  Gianna C. Clark Secretary  Dorothy Reynolds Brotherton Treasurer  Patrick W. Farrell Assistant Treasurer  Amelia M. Bradshaw Past President   Jerry P. Fox

We welcome Mitchell F. Haddon to the Board. We thank James Cuthbertson, Joseph C. Hutchison, The Honorable   Benjamin J. Lambert III, Ivor Massey Jr., and Pamela J. Royal for their service.

Amelia M. Bradshaw   J. Sargeant Reynolds   Community College Dorothy Reynolds Brotherton   Community Volunteer Gianna C. Clark   Dominion Virginia Power Mark A. Creery, Sr.   J. Sargeant Reynolds   Community College Board Chair Patrick W. Farrell   Community Volunteer Jerry P. Fox   Cherry Bekaert LLP J. Douglas Freeman, Sr.   Tucker Pavilion (Retired) L. Michael Gracik, Jr.   Keiter CPA’s Mitchell F. Haddon   ColonialWebb Contractors Bruce R. Hazelgrove III   NewMarket Corporation Deborah J. Johnston   Care Advantage, Inc. Margaret E. ‘Lyn’ McDermid   Federal Reserve J. Sargeant Reynolds, Jr.   Reynolds Development The Honorable Anne J. G. Rhodes   Richmond, Virginia Gary L. Rhodes   J. Sargeant Reynolds   Community College E. Massie Valentine, Jr.   Davenport & Company LLC Michelle A. Williams   Richmond Restaurant Group, Inc. James F. Woodward, Sr.   Media General, Inc.

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

Director of Development Marianne McGhee at 804-523-5810 mmcghee@reynolds.edu. 1651 East Parham Road Post Office Box 26924 Richmond, Virginia 23261-6924 804.523.5181 (ph) 804.523.5107 (fx)

Directors Emeriti Dimitri B. Georgiadis (1927–2012) L. H. Ginn III Lucylle F. Gordon (1920–2005) Jeanette S. Lipman J. Sargeant Reynolds, Jr. Patricia L. Robertson Special Advisor R. Roland Reynolds   Industry Little Hawk LLC

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Foundation Board President E. Massie Valentine, Jr. is Senior Vice President with Davenport & Company LLC, with offices in One James Center, pictured here. The Foundation Board of Directors provides oversight of the Educational Foundation’s investments and assets.

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2013 Impact Report


I MPACT :

E. Massie Valentine, Jr. I believe the future of Reynolds hinges on an important characteristic of its history, which is that we’re deeply embedded into the community. There’s a ubiquitous quality to the college. It’s striking how many people in Richmond have earned a degree through Reynolds, or taken a class or two; people who work with you and for you. This demonstrates we’re meeting the demands of students and businesses, too. Something I’m passionate about is growing our scholarship funding. We’re making progress, but there’s more to do. Most of our students work full or part-time. Even with financial aid, it can be a struggle to pay tuition. We also have students whose family income is just over the threshold to receive financial aid, and scholarships relieve some of that burden. This is something I care a lot about. Does Richmond have its challenges? Sure. What’s important is that Reynolds can be part of the solution. One example

The passion and commitment of the Educational Foundation Board of Directors is helping Reynolds serve more students than ever. Every Director, past and present, has expanded access to higher education and workforce training for people in our community.

is the Middle College program. The demand is much greater than the number of young people we can serve. These are young adults who want to and need to earn their GED. If we could do more to support programs like this one, we have the potential to make even more of an impact. Gary Rhodes is doing as much as anyone has ever done to try to connect with the business community. The boards he serves on and the relationships he’s built are getting the word out there. It’s really important that we have the business community’s involvement, because Reynolds either has trained, is training, or will train many of their employees throughout the entire region. I don’t have one particular memory of being taught that philanthropy is important. It was the way I was brought up, the church I’ve gone to, the schools I’ve gone to. I’ve always wanted to try and give back in some way.

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

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The Picture of Generosity

Dimitri Georgiadis (1927–2012) Director Emeritus

In the spring of 1996 Dimitri Georgiadis’ passion for photography led him to take a class at Reynolds - and he never left. His roles at the college were numerous: student, probono program head in photography, scholarship benefactor and Director Emeritus of the Educational Foundation. Mr. Georgiadis had a special kinship with the students at Reynolds. As an international businessman, he was fluent in many languages – and, it wasn’t unusual to find him chatting with an ESL student in their native tongue. He would make time to do that because he said he understood what it was like to be in a new country and to want to belong and connect with people. In 2007, Reynolds was proud to recognize Dimitri and his wife Maggie’s longstanding commitment and generosity through the naming of “Georgiadis Hall.” Dimitri passed away in December 2012, but not before devoting 20 years to helping Reynolds students achieve their American Dream as he did.

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2013 Impact Report


Financials J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

2012-13 Raised by Donor Type

Statement of Financial Position June 30, 2013

l  Community Groups . l Individuals* . . . . l Corporations . . . l  Foundations . . . .

Total

ASSETS .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

$183,434 $117,593 $191,872 $473,956

*Includes realized bequests

Cash & Cash Equivalents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $479,109 Investments .

. . . . . . . $966,855

$7,570,903

Unconditional Promises to Give . . . . . . . . . . . . $722,206 Other Receivables and Prepaid Expenses .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

$8,637

Net Investment in Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33,909 TOTAL ASSETS .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. $8,814,764

LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS Total Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,768 Net Assets:  Unrestricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $534,049

2012-13 Distribution of Gifts

  Temporarily Restricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,143,846

Total

  Permanently Restricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,097,101

l Unrestricted . l Scholarships . l Programs . .

Total Net Assets

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

$8,774,996

TOTAL LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,814,764

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Educational Foundation, Inc.

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. . . . . . . $966,855 . . .

. . .

. $101,591 . $402,583 . $462,681


I MPACT : Gratitude Linda A., Pre-Nursing I work three jobs, have a mortgage and plenty of bills. There is no way I could have paid for this by myself. I am so grateful for my scholarship and grateful that I came this far with my studying.

Jordan K., Engineering My scholarship covered the gap between Army funding, making it possible for me to go to school and support my family.

reynolds.edu/foundation

Edwin M., Science It is appreciated more than words can really express. Whether large or small, the generosity of others validates to the recipient that what they are doing and the reason for doing it matters to someone. It is a great feeling knowing that someone out there apart from friends and family believes in you.


Reynolds Foundation Impact Report 2013