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NOVEMBER / DECEMBER 2019 THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF PLUMBING AND HEATING ENGINEERING

JOINING FORCES

GREEN ENERGY

SYSTEM SUPPORT

Working towards a stronger industry: the IDHEE joins the CIPHE

Could heat pumps help us meet emissions targets?

Helping your customers through the switch to low-carbon

FIGHTING FUEL POVERTY We look at what the industry can do to help


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Welcome Right now, I’m concerned about the welfare of an elderly lady who lives in our village. Her carer is about to move out and she has dementia. The property is badly insulated, she’s a hoarder and she has a habit of turning the oven on to heat her home. Sadly, she is not alone. Millions of people are living in fuel poverty and the problem is getting worse as energy bills rise and benefit payments are squeezed. We can’t carry on like this, not least due to the safety and environmental issues. A plumber made headlines last month after refusing to charge a 91-year-old customer for a boiler repair. The public commends his decency, but we should be raging at the plight of ordinary people. So we’re making the issue our cover story and sharing how you can get involved. We’re also sharing tips on how you can make your business run more smoothly and asking whether heat pumps could help to ease our reliance on fossil fuels. There’s plenty here to get your attention. Enjoy the edition.

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Contents

CHRIS SMITH

FEATURES

25 THE FIX

12 Trading on trust Being in business is a daily battle. The CIPHE’s Jerry Whiteley imparts advice to help you maximise turnover

pandhengineering@ jamespembrokemedia.co.uk

Editor Chris Smith Project manager Lizzie Hufton Head of design Simon Goddard Publisher James Houston Published by James Pembroke Media, 90 Walcot Street, Bath BA1 5BG Tel 01225 337777 Group Advertising Sales Manager Mark Durham, mark.durham@jamespembrokemedia.co.uk Advertising sales executive Harvey Falshaw, harvey.falshaw@jamespembrokemedia.co.uk Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering (CIPHE) 64 Station Lane, Hornchurch, Essex RM12 6NB Tel 01708 472791

When it comes to installing new, low-energy heating systems, the homeowner will look to the installer for advice... 29 Q&A CPD questions to bolster your skills

16 Fuel poverty Discover what the industry can do to support the millions of UK households living in fuel poverty

30 Your membership

20 Heat pumps

33 Advice

Could heat pumps help the UK meet its emissions targets?

Tips from Which? on how to avoid the bank scammers

REGULARS

34 Q&A: Jason Clark ...on why learning a trade was the best

5 From the CEO

thing he ever did

There are big changes ahead – but the CIPHE is getting ready for them

6 Frontline

Editor

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The IDHEE’s union with the CIPHE, plus news from around the industry

Subscriptions P&H Engineering is the magazine for the Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering, containing technical articles, latest industry news and environmental and educational updates. It is published six times a year and sent free to members. Annual subscription for non-member £120 Annual subscription for overseas non-member £145 To join CIPHE, email tims@ciphe.org.uk

Industrial Associate group meet leads to new strategy; renewal discount

ON THE COVER Helping those at risk from fuel poverty Page 16 Illustration: Adam Gale

Membership Founded in 1906, the Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering (CIPHE) is the professional body for the UK plumbing and heating industry. Membership is made up of consultants, specifiers, designers, public health engineers, lecturers, trainers, trainees and practitioners. The CIPHE has a membership of 7,500, including over 150 manufacturers and distributors. The majority of members live in the UK, although over 1,000 are residents in Hong Kong. The CIPHE is a member of the Construction Industry Council and a licensed member of the Engineering Council.

Copyright notice and disclaimer P&H Engineering is published bi-monthly by the Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering. All material is copyright of the Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering and may not be reproduced without written permission. The publishers do not accept responsibility for errors or omissions. The views expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of the Institute and publication of an advertisement or article does not necessarily mean the Institute endorses those products, materials or techniques.

www.ciphe.org.uk

NOV / DEC 2019

P&H ENGINEERING 3


FROM THE CEO

The need for collaboration has never been greater

KEVIN WELLMAN Chief executive officer kevinw@ciphe.org.uk

Big changes are coming – and we’re getting ready

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GIVING BACK There is increasing demand for CIPHE representatives to support our technical, education and membership activities. If you are in a position to put something back into the industry through CIPHE’s committees, technical working groups or making presentations to colleges and training centres please contact Tim Sainty on tims@ciphe.org.uk. See page 7 for our call for members to put themselves forward for the roles of President, Vice-President and Board of Trustee representative.

www.ciphe.org.uk

ur industry doesn’t stand standards need to be put in place when Stay in still; as recent weeks hydrogen is going to be produced and touch have shown. used in the domestic environment. Got an opinion on an In September I attended the World Not surprisingly, training and industry issue? Join in the conversation on Plumbing Conference, which attracted licensing featured heavily, including Twitter @CIPHE more than 500 delegates from across the call for mandatory CPD and the world. The inaugural presentation concerns about the worldwide skills was given by a futurist who explained the shortage. Plumbing hazards such as advances in plumbing and how technology is backflow, Legionnaires’ disease and scalding progressing at an alarming pace. An example attracted great interest. The one thing that followed immediately as intelligent plumbing everyone agreed on is that we are facing global systems featured in the next presentation. water challenges and the need for collaboration Other subjects covered included water has never been greater. efficiency and water labelling, the reasons behind Following the conference, I met with plumbing failures, and renewable technologies, representatives of the Hong Kong Branch which included a series of presentations on who, along with Branch members in the UK, hydrogen. I was left with the impression that the work tirelessly in support of the CIPHE. In UK is more advanced in many aspects regarding recent months, CIPHE has provided support the wider use of hydrogen. A particular message to the officials at Hong Kong’s Water Supplies that everyone agreed with was that robust Department, which has been well received.

Work in progress The Industry Response Group Steering Group on Competences for Building a Safer Future (CSG), established following the Grenfell Tower tragedy, has the responsibility for the 12 competency Working Groups previously reported upon. All the Working Group reports have been completed and collated into the Raising the Bar Interim Report. The consultation closed at the end of October, with over 900 submissions being received. I will use future opportunities available through this column and our other communication channels to provide further updates to members.

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Frontline

KEEP INFORMED Read all the latest news, updates, and member benefits Facebook/CIPHE twitter.com/CIPHE www.ciphe.org.uk

All that’s happening in plumbing and heating Kevin Wellman (left) with Peter Thom, director of IDHEE

Regulation

Got a news story? Get in touch with editor Chris Smith using the email address on p3 New union

CIPHE INTEGRATES IDHEE TO SAFEGUARD INDUSTRY The unification of the two institutes will help protect the future of plumbing, heating and environmental engineers

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he Institute of Domestic Heating & Environmental Engineers (IDHEE) has been incorporated with the Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering (CIPHE), in a move that will provide heightened professional and technical support to members of the plumbing and heating industry. Founded in 1964, IDHEE’s ideology of promoting energyefficient domestic central heating components and the installation of safe and efficient systems, sits neatly within the CIPHE’s own remit to protect public health. The IDHEE will become a distinct group within the CIPHE, with the CIPHE establishing a new Register of Heating & Environmental Engineers. IDHEE members will be

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NOV / DEC 2019

welcomed into the folds of CIPHE membership, with individuals encouraged to also register with the Engineering Council at Engineering Technician, Incorporated Engineer or Chartered Engineer level. Kevin Wellman, CIPHE CEO said, “The CIPHE and IDHEE are closely aligned in our aims and activities, and we at the Institute have always held a mutual respect for the work of the IDHEE. There are already a sizeable number of individuals who hold membership of both organisations and we are therefore ideally suited to provide a natural home for the engineers in its ranks. “This incorporation is about building a stronger industry, which is environmentally appreciative and better equipped to deal with the demands of future technology.”

SPRINKLER RULES SET TO BE OVERHAULED The Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government (MHCLG) is calling for views on reducing the trigger height for sprinkler systems in high-rise flats. The current regulations in Approved Document B demand installation in buildings more than 30m high, but the government is considering setting a height of 18m. Sprinkler systems are already mandatory on new buildings in Scotland and Wales. The MHCLG said: “The government will consider the case for making changes to fire safety guidance for the other proposals based on views received.” It follows recommendations made by the Hackitt review into fire safety and building regulations. The consultation closes on 28 November. Meanwhile, the Construction Industry Council (CIC) has issued a statement on the installation of sprinklers. It said: “We support the installation of sprinklers in all new and converted residential buildings, hotels, student accommodation, hospitals, schools and care home buildings of 11m or above in height.” The CIC also supports the retrofitting of sprinklers to buildings during refurbishment, a measure not included in the MHCLG’s review. CIPHE’s Kevin Wellman said: “We have long campaigned for sprinklers in high-rise buildings, so this is a welcome step forward.” tinyurl.com/y22jysls]

www.ciphe.org.uk


FRONTLINE

HEAT PUMPS Could replacing gas boilers with heat pumps help the UK meet its emissions targets? Page 20

NEWS IN BRIEF Testing

New range from Raptor

Nominations

Raptor has launched a new range of test equipment for professional plumbing, heating and air conditioning engineers. The tool firm has added 14 new testing products for heating, ventilation, cold storage and air conditioning applications including a new stem thermometer with LCD display.

Get involved with your Institute! THE CIPHE HAS called for nominations for the posts of president and vice president. We are also seeking nominations for a voting member trustee to serve on the Board of Trustees for four years (2020 – 2024). A copy of the responsibilities and requirements for the roles is available from Lesley Church on lesleyc@ciphe.org.uk or 01708 463115. Nominations are required for: president of the Institute; vice president of the Institute; voting member trustee. Only the voting member trustee will be a member of the Board of Trustees, as set out in Byelaw 24. Written nominations must be submitted to the CIPHE honorary company secretary no later than 31 January 2020 by a voting member, by a CIPHE branch officer or by a representative of the Board of Trustees. Kevin Wellman, chief executive officer, said: “The roles of president and vice-president are crucial in representing, supporting and advocating CIPHE members and the wider plumbing and heating industry. I would strongly encourage anybody who feels they

The roles of president and vice president are crucial

www.ciphe.org.uk

Current president Chris Northey with former president Tracey Richardson

Find out more at www. wolseley.co.uk/b/raptor-tools/

Suppliers

Supply firm sold would like to contribute to find out more. At the same time, CIPHE is currently investing significantly in how it fulfils its varied roles as a professional and educational body. With regards to the trustee appointment, somebody who wishes to contribute positively to matters of governance and strategy will be a welcome addition.” Nomination papers include the requirement to provide a short CV and a good quality photograph, a signed declaration from the nominee of his or her willingness to serve, if elected, and in respect of a trustee appointment an acknowledgement of awareness of, and acceptance to adhere to, the role and responsibilities of charitable trustees. For a nomination form and information about the roles and responsibilities of trustees, please apply to: CIPHE Honorary Company Secretary, Chartered Institute of Plumbing and Heating Engineering, 64 Station Lane, Hornchurch, Essex RM12 6NB. The CIPHE’s Annual General Meeting, at which the results of the elections will be announced, will take place on Friday 19 June 2020.

Supply firm Plumbase has been sold by its parent company. Grafton Group confirmed the sale to Plumbing and Heating Investments Limited for £66.75m. Gavin Slark, chief executive of Grafton Group, said: “The sale of Plumbase to PHIL secures future opportunities for Plumbase, its employees and other stakeholders as part of an enlarged specialist plumbing and heating business.”

Boilers

Worcester Bosch adds to line up Worcester Bosch has launched a new natural gas-fired boiler. With outputs of 25kW and 30kW, the Worcester 2000 has the same flow rates as the existing Greenstar i. It can pipe vertically to the boiler and is simple to specify with maximum flue lengths of 12m horizontally and 15m vertically. Worcester Bosch said: “The series comes with a five-year warranty, which can be increased to six when fitted with a system filter.” For more information, visit: www.worcester-bosch.co.uk

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P&H ENGINEERING 7


FRONTLINE

NEWS IN BRIEF Development

Duravit does its bit for CPD Duravit has updated advice to installers with the help of the Royal Institute of British Architects. Its hygiene and cleanliness in bathroom design advice covers aspects of toilet design, hygiene options and more. Martin Carroll, managing director of Duravit UK, said: “CPDs are not only about providing in-depth knowledge and information, but also help to establish and build relationships.” To find out more, go to www.ribacpd.com and look under the Design, Construction and Technology section.

Education

Young people don’t understand engineering Engineering could be one of the most poorly understood professions, according to new survey findings. Research by the Royal Academy of Engineering warned young people are missing opportunities to make a difference because they are unaware of career choices they can make. It found 76% of young people aged 11–19 do not know about what people working in engineering do. The research was released to coincide with This is Engineering Day – created by the Academy – on 6 November, which will raise awareness of the sector’s work.

Career choices are limited by lack of awareness

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Campaign

CIPHE backs calls for better building safety BUILDING INDUSTRY LEADERS have called for a step change in attitudes towards safety. Members of the Industry Response Group’s steering group on competences, which includes the CIPHE, said the industry needed to do more to end the minimumstandards culture that is risking safety and quality. The steering group’s work, called Building a Safer Future, has included two conferences held in September, which shared the main calls to action from the working groups. Among the contributors was Dame Judith Hackitt, who reviewed building safety for the government after the Grenfell fire. She said: “The direction of travel is right, and progress on many of the aspects of implementing the recommendations

The “minimum standards” culture must end

[set out in her report Building a Safer Future] is encouraging. But we’re not moving fast enough to change any of it. So, what are we waiting for?” CIPHE chief executive officer Kevin Wellman, who attended, said: “Dame Hackitt is certainly an advocate of licensing and concluded that as far as she is concerned we do need registration. A common theme emanating from the discussions was regarding life safety, fire safety, structural safety and water safety. More has to be done.”

Campaign

Campaigners demand action on fuel poverty CAMPAIGNERS HAVE CALLED for action after figures revealed little change in the number of people living in fuel poverty. The figures for 2017, released this year, reveal that 2.53m households in England – one in 10 – are living in fuel poverty, a decrease of just 0.2% on 2016. A household

is said to be fuel poor if it has above-average energy costs, and if paying those costs would push it below the poverty line. Adam Scorer, chief executive of the charity National Energy Action (NEA), said: “As well as supporting people on impossibly low incomes, meeting that target would require

a step-change in installing insulation, boilers and first-time central heating systems.” CIPHE chief executive officer, Kevin Wellman, said: “This is a national crisis that can only be solved at a national level by the government.” Read our feature on fuel poverty on page 16

www.ciphe.org.uk


FRONTLINE

BEAT THE SCAMMERS Which? advice on how to avoid falling victim to the banking fraudsters Page 33

Competition

Suppliers

Which? sets the mark for best boilers BRITAIN’S BIGGEST CONSUMER product tester has announced the industry’s best buys. Boiler maker Viessmann’s Vitodens domestic boiler range was awarded Which? Best Buy status for the third year running. Viessmann was described as a “very smart choice” by the respected UK consumer organisation in its annual survey. The independent Which? survey, carried out earlier this year, is based on feedback from 171 registered Trusted Traders heating engineers and 8,458 domestic customers. Graham Russell, Viessmann managing director, commented: “We are immensely proud of this achievement. Our overall Which? rating has increased steadily, telling us that the continued investment we are making to constantly improve our customer

We aim to challenge and exceed expectations

service and operations is having a positive effect. “By growing our in-house team and improving response times to both engineers and end-users, we aim to challenge and exceed expectations.” Worcester Bosch became the first boiler brand to have been awarded the Which? Best Buy endorsement 10 times  since 2009. Scores were based on engineer recommendation, ease of servicing, fixing a common fault, availability of parts and spares and build quality. Carl Arntzen, chief executive of Worcester Bosch said: “We are beyond thrilled to be recommended by Which?.” Matthew Knight, Which? principal researcher, commented: “Reliability is the single most important consideration when buying a new boiler.” 

IDEAL PRIZE IS VAN-TASTIC Wolseley and Ideal Boilers are giving plumbing and heating installers the chance to win a brand new VW Transporter van. Until 31 December, installers will be entered into a prize draw every time they buy an Ideal Logic Max or Vogue Max boiler at a Wolseley branch. It will be wrapped in the winner’s livery, fitted with a tube carrier for the roof rack and stocked with an i-Mini, Logic Max and Vogue Max boiler from Ideal. Buy an Ideal Logic Max or Vogue Max in a Wolseley branch to be entered.

Business

NEW CHIEF EXEC AT BMA The Bathroom Manufacturers Association (BMA) has a new chief executive officer. Tom Reynolds takes over from Yvonne Orgill who has worked in the industry for 33 years. She will continue working with the BMA until the end of the year, in a part-time support capacity, and also takes on the role of CEO at the Unified Water Label. BMA president Alan Dodds said, “Yvonne has tremendous energy and passion for the bathroom industry. She has poured her heart and soul into developing and leading the BMA.”

Award

MIRA HITS THE RED DOT SPOT Mira Showers has won a coveted Red Dot Design Award for its Mira Mode Maxim digital shower. The Mira Mode Maxim has been developed to offer a variety of unique spray combinations based on customer research. This is Mira’s seventh Red Dot Award; its most recent previous award was for the Mira Mode in 2017. Roland Boal, design studio director, Mira Showers, said: “The award is great recognition for the whole Mira Showers team.”

www.ciphe.org.uk

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P&H ENGINEERING 9


FRONTLINE

NEWS IN BRIEF

Awards

Supplier

Saniflo makes the big 4-0 Saniflo UK celebrated 40 years of doing business by highlighting its work with small firms. The pump manufacturer used the occasion to highlight its work to help keep businesses around Britain operational. Among them was KMD Cleaning & Laundry, founded by husband and wife team Matthew and Kirsty Curtis in 2013, which was helped out after installers discovered the drains were fresh water, threatening the future of their business.

Charity

Selco raises money for cancer nurses Plumbing supplier Selco has raised thousands for cancer nursing. A team of 30 Selco Builders Warehouse staff members, from 10 different branches, raised almost £20,000 by completing the Macmillan Cancer Support Wye Valley Mighty Hike. Kelvin Coe, regional manager for Selco and part of the team that took on the challenge, said: “It was a very tough challenge and there were a lot of aches and pains when we finished the event and the following day.” You can still donate at www. justgiving.com/fundraising/ coeywalk2019

Not a member? Contact us to find out how you can sign up today membership@ciphe.org.uk 01708 463116

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CIPHE joins hunt for best apprentice THE CIPHE HAS partnered with HIP magazine to help find the best plumbing apprentice in the country. The annual HIP Apprentice of the Year competition kicks off in the new year – and plumbing students are being urged to get their entries in now. Heats will take place between January and April in the South West, South East, North West, North East, Midlands, Wales, Northern Ireland and – for the first time – Scotland. The competition, now in its

12th year, is open to Level 2 and 3 students, who will be judged on a number of practical tasks by a panel of industry experts. The grand final will take place at the ADEY Innovation Training and Conference Centre in Cheltenham, and there are prizes worth up to £10,000 up for grabs. For more information or to enter the competition, head to www.hip-magazine.co.uk

Find out more

Congratulations

More members are proud to be professional

Discover more on how to register with the Engineering Council at www.engc.org.uk

STUDYING HAS PAID off for a group of CIPHE members who are the latest to be approved and accepted as Engineering Council registrants Professional Title

First Name(s)

Last Name

Address

IEng

Thomas

Sterling

Southampton, Hampshire

Eng Tech

Ryan

Sutton

Corringham, Essex

Eng Tech

Chi Keung

Leung

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Chi Kit

Wong

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Tsz Hong

Poon

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Tsz Hin

Ng

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Man Kit

Sham

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Lap Chi

Chan

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

David

Gaunt

Leeds, West Yorkshire

Eng Tech

David

Mather

Winsford, Cheshire

Eng Tech

Ka Lun

Chan

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Adam

Murphy

Lincoln, Lincolnshire

Eng Tech

Ching Kit

Ng

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Gareth

Price

Weymouth, Dorset

Eng Tech

Chung Tak

Ip

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Wai Sing

Wong

Hong Kong

Eng Tech

Chan

King On

Hong Kong

www.ciphe.org.uk


FE ATURE / BUSINESS ADVICE

TR ADING ON TRUS T Running a successful business is about more than doing a good job. Jerry Whiteley, technical manager at the CIPHE, looks at cashflow and more

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he crash of the banks and financial sector of 2008/9 reinforced the old adage of the bigger the business, the harder they fall. However, as a sole trader or limited company, failing can cost you your house and have a detrimental impact upon your family life for a long time thereafter. Is trading on trust enough? Being in business is a daily challenge to survive. Overheads, such as employee salaries, pensions and tax, vehicles, premises and paying the trade account each month means that you have recurring financial commitments over a relatively short period of time. So, here is some advice on how to stay on track.

Watch your bank balance Small businesses often suffer hardest when a client doesn’t pay in a timely manner and it can have a severe impact on

If you don’t stipulate your T&Cs for payment, how is the client expected to know? 12 P&H ENGINEERING

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cashflow. However, if you don’t stipulate your terms and conditions for payment, then how is the client expected to know? A lways include the commercial terms that you offer – products and services provided and a defined payment period Include a workmanship guarantee in your terms so your clients feel equally protected and assured that you will be available if something goes wrong after payment has been made Make sure you use plain English and that your terms and conditions are accessible. Using smallest font possible will not endear you to your customers And finally, picture the most difficult customer you can imagine and draw up a list of issues that they might raise and answers that you might require. Thereafter, if materials are provided as part of the supply and installation, the layout of money and your business exposure has increased. There is an expectation that these materials carry warranties. Make it a part of the job to complete the necessary paperwork – ensuring your business and your customer are adequately protected should any problems arise.

Standards matter most When trading and supplying services, competency is evidenced through

qualifications and certificates. If you carry out work for which you are not qualified, then you might be deemed incompetent. Examples of this include gas installations, unvented hot water systems, any notifiable work or just carrying out work for which you cannot claim expertise. A combination of confidence in your own abilities and a desire to see a job through to a conclusion can be a temptation, but legal repercussions that put your business at risk can follow. If a customer subsequently states they are not happy with the standard of the work you might face the prospect of a court case for monies owed. Evidence provided might typically include photos or video taken, or emails and any other correspondence.

Importance of evidence A judge is not an expert in plumbing and heating, and potentially neither is the customer. They follow the recommendations from things like codes of practice, British Standards,

www.ciphe.org.uk


FEATURE / BUSINESS ADVICE

regulations – such as Building Regulations or Water Regulations – or manufacturers’ instructions to identify and authenticate the evidence you both provide. A job might look good, but that doesn’t mean it’s compliant. You are probably claiming that the work is to a professional standard and

satisfactory. However, if you cannot evidence this by proving competency in the first place, you are most likely on the wrong side from the outset. It is to your own advantage that you can demonstrate your competence through membership of a recognised professional body such as the CIPHE.

Trust isn’t enough The nature of plumbing and heating engineering call outs means that some are often at a time of emergency. This can be difficult to manage for you and your customer. However, an up-front professional approach can provide you both with the necessary reassurance and confidence from the outset. Establish and agree if you have a call out and diagnosis fee before you do any work to remedy a problem. Once you have identified the root cause, provide the customer with a further update and quote for any subsequent work required. It can be difficult because what the eye cannot see, it cannot understand but communication is key. Completing work because you trust or believe that you will be paid for it can lead to problems later on. A professional plumbing and heating engineer will have very good communication skills. This includes verbal and non-verbal, written, listening, respect, friendliness and confidence. Any work you carry out should be put in writing or a

www.ciphe.org.uk

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FE ATURE / BUSINESS ADVICE

potential hazards that could cause simple contract. This can be in the form additional work should this happen of a job record with job number. will cover you. For instance, don’t drain If it’s not in writing, then you only down straight away. Get the system have hearsay. Hearsay is not evidence switched on while the customer is there or fact, it is open to question, debate and walk round checking its functions. and opinion. A walk through the job with the The other most common problem in customer and explaining your concerns business is undertaking additional work is far better than disputing them on trust or verbal agreements. after and then arguing to get Replacing a boiler on a very paid. Customers want good old system is one example. Did you honest advice as this is Older systems will definitely know? what is anticipated from suffer from corrosion and The Institute has an a professional. subsequent sludge etc. You e-learning facility specifically for members Plumbing and heating allow for power flushing of the CIPHE work has so many variations as per the manufacturer’s that adhering to a plan can often warranty, but this can lead to be a sticking point. No two buildings all sorts of ensuing issues, blocked are the same, other trades can impact pipes, pumps, jammed motorised valves, upon your work, and some customers leaking radiators, to name a few. Any change their mind because they can’t of these have the potential to happen visualise your proposal. because once the muck has been disturbed or removed the system can be worse off than when you started. You may fear that if you estimate to replace everything, you might not have got the work as a customer won’t see this as like for like! But explaining

Taking quick action If you have to vary from what you intended or estimated, then you must inform the client either straight away or the same day, and in writing, to

The other common problem is doing additional work on trust or verbal agreements get the work agreed. If the client isn’t around because they are at work, for instance, follow up with an email or text with full details. Do also ensure that you meet them. Keeping the client informed is key. It’s no good doing extra work and just expecting the client to have the money because they live in a big house or are spending what appears to be large amounts of money. Using digital software on a tablet showing your designs helps create and agree the vision. You can also use software to stay on top of your fi nances, by using an app for instant invoicing, payments and accounting. These methods are quick, professional and in writing, and have a better chance of getting payment via a card transaction on the day. Using video or camera pictures of the area of work before, during and after will help provide evidence of your work that might be concealed by boxing in or buried. Above all, being professional is paramount. Keeping your eye on the ball and reducing the risks is what gets you work and success.

Advice provided via Plumbing and Heating Promotions Limited (PHPL)

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www.ciphe.org.uk


FEATURE / BUSINESS ADVICE

TOP TIPS

Surviving in the marketplace Working with customers is one challenge – finding them is another Here are five tips on how to market your business from Vic Billings, director of marketing at Worcester Bosch. “Industries of all kinds are becoming more competitive, therefore it’s imperative that you employ strong marketing activities to stand out from your competition and ensure that your key potential customers are aware of you and your business. Boilers are something some people may only buy once in their lifetime. So, when the time comes, how can they find you? With this in mind, below are my five broad top tips to help market your business more effectively.”

1

Know your customers None of us have limitless advertising budgets, so it is vital to your company’s success that you market your business in the most efficient, cost-effective way possible. Data-driven decisions are key – know your area, the type of customers you want to attract and how they like to consume media. Find out which marketing tactics work – and which don’t – and keep testing and learning with different approaches, recording the results of all campaigns and working out your return on investment.

It’s imperative that you employ strong marketing activities to stand out

2

Get online Whether it’s buying a car, a holiday, or a boiler – it is now essential to ensure that you can be found quickly online. By 2021, roughly 93 per cent of UK internet users are expected to engage in online shopping (Statista). Even if your business has always been built on recommendation and word of mouth, finding local trades online is now the norm.

3

Set Key Performance Indicators Do you know what your KPIs for your company are? Work out your cost per acquisition of a customer and look at ways to optimise this. Basics like recording where a customer heard about your company can give you the insight you need to create and tailor local marketing campaigns. I recommend determining your top three company KPIs and demonstrating how your marketing contributes to these.

or sponsor a local charity event – people want to know that they’re dealing with a company that cares. In the current climate, corporate social responsibility (CSR) has unprecedented value in the eyes of consumers. So long as your CSR activities are genuine and make a real change, you will receive new levels of respect and loyalty from prospective and current customers.

5

Be social Whether that’s digitally or in person. Networking is key! Attending local business networking events or showcasing your company on Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn are great ways to demonstrate your company values and make yourself known within the area you work. As society moves online, and consumers become savvier, marketing has never been so important.

4

Be a part of your community Get involved and be visible. You could donate some time to a local school or community project,

www.ciphe.org.uk

More information Want more help for your business? Government help is also available Find out more: gov.uk/business-support-helpline

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Illustrations: Adam Gale

COLD COMFORT More than four million households in the UK are living in fuel poverty. We look at what the industry can do to help

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his winter is forecast to be particulary cold and the most vulnerable, those who cannot afford to heat their homes, will be hit the hardest. According to official figures, more than four million households in the UKÂ are living in fuel poverty. A household is said to be fuel poor if it has above-average energy costs, and if paying those costs would push it below the poverty line as far as its remaining income was concerned.

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The most tragic consequence is that cold homes cost lives. In the winter of 2017/18, 16,900 people died due to cold housing conditions. Health problems caused by cold homes predominantly relate to cardiovascular and respiratory problems. Low temperatures also diminish resistance to infection and encourage damp and mould growth. Each year cold homes and poor housing costs the NHS ÂŁ1.4bn. Cold indoor conditions have also been linked to poor mental health resulting

The shame of admitting how they cope with fuel poverty can be overwhelming

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FEATURE / FUEL POVERTY

from anxiety and stress. Social isolation can become an issue, particularly for older people, because their homes are neither safe nor welcoming. In homes where young families live, there is evidence that cold homes can reduce educational attainment. New data from Citizens Advice shows 49% of claimants affected by the benefits freeze have struggled to meet essential costs such as rent, household bills and food, while 40% have lost sleep in the past 12 months due to money worries. Adam Scorer, chief executive officer of the charity National Energy Action (NEA), told P&H Engineering: “We have hit the time of year when millions of people will start to stress about heating their homes. Many will occupy one room, spend more time in bed, and avoid cooking hot meals or inviting friends and family to visit. “Much of this will go unnoticed. While some will seek help, many others will sit and bear the cold and damp. The shame of admitting how they cope with fuel poverty can be overwhelming and paralysing.”

On the breadline The key factors that contribute to fuel poverty are the energy efficiency of the property, the cost of energy and household income. Old or badly built homes are the least energy efficient. It’s a vicious circle: the people living in the lowest quality housing end up with bills they cannot afford. It isn’t just pensioners: official research from London Councils, which represents local authorities in the capital, found more working families are also now finding it difficult to make ends meet and are having to claim benefits. There are signs that the country is beginning to wake up to the challenge. A plumber hit the headlines last month after refusing to charge an elderly woman for work on her boiler. He is not the first: plumbers and heating engineers have helped

STATISTICS

Who’s at risk of fuel poverty?

There needs to be prompt action to upgrade the fuel poor in F and G-rated properties

21.5% of all households living in properties with the lowest energy ratings (E, F or G) are fuel poor – they make up 39.7% of all fuel-poor households. This is compared to only 2.7% of households that live in properties with the highest energy ratings (A, B or C) – they make up just 7.2% of all fuel-poor households.

people informally in the past but the numbers struggling to make ends meet have reached such significant levels that refusing payment for all of them is no longer viable. Melville Gumbs, vice president of the CIPHE, says it’s very easy for someone on a low income to find themselves in trouble. “I’ve seen it many times,” he says. “You get there and the boiler’s gone wrong. It’s usually an old-fashioned boiler and the thermal caps have broken. The part costs £5 but the pilot light has gone out and there’s no ignition. It’s frightening for people. “You don’t charge for what you do: it’s a case of ‘see you next time’ – especially if it’s a five-minute job. It’s mostly pensioners with very limited budgets. They have a set amount to spend on energy each week.”

19.4% of households in the private rented sector are fuel poor – they make up 35.4% of all fuel-poor households. Among social tenants 13.8% of households are fuel poor, while 7.7% of owner occupiers are fuel poor. The government is slowly waking up to the issue, but campaigners say ministers must do more to avoid lasting harm.

Fuel poverty puts health at risk

In the winter of 2017/18,

16,900

people died due to cold housing conditions. Each year cold homes and poor housing costs the NHS

£1.4bn

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FE ATURE / FUEL POVERTY

ACTION PLAN

The way forward on fuel poverty There are ways that the industry can make a difference in the fight against cold, unhealthy homes. Plumbers and heating engineers will find themselves in the homes of the fuel poor and see people who are not coping. Adam Scorer of the NEA shares five things they can do to help.

1

If you see someone clearly struggling to keep their home warm, signpost them to someone who they trust and who can help them.

2

Raise the profile of fuel poverty through your trade associations or membership bodies so that they can take the message to politicians.

3

Take advantage of the training provided by NEA and others so that engineers and plumbers can spot and respond to signs of fuel poverty. www.nea.org.uk/training

4

Support NEA to raise awareness of fuel poverty, share your experiences via social media or support our campaigning and fundraising efforts.

5

Most importantly, do not let fuel poverty go unnoticed. Let’s get the problem in the open and higher up the government’s agenda. After all, it’s not the fuel poor who should be ashamed.

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The industry is calling on the government to tackle the rich/poor divide

He is also clear about what is likely to happen if installers do nothing and walk away: “The next thing is that they will become ill and then they’re in hospital. That’s an added pressure on the NHS at a higher cost than addressing the issue at source. We’ve got to stop it.”

Cold indoor conditions have been linked to poor mental health

Lack of funding The government introduced statutory fuel poverty targets for England in 2014, which required it to hit key milestones in 2020, 2025 and to lift as many fuel-

poor homes as reasonably practical up to energy efficiency band C by 2030. The NEA says this national initiative could – as well as supporting people on

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FEATURE / FUEL POVERTY

low incomes – drive a step change in installing insulation, boilers and fi rsttime central heating systems. But the government has not committed funding to make it happen. The End Fuel Poverty Coalition warned last month that the lack of funding to tackle statutory targets on fuel poverty in England could have damaging long-term consequences. It argues that the government needs to support proposals for a new ‘Clean Growth Fuel Poverty Challenge Fund’, which would help the poorest households living in the worst F and G-rated homes. Other ideas include making the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme more accessible to those in greatest need. The coalition also wants to see the government introduce more locally led, area-based schemes to improve energy efficiency, backed up by a national safety net. And the group is also calling on ministers to ensure all improvements are of the highest and safest quality. Dr Brenda Boardman, emeritus fellow at the University of Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute, says: “There needs to be prompt, positive

Fuel payments and grants for new boilers and insulation will help

action to upgrade all the fuel poor in F and G-rated properties in the next 15 months.” But the government has been tied up with Brexit and the Treasury’s spending priorities are in areas that grab headlines, such as extra police officers. That leaves charities with limited resources picking up the strain. Some raise awareness to challenge the government, while others offer practical help and fi nancial support. But charities can only do so much and with the number of people living in poverty remaining stubbornly high, what can be done to get the government to step up? Scorer says anyone wanting change

WHO CAN HELP? British Gas Energy Trust, incorporating the Scottish Gas Energy Trust, is an independent charitable trust funded solely by British Gas donations. The trust contributes to the relief of poverty, with a particular focus on fuel poverty. The charity awards grants to families and individuals struggling with gas and electricity debts. This makes a significant difference to the lives of thousands of people each year, helping them get back on their feet and remain debt free going forward. The trust also funds organisations across England, Wales and Scotland to

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Installers can help by encouraging customers to maintain systems

provide fuel debt and financial advice services within communities. Both customers and non-customers of British Gas can apply. Applicants must: Receive financial advice before applying Have a net annual income below £13,260 Demonstrate exceptional/multiple vulnerabilities within households

will have to overcome the powerful lobbying industry in Westminster and push the government harder. “Where does that leave us? Short of resources, short of meaningful government commitment and sliding down the hierarchy of policy priorities. But more determined than ever to look for allies and achieve long-term change,” he adds. Installers and the heating industry could do more for vulnerable people than not accepting payment. “Fuel payments and grants for new boilers and insulation will help,” says Gumbs. “And it would be great for Gas Safe to stress to its members the need to help older people. But ultimately, it’s up to the government. We need to put pressure on our MPs. It’s not right, given the country we live in.”

More information For more about the help available for struggling households, go to: www.turn2us.org.uk/Benefitguides/Fuel-Poverty/Grants-andSchemes

To find out more go to: www.britishgasenergytrust.org.uk

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THE HEAT IS ON Replacing gas boilers with heat pumps is one way the UK could help meet its emissions targets. We find out how they work and explore the potential benefits

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FE ATURE / HE AT PUMPS

FOR AND AGAINST HEAT PUMPS

AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP Reversing valve Low-pressure, lowtemperature vapour

High-pressure, hightemperature vapour

Refrigerant absorbs heat from air and boils to vapour Indoor coil

Outdoor coil High-pressure, high-temperature liquid

Compressor

Low-pressure, lowtemperature liquid

Refrigerant releases heat to air and returns to a liquid state

Expansion device

GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP

Low-pressure, low-temperature vapour

Reversing valve

Refrigerant absorbs heat from heattransfer fluid and boils to vapour

Low-pressure, low-temperature liquid

High-pressure, high-temperature vapour

Refrigerant releases heat to heat-transfer fluid and returns to liquid state

Expansion device

High-pressure, high-temperature liquid

Heat absorbed from ground

E

very schoolchild in the country will tell you that the world is facing a climate change crisis. The UK government has set tough carbonemissions targets and plans to phase out gas supplies within a generation. Most consumers are unaware that the way we heat our homes is set to change forever. One option already successfully trialled and breaking into the mainstream is heat pump technology, which uses the air we breathe or natural heat from the ground. Could this be the eco-friendly solution we need? Amazingly, this is not new technology. The concept was created by Lord Kelvin in 1852 and the first system was

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developed by Peter Ritter von Rittinger in 1857. Commercially successful ground source heat pumps were developed by Robert C Webber in the 1940s. Air or ground source heat pumps do exactly as the name suggests: take heat from the atmosphere or the ground next

High efficiencies mean heat pumps can offer carbonemissions savings

Any customer considering heat pumps will want to know if it’s the right choice for them. According to the Heat Pump Association, there are several considerations to make before buying.

Pros Lower fuel bills Eligible for the government’s Renewable Heat Incentive Lower carbon emissions Does not require fuel deliveries Can provide cooling during hotter periods of the year

Cons Up-front costs are significant Planning permission may be needed Groundworks are inevitable for a ground source heat pump. Air source will need large, external space for condenser unit Outdoor units can be noisy so need to be situated carefully

to a property and use it to warm rooms or water. There are two types of heat pumps: air-to-water, which can work with traditional central heating systems, or air-to-air systems, which pull in warm air that is circulated by fans. Air-to-air systems are not used for generating hot water. The science behind them is simple. Heat from the air is absorbed at low temperature into a fluid. This fluid then passes through a compressor where its temperature is increased, and transfers its higher temperature heat to the heating and hot water circuits of the house.

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FE ATURE / HE AT PUMPS

What are the advantages?

SHOW ME THE MONEY

According to Heat Pump Association vice chairman Phil Hurley, heat pumps run for longer hours and provide a consistent and comfortable indoor temperature. “Heat pumps provide both space and hot water heating throughout the year and can heat water above 50°C for hot water production. Their high efficiencies mean they can offer carbon-emissions savings against fossil fuel systems, including gas boilers, which we will be moving away from in coming years.” Major manufacturers, including Mitsubishi and Worcester Bosch, already have products in the marketplace. Worcester Bosch says: “Air and ground source heat pumps are an ideal solution to reduce your property’s carbon footprint while lowering your energy bills.” So, if heat pumps are brilliant, why aren’t homeowners installing them in their thousands? It’s the upfront cost – according to Which? an air-source system starts at £6,000, while ground-source systems are significantly more – and installers’ lack of technical knowledge. Hurley says: “The transition from high-carbon fossil fuels to low-carbon alternatives is essential, and heat pumps form part of a range of solutions available to address our heterogeneous stock. But, while the technology is readily available,

To qualify for government grants, any system being installed must be accepted as part of the microgeneration certification scheme. Visit www.mcscertified.com MORE INFO The Heat Pump Association represents manufacturers and distributors in the UK. It provides technical bulletins for installers and more. www.heatpumps.org.uk Details on grants, guides can be found at the Renewable Energy Hub. tinyurl.com/yxhp98nj Heat pumps explained by the Energy Saving Trust: tinyurl.com/z8mbvej Find out more about training on heat pumps via CIPHE IA, NIBE Energy Systems at www.nibe.eu/engb/vip-installers/training

While the technology is readily available, the number of installers familiar with renewable heating falls short the number of installers familiar with renewable heating falls short.” There are signs of change: government grants are available and, with deadlines for meeting emissions targets becoming more pressing, the timing could be right. So, if heat pumps are the future, how does the industry enable take-up? According to manufacturers, a strategy to qualify new installers has to be part of the solution. That will need government intervention as current sales are not generating enough money for investment. For consumers, the move away from traditional gas boilers and fossil fuels is a major step and the Energy Saving Trust believes installers need to help educate homeowners about the benefits. “Considering their engagement with homeowners, installers are best placed to raise awareness of alternative heating options available,” a spokesman said. “Recognising the importance of installer training is vital.” CIPHE chief executive officer Kevin Wellman agrees: “We have emissions targets and a climate emergency. Phasing out gas boilers is going to happen. We have to do different and heat pumps are clearly an option we have to take seriously.”

More information CIPHE Industrial Associates can also help. The science and product options are explained by... Worcester Bosch: tinyurl.com/y6dm54ro Mitsubishi: tinyurl.com/y4zl4op5 NIBE: www.nibe.eu/en-gb

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TheFix

Technical and professional advice from experts on hot water systems, ventilation and more PAUL HARMER Lead technical consultant CIPHE CEng MIET Paul is a chartered engineer who has consulted and led on many high-profile plumbing and heating industry projects paulh@ciphe.org.uk

Low-carbon heating

How to design with responsibility When choosing a low-carbon heating system, take into account the consumer’s needs and behaviour with heating and hot water, says Paul Harmer

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ith estimates suggesting that over 50% of UK domestic energy consumption is from heating and hot water, this firmly places the installer at the heart of tackling climate change. Industry is currently locked in a debate about whether our homes should be heated by hydrogen boilers or heat pumps – or both. However, the future of low-carbon heat does not sit with one technology alone, moreover a mixture of different technologies are required to help the UK meet its ambitious targets of net zero by 2050.

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WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD? There is a considerable amount of government-funded research being carried out into the feasibility of hydrogen as a fuel for heating our homes, which is assessing both the technology readiness of current boiler components and the gas infrastructure. By comparison, the electrification of our heat and the use of heat pumps is currently seen as the front runner in new-build properties due to its technology readiness. Heat pumps typically are able to deliver 3 kWh of heat for every 1 kWh of electricity put in, which in simple terms reduces

the carbon intensity of the delivered heat by a factor of three, compared to direct electric heating. However, the big question in the debate lies with how we can decarbonise both the electricity grid and the production of hydrogen in the future while minimising the impact on the consumer.

LISTEN TO THE CONSUMER Ultimately, the consumer wants simple comfort with cost-effective, problem-free heating and hot water. It is easy for us to bamboozle the customer with technical jargon and science rather than actually trying to understand the real pains and gains of the system they currently have and how we can help meet their expectations. As a first port of call, it is

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THE FIX / NEW HEAT SYSTEMS

FIGURE 1

losses from the cylinder and distribution pipework) estimates suggest around 190l of usable domestic hot water is available before the charging phase starts. Therefore, in this instance, without sufficient input from a heat source during the peak hot water usage hour, it could lead to consumer complaints. Figure 2 illustrates three scenarios comparing systems that may deliver the required domestic hot water of 10l/min continuously for 30 minutes.

Basic cumulative hot water consumption graph A typical semi-detached house with a family of four

Cumulative DHW KWh usage 300 litres of water usage during 30 minutes at 40°C

7am

SPACE HEATING

7:30am

BS EN 12831-1:2017 Part 1, a method for designing the heat load, discusses in detail the requirements that need to be met to design a fit-for-purpose space heating load that considers many factors outside of the simple heat loss of a building. Our first port of call is undoubtedly an accurate room-by-room heat-loss calculation, however doing this alone would risk falling into the trap of proceeding with only a little bit of knowledge. Consumers often try to be frugal with their heating and hot water by using it on demand. Estimates suggest 73% of homes operate their heating based upon twicea-day heating schedules. Promoting more efficient control is a cultural change for many consumers.

Time

important to ask the consumer about their behaviour with regards to hot-water usage patterns and how they control their heating. The future low-carbon heating professional needs to be able to advise on a wide variety of system options looking at energy-efficient controls, such as those already included in Boiler Plus.

INSTANTANEOUS HOT WATER The big question is, can you design a hot water system with a heat pump with sufficient hot water storage that meets customers’ needs. Figure 1 demonstrates a typical semidetached house with a family of four who between them require continuous showering for 30 minutes at 10 litres per minute (l/min) before they head off to work. This equates to 300 litres (l) of hot water that would need to be delivered at no lower than around 40oC to be deemed “usable” for the consumer. There is a misconception among consumers that, for example, a 300l hot water cylinder would deliver the equivalent of 300l to their outlets. BS EN 12831-3:2017 Part 3: Domestic hot water systems heat load and characterisation of needs states the need to consider other factors, such as the amount of “usable” hot water, heat loss from pipework, cylinder heat exchanger effectiveness and the effects of stratification in the overall hot water cylinder sizing. In addition to this, the standard highlights the importance of

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calculating a suitably sized heat generator to be able to meet the demands of the consumer’s hot water consumption. It is a balancing act between the heat source size and the amount of stored “usable” hot water required over a period of time. Today’s consumer requires everything on demand, which puts pressure on the installer to meet their expectations while also promoting energy efficiency and the environment.

HOT WATER VOLUME In simple terms, the example 300l cylinder stored at 60oC with a hot water delivery temperature at 40oC and a cold water inlet of 10oC (not considering any heat

PROTECTING THE VULNERABLE According to a report published by Age

FIGURE 2

Calculating useable hot water and how long it will last Typical scenarios comparing different systems

28 kW Instantaneous DHW

A

15 kW

300

6 kW

400

Litres

Litres

B

C

*DHW delivery options for 30 minutes of continuous showering at 10 l/min Delivery temperature for cold water 10 °C. Density and specific heat capacity varied dependent upon temperature. Example ignores heat loss from boiler, pipework and cylinder. No combustion loss considered.

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THE FIX / NEW HEAT SYSTEMS

FIGURE 3

Specific heating up power for temperature drops between 1 K and 5 K Table F.2 BS EN 12831-1:2017

Temperature drop ∆Osh,i [K]

1

Air change rate during setbacka nsb,i [h] Heating up time

2

0.1

0.5

3

0.1

0.5

4

0.1

0.5

5

0.1

0.5

0.1

0.5

Thermal storage capacityb l

h

l

h

l

h

thu,i [h]

l

h

l

h

l

h

l

h

l

h

l

h

l

h

Specific heating up power [W/m ] 2

0.5

12

12

14

18

27

28

29

35

39

44

44

53

50

60

58

69

-

-

-

-

1

8

8

10

14

18

21

21

28

26

34

32

43

33

48

41

56

-

-

-

-

2

5

5

7

11

10

15

13

22

15

25

21

33

20

35

28

43

43

43

85

47

3

3

3

5

10

7

12

10

19

9

20

15

27

14

29

21

37

33

75

37

84

4

2

3

4

9

5

10

8

17

7

18

13

25

10

26

17

34

28

72

31

76

An air exchange rate of nsb,i= 0,1 h1 can be assumed if windows and doors are closed l- low h-medium/high: see Ceff, Clause 6.3.5, Subclause A.2.7 /B.2.7

UK, there are over 12 million people aged above 65 in the UK with over 5.4 million of them aged over 75 years old. Projections say that there will be another 8.6 million over 65 years old in 50 years, roughly the population of London in 2018 (ONS, 2018) with 21% of people being aged over 65 by 2030. So, how does this effect the way we design our heating systems? The actual comfort needs of the consumer can differ significantly, especially with the elderly or vulnerable, who may require a greater room temperature. There are also additional risks associated with specifying a heating system for the vulnerable, such as the capacity required for those rare occasions where the UK can freeze below -10oC. One of the biggest challenges that the government faces when implementing new policy, is to not force our ideas and systems into consumers’ homes without really understanding their specific needs. Nevertheless, as frontline professionals

There are risks with specifying a heating system for the vulnerable www.ciphe.org.uk

we should help encourage and educate the consumer on the different environmental benefits of any new heating system, though not to the detriment of their safety, health and welfare.

CONSULT BRITISH STANDARDS According to the official British standard BS EN 12831-1:2017 Part 1, the effects on the overall boiler size is determined by many factors, such as thermal response capacity for reheat times of one hour after an eighthour night setback of 4oC. Consider an elderly couple suffering with the effects of fuel poverty. They may wake up in the morning and turn the heating on to ensure they don’t feel cold, however, this has a huge impact upon the overall boiler and heat emitter size and one that installers need to take note of. Taking an example house floor area of 150m2, a table from the BS EN 12831-1:2017 Part 1 (figure 3) gives a series of additional “net” heating up power outputs required to meet different property types and consumer behaviour. To put it into perspective, a building with a high thermal mass (h) and a consumer requirement of a one-hour reheat time, and a night setback temperature of 4oC specifies the need for an additional 8.4 kW of boiler output, 56 w/m2 multiplied by 150m2. This equates to 8,400 Watts or

8.4 kW. By contrast though we need to be mindful of the efficiency of the heat source and its turndown ratio, such as its ability to modulate down during low-load conditions, albeit boilers are at their greatest efficiency after low loads. However, the heat generator efficiency becomes an issue when it starts to cycle on and off consistently. This emphasises the importance of upskilling your knowledge in low-carbon heating design.

HOW BUILDING REGULATIONS AFFECT THE INSTALLER The MHCLG recently submitted a consultation for the future homes standard looking at the changes to part L and F of the building regulations for new dwellings, and how it may improve the quality and efficiency of our homes. Part L of the building regulations, which is due to be published in May 2020, may be enforced in the autumn of the same year, aimed at supporting the future homes standard in 2025. One of the key changes for the plumbing and heating installer will be the potential mandating of lowtemperature heating with a maximum flow temperature of 55oC to the heat emitters. So, how will this effect how we install and design heating systems? The obvious one is that we will need to over-size the radiators to allow for the lower temperatures, or install warm wall or underfloor heating. Be that as it may, not only do we need to oversize the radiators for the lower flow temperatures and reheat capacity, we need to allow for heat loss in both the distribution pipework and boiler thermal/combustion losses. However, unless the build quality of our homes is ensured, our calculations are meaningless.

BE MORE CUSTOMER CENTRIC The CIPHE works to protect the safety, health and welfare of the consumer by promoting professional plumbing and heating systems. Consumers are looking for the most cost-effective, safe and reliable solution to suit their comfort requirements, so take the time to understand their needs first to help build a more sustainable, long-term solution.

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YOUR CPD

Assessment: Domestic heat pumps

Career progression Under the CIPHE Code of Professional Standards, members are required to participate in CPD

The following questions cover regulations and system design

1

6

2

7

How much usable hot water is there in a 300l cylinder and how long will it last? .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... How many kWh of heat can heat pumps deliver? .................................................................................... .................................................................................... ....................................................................................

3

Which standard sets out the design requirements for heat pumps? .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... ....................................................................................

4

Where can you fi nd the heat source requirements for space heating? .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... ....................................................................................

5

A building with a high thermal mass (h) and a consumer requirement of a 1 hour reheat time plus a night setback temperature of 4ºC would need how much boiler output? .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... ....................................................................................

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Which parts of the Building Regulations would you need to refer to? .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... A change on the horizon is the mandating of low temperature heating with a maximum flow temperature of 55ºC to the heat emitters. What design changes should you consider? … ................................................................................. .................................................................................... .................................................................................... ....................................................................................

8

Your CPD CIPHE members are expected to complete 30 hours of CPD each year. Completion of these assessments can count towards this requirement.

What to do Answer the questions (using an additional A4 sheet if necessary) and return by scanning and emailing or posting to the address below.

Your details Please complete this form Your name:

CIPHE membership number:

What types of heat pumps are there? ........................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... ....................................................................................

Email:

9

Return to:

Why are air-to-air systems less suitable for domestic dwellings? .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... ....................................................................................

1 0

Why should you consult with a local authority ahead of installation? .................................................................................... .................................................................................... .................................................................................... ....................................................................................

CPD Assessment, CIPHE, 64 Station Lane, Hornchurch, Essex RM12 6NB Email: info@ciphe.org.uk Or visit the members-only area of the CIPHE website, www.ciphe.org.uk/cpd

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Your Membership One of the key benefits of being a CIPHE member is being kept informed on the industry issues that matter TIM SAINTY CIPHE Membership Director Tim looks after the growing CIPHE membership, enhancing services for members and improving communications

Strategy

tims@ciphe.org.uk +44 (0)1708 463102

UNITED WE STAND An Industrial Associate Strategy Group meet will lead to a new 2020 business plan

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e work with everyone, from manufacturers to merchants and from trade bodies to training centres. We constantly bang the drum that consumer, plumbing and heating industry interests alike are all greatly improved upon when we bring together a range of parties to promote a consistent and collaborative message. It was therefore great to meet in September as an Industrial Associate Strategy Group in order to sit down and consider the ways in which we can best do this. With representatives in the room from three key elements of the industry

– plumbing, heating and merchants – we identified some key areas to focus on as the work of the group kicks off. Among these were: The need for and the role of a professional body in the 21st century Strategy for growing CIPHE membership Routes into careers in the industry, work opportunities and apprenticeships for learners Business growth support and services for sole traders and micro SMEs Making training and CPD as accessible as possible The benefit and value of being an organisational member of the CIPHE

Left to right: Calvin Pope (Bell Plumbing Supplies), John Robinson (Ideal Standard), Paul Massey (CIPHE IADG Chair), Darren McMahon (Viessmann), Richard Soper (CIPHE Development Director)

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We bring together a range of parties to promote a consistent and collaborative message The sharing of marketing resources and reach in order to disseminate information Improving outcomes for the vulnerable. As a group, we have committed to producing a 2020 business plan and timeline for delivery that will see meaningful improvements in the quality of services provided for members and the voice that we use to represent the plumbing and heating industry. Of course, everyone is busy, and we all appear to be increasingly time poor, so it has not escaped my attention how lucky the CIPHE is for people to volunteer their time and efforts for our projects. My sincere thanks to everyone involved.

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Renewals

NEW MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL DISCOUNT Renew on time and you’ll make a bigger saving

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embership renewal notices for public safety, welfare and health. 2020 will be landing in the However, we do currently spend too next week or so and I wanted long on our membership renewals to use the space here to explain a process and that is affecting other change we have introduced. priorities. We have increased the I hope that you, our discount available for members, will help support Feedback We want to hear views on individual members who pay this change and help us to your membership. Email before 31st January 2020, be better by taking pandhengineering@ or who pay by direct debit, advantage of the discount jamespembroke to £10. available and renewing media.co.uk I’m sure that all members membership on time, but if will agree the CIPHE is better you have any comments or committing its time and resources to questions regarding the changes issues affecting our members’ introduced, please contact me on professional lives and to matters of tims@ciphe.org.uk or 01708 463102.

2020 rates Category

2020 nondiscounted rate

DD/early payment discount

2020 discounted rate

Monthly Direct Debit cost

Individual membership categories Fellow (FCIPHE)

£175

£10

£165

£13.75

Member (MCIPHE)

£124

£10

£114

£9.50

Associate (ACIPHE)

£124

£10

£114

£9.50

Affiliate

£64

£10

£54

£6.50

Trainee

£40

£10

£30

£2.50

Companion

£100

£10

£90

£7.50

Reduced Fee*

£55

£10

£45

£3.75

The CIPHE is better committing its time and resources to issues affecting our members’ professional lives

Organisation membership categories Industrial Associate – Small

£385

£25

£360

£30

Industrial Associate– Large

£505

£25

£480

£40

Industrial Associate Training Centre

£625

£25

£600

£50

College/Training Centre

£175

£25

£150

£12.50

Registered Plumbing/Heating Company

£240

£0

£240

£20

Business Directory Listing

£60

£0

£60

£5

Vatable items**

www.ciphe.org.uk

* Reduced fees available for members out of work, retired or not earning from plumbing and heating industry ** Prices contain VAT at 20%

NOV / DEC 2019

P&H ENGINEERING 31


PRODUCTS & SERVICES

TO ADVERTISE IN P&H ENGINEERING CONTACT Harvey Falshaw

32 P&H ENGINEERING

NOV / DEC 2019

harvey.falshaw@jamespembrokemedia.co.uk

0203 859 7100 www.ciphe.org.uk


ADVICE

Money for nothing Businesses in the UK are losing millions of pounds every year to scams. Which? Trusted Traders has advice on how to avoid getting caught out

F

raudsters are becoming increasingly sophisticated but there are steps you can take to protect yourself and your customers, and avoid losing your hard-earned cash. There are many types of scams that small business owners might come Banking across but authorised scams push payment (APP) In 2018, UK banking scams are among the customers lost £228m in bank transfer scams – most common. Your that’s £625k a day. customer may be duped into transferring money to criminals instead of paying you.

How it works The fraudsters pretend to be you and tell your customer you’ve changed your bank details. They’ll ask your customer to transfer future payments to a new account, which actually belongs to the criminals.

possible, to prevent details being intercepted. Use secure passwords for your email accounts. Password manager tools can help to create and store complex passwords for you.

Warn your customers that they could be duped into transferring cash to criminals

Your customers may be duped into transferring money to criminals instead of paying you You can help to protect your customers by taking these actions: Provide invoices and bank details to your customer in person where

www.ciphe.org.uk

Warn your customers to be suspicious of any emails, letters or calls saying that you’ve changed your bank details. Ask them to contact you directly, in person or over the phone (using a number they know is safe), if they receive any requests. If one of your customers thinks they’ve been the victim of an APP scam, tell them to contact their bank to report it as soon as possible.

Knowledge is power As technology becomes more advanced, scammers are fi nding increasingly clever ways to try to part us from our cash, either through businesses or our personal lives. But knowing what to look out for can help you to protect your business and your customers.

Find out more Which? Trusted Traders has teamed up with the CIPHE to help you get more recognition in the market. Find out more in the benefits section at www.ciphe.org.uk

NOV / DEC 2019

P&H ENGINEERING 33


MEET THE MEMBERS

Jason Clark, LCGI, EngTech, MCIPHE, RP A member of the CIPHE’s disciplinary committee, the marathon man is also a company chairman and business investor

Q A

Q

What interests you about the industry?

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR STAND-OUT MOMENT?

I have always had an inquisitive nature. When I was about 15 and living at home with my mother in a local authority-owned home, they sent a team of plumbers to install central heating and a new bathroom suite. I was amazed at the complexity of the cylinder cupboard pipework and the skill involved at the time, and so began my journey of interest.

Q A

How did you get into it?

When I left school in 1987, I registered for the YTS (Youth Training Scheme), which at the time was run by the CITB (Construction Industry Training Board), to become an apprentice plumber. I attended Walthamstow College on day release and worked on site and in occupied premises until I received the City & Guilds qualification.

Q

A

Receiving the Master Plumber award in 2004 at Merchant Taylors’ Hall, and the Freedom of the City of London, and becoming a Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Plumbers was a great honour for me.

Becoming a Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Plumbers was an honour for Jason

What’s the best thing you have learned?

A

I always tell people the best thing I’ve learned is a trade! This is my safety net; whatever else happens, I can always rely on my skill to earn a living.

Q A

How did you get into your current role?

After a varied career, from plumbing and heating engineer

to designer and estimator, I moved into sales and became a partner in a plumbing, heating and electrical merchants. My business partner and I then diversified into supplying specialist controls and materials to the lift and escalator industry and we are now one of the largest suppliers to this industry in the country.

Q

If you had the chance would you do it all over again?

A

Q

TELL US SOMETHING PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU

A

I am a keen runner and I ran the London Marathon in 2011 for the Little Havens Hospice, a charity that provides specialist care for babies, children and teenagers, which I also support through my company. I’ve enjoyed fitness from an early age and I studied nutrition, which also interests me.

34 P&H ENGINEERING

NOV / DEC 2019

Defi nitely! I have built on the foundations that my apprenticeship and my trade gave me. To this day, I have so much admiration for training and apprenticeships.

Share your story Would you like to appear on our Q&A page? Drop a line to editor Chris Smith pandhengineering@ jamespembrokemedia.co.uk

www.ciphe.org.uk


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P&H Engineering November/December 2019  

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