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June 21, 2013 • Vol. 35, No. 25 • $2 • 32 pages

RED MARKS THE SPOT » A never-before-published report shows Mississippians are driving across more than 2,000 dangerously deteriorated bridges in every corner of the state — Page 11 MBJ FOCUS: HEALTHCARE

Therapy & advocacy Stogner spreads her knowledge to patients — Page 16


2 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013

MONEY

State task force examining pluses, minuses of Internet sales tax By TED CARTER I STAFF WRITER ted.carter@msbusiness.com

A state task force is quietly taking a hard look at the pros and cons of forcing Internet retailers to comply with a Mississippi law that mandates they collect sales taxes on items they sell online to buyers in the state. A key question is whether taxing cyber sales is a true pot of gold at the end of the rainbow or a big hassle not worth the expense, as a State of Maryland study concluded in 2011. How much Mississippi is losing in tax revenues is a big question without a consensus answer. Some studies put the range at between $40 million and $200 million, while a survey cited in an April Associated Press story tagged the cyber revenue loss at $616 million. Bob Neal, a senior state economist with the Institutes of Higher Learning, has not seen any figure with which he is comfortable. He said he thinks the $40 million may be too low and the $200 million too high. “I am not any more confident in either number, to tell you the truth,” Neal noted. He has brought the task force together but is unsure its work will produce any sort of revenue projection. “The task force is exploring what is the situation and, frankly, is it an addressable issue,” he said. He said Tuesday the task force, made up of economists, state officials and private sector representatives, is in its infancy but plans to complete its work before the next legislative session. The conclusions of the task force could prove timely. At least one key legislative leader intends to push for collecting the state’s 7 percent sales tax on all cyber sales as a way to generate money for maintenance of the state’s highways and bridges. Rep. Robert Johnson III, a 20-year state legislator and chairman of the House Transportation Committee, said he wants a sales tax on Internet purchases to be among the options lawmakers consider for funding the growing backlog of road and bridge maintenance needs. He said his first preference is to replace the fixed 18 cents-a-gallon tax on

motor fuels with a rate tied to either the price per gallon of motor fuel or to inflation. Outside of that, he is ready to pursue a cyber charge, he said. “If people are not inclined to raise that tax (on motor fuel), we have to look at the Internet,” Johnson said in a recent interview. Neal’s plan is to have some answers to questions likely to be raised during the legislative session. The study won’t be purely dollars and cents, however. Some of the impetus for creating the task force came about through the urging of Mississippi’s brickand-mortar retailers to look at leveling a playing in which cyber sellers with no physical presence in the state have the advantage of not assessing buyers the 7 percent tax. “This is one of the fundamental issues that I think inspired” formation of the task force, Neal said. “It is an issue local merchants are passionate about – and for good reason.” Neal emphasized that Mississippi’s demographic of low-income people without access to credit cards (a key requirement for online buying) and low Internet connectivity will be important factors. Further influencing any finding will likely be the predominance of business-to-business Internet sales. It is estimated that nationally, business-to-business accounts for 92 percent of cyber sales. Neal said he figures Mississippi is not too far above or below that estimate. The likelihood is that most businesses are paying sales taxes on the purchases of items not exempted from the taxes, Neal said. So the percentage of sales that the task force will focus on will be much smaller than many people would think, according to Neal. It would not greatly surprise him, he said, is Mississippi’s study reaches the same conclusion as Maryland’s 2011 study: Legal challenges and uncertainty over the amount of money that would be raised make the endeavor questionable. The study by the Maryland Comptroller’s Office concluded retailers outside the state would not collect the tax

and remit to the state absent a federal law forcing them to do so. Congress may be in a mood to do just that. It is considering a measure dubbed the Marketplace Fairness Act mandating collection of taxes on online sales. Even Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has bended some on the issue, having dropped his previous objection to a cyber tax and notified U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran (R-Miss.) he would not oppose passage of the measure. Nationally, sentiment is growing to tax Internet sales, said J. Craig Shearman, a spokesman for the National Retail Federation. “We definitely feel” the issue is starting to turn, he said Tuesday. “We see a lot of things coming together.” He put the value of retail sales taxes going uncollected nationwide at $25 billion.


June 21, 2013

I

Mississippi Business Journal

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3

TRANSPORTATION

FAA fiscal ’14 budget has money to keep threatened Miss. air control towers open » Emergency money granted by Congress keeps open 149 towers that were to close June 15 By TED CARTER I STAFF WRITER ted.carter@msbusiness.com The Federal Aviation Administration’s budget for fiscal 2014 assumes an end to the federal fiscal sequester and proposes including money to keep open 149 contract air traffic control towers around the country, including five in Mississippi, previously targeted for loss of FAA funding. The tower funding is proposed to continue under the FAA’s fiscal 2014 budget request of $15.6 billion. The request represents a $351 million reduction from fiscal 2012, the agency says. However, the FAA’s proposed budget for 2014 assumes a long-term solution to the nation’s budget deficit is reached and no sequester, according to the FAA. “The 2014 proposed budget would allow us to maintain staffing for air traffic control and aviation safety,” the agency said in a press statement.

Meanwhile, a reprieve for the five Mississippi air traffic control towers comes as a side benefit of Congress acting quickly to prevent flight delays at the nation’s largest airports. FAA contract towers that had been slated to lose funding on June 15 were at Hawkins Field, Jackson; Stennis International, Bay St. Louis; Mid Delta Regional, Greenville; Tupelo Regional and Olive Branch. Those towers will remain open with federal funding through the end of 2013, as will all 149 contract towers the FAA had targeted for total funding losses as part of across-the-board budget cuts mandated by the FAA. The contract towers are staffed by non-FAA controllers but paid by the agency. As the FAA funding cuts and furloughs at major national airports kicked in this spring, Congress and the White House came under huge pressure to restore at least some funding. That led to passage of the Reducing Flight Delays Act of 2013. Soon-to-depart Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said on May 10 that the DOT, which oversees the FAA, has determined that the recently enacted funding rescue “will allow the FAA to transfer sufficient funds to end employee furloughs and keep the 149 low activity contract towers originally slated for closure in June open for the remainder of fiscal year 2013.” In recent testimony to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on FAA Reauthorization , FAA Administrator Michael Huerta said the sequester is requiring the FAA to make sizeable

TECHNOLOGY

SMALL TOWN SPOTLIGHT

C Spire launches new WiFi On app for Android-powered phones

Ocean Springs kicks it up a notch with Main Street Award Among all the ravages wrought by Hurricane Katrina, and more recently, the BP Oil Spill, there have been many great examples of individuals, businesses, and communities rolling up their sleeves and getting back to work. One of the most noteworthy of these is the community of Ocean Springs. On a recent visit to the Coast, we dropped by the offices of the Ocean Springs Chamber of Commerce and heard about their Main Street Award. Once a relatively sleepy coastal community, Ocean Springs has emerged as a major cultural, arts, and tourist destination. Through its Main Street program, the community has attracted tons of new businesses to its downtown area, to the point that there is a virtually non-existent vacancy rate. The community has multiple well-attended events through the year, a burgeoning arts community, and a pervasive sense of pride in its accomplishments. Now, the community has been recognized as a Great American Main Street Award winner at the 2013 National Main Street Conference in New Orleans this spring. Some people refer to these awards as the “Oscars” of downtown development, and the competition for recognition is fierce. “This is an amazing honor,” said Margaret Miller, executive director of the Ocean Springs Chamber of Commerce. “The growth didn’t happen overnight, but one by one this sleepy little town has become a national travel and arts destination.” Ocean Springs, and other success stories on the Coast, are certainly evidence of the resilience and determination of the individuals and businesses who make the Coast their home.

— Alan Turner / MBJ publisher

budget cuts that affect our operations and our future. “While we are grateful that Congress found a temporary solution to the FAA furloughs, this stop-gap measure does not end the sequester,” Huerta said. “We will not enjoy the benefits or the stability that reauthorization provides until we end the sequester and find a sensible long-term solution.” The money to fund the congressional stop-gap measure comes from funds that had been allocated for airport infrastructure improvements around the country. In a joint statement, the American Airport Executives Association and the U.S. Contract Tower Association voiced gratitude to the senators and House members who acted quickly to restore the funding. “Their dedication and determination give us great hope for the long-term success of the contract tower program,” the statement said.

For the Mississippi Business Journal

Representatives of Ocean Springs show off their winnings at the 2013 National Main Street Conference in New Orleans this spring. The town was recognized as a Great American Main Street Award winner.

RIDGELAND — C Spire Wireless has launched WiFi On, a free app that gives users a connection to a Wi-Fi network with over 12 million global hotspots. C Spire is partnering with Devicescape, a San Bruno, Calif.-based Wi-Fi connection services company, to provide the new, always-on clientbased app. The new service allows C Spire customers with Android touchscreen smartphones to use Wi-Fi Internet connections. Kevin Hankins, C Spire COO, said customers can download the free WiFi On app from the Google Play store on any Androidpowered smartphone with the 2.2 (Froyo) or later mobile operating system. The app also will come preloaded on new C Spire Android-powered smartphones, including two that will be arriving soon on the company’s 4G LTE network — the Samsung Galaxy S 4 and the HTC One. The app prompts users to add their own home Wi-Fi networks, automatically connects to public hotspots when available and saves battery power on smartphones and tablets by turning the device’s Wi-Fi radio signal off when it isn’t available or strong enough to provide a quality experience, he added. “We’re thrilled to be working with C Spire to extend the capacity and reach of their network,” said Dave Fraser, CEO of Devicescape. “C Spire has built a reputation as a company with a passionate focus on delivering personalized services and our product will give their customers an enhanced experience as devices intelligently connect to the best available network.”

— from staff reports


4 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 April 2013 sales tax receipts/year to date, July 1 MISSISSIPPI STATE TAX COMMISSION Here are cities’ earnings through sales tax collections. Sales tax has a three-month cycle. Month 1 — Tax is collected by the retailer. Month 2 — Tax is reported/paid to the Tax Commission by the retailer. Month 3 — Sales tax diversion is paid by the Tax Commission to the cities. This report is based on the month the tax is collected at the Tax Commission (Month 2). April April Year to date YTD CITY 2013 2012 2013 2012 ABBEVILLE $3,296.84 $7,375.57 $42,332.16 $69,819.91 ABERDEEN 71,591.22 72,320.97 678,278.91 692,278.36 ACKERMAN 23,395.46 24,980.31 231,344.27 229,547.23 ALCORN STATE U 358.16 1,170.68 7,535.62 13,566.07 ALGOMA 1,942.11 2,135.79 19,864.62 58,893.09 ALLIGATOR 584.18 934.80 6,703.92 7,137.28 AMORY 161,605.62 182,299.80 1,536,805.80 1,577,311.00 ANGUILLA 2,522.26 3,565.09 28,575.82 34,396.79 ARCOLA 1,348.18 1,999.27 15,100.43 18,476.07 ARTESIA 778.98 827.72 8,612.36 10,824.28 ASHLAND 12,308.77 13,879.70 116,776.15 129,145.89 BALDWYN 49,586.84 46,596.46 458,102.39 451,982.11 BASSFIELD 12,525.27 10,913.94 121,165.80 122,781.75 BATESVILLE 347,111.35 359,779.53 3,214,641.17 3,193,065.49 BAY SPRINGS 54,548.58 57,156.29 504,736.72 503,768.74 BAY ST LOUIS 106,465.94 93,062.99 1,050,770.64 899,051.57 BEAUMONT 6,620.31 7,031.84 61,330.87 67,504.29 BEAUREGARD 266.27 208.22 2,427.45 2,055.97 BELMONT 22,536.27 22,766.63 224,444.07 218,264.54 BELZONI 44,317.97 50,592.49 454,047.67 442,760.60 BENOIT 6,343.94 6,533.75 64,533.82 67,741.55 BENTONIA 19,549.93 27,279.71 221,217.36 266,732.60 BEULAH 313.30 293.44 3,755.53 3,626.29 BIG CREEK 344.60 368.96 3,818.20 4,617.44 BILOXI 960,023.37 908,953.35 8,999,348.44 8,557,969.14 BLUE MOUNTAIN 9,399.42 9,840.88 88,545.94 92,667.17 BLUE SPRINGS 2,896.51 2,102.38 26,517.22 24,596.60 BOLTON 11,354.39 10,172.45 101,051.93 91,532.83 BOONEVILLE 154,002.06 152,454.82 1,484,407.36 1,459,206.71 BOYLE 18,754.86 19,698.86 144,756.18 138,108.51 BRANDON 410,564.25 428,762.10 4,134,861.99 4,027,214.62 BRAXTON 1,269.14 689.09 11,737.20 9,419.75 BROOKHAVEN 459,008.49 465,261.12 4,288,037.67 4,203,046.46 BROOKSVILLE 8,757.13 9,688.67 86,015.87 90,357.47 BRUCE 38,393.86 44,985.77 398,637.67 395,030.59 BUDE 11,822.14 10,140.80 103,456.62 96,188.64 BURNSVILLE 12,074.29 12,948.62 118,186.79 123,631.34 BYHALIA 59,706.62 64,136.69 583,940.41 590,353.69 BYRAM 164,511.16 132,713.02 1,554,059.70 1,377,084.29 CALEDONIA 13,184.48 11,300.53 113,754.50 110,293.83 CALHOUN CITY 24,745.50 23,585.05 243,093.63 245,267.60 CANTON 210,717.19 201,689.09 1,998,164.03 1,817,870.82 CARROLLTON 6,166.10 5,540.86 59,294.92 53,825.03 CARTHAGE 145,871.74 156,725.04 1,305,745.95 1,290,786.63 CARY 1,569.20 1,375.55 14,677.46 14,520.04 CENTREVILLE 19,950.52 19,753.41 186,579.08 188,753.94 CHARLESTON 28,610.52 30,598.93 282,261.79 283,250.68 CHUNKY 563.66 604.36 5,458.97 5,827.99 CLARKSDALE 237,472.60 251,016.86 2,329,453.95 2,338,976.86 CLEVELAND 302,341.47 324,262.67 2,850,746.68 2,999,429.71 CLINTON 382,922.94 355,691.04 3,692,465.30 3,459,470.09 COAHOMA 575.73 300.63 4,881.61 4,092.03 COAHOMA COLLEGE 849.71 22.57 2,945.39 2,350.24 COFFEEVILLE 8,817.50 12,060.40 103,128.04 115,619.90 COLDWATER 17,686.57 16,797.30 169,768.23 172,512.82 COLLINS 115,150.18 125,242.88 1,091,104.46 1,102,969.54 COLUMBIA 294,874.83 289,894.70 2,735,596.10 2,687,760.18 COLUMBUS 781,624.11 809,699.99 7,155,607.38 7,366,232.97 COMO 12,000.33 12,542.22 139,791.54 130,288.87 CORINTH 486,987.01 507,754.11 4,554,008.34 4,534,275.72 COURTLAND 1,349.48 707.68 13,090.14 13,097.06 CRAWFORD 1,309.62 1,170.91 12,515.98 11,009.90 CRENSHAW 4,682.10 5,596.44 48,441.95 50,831.91 CROSBY 713.98 3,047.37 9,646.82 13,454.25 CROWDER 1,489.47 2,111.53 17,166.67 19,541.91 CRUGER 474.42 442.22 5,824.87 6,309.94 CRYSTAL SPRINGS 59,822.08 49,661.62 522,259.83 517,551.01 D LO 3,298.36 3,469.71 30,616.35 31,452.56 D'IBERVILLE 536,097.19 514,680.98 4,933,586.99 4,753,825.54 DECATUR 10,132.70 12,026.26 116,442.91 123,770.10 DEKALB 21,640.39 20,451.69 200,906.29 206,707.94 DERMA 4,198.98 3,775.80 47,147.34 48,432.74 DIAMONDHEAD 38,093.90 43,994.30 386,718.74 78,565.81 DODDSVILLE 45.70 507.07 4,937.24 3,340.63 DREW 9,614.27 11,313.77 95,506.15 116,837.35 DUCK HILL 3,966.52 7,875.73 37,757.70 42,112.06 DUMAS 1,284.90 1,317.29 10,708.16 10,306.18 DUNCAN 2,346.32 936.80 13,032.50 6,458.72 DURANT 24,914.89 25,992.89 240,173.86 243,221.89 EAST MS COLLEGE 61.61 33.49 2,943.93 3,394.58 ECRU 13,761.59 13,783.47 113,356.12 111,155.78 EDEN 60.50 44.03 539.32 484.71 EDWARDS 6,566.28 5,928.48 59,202.98 53,328.84 ELLISVILLE 93,587.14 81,383.67 874,527.42 730,695.09 ENTERPRISE 5,217.11 5,743.34 51,020.76 51,255.11 ETHEL 1,458.31 1,923.45 11,664.87 14,118.36 EUPORA 34,791.89 35,757.30 345,876.68 368,897.29 FALCON 32.19 24.79 521.01 488.79 FARMINGTON 3,746.62 4,326.53 43,036.26 42,023.92 FAULKNER 3,911.96 2,447.47 34,868.88 33,011.92 FAYETTE 18,274.37 16,817.60 165,943.69 162,781.76 FLORA 30,372.25 25,635.09 275,628.96 259,850.80 FLORENCE 74,802.11 62,881.09 609,939.55 568,607.68 FLOWOOD 903,509.07 918,156.86 8,596,312.64 8,458,440.67 FOREST 197,775.92 190,993.17 1,746,252.43 1,744,989.00 FRENCH CAMP 492.47 1,402.52 8,933.73 16,319.78 FRIARS POINT 1,812.89 2,360.03 23,373.85 24,177.65

FULTON GATTMAN GAUTIER GEORGETOWN GLEN GLENDORA GLOSTER GOLDEN GOODMAN GREENVILLE GREENWOOD GRENADA GULFPORT GUNNISON GUNTOWN HATLEY HATTIESBURG HAZLEHURST HEIDELBERG HERNANDO HICKORY HICKORY FLAT HINDS COMMUNITY HOLLANDALE HOLLY SPRINGS HORN LAKE HOULKA HOUSTON INDIANOLA INVERNESS ISOLA ITTA BENA IUKA JACKSON JONESTOWN JUMPERTOWN KILMICHAEL KOSCIUSKO KOSSUTH LAKE LAMBERT LAUREL LEAKESVILLE LEARNED LELAND LENA LEXINGTON LIBERTY LONG BEACH LOUIN LOUISE LOUISVILLE LUCEDALE LULA LUMBERTON LYON MABEN MACON MADISON MAGEE MAGNOLIA MANTACHIE MANTEE MARIETTA MARION MARKS MATHISTON MAYERSVILLE MCCOMB MCCOOL MCLAIN MEADVILLE MENDENHALL MERIDIAN MERIGOLD METCALFE MIZE MONTICELLO MONTROSE MOORHEAD MORGAN CITY MORTON MOSS POINT MOUND BAYOU MS GULFCOAST MS STATE UNIV MS VALLEY ST MT OLIVE MYRTLE NATCHEZ NETTLETON NEW ALBANY NEW AUGUSTA NEW HEBRON NEWTON NO. CARROLLTON NOXAPATER OAKLAND OCEAN SPRINGS OKOLONA OLIVE BRANCH OSYKA OXFORD PACE PACHUTA PADEN

126,284.98 122.10 204,020.46 3,886.29 1,840.40 323.16 11,368.75 4,080.16 3,799.67 573,579.83 389,123.08 368,980.74 1,745,299.09 762.85 14,717.09 433.19 1,904,465.40 112,119.63 32,034.61 235,623.75 4,189.43 5,955.13 888.00 14,788.46 111,630.66 332,119.54 8,839.15 85,955.39 159,920.16 8,233.23 1,032.34 10,717.45 62,847.61 2,722,855.43 3,950.00 751.52 4,668.56 177,619.69 4,483.68 6,777.00 4,217.06 825,854.37 26,778.47 473.72 46,103.56 1,925.05 39,829.09 20,362.22 115,767.84 2,342.86 1,087.15 157,375.21 179,518.13 3,263.02 15,718.42 3,974.36 5,686.32 52,188.16 506,333.06 175,553.41 39,261.04 17,838.70 2,675.44 5,055.79 17,877.14 20,246.60 16,164.54 428.28 478,836.69 456.77 6,149.34 10,911.01 52,347.21 1,298,575.53 8,493.78 709.67 10,399.80 42,120.42 2,047.18 9,884.89 624.35 40,285.37 139,132.76 3,995.46 347.62 39,509.52 699.67 8,926.28 3,739.14 503,155.10 27,441.02 236,601.55 14,621.36 8,050.33 89,624.00 2,420.57 9,276.55 6,499.12 378,521.74 24,900.26 667,249.96 5,578.25 567,127.50 523.55 1,824.54 171.87

123,185.83 284.53 195,190.18 4,080.90 1,577.19 369.70 11,646.00 4,214.86 4,459.98 577,094.66 392,010.62 375,904.16 1,768,290.25 645.72 16,195.57 975.56 1,856,177.57 108,085.25 36,742.15 231,490.75 4,404.00 6,955.50 700.04 15,250.32 100,224.67 355,137.77 7,216.26 94,239.33 171,283.97 9,321.48 1,643.51 11,508.74 60,014.70 2,786,256.51 4,036.30 1,089.73 5,751.44 186,556.61 4,174.99 6,772.63 3,152.61 816,192.04 25,147.36 1,023.53 41,152.46 1,204.38 44,971.56 19,870.52 119,789.61 1,941.57 771.69 152,540.24 170,642.50 2,914.23 14,858.71 2,975.36 6,653.10 52,457.12 477,343.95 196,745.96 34,678.78 16,252.93 3,412.64 4,665.03 16,658.66 21,537.10 15,604.44 547.71 489,484.79 566.66 6,090.12 9,636.07 52,943.19 1,267,970.52 8,236.18 1,192.91 18,421.00 39,014.64 142.38 8,416.23 580.22 43,261.65 133,299.10 3,232.29 298.78 21,664.38 211.46 10,496.23 3,236.93 483,016.92 26,705.34 244,919.89 15,576.59 7,510.96 90,422.12 3,110.46 8,537.75 6,072.31 373,440.95 26,142.41 635,707.92 5,960.86 562,139.46 545.75 1,668.66 140.42

1,183,443.60 1,272.19 1,844,352.99 35,793.54 16,596.78 3,350.44 111,257.62 42,803.05 35,269.23 5,283,973.50 3,668,342.59 3,359,826.59 16,052,356.73 7,612.04 150,282.31 5,405.07 17,555,647.86 1,048,513.00 342,001.84 2,337,771.70 39,504.10 58,711.57 7,068.30 142,974.60 991,471.79 3,220,029.12 81,474.53 827,210.48 1,535,106.30 61,625.00 16,238.20 116,272.93 648,079.00 26,198,243.25 37,949.02 7,999.37 57,160.84 1,665,760.30 37,801.83 67,397.43 34,908.61 7,616,994.23 236,199.51 4,513.23 429,051.40 16,902.97 369,489.27 190,175.15 1,106,248.58 23,634.54 10,082.84 1,445,460.54 1,616,582.85 32,818.27 145,627.14 56,466.52 62,368.97 493,167.62 4,951,573.52 1,632,759.15 348,675.11 162,871.82 27,674.32 46,934.09 162,817.73 195,979.47 152,884.29 5,596.36 4,431,885.37 5,042.99 58,046.78 103,843.71 486,046.98 11,977,310.52 70,559.27 10,690.29 120,652.95 382,368.16 6,105.97 90,344.07 6,003.12 386,389.95 1,318,495.63 46,766.28 5,708.03 261,339.09 7,625.16 82,204.40 37,779.85 4,461,458.21 235,038.13 2,306,089.97 151,267.36 72,915.07 854,490.99 28,588.90 92,526.56 58,227.53 3,717,743.14 244,117.71 6,215,899.13 54,375.04 5,697,457.56 5,632.07 18,153.14 1,592.51

1,172,530.02 1,488.21 1,818,770.94 35,676.44 16,225.94 3,970.91 115,998.90 46,278.43 38,860.28 5,204,698.65 3,682,603.15 3,325,034.61 15,818,056.07 7,074.70 153,170.33 10,171.30 17,047,691.49 1,028,941.04 366,493.51 2,199,521.64 40,879.68 59,559.21 7,191.90 151,220.95 954,395.20 3,217,034.17 85,100.48 849,584.30 1,600,020.97 65,190.77 21,541.16 113,134.47 613,975.95 26,201,489.39 39,922.63 8,986.73 55,794.71 1,654,478.15 37,451.01 64,829.69 29,613.70 7,413,508.60 227,735.27 7,322.52 368,822.45 15,845.88 377,122.99 186,946.63 1,073,390.33 32,871.57 11,881.07 1,406,135.67 1,541,650.36 30,250.30 223,295.41 30,265.54 66,288.85 496,008.11 4,501,384.30 1,649,078.38 335,201.73 154,990.23 25,942.42 48,208.23 153,450.60 200,129.38 158,988.47 5,302.06 4,348,715.96 6,511.49 59,200.75 101,096.14 476,123.44 11,631,121.67 68,803.54 11,786.23 145,634.18 381,657.08 5,612.60 86,510.17 6,247.73 393,398.94 1,319,769.75 39,391.09 4,348.62 262,723.05 9,238.75 92,217.45 35,381.94 4,352,695.21 239,662.22 2,223,614.02 150,101.83 69,279.80 838,022.72 30,836.32 84,831.19 59,039.21 3,550,022.19 237,763.82 5,895,717.88 57,941.33 5,454,405.32 6,228.86 17,069.65 1,457.64

PASCAGOULA PASS CHRISTIAN PAULDING PEARL PELAHATCHIE PETAL PHILADELPHIA PICAYUNE PICKENS PITTSBORO PLANTERSVILLE POLKVILLE PONTOTOC POPE POPLARVILLE PORT GIBSON POTTS CAMP PRENTISS PUCKETT PURVIS QUITMAN RALEIGH RAYMOND RENOVA RICHLAND RICHTON RIDGELAND RIENZI RIPLEY ROLLING FORK ROSEDALE ROXIE RULEVILLE SALLIS SALTILLO SANDERSVILLE SARDIS SATARTIA SCHLATER SCOOBA SEBASTAPOL SEMINARY SENATOBIA SHANNON SHAW SHELBY SHERMAN SHUBUTA SHUQUALAK SIDON SILVER CITY SILVER CREEK SLATE SPRINGS SLEDGE SMITHVILLE SNOWLAKESHORES SOSO SOUTHAVEN SOUTHWEST COMM STARKVILLE STATE LINE STONEWALL STURGIS SUMMIT SUMNER SUMRALL SUNFLOWER SYLVARENA TAYLOR TAYLORSVILLE TCHULA TERRY THAXTON TISHOMINGO TOCCOPOLA TOWN OF WALLS TREMONT TUNICA TUPELO TUTWILER TYLERTOWN UNION UNIV OF MISS UTICA VAIDEN VARDAMAN VERONA VICKSBURG WALNUT WALNUT GROVE WALTHALL WATER VALLEY WAVELAND WAYNESBORO WEBB WEIR WESSON WEST WEST POINT WIGGINS WINONA WINSTONVILLE WOODLAND WOODVILLE YAZOO CITY

490,524.21 105,621.48 130.61 719,203.56 27,770.12 204,068.50 357,336.93 361,643.05 7,356.61 388.69 4,201.76 116.48 196,758.87 4,302.84 54,556.52 20,411.37 7,813.31 41,402.34 8,557.83 65,420.37 44,037.70 18,703.37 17,735.38 2,850.97 376,360.07 28,365.17 1,313,155.68 4,348.30 107,835.23 37,234.85 10,079.20 1,563.77 23,146.64 2,028.34 55,212.20 47,802.05 26,078.86 376.66 595.57 5,613.31 14,112.86 12,031.07 176,014.40 11,643.36 7,532.96 10,407.96 10,838.40 3,816.37 1,814.64 791.49 381.66 3,299.69 219.44 1,564.08 6,049.65 126.73 11,937.72 1,099,031.02 42.00 491,545.50 9,580.53 6,873.32 2,567.59 36,983.21 3,231.44 38,778.08 1,466.02 527.44 893.37 27,648.11 7,475.15 23,741.29 3,165.72 8,605.62 540.79 4,323.78 1,618.79 43,412.79 1,562,979.14 3,676.11 58,589.21 30,394.25 17,251.05 9,634.42 9,964.84 9,638.37 20,311.95 695,019.33 17,239.92 7,343.50 768.78 38,435.70 192,492.35 184,438.59 8,503.93 2,576.19 14,922.76 1,486.12 181,017.80 154,052.35 91,448.07 305.62 6,207.67 27,437.40 148,661.10

469,775.05 92,739.72 88.43 721,861.53 26,911.06 200,012.21 358,846.74 356,600.27 8,746.54 280.65 4,874.00 336.35 204,990.13 3,896.78 53,194.36 23,484.20 8,256.86 42,388.10 8,997.37 55,401.41 50,195.73 18,426.76 16,538.76 2,918.09 374,851.91 26,517.20 1,053,898.68 2,042.73 112,783.84 35,500.56 10,551.34 1,415.69 19,951.93 2,228.88 50,497.94 112,012.48 30,055.96 265.11 659.84 5,859.88 15,902.85 10,870.90 168,363.64 15,337.77 6,168.29 10,530.85 13,623.43 3,413.47 1,528.73 838.32 360.20 2,488.66 447.70 1,890.95 5,666.31 141.16 10,919.50 1,136,550.84 297.85 476,275.46 8,455.19 7,253.88 2,569.55 34,254.20 4,340.45 30,904.55 2,269.44 301.55 2,161.36 27,018.33 6,926.94 22,490.39 2,793.69 8,523.09 496.22 2,193.89 1,249.85 43,007.52 1,640,650.02 3,981.45 56,649.68 29,077.21 16,583.49 11,292.72 10,839.02 8,691.12 21,781.40 720,311.24 18,247.20 6,280.75 2,105.61 40,861.31 194,141.27 175,864.23 9,122.81 2,405.76 13,771.87 1,741.10 191,321.75 148,830.54 93,837.68 585.71 7,430.07 25,556.52 161,900.17

TOTAL

$35,328,097.21

$35,190,227.16

4,443,986.69 922,096.95 1,135.52 6,799,364.72 259,683.72 1,804,826.94 3,181,207.89 3,405,782.79 76,963.44 4,333.10 37,045.94 3,659.20 1,815,182.40 38,515.48 510,115.77 197,777.09 83,804.95 356,908.94 86,731.15 571,192.24 430,642.28 164,583.33 162,007.54 27,387.35 3,747,636.34 260,442.10 10,301,805.74 27,528.86 1,009,424.13 348,114.25 100,732.71 14,506.02 192,364.32 21,993.97 589,242.54 633,578.29 244,563.25 4,134.78 9,137.64 62,656.50 150,197.61 109,741.37 1,556,248.35 138,203.62 63,560.41 98,430.06 112,576.36 35,196.75 18,495.00 7,933.29 3,922.48 29,207.47 3,062.79 15,332.92 55,343.00 1,263.79 136,180.78 10,420,051.39 1,633.21 4,733,964.29 87,305.22 65,920.46 36,837.22 305,936.76 41,965.62 353,317.07 19,217.13 3,213.67 17,697.88 247,419.95 70,196.53 240,874.18 29,478.05 81,673.09 5,610.73 32,806.05 16,881.28 411,797.10 14,901,035.62 37,828.48 535,999.15 289,133.26 344,673.15 114,130.77 102,111.13 102,994.00 196,970.65 6,335,630.31 164,132.36 66,740.57 17,043.02 389,626.67 1,773,053.90 1,707,799.57 77,796.36 23,574.31 145,016.18 15,000.77 1,753,001.80 1,395,467.22 868,418.42 3,729.61 56,216.05 261,868.50 1,469,146.34 $330,402,251.94

4,314,461.58 881,258.56 1,511.86 6,690,894.67 243,722.99 1,775,404.55 3,160,298.57 3,321,706.21 83,199.87 4,138.10 40,566.04 4,290.23 1,824,172.10 35,914.66 505,707.29 205,211.93 80,735.38 352,005.03 78,699.74 516,461.84 438,664.28 179,682.32 165,102.04 27,723.88 3,482,728.07 237,071.53 9,615,493.36 27,068.66 975,726.90 307,761.52 99,170.49 14,042.83 180,079.44 20,062.73 532,543.64 588,929.31 275,325.71 3,424.20 8,638.20 58,626.53 141,889.26 112,115.16 1,529,492.82 134,354.46 65,611.73 99,265.35 111,192.48 35,254.68 18,952.40 7,828.64 3,701.74 28,877.08 3,704.06 16,140.71 46,199.15 1,397.16 114,164.01 10,368,059.40 3,703.71 4,625,287.73 83,975.56 57,496.96 27,394.88 299,460.12 37,898.59 332,501.16 21,740.38 2,988.05 20,093.06 244,313.65 65,735.46 240,444.17 28,584.69 83,479.80 5,028.16 28,904.48 14,661.89 413,866.57 14,860,964.92 50,703.20 537,651.56 303,134.41 322,132.58 115,302.21 107,417.23 90,431.36 182,385.08 6,355,913.44 201,189.06 59,599.85 19,963.11 392,213.00 1,731,165.46 1,676,889.55 85,595.54 23,844.09 143,317.02 16,797.25 1,742,988.52 1,354,230.34 857,081.13 6,395.24 55,612.15 253,848.48 1,451,837.87 $323,520,420.20


6 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 May 2013 sales tax receipts/year to date, July 1 MISSISSIPPI STATE TAX COMMISSION Here are cities’ earnings through sales tax collections. Sales tax has a three-month cycle. Month 1 — Tax is collected by the retailer. Month 2 — Tax is reported/paid to the Tax Commission by the retailer. Month 3 — Sales tax diversion is paid by the Tax Commission to the cities. This report is based on the month the tax is collected at the Tax Commission (Month 2). May May Year to date YTD CITY 2013 2012 2013 2012 ABBEVILLE $3,715.09 $10,067.80 $46,047.25 $79,887.71 ABERDEEN 66,199.99 73,647.28 744,478.90 765,925.64 ACKERMAN 23,614.63 25,729.93 254,958.90 255,277.16 ALCORN STATE U 1,202.87 1,124.99 8,738.49 14,691.06 ALGOMA 2,413.45 1,870.35 22,278.07 60,763.44 ALLIGATOR 908.49 647.31 7,612.41 7,784.59 AMORY 154,848.14 158,575.10 1,691,653.94 1,735,886.10 ANGUILLA 2,622.84 3,885.88 31,198.66 38,282.67 ARCOLA 1,465.00 2,012.95 16,565.43 20,489.02 ARTESIA 955.84 947.60 9,568.20 11,771.88 ASHLAND 12,091.38 14,011.38 128,867.53 143,157.27 BALDWYN 46,079.70 53,614.37 504,182.09 505,596.48 BASSFIELD 15,002.98 12,629.63 136,168.78 135,411.38 BATESVILLE 324,196.67 333,018.38 3,538,837.84 3,526,083.87 BAY SPRINGS 53,689.46 51,434.77 558,426.18 555,203.51 BAY ST LOUIS 125,817.81 108,535.09 1,176,588.45 1,007,586.66 BEAUMONT 5,781.89 7,297.87 67,112.76 74,802.16 BEAUREGARD 236.12 199.16 2,663.57 2,255.13 BELMONT 25,993.50 26,766.70 250,437.57 245,031.24 BELZONI 42,525.63 44,861.96 496,573.30 487,622.56 BENOIT 7,354.96 7,647.45 71,888.78 75,389.00 BENTONIA 77,145.80 18,220.79 298,363.16 284,953.39 BEULAH 500.57 621.17 4,256.10 4,247.46 BIG CREEK 405.65 592.81 4,223.85 5,210.25 BILOXI 965,188.77 831,182.68 9,964,537.21 9,389,151.82 BLUE MOUNTAIN 10,001.13 9,442.99 98,547.07 102,110.16 BLUE SPRINGS 2,839.16 4,498.32 29,356.38 29,094.92 BOLTON 11,005.11 10,702.89 112,057.04 102,235.72 BOONEVILLE 144,569.65 154,084.66 1,628,977.01 1,613,291.37 BOYLE 17,497.34 19,345.23 162,253.52 157,453.74 BRANDON 462,136.87 422,402.26 4,596,998.86 4,449,616.88 BRAXTON 1,162.58 2,463.98 12,899.78 11,883.73 BROOKHAVEN 457,758.74 455,154.23 4,745,796.41 4,658,200.69 BROOKSVILLE 8,808.94 9,066.50 94,824.81 99,423.97 BRUCE 47,622.28 40,044.92 446,259.95 435,075.51 BUDE 12,178.08 9,776.35 115,634.70 105,964.99 BURNSVILLE 12,035.97 14,344.96 130,222.76 137,976.30 BYHALIA 62,704.76 63,602.59 646,645.17 653,956.28 BYRAM 189,073.59 133,184.71 1,743,133.29 1,510,269.00 CALEDONIA 11,146.52 12,581.84 124,901.02 122,875.67 CALHOUN CITY 25,837.26 24,045.11 268,930.89 269,312.71 CANTON 213,585.90 199,535.43 2,211,749.93 2,017,406.25 CARROLLTON 5,275.30 6,611.27 64,570.22 60,436.30 CARTHAGE 132,810.94 128,211.26 1,438,556.89 1,418,997.89 CARY 1,282.83 2,088.36 15,960.29 16,608.40 CENTREVILLE 17,074.09 19,123.20 203,653.17 207,877.14 CHARLESTON 28,832.09 29,291.05 311,093.88 312,541.73 CHUNKY 1,016.54 854.11 6,475.51 6,682.10 CLARKSDALE 243,519.05 245,317.79 2,572,973.00 2,584,294.65 CLEVELAND 285,663.16 287,661.69 3,136,409.84 3,287,091.40 CLINTON 376,311.78 414,800.22 4,068,777.08 3,874,270.31 COAHOMA 453.62 631.78 5,335.23 4,723.81 COAHOMA COLLEGE 8.33 2,945.39 2,358.57 COFFEEVILLE 11,492.05 11,534.27 114,620.09 127,154.17 COLDWATER 16,633.60 26,172.73 186,401.83 198,685.55 COLLINS 142,620.64 108,639.29 1,233,725.10 1,211,608.83 COLUMBIA 285,842.20 281,505.99 3,021,438.30 2,969,266.17 COLUMBUS 726,302.73 728,609.24 7,881,910.11 8,094,842.21 COMO 18,807.39 14,728.92 158,598.93 145,017.79 CORINTH 464,977.28 472,043.33 5,018,985.62 5,006,319.05 COURTLAND 1,117.75 3,149.82 14,207.89 16,246.88 CRAWFORD 1,322.02 1,922.56 13,838.00 12,932.46 CRENSHAW 4,771.01 6,280.75 53,212.96 57,112.66 CROSBY 1,192.11 1,252.50 10,838.93 14,706.75 CROWDER 1,434.53 2,221.12 18,601.20 21,763.03 CRUGER 432.05 791.31 6,256.92 7,101.25 CRYSTAL SPRINGS 56,774.73 53,328.67 579,034.56 570,879.68 D LO 3,227.13 3,364.47 33,843.48 34,817.03 D'IBERVILLE 483,104.07 447,365.62 5,416,691.06 5,201,191.16 DECATUR 12,681.26 10,440.39 129,124.17 134,210.49 DEKALB 19,209.93 20,171.87 220,116.22 226,879.81 DERMA 5,098.24 4,735.40 52,245.58 53,168.14 DIAMONDHEAD 35,644.07 36,600.59 422,362.81 115,166.40 DODDSVILLE 349.65 697.27 5,286.89 4,037.90 DREW 9,813.36 10,531.59 105,319.51 127,368.94 DUCK HILL 2,904.44 4,660.80 40,662.14 46,772.86 DUMAS 1,334.74 1,326.96 12,042.90 11,633.14 DUNCAN 1,284.90 555.00 14,317.40 7,013.72 DURANT 25,722.43 23,825.28 265,896.29 267,047.17 EAST MS COLLEGE 38.11 25.16 2,982.04 3,419.74 ECRU 11,090.83 12,206.72 124,446.95 123,362.50 EDEN 56.80 54.02 596.12 538.73 EDWARDS 5,946.34 7,370.74 65,149.32 60,699.58 ELLISVILLE 94,104.03 81,064.06 968,631.45 811,759.15 ENTERPRISE 4,557.03 5,302.28 55,577.79 56,557.39 ETHEL 972.92 1,696.82 12,637.79 15,815.18 EUPORA 32,951.03 39,887.22 378,827.71 408,784.51 FALCON 51.06 66.97 572.07 555.76 FARMINGTON 4,045.46 5,040.53 47,081.72 47,064.45 FAULKNER 3,472.91 5,458.14 38,341.79 38,470.06 FAYETTE 17,267.72 19,279.64 183,211.41 182,061.40 FLORA 28,257.62 26,449.56 303,886.58 286,300.36 FLORENCE 78,958.61 63,915.67 688,898.16 632,523.35 FLOWOOD 872,262.59 815,058.59 9,468,575.23 9,273,499.26 FOREST 172,013.16 169,825.83 1,918,265.59 1,914,814.83 FRENCH CAMP 1,391.58 2,479.22 10,325.31 18,799.00 FRIARS POINT 2,521.81 2,936.51 25,895.66 27,114.16

FULTON GATTMAN GAUTIER GEORGETOWN GLEN GLENDORA GLOSTER GOLDEN GOODMAN GREENVILLE GREENWOOD GRENADA GULFPORT GUNNISON GUNTOWN HATLEY HATTIESBURG HAZLEHURST HEIDELBERG HERNANDO HICKORY HICKORY FLAT HINDS COMMUNITY HOLLANDALE HOLLY SPRINGS HORN LAKE HOULKA HOUSTON INDIANOLA INVERNESS ISOLA ITTA BENA IUKA JACKSON JONESTOWN JUMPERTOWN KILMICHAEL KOSCIUSKO KOSSUTH LAKE LAMBERT LAUREL LEAKESVILLE LEARNED LELAND LENA LEXINGTON LIBERTY LONG BEACH LOUIN LOUISE LOUISVILLE LUCEDALE LULA LUMBERTON LYON MABEN MACON MADISON MAGEE MAGNOLIA MANTACHIE MANTEE MARIETTA MARION MARKS MATHISTON MAYERSVILLE MCCOMB MCCOOL MCLAIN MEADVILLE MENDENHALL MERIDIAN MERIGOLD METCALFE MIZE MONTICELLO MONTROSE MOORHEAD MORGAN CITY MORTON MOSS POINT MOUND BAYOU MS GULFCOAST MS STATE UNIV MS VALLEY ST MT OLIVE MYRTLE NATCHEZ NETTLETON NEW ALBANY NEW AUGUSTA NEW HEBRON NEWTON NO. CARROLLTON NOXAPATER OAKLAND OCEAN SPRINGS OKOLONA OLIVE BRANCH OSYKA OXFORD PACE PACHUTA PADEN

124,436.40 102.12 189,043.51 3,202.30 1,971.75 418.99 12,316.14 5,354.23 3,535.30 517,199.21 370,240.68 353,964.85 1,622,635.50 977.64 15,715.38 484.62 1,797,768.37 100,351.28 37,630.79 230,853.25 3,787.79 5,166.10 1,050.99 14,588.60 94,469.12 353,170.19 8,107.15 84,425.07 153,965.74 7,371.77 1,598.82 12,344.95 63,582.49 2,761,968.69 3,847.16 866.93 6,867.28 164,821.65 3,509.29 6,899.85 3,741.57 808,755.29 27,947.07 466.87 45,786.11 1,795.03 38,491.17 20,233.26 113,828.24 2,829.41 1,528.56 155,607.80 160,828.33 3,373.28 14,685.92 6,677.95 6,530.48 49,804.61 487,712.15 159,874.66 35,289.12 16,588.77 2,666.59 4,611.23 17,331.92 18,958.16 18,744.48 715.21 484,865.98 462.50 5,454.11 10,694.58 51,957.33 1,213,238.92 7,134.95 1,417.48 18,328.93 37,172.00 540.17 7,609.71 564.97 39,728.66 143,435.92 3,968.84 326.90 70,017.78 199.99 7,548.40 4,928.73 455,036.31 26,675.68 261,096.88 15,478.46 6,860.23 83,464.54 3,976.79 9,429.73 5,944.53 381,756.79 26,674.56 668,290.39 5,539.64 617,303.26 566.10 1,753.50 186.30

127,302.07 251.79 184,264.88 3,841.04 1,988.63 294.28 13,655.39 5,464.42 3,678.72 504,442.45 357,403.47 329,763.81 1,582,933.65 974.65 16,838.32 5,763.73 1,735,016.66 104,612.50 31,595.68 264,560.72 4,058.79 7,481.67 952.38 14,642.86 102,314.66 344,835.26 9,617.69 85,205.48 167,572.75 6,777.61 1,795.75 13,074.72 75,702.24 2,570,911.41 4,141.01 1,120.51 6,438.16 166,497.77 3,613.70 7,398.93 3,419.54 758,533.07 23,527.25 1,274.58 42,211.25 2,922.84 28,738.74 23,157.94 109,034.93 3,007.92 1,559.97 152,073.42 166,551.31 3,123.60 18,608.43 3,962.89 7,114.86 49,091.10 465,788.23 165,067.66 36,805.24 16,733.76 3,090.66 5,209.67 17,934.22 20,671.38 21,903.76 559.36 448,893.18 765.35 5,971.23 11,529.92 50,626.65 1,150,624.29 7,241.76 1,189.95 15,872.81 39,765.11 166.06 7,031.21 827.93 42,029.35 137,617.85 6,502.11 245.13 73,501.60 106.01 10,066.47 4,527.49 455,345.59 26,502.94 226,470.38 14,940.66 8,107.95 82,830.34 3,108.42 11,178.50 7,059.85 370,181.79 26,542.61 625,070.16 7,621.75 581,160.44 717.99 2,298.58 145.41

1,307,880.00 1,374.31 2,033,396.50 38,995.84 18,568.53 3,769.43 123,573.76 48,157.28 38,804.53 5,801,172.71 4,038,583.27 3,713,791.44 17,674,992.23 8,589.68 165,997.69 5,889.69 19,353,416.23 1,148,864.28 379,632.63 2,568,624.95 43,291.89 63,877.67 8,119.29 157,563.20 1,085,940.91 3,573,199.31 89,581.68 911,635.55 1,689,072.04 68,996.77 17,837.02 128,617.88 711,661.49 28,960,211.94 41,796.18 8,866.30 64,028.12 1,830,581.95 41,311.12 74,297.28 38,650.18 8,425,749.52 264,146.58 4,980.10 474,837.51 18,698.00 407,980.44 210,408.41 1,220,076.82 26,463.95 11,611.40 1,601,068.34 1,777,411.18 36,191.55 160,313.06 63,144.47 68,899.45 542,972.23 5,439,285.67 1,792,633.81 383,964.23 179,460.59 30,340.91 51,545.32 180,149.65 214,937.63 171,628.77 6,311.57 4,916,751.35 5,505.49 63,500.89 114,538.29 538,004.31 13,190,549.44 77,694.22 12,107.77 138,981.88 419,540.16 6,646.14 97,953.78 6,568.09 426,118.61 1,461,931.55 50,735.12 6,034.93 331,356.87 7,825.15 89,752.80 42,708.58 4,916,494.52 261,713.81 2,567,186.85 166,745.82 79,775.30 937,955.53 32,565.69 101,956.29 64,172.06 4,099,499.93 270,792.27 6,884,189.52 59,914.68 6,314,760.82 6,198.17 19,906.64 1,778.81

1,299,832.09 1,740.00 2,003,035.82 39,517.48 18,214.57 4,265.19 129,654.29 51,742.85 42,539.00 5,709,141.10 4,040,006.62 3,654,798.42 17,400,989.72 8,049.35 170,008.65 15,935.03 18,782,708.15 1,133,553.54 398,089.19 2,464,082.36 44,938.47 67,040.88 8,144.28 165,863.81 1,056,709.86 3,561,869.43 94,718.17 934,789.78 1,767,593.72 71,968.38 23,336.91 126,209.19 689,678.19 28,772,400.80 44,063.64 10,107.24 62,232.87 1,820,975.92 41,064.71 72,228.62 33,033.24 8,172,041.67 251,262.52 8,597.10 411,033.70 18,768.72 405,861.73 210,104.57 1,182,425.26 35,879.49 13,441.04 1,558,209.09 1,708,201.67 33,373.90 241,903.84 34,228.43 73,403.71 545,099.21 4,967,172.53 1,814,146.04 372,006.97 171,723.99 29,033.08 53,417.90 171,384.82 220,800.76 180,892.23 5,861.42 4,797,609.14 7,276.84 65,171.98 112,626.06 526,750.09 12,781,745.96 76,045.30 12,976.18 161,506.99 421,422.19 5,778.66 93,541.38 7,075.66 435,428.29 1,457,387.60 45,893.20 4,593.75 336,224.65 9,344.76 102,283.92 39,909.43 4,808,040.80 266,165.16 2,450,084.40 165,042.49 77,387.75 920,853.06 33,944.74 96,009.69 66,099.06 3,920,203.98 264,306.43 6,520,788.04 65,563.08 6,035,565.76 6,946.85 19,368.23 1,603.05

PASCAGOULA PASS CHRISTIAN PAULDING PEARL PELAHATCHIE PETAL PHILADELPHIA PICAYUNE PICKENS PITTSBORO PLANTERSVILLE POLKVILLE PONTOTOC POPE POPLARVILLE PORT GIBSON POTTS CAMP PRENTISS PUCKETT PURVIS QUITMAN RALEIGH RAYMOND RENOVA RICHLAND RICHTON RIDGELAND RIENZI RIPLEY ROLLING FORK ROSEDALE ROXIE RULEVILLE SALLIS SALTILLO SANDERSVILLE SARDIS SATARTIA SCHLATER SCOOBA SEBASTAPOL SEMINARY SENATOBIA SHANNON SHAW SHELBY SHERMAN SHUBUTA SHUQUALAK SIDON SILVER CITY SILVER CREEK SLATE SPRINGS SLEDGE SMITHVILLE SNOWLAKESHORES SOSO SOUTHAVEN SOUTHWEST COMM STARKVILLE STATE LINE STONEWALL STURGIS SUMMIT SUMNER SUMRALL SUNFLOWER SYLVARENA TAYLOR TAYLORSVILLE TCHULA TERRY THAXTON TISHOMINGO TOCCOPOLA TOWN OF WALLS TREMONT TUNICA TUPELO TUTWILER TYLERTOWN UNION UNIV OF MISS UTICA VAIDEN VARDAMAN VERONA VICKSBURG WALNUT WALNUT GROVE WALTHALL WATER VALLEY WAVELAND WAYNESBORO WEBB WEIR WESSON WEST WEST POINT WIGGINS WINONA WINSTONVILLE WOODLAND WOODVILLE YAZOO CITY

462,766.27 92,660.03 122.29 789,307.74 29,537.08 190,912.16 324,427.65 342,495.96 7,652.04 403.30 3,693.98 395.09 193,218.65 2,409.92 56,981.82 19,322.88 9,816.41 44,984.24 7,284.12 59,820.44 48,368.99 17,036.46 16,906.58 2,318.46 394,444.75 29,828.29 1,050,705.73 3,881.92 98,341.35 35,506.89 9,524.02 1,400.60 20,102.57 2,583.90 64,371.63 52,353.76 28,386.21 338.74 844.76 5,446.07 18,463.57 10,914.30 166,248.75 13,613.28 5,873.35 11,680.24 12,470.96 3,510.01 1,873.44 858.46 330.41 3,152.44 175.23 1,378.34 5,892.09 346.69 13,146.84 1,004,916.04 22.20 489,209.65 9,170.76 6,183.27 2,814.01 38,758.90 5,801.09 38,272.74 2,105.57 227.18 2,864.54 23,229.36 6,973.43 24,873.25 3,376.99 8,643.81 562.07 3,470.24 2,128.10 43,313.19 1,459,613.48 4,320.06 56,696.41 27,906.51 16,720.29 14,908.40 10,238.60 10,123.49 23,552.90 633,639.31 17,831.80 6,344.70 2,711.65 41,844.70 180,993.11 164,489.89 6,962.74 2,073.54 12,851.69 1,638.88 175,759.65 140,698.63 89,664.95 205.17 4,792.24 28,447.38 150,100.80

TOTAL

$34,244,739.66

442,364.91 96,648.84 264.18 663,957.90 27,124.67 168,292.64 297,505.97 354,790.30 7,984.67 746.85 4,783.63 275.12 194,305.74 4,576.84 59,749.17 24,703.53 11,077.52 36,111.55 8,299.17 60,117.68 44,115.36 18,179.44 20,022.98 2,295.57 357,361.53 27,162.81 935,199.58 4,285.49 107,217.20 29,628.67 10,117.77 2,553.07 18,799.30 2,453.29 61,213.60 62,572.41 28,785.80 503.20 1,400.95 5,764.98 14,965.64 12,509.16 156,248.32 16,713.98 7,764.42 10,707.34 14,036.24 4,156.80 2,368.63 1,085.66 493.58 4,789.14 345.76 1,780.23 5,930.34 641.21 11,205.48 997,102.77 216.82 486,239.50 9,043.86 7,136.11 3,357.80 36,945.04 5,616.58 32,750.26 3,142.62 247.35 2,710.62 26,791.05 7,194.82 25,913.17 3,369.22 9,964.49 690.47 4,206.72 1,485.72 49,689.92 1,460,802.94 4,055.08 61,295.47 28,936.98 16,579.48 13,468.81 10,646.27 9,637.62 18,187.75 668,452.57 18,791.34 7,452.26 2,093.59 41,971.08 176,697.12 178,093.09 7,848.65 2,866.04 19,011.55 1,912.04 205,934.04 140,403.55 91,693.42 649.12 5,752.30 28,712.84 138,480.83

4,906,752.96 1,014,756.98 1,257.81 7,588,672.46 289,220.80 1,995,739.10 3,505,635.54 3,748,278.75 84,615.48 4,736.40 40,739.92 4,054.29 2,008,401.05 40,925.40 567,097.59 217,099.97 93,621.36 401,893.18 94,015.27 631,012.68 479,011.27 181,619.79 178,914.12 29,705.81 4,142,081.09 290,270.39 11,352,511.47 31,410.78 1,107,765.48 383,621.14 110,256.73 15,906.62 212,466.89 24,577.87 653,614.17 685,932.05 272,949.46 4,473.52 9,982.40 68,102.57 168,661.18 120,655.67 1,722,497.10 151,816.90 69,433.76 110,110.30 125,047.32 38,706.76 20,368.44 8,791.75 4,252.89 32,359.91 3,238.02 16,711.26 61,235.09 1,610.48 149,327.62 11,424,967.43 1,655.41 5,223,173.94 96,475.98 72,103.73 39,651.23 344,695.66 47,766.71 391,589.81 21,322.70 3,440.85 20,562.42 270,649.31 77,169.96 265,747.43 32,855.04 90,316.90 6,172.80 36,276.29 19,009.38 455,110.29 16,360,649.10 42,148.54 592,695.56 317,039.77 361,393.44 129,039.17 112,349.73 113,117.49 220,523.55 6,969,269.62 181,964.16 73,085.27 19,754.67 431,471.37 1,954,047.01 1,872,289.46 84,759.10 25,647.85 157,867.87 16,639.65 1,928,761.45 1,536,165.85 958,083.37 3,934.78 61,008.29 290,315.88 1,619,247.14

$33,070,752.01 $364,646,991.60

4,756,826.49 977,907.40 1,776.04 7,354,852.57 270,847.66 1,943,697.19 3,457,804.54 3,676,496.51 91,184.54 4,884.95 45,349.67 4,565.35 2,018,477.84 40,491.50 565,456.46 229,915.46 91,812.90 388,116.58 86,998.91 576,579.52 482,779.64 197,861.76 185,125.02 30,019.45 3,840,089.60 264,234.34 10,550,692.94 31,354.15 1,082,944.10 337,390.19 109,288.26 16,595.90 198,878.74 22,516.02 593,757.24 651,501.72 304,111.51 3,927.40 10,039.15 64,391.51 156,854.90 124,624.32 1,685,741.14 151,068.44 73,376.15 109,972.69 125,228.72 39,411.48 21,321.03 8,914.30 4,195.32 33,666.22 4,049.82 17,920.94 52,129.49 2,038.37 125,369.49 11,365,162.17 3,920.53 5,111,527.23 93,019.42 64,633.07 30,752.68 336,405.16 43,515.17 365,251.42 24,883.00 3,235.40 22,803.68 271,104.70 72,930.28 266,357.34 31,953.91 93,444.29 5,718.63 33,111.20 16,147.61 463,556.49 16,321,767.86 54,758.28 598,947.03 332,071.39 338,712.06 128,771.02 118,063.50 100,068.98 200,572.83 7,024,366.01 219,980.40 67,052.11 22,056.70 434,184.08 1,907,862.58 1,854,982.64 93,444.19 26,710.13 162,328.57 18,709.29 1,948,922.56 1,494,633.89 948,774.55 7,044.36 61,364.45 282,561.32 1,590,318.70 $356,591,172.21


A member of the Mississippi Press Association and the Alliance of Area Business Publications www.mspress.org www.bizpubs.org

200 North Congress, Suite 400 Jackson, MS 39201-1902 Main: (601) 364-1000; Toll Free: 1-800-283-4625 Faxes: Advertising (601) 364-1007; Circulation (601) 364-1035 E-mails: mbj@msbusiness.com, ads@msbusiness.com, photos@msbusiness.com, research@msbusiness.com, events@msbusiness.com

MBJPERSPECTIVE June 21, 2013 • www.msbusiness.com • Page 7

OUR VIEW

Indiana’s self-serving sequel on manufacturing study

Website: www.msbusiness.com June 21, 2013 Volume 35, Number 25

ALAN TURNER Publisher alan.turner@msbusiness.com • 364-1021 ROSS REILY Editor ross.reily@msbusiness.com • 364-1018 WALLY NORTHWAY Senior Writer wally.northway@msbusiness.com • 364-1016 FRANK BROWN Staff Writer/Special Projects frank.brown@msbusiness.com • 364-1022 TED CARTER Staff Writer ted.carter@msbusiness.com • 364-1017 CLAY CHANDLER Staff Writer clay.chandler@msbusiness.com • 364-1015

I

ndiana has employed a scorched earth economic development strategy of degrading the manufacturing and logistical capabilities of its Midwestern neighbors and Southern competitors such as Mississippi. While generously pointing out all the shortcomings of others the Hoosier State goes up against in the economic development arena, the study sponsored by Conexus Indiana — the state’s manufacturing initiative — had to concede a few indigenous blemishes. The report card prepared by home- state university Ball State gave Indiana straight As on Manufacturing Health, Logistical Health, Tax Climate and Global Reach. Human Capi-

tal earned the lowest mark, a D, while Worker Benefit Costs and Sector Diversification received a C- and C, respectively. Ball State attributed Indiana’s poor showing in the Human Capital category to a large “relative decline” in graduation rates of associate degree programs in 2010. Alas, the graduation decline was “a rare statistical anomaly” brought on by the Great Recession, Ball State notes in a series of assessments that finds regional neighbors Kentucky, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin lagging in a range of categories. Zeroing-in on its emerging Southern competitor, the Indiana-commissioned study

graded Mississippi thusly: » Manufacturing: C+ » Logistics: C» Human Capital: F » Worker Benefit Costs: B » Tax Climate: B » Expected Liability Gap: D » Global Reach: D » Sector Diversification: A » Productivity and Innovation: F “Mississippi’s grades dropped from “C” to “D” in global position category due to lower See VIEW, Page 9

STEPHEN MCDILL Staff Writer stephen.mcdill@msbusiness.com • 364-1041 TAMI JONES Advertising Director tami.jones@msbusiness.com • 364-1011

» NATION’S PERSPECTIVE

» OTHER VIEWS

Balancing privacy and security is difficult

MELISSA KILLINGSWORTH Sr. Account Executive

melissa.harrison@msbusiness.com • 364-1030 ASHLEY VARNES Account Executive ashley.varnes@msbusiness.com • 364-1013

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VIRGINIA HODGES Account Executive virginia.hodges@msbusiness.com • 364-1012 TACY RAYBURN Production Manager tacy.rayburn@msbusiness.com • 364-1019 CHARINA RHODES Circulation Manager charina.rhodes@msbusiness.com • 364-1045 MARCIA THOMPSON-KELLY Business Assistant marcia.kelly@msbusiness.com • 364-1044 SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES (601) 364-1000 subscriptions@msbusiness.com Mississippi Business Journal (USPS 000-222) is published weekly with one annual issue by MSBJ 200 N. Congress St., Suite 400, Jackson, MS 39201. Periodicals postage paid at Jackson, MS. Subscription rates: 1 year $109; 2 years $168; and 3 years $214. To place orders, temporarily stop service, change your address or inquire about billing: Phone: (601) 364-1000, Fax: (601) 364-1035, Email: charina.rhodes@msbusiness.com, Mail: MS Business Journal Subscription Services, 200 N.Congress Street, Suite 400, Jackson, MS 39201 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mississippi Business Journal, Circulation Manager, 200 North Congress Street, Suite 400, Jackson, MS 39201 To submit subscription payments: Mail: MS Business Journal Subscriptions Services, 200 North Congress Street, Suite 400, Jackson, MS 39201. No material in this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written consent. Editorial and advertising material contained in this publication is derived from sources considered to be reliable, but the publication cannot guarantee their accuracy. Nothing contained herein should be construed as a solicitation for the sale or purchase of any securities. It is the policy of this newspaper to employ people on the basis of their qualifications and with assurance of equal opportunity and treatment regardless of race, color, creed, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or handicap. The Mississippi Business Journal, is an affiliate of Journal Publishing Company (JPC), Inc.: Clay Foster, president and chief executive officer. Entire contents copyrighted © 2013 by Journal Inc. All rights reserved.

» HOW TO WRITE Letters to the editor are one of the most widely read features of the Mississippi Business Journal, and they give everyone a chance to voice their opinions about current affairs. We’re interested in what you think and we welcome Letters to the Editor for publication. Here are the guidelines: >> Letters should not exceed 300 words in length as a general rule. >> All letters must bear the writer’s address and telephone number. Street addresses and telephone numbers will not be published, but may be used for verification purposes. Letters may not appear without the author’s name. >> Form letters, thank you letters and letters to third parties generally are not acceptable. >> Letters must be typed or e-mailed. >> Letters must conform to good taste, not be libelous and not involve personal attacks on other persons.

>> All letters are subject to editing, and become the property of the Mississippi Business Journal. >> Letters can be sent to The Editor, The Mississippi Business Journal, 200 North Congress, Suite 400, Jackson, MS 39201, delivered to the newspaper during regular business hours or e-mailed to editor@msbusiness.com. They may also be faxed to Ross Reily at (601)-364-1007.

>> CORRECTIONS The Mississippi Business Journal takes seriously its responsibility to provide accurate information, and will correct or clarify articles produced by the editorial department if we have made an error or published misleading information. The correction will be placed in the perspective section. If you see inaccuracies in Mississippi Business Journal news stories, please report the mistake via email at editor@msbusiness.com.

ver since the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Americans have vacillated between their desire for safety and their desire for privacy. The federal government, whose spying on its own citizens has been further exposed this past week, says Americans can't have it both ways. If they want the government to protect them from terrorism, which it has done a good job of in the 12 years since the suicide hijackings, some inconveniences have to be accepted and some privacy forfeited. The tension, though, is over just how much snooping is necessary. It has been known since 2005 that the nation's security apparatus has been collecting phone records of U.S. citizens, trying to ferret out possible terrorists. What wasn't known until last week is how vast that snooping operation has become. The federal government has been looking at an estimated three billion phone calls a day, compiling a vast database of who is calling whom and when. Supposedly, only numbers, not names, interest the government; they only eavesdrop on a select number of conversations when calling patterns have raised suspicions; and all of this surveillance is being overseen by a special but secret court. Separately, another highly classified program has been broadly monitoring email communications of U.S. residents, not just the traffic patterns of the messaging but the actual content of them. President Obama has defended the domestic surveillance programs, which started under his predecessor, George W. Bush. The president says it's a necessary tool in deterring acts of terrorism before they happen. Maybe it is. But it rightfully makes citizens uncomfortable — that is, until someone blows up a building, and then civil liberties take a back seat. There is no easy solution to this. — Greenwood Commonwealth


PERSPECTIVE

8 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 » RICKY NOBILE

» MIND OVER MONEY

Check out this new unique device — it’s pretty cool stuff

I

»FINANCIAL TIMES

Has your identity been stolen?

A

ccording to data compiled by Norton, cybercrime hits over 74 million Americans annually. You know you have been victimized when you get that courtesy call or email from a bank or credit card issuer but is there a way you can tell prior to that moment?1 There are, however, certain warning signs to cybercrime. Watching out for them just might save you money and headaches. If you notice any of the following conditions, pay attention: » Odd little charges appear on your credit card. Big charges are of course a giveaway, but criminals might first venture some little charges. This often happens when more sophisticated identity thieves buy or obtain credit or debit card numbers through syndicates or online forums (they do exist). » You stop getting credit or debit card statements. A thief may have changed the billing address. What time of the month do these bills arrive? Knowing when may alert you to something fishy. » Weird packages show up at your home or office. “I didn’t order a new PC,” you react when the truck pulls up at your door. Well, maybe a thief did and forgot to change the default shipping address on your online profile at a retailer. » Bizarre calls & emails enter your life. Your friends get spam in their inboxes; you get calls from debt collection agencies. At first, you may categorize the calls as simple mistakes and apologize for the spam. Instead, check it out – it may indicate crime. » Your loan apps get rejected. Your credit score can plunge as a result of a thief’s extravagance and detachment. If you can’t get a loan or your credit report shows a plunging score, something may be up. » Victimization can be quite subtle. Some identity thieves never progress to shopping sprees or draining bank balances. They have other goals in mind, just as ignoble. Some people steal personal information so that they can hide from creditors. They would like to plug in your address or phone number on assorted financial, federal and state documents for purposes of evasion as well as future opportunity.

If you suspect this may be happening, file an identity theft report with the U.S. Postal Service (or a police report, but Ike Trotter some identity theft experts think notifying the USPS may be just as effective). You can also let bill collectors who mistakenly call know that you have done so, out of a belief that you have been victimized. Tax refund identity theft rose by 97 percent last year alone. The Taxpayer Advocate Service (an independent agency within the Internal Revenue Service) looked into more than 34,000 cases of such theft in fiscal year 2011, nearly double the amount from fiscal year 2010. Certain taxpayers logged into the IRS website this year to see the status of their refunds only to be asked to verify essential information. Identity thieves had filed online income tax returns in their name and using their Social Security numbers, but the crooks had directed the tax refunds toward new addresses. The IRS is finding it hard to resolve such issues as speedily as it used to: its workload has increased in recent years, but its funding has not. » This month’s parting shot: Here’s some interesting data on demographic trends at work in Japan today. It is a wellknown fact that the Japanese government has been employing birth control methods for years to reign in the population growth of this Pacific country which occupies a relatively small area of space in proportion to their overall population. Apparently the process is working because according to recent data, there are more diapers today being sold in Japan to adults — than to babies... Ike S. Trotter, CLU, ChFC, is a financial advisor in Greenville. Securities and investment advisory services provided through Woodbury Financial Services Inc., Member: FINRA, SIPC and Registered Investment Advisor, P.O. Box 64284, St. Paul, MN 55164. Tel: 800.800-2638. IKE TROTTER AGENCY, LLC, and Woodbury Financial Services are not affiliated entities. Information and opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily those of Woodbury Financial Services Inc.

have a UDID. It’s not what you think. UDID stands for unique device identifier. Every iPhone and iPad has its own set of numbers which will allow app designers to track usage. Folks, it’s a brave new world. Last summer, I had an idea for a financial app called “Crazy Money.” I submitted the idea to a competition and found myself in Washington, D.C., presenting to a group of dignitaries. I got a trophy and some cash and felt pretty good about the Nancy Anderson whole thing. I had no idea they wanted me to actually bring this thing to life! They handed me a little more money and sent me on my way to create this app. But I didn’t even know what a UDID was! And I live in Mississippi, not Silicon Valley. So I began my search for some teenager to write the code and go through the process of submission to the app store. What I found was a tech-savvy 30-something with access to a network of coders and designers. I spent one Saturday at my kitchen table drawing my vision on pieces of copy paper. Each drawing represented a different screen shot. What started as a simple approach to budgeting turned into quite a compilation of drawings as I tracked my “app” to its natural conclusion. I turned my vision over to Joe, then stepped back and waited. Now I’m a control freak, but it took about 10 seconds for me to realize I was out of my league. Apps are the future, and I’m completely lost in this world. I signed a contract. I wrote checks. And I trusted this would all happen as planned. Joe asked for my UDID. I asked a passing child what a UDID was. Before long, I was staring at the first iteration of “Crazy Money” on my screen. Wow! My kitchen drawings were coming to life before my very eyes — technology and creativity married in one tiny square on my phone. We’ve submitted “Crazy Money” to the next phase of the competition and to the Apple Store for approval. We head to San Francisco for formal presentations and await Apple’s decision on our idea. In the meantime, Joe created a website, www.crazymoneyapp.com, to showcase the idea. Mississippi may not be Silicon Valley, but Joe and his crew showed we can get the job done! Yes sir, it’s a brave new world!

Now I’m a control freak, but it took about 10 seconds for me to realize I was out of my league. Apps are the future, and I’m completely lost in this world.

Nancy Lottridge Anderson, Ph.D., CFA, is president of New Perspectives Inc. in Ridgeland — (601) 991-3158. She is also an assistant professor of finance at Mississippi College. Her e-mail address is nanderson@newper.com, and her website is www.newper.com.


PERSPECTIVE

June 21, 2013 I Mississippi Business Journal

»UNDER THE CAPITOL DOME

Money at the root of transportation

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ississippi supervisors gather on the Gulf Coast this week to talk about roads and bridges, economic development, water resources and other issues. The core issue is money. Counties, just like municipalities, are faced with dwindling tax bases and rising costs. Something has to be done without harm to the taxpayers, says Steve A. Gray, director of governmental affairs for the Mississippi Association of Supervisors. “Local governments are strapped,” Gray told The Associated Press. “Everybody is looking for alternative ways to provide services, and no one wants to raise taxes.” The MAS convention in Biloxi opened Wednesday with a presentation by House Appropriations Committee Chairman Herb Frierson, a Republican from Poplarville. Frierson said he understands county officials are concerned about how revenue collections affect local reimbursement for housing state inmates, homestead exemption and local road and bridge programs. Gray said counties are hoping for help with anticipated higher health costs with implementation of 2010 federal health care law. He said counties also want Mississippi lawmakers to keep a rural bridge replacement program funded as they did this year with a $20 million appropriation. Frierson said the bridge replacement program is also popular with lawmakers. “We’re hoping revenues continue to keep improving,” he said. Frierson said lawmakers know local governments are struggling, and increasing the property tax burden on citizens is not popular. “I think my term as appropriations chairman will be running around sticking fingers in dikes,” Frierson told the AP. “I think we are going to catch our wind at some point, but for now we’re going to muddle through this.” Frierson said tax collections have some shown improvement and the question is whether revenue growth can be sustained through this fiscal year that ends June 30 and into the next. Homestead exemption continues to be a concern to local gov-

ernment as Mississippi’s aging population takes more property off tax tolls. Under homestead exemption, the state encourages people to own homes by exempting the houses from some property taxes. The state reimburses counties and cities for lost tax revenues, although local officials say payments have not kept pace with actual losses. Mississippi homeowners who are 65 or older or totally disabled, who are eligible for the homestead exemption, can claim a total exemption from property taxes on up to 160 acres or the first $75,000 of the true value of their home, whichever limit is reached first. The 2013 Legislature appropriated $81 million to homestead reimbursement. Counties, cities and school districts asked for nearly $90 million. When supervisors head back home after their conference, they will have only a few weeks to prepare a new budget. Counties’ new fiscal year starts Oct. 1. Gray sees a ray of sunshine in the federal Marketplace Fairness Act, which would allow states to more uniformly tax online sales. The act was approved by the U.S. Senate in May and awaits House consideration. Mississippi could realize an estimated $303.2 million in sales taxes from online purchases, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. That is based on the level of Internet sales from last year. Mississippi and other states would have to write laws to require that the sales tax be collected at the point of delivery rather than at the point of sale. States have pursued an approach to collecting e-retail sales taxes since a 1992 U.S. Supreme Court ruling barred them from seeking such revenues from businesses without a physical presence within their borders. “We would hope, if Congress passes the act, for a part of the money to come to the local level, a percentage to local governments,” Gray said.

Gray sees a ray of sunshine in the federal Marketplace Fairness Act, which would allow states to more uniformly tax online sales. The act was approved by the U.S. Senate in May and awaits House consideration.

— Jack Elliot / The Associated Press

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Continued from Page 7

relative export growth,” the study says. “As with neighboring states, the real drag on Mississippi’s manufacturing sector is its dismal record of educational achievement.” Hard to argue with the assessments on global reach and workforce development, though we would invite Ball State to take another look at the state’s global export reach once the Port of Gulfport’s rebuilding from the destruction of Katrina is complete and the expanded Panama Canal opens up new trade horizons in 2015. Improving workforce education? That’s a more long-term challenge, one that cries out for non-ideological solutions and a renewed desire to cultivate top-flight educators for our public schools and pay them in a way that reflects the value of the work they do. We’re encouraged more and more by the increasing priority that our elected leaders and economic development professionals are placing on developing a literate and trainable workforce. Meanwhile, this is what puzzles us: Ball State handing Mississippi an “F” in productivity and innovation. Don’t they read newspapers and magazines up there? Already this year, the Mississippi Development Authority has surpassed last year’s industrial recruitment levels. The enlistees are focused on innovations that range from plastics and biomass to cutting-edge building technologies. And without productive workers, Mississippi would not get even a first look from these companies. We’ve seen this Indiana thing before. You’ll recall a couple of years ago, Conexus Indiana’s Ball State study painted an unflattering picture of Mississippi’s economic development success just as the state busied itself with landing big-time manufacturers such as Toyota for Blue Springs, General Electric Aviation for Batesville and assisting Nissan with a major expansion in Canton. Somehow the Ball State report card must have eluded the editors and researchers at Forbes. You’ll recall the long-established and respected business magazine last July profiled the state’s manufacturing successes, telling readers: “Think Mississippi’s future and you’re looking at a new American manufacturing center.” Here’s the lowdown on that assessment: It didn’t cost Mississippi a dime.

»PERCOLATING

Kemper County Coal Plant a prudent investment

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ating agencies and regulators expect utility companies to maintain sound risk management and long-term planning strategies. For this reason, electric utilities value diversity in power generation options. “Reliance on one fuel or technology can leave them vulnerable to price and supply volatility,” says a Congressional Research Service study published in February. The study cautions utilities from becoming too dependent on natural gas: “There is still much debate as to whether the ‘shale gas revolution’ will result in a predictable, long-term increase in supplies of natural gas at relatively low prices.” Always volatile, natural gas prices have doubled since reaching historic lows last year. The study also points to a growing dilemma as aging coal-fired plants are retired. Pending EPA rules virtually eliminate building traditional coalfired plants. “Only new coal plants with carbon capture and storage are likely to meet the proposed greenhouse gas regulations,” says the study. The new “lignite plant” Mississippi Power Company is building in Kem-

per County is a carbon capture plant. It will gasify cheap lignite coal, burn the gas to generate electricity, and capture the carbon dioxide. In 2009 when MPCo began discussions with the Mississippi Public Service Commission Bill Crawford about its need to replace aging coal-fired plants, adding a new natural gas plant was considered. However, this would have made MPCo’s generating capacity 75 percent dependent on price-volatile natural gas. The Commission instead approved the lignite plant, giving MPCo a diversified capacity mix of 50 percent natural gas, 25 percent coal and 25 percent lignite. Costs for lignite coal are low and stable. Despite the sound reasoning that guided MPCo’s decision to build the lignite plant, based on EPA’s pending rules and the need for prudent fuel diversity, the company and the Commission have come under fire. Opponents voice concerns about the plant’s costs and electricity rate increases

and argue MPCo should build a natural gas plant. Reasons to avoid over-dependence on natural gas are profound and discussed above. The plant is costing more than projected, but cost overages are being covered by company stockholders, not customers. To pay for the plant, MPCo has sought Commission approval to increase rates 22 percent; 15 percent of that has already occurred. But the impact is far less. As MPCo increased rates based on new capital costs it also reduced rates based on lower fuel costs. Today, despite the 15 percent increase, the company’s electricity rates are about the same as in 2009. In 1985 when Entergy completed Grand Gulf nuclear plant, rates jumped 54 percent. In 1981 when MPCo completed its Plant Daniel coal units, rates increased 30 percent. Both plants proved to be good investments, providing low-cost energy for decades. “We the people” depend upon our elected Public Service Commissioners to make prudent forward looking, long-term decisions. They did so in approving MPCo’s lignite plant. Bill Crawford (crawfolk@gmail.com) is a syndicated columnist from Meridian.


10 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013

LOCAL AUTHOR

Babies and books » Jackson doctor mixes medicine with thriller writing By STEPHEN McDILL I STAFF WRITER stephen.mcdill@msbusiness.com

Jackson OB/GYN Darden North’s fourth thriller, “Wiggle Room,” moves quickly from the battlefields of Iraq to the lobby of the King Edward Hotel powered by a rollercoaster page-turning plot written in the spirit of John Grisham and Tom Clancy. After saving the life of a wounded insurgent at the height of the Iraq War in 2006, Air Force trauma surgeon Maj. Brad Cummins returns to his family in Mississippi. The doctor soon realizes that the war on terror has followed him home. The story of how a military doctor gets caught up in a life and death struggle in his own backyard came to North after a conversation with a fan. “The idea came from a book signing in Monroe, La.,” North says. “Someone was talking to me about an experience their son had in Iraq as a physician.” While not a war novel, the book’s opening scenes unfold at the Balad Air Base Hospital at Camp Anaconda, fifty miles north of Baghdad, an area of the war that North heavily researched. Prior to the U.S. invasion in 2003, the compound was used by Saddam Hussein to train his Revolutionary Guard shock troops.

North interviewed a number of physicians for the novel including St. Dominic surgeon Lt. Col. Huey McDaniel, who did a rotation through Balad and shared many pictures and stories from the life of a military trauma surgeon. “I found it fascinating because I knew nothing about that and how the medicine is run over there,” North said. “What was central to this book was those hospitals are much better than the national hospitals. The injured civilians come to the American hospital and we're obligated to treat them in an ethical and humanitarian sense.” Research has always been critical to North’s fiction. For past novels, he has talked to police detectives, SWAT snipers and fire marshals all to insure he is constructing a scene as authentically as possible. “When you're writing even though it’s fiction it has to make sense and be reasonable,” North says. In the case of “Wiggle Room” sometimes the truth is indeed stranger than fiction. While his plot was developed long before the recent terrorist bombing of the Boston Marathon, North says the same immigration loopholes that reportedly brought one of the alleged bombers to the U.S. are also exploited

Special to the MBJ

“Wiggle Room” has been well-received by readers including the New York Journal of Books and numerous mystery writing magazines. Author Darden North says the e-book is also a bestseller on the Internet.

sible connection in a fictitious north Mississippi town. "Points of Origin," published in 2006, tells the story of a small town Delta plastic surgeon that gets caught up in a plaintiffs case. The novel won North a Southern Fiction IPPY award at the annual Independent Publishers Book Awards. North’s third thriller, “Fresh Frozen,” centers on Hollywood and the fertility industry and he says a screenplay has already been written for a developing movie project. “I think that's every author’s dream that's writing commercially,” he says. North compares his typical characters and situations to those you might find in a popular TV medical drama. The background is usually a hospital or medical clinic and the main characters are mostly MDs. The novels stand-alone as far as the plot but some of North’s more memorable characters have resurfaced over the years. Putting thoughts on paper in a creative way and thinking outside of the box are two of the main things North says he enjoys most about writing. “I may have a character say or do something that I might never do or consider wrong,” North says. “Certainly

North interviewed a number of physicians for the novel including St. Dominic surgeon Lt. Col. Huey McDaniel, who did a rotation through Balad and shared many pictures and stories from the life of a military trauma surgeon.

Special to the MBJ

Jackson OB/GYN and novelist Darden North says some of his favorite novelists are James Hough Jr., Robert Dugoni, Peter James and Hattiesburg native Carolyn Haines.

by one of his characters. “The terrorist is here on a study program. He comes to the U.S. on a scholarship,” North says. “It is sort of a timely issue (and will) probably be in the forefront with us for a while.” Born in Cleveland and educated at the University of Mississippi, North finished his residency at UMMC in Jackson then started what has become a successful 27year-old practice at Jackson Healthcare for Women. North’s 2005 debut novel, "House Call," observes the deaths of a nurse and well-respected doctor and their pos-

I consider murder is wrong. (Writing) is a way to live in your creative brain and I really do enjoy making up the characters and combining them. You want your readers to like your character but you have to put them under pressure and give them internal and external conflict.” When he’s not writing, North still maintains a busy schedule that includes delivering babies and performing advanced surgical procedures with his clinic’s acclaimed Da Vinci robotic systems. An avid outdoorsman and Ole Miss Rebels fan, North and his wife, Sally, live in Jackson.


June 21, 2013

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Mississippi Business Journal

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TRANSPORTATION

IN THE RED » Where are Mississippi’s bad bridges? BY WALLY NORTHWAY I STAFF WRITER wally.northway@msbusiness.com

It is one thing to see the figures on Mississippi’s thousands of bad bridges; it’s another to see them marked on a map and listed individually. The National Bridge Inventory, through the Office of State Aid Road Construction in Jackson, offers a map that pinpoints exactly where the weakest bridges are, marking them with a red flag. Graded on a sufficiency rating scale of 0-100, these red flags represent bridges that score a sufficiency rating of 50 or less. The state has so many of these bridges that the state map is painted almost entirely red, crowding out the best bridges (marked with green flags) and median-quality ones (marked in yellow). However, even the map does not tell the whole story. Using the zoom-in feature, individual bridges appear, allowing the user to view what roads or highways these bridges are on, their sufficiency rating, year built and more data. Research by the Mississippi Business Journal found that the list of the National Bridge Inventory’s red-flagged bridges has never been published — until now. Here is a complete list, broken out by county, of all of Mississippi’s red-flagged bridges in the National Bridge Inventory.

Adams County

Webster St. over Norfolk Southern R.R. (36.0; 1962)

Anna’s Bottom Rd. over ditch (44.0; 1930) Anna’s Bottom Rd. over ditch (33.0; 1930) Anna’s Bottom Rd. over ditch (40.0; 1930) Anna’s Bottom Rd. over ditch (42.9; 1930) Buckhurst Plant Rd. over Walnut Creek (30.3; 1960) Cloverdale Rd. over unnamed creek (32.8; 1920) Deerfield Rd. over Sandy Creek (29.2; 1940) Deerfield Rd. over Homochitto River branch (35.5; 1970) Deerfield Rd. over Homochitto River branch (40.6; 1976) Garden City Rd. over Levees Creek (37.8; 1950) Hutchins Landing Rd. over Hutchins Creek (39.8; 1940) Low Water Bridge Rd. over Coles Creek (46.4; 1992) Lower Woodville Rd. over St. Catherine’s Creek (4.0; 1945) Quitman Rd. over ditch (35.9; 1945) Quitman Rd. over ditch (37.9; 1950) River Terminal Rd. over St. Catherine’s Creek branch (46.3; 1950) Sedgefield Rd. over Fairchild’s Creek (26.4; 1945) York Swamp Rd. over Hutchins Creek (44.5; 1930)

Amite County

Alcorn County CR 100 over Waldrop Creek (11.8; 1960) CR 172 over Goose Pond Creek (44.2; 1940) CR 201 over Bridge Creek (23.4; 1978) CR 220 over Clear Creek (17.8; 1976) CR 331 over Redmont R.R. (16.1; 1930) CR 346 over Redmont R.R. (24.5; 1930) CR 420 over unnamed branch (48.4; 1998) CR 427 over Tuscumbia River relief (34.1; 1991) CR 427 over Tuscumbia River relief (18.5; 1948) CR 510 over Tuscumbia River (27.3; 2005) CR 510 over Tuscumbia River relief (20.6; 1950) CR 540 over Hinkle Creek tributary (14.8; 1976) CR 544 over McDougal Creek (22.2; 1999) CR 600 over Hatchie River (8.7; 1953) CR 600 over Hatchie River (27.7; 1930) CR 600 over Hatchie River tributary (34.1; 1957) CR 609 over Goose Pond Creek (29.1; 2009) CR 609 over unnamed creek (24.3; 2009) CR 632 over Herman Eastes Creek (18.0; 1975) CR 632 over Herman Creek (25.8; 2004) CR 655 over Bridge Creek (15.8; 1950) CR 711 over Little Cane Creek (21.0; 1993) CR 755 over Hatchie River (46.0; 1991) CR 764 over Coon Creek (24.0; 1958) Old Hwy. 72 over Redmont R.R. (42.4; 1950) Old Hwy. 145/Tate St. over Elam Creek (8.4; 1970) SR 2 over Kossuth Creek (22.3; 1991) SR 145 over Norfolk Southern R.R. (49.1; 1955)

Ash Rd. over small creek (38.9; 1972) Bethel Rd. over small drain (34.0; 1983) Branch Rd. over Pumpkin Patch Creek (49.6; 1993) Branch Rd. over small creek (32.0; 1984) Burris Rd. over small creek (38.0; 1965) Chance Rd. over Centreville Creek (41.0; 1962) Chance Rd. over small drain (40.0; 1968) Copell Rd. over large drain (32.9; 1956) Copell Rd. over Comite Creek (28.4; 1958) County Line Rd. over Hayman’s Creek (38.5; 1968) Dominick Rd. over Berry Creek (33.0; 1964) East Homochitto Rd. over small creek (44.8; 1963) Ebenezer Church Rd. over Section Branch (45.7; 1970) Ebenezer Church Rd. over small creek (25.4; 1970) Ewell Rd. over Centreville Creek (40.0; 1960) Farmer Rd. over small drain (26.4; 1976) Farmer Rd. over small drain (27.4; 1977) Fox Rd. over branch (38.9; 1994) Gary Rd. over Beaver Creek (32.0; 1965) Gary Rd. over Beaver Creek relief (35.0; 1960) Grange Hall Rd. over Tickfaw River (39.0; 2006) Hancock Rd. over Caston Creek (36.0; 1960) Hebron Rd. over Amite River-east fork (36.9; 1979) Hebron Rd. over Amite River-east fork relief (49.5; 1960) Lower Centreville over Amite River-west fork (31.8; 1960) Jernigan Rd. over Robinson Creek (19.4; 1965) Jim Thomas Rd. over small drain (40.0; 1970) Jones Rd. over McGeehee Creek (36.9; 1970) Jones Rd. over McGeehee Creek (35.9; 1974) Kahnville Rd. over Ellis Creek (46.3; 1980) Kahnville Rd. over small drain (35.0; 1962) Liberty Gloster Rd. over Wagoner Creek-east fork (37.6; 1990) Mary Wall Bridge over Amite River-east fork (35.0; 1988) Mary Wall Bridge over Amite River-east fork relief (29.4; 1978) Mary Wall Rd. over Davis Creek (26.3; 1976) Middle Glading Rd. over large creek (38.9; 1976) Mixon Rd. over Tickfaw Creek (38.9; 1970) Moak Rd. over Gordon Creek (43.6; 1984) Moore Rd. over small branch (35.9; 1982) North Newman Rd. over Amite River-east fork relief (39.0; 1975) North Newman Rd. over Amite River-east fork relief (40.0; 1965) Old Hwy. 24 over Love Creek (40.0; 1961) Old Hwy. 24-comprimise over Amite River-west fork branch (40.0; 1960) Old Hwy. 24-comprimise over Amite River-west fork

(40.1; 1972) Parker Rd. over Gordon Creek (39.0; 1962) Patterson Rd. over Gardner Creek (34.0; 1957) Perkins Rd. over small drain (34.0; 1971) Perry Rd. over Little Beaver Creek (37.9; 1990) Perry Rd. over Seabury Creek (44.3; 1969) Perry Rd. over small drain (40.2; 1962) Powell Rd. over Amite River-west fork (39.9; 1979) Powell Rd. over Amite River-west fork relief (38.9; 1964) Powell Rd over unnamed creek (43.5; 1964) Reeves Rd. over small creek (25.4; 1962) Richmond Rd. over Cuba Creek (40.0; 1983) Royal Chapel Rd. over small drain (39.0; 1965) Sherman Church Rd. over small creek (40.0; 1981) St. Rd. over Mart Branch (39.9; 1977) St. Rd. over small drain (47.6; 2003) Swamp Rd. over Amite River-east fork (31.8; 1971) Swamp Rd. over small drain (25.2; 1958) Swamp Rd. over Hominy Creek (31.8; 1956) Tangipahoa Rd. over small creek (26.9; 1976) Tangipahoa Rd. over Cobb Branch (35.0; 1977) Thornton Rd. over small creek (46.5; 2000) Trask Rd. over large creek (37.9; 1960) Trask Rd. over small drain (36.8; 1958) Turner Rd. over large drain (39.9; 1984) Wall St. over Hurricane Creek (39.9; 1972) Whittington Rd. over Zion Hill Creek (33.0; 1971) Wilson Rd. over small creek (35.0; 1988) Wilson Rd. over Wilson Creek (40.0; 1976)

Attala County CR 2006 over Yockanookany River branch (50.0; 1968) CR 2101 over Little Zilpha Creek (40.0; 1992) CR 2230 over Leflore Creek (37.0; 1956) CR 2246 over Yackanooka River branch (39.0; 1979) CR 2247 over Yockanookany River branch (40.9; 1974) CR 3011 over Sharkey Creek (35.0; 1992) CR 3022 over Sugar Creek (34.0; 1966) CR 3022 over Hosspen Creek branch (31.9; 1950) CR 3024 over Hosspen Creek (32.8; 1960) CR 3024 over Sugar Creek (32.8; 1960) CR 3111 over Sharkey Creek (36.9; 1969) CR 3111 over Sharkey Creek relief (31.9; 1974) CR 3113 over Sharkey Creek (31.9; 1966) CR 3122 over Cole Creek (32.7; 1955) CR 3204 over Baxter Creek (34.9; 1967) CR 3204 over Baxter Creek relief (32.9; 1967) CR 3217 over Scoobachitto Creek branch (32.8; 2008) CR 3217 over Zilpha Creek (19.1; 1969) CR 3217 over Zilpha Creek relief (22.3; 1974) CR 3217 over Braswell Branch (32.8; 1962)

Office of State Aid Road Construction - MDOT / From Google Maps

Mississippi County and Local "Requiring Posting (including CLOSED)" Compiled 02/25/2010 . CR 3221 over Zilpha Creek (24.3; 1970) CR 3221 over Zilpha Creek relief (24.3; 1970) CR 3221 over Zilpha Creek relief (28.3; 1970) CR 3221 over Scoobachitto Creek relief (31.7; 1967) CR 3221 over Scoobachitto Creek (31.7; 1965) CR 3225 over Taylor Creek (31.9; 1975) CR 3226 over Braswell Branch (40.0; 1986) CR 3232 over Scoobachitto Creek (24.3; 1964) CR 3232 over Scoobachitto Creek branch (24.3; 1964) CR 3245 over Apookta Creek (22.8; 1974) CR 4002 over Parker Creek (21.4; 1942) CR 4002 over Roby Creek branch (38.9; 1974) CR 4002 over Seneasha Creek (38.9; 1974) CR 4004 over Crooked Creek (24.4; 1960) CR 4004 over Crooked Creek (24.4; 1946) CR 4010 over Parker Creek (24.5; 1942) CR 4010 over Seneasha Creek branch (19.2; 1946) CR 4010 over Seneasha Creek branch (24.3; 1950) CR 4015 over Seneasha Creek (24.5; 1950) CR 4015 over Seneasha Creek branch (24.5; 1948) CR 4020 over Bolatusha Creek (45.7; 1996) CR 4045 over Pony Creek branch (31.7; 1959) CR 4101 over Appokta Creek (24.3; 1950) CR 4102 over May Creek (28.5; 1955) CR 4102 over Roby Creek branch (30.5; 1952) CR 4102 over Roby Creek branch (32.7; 1958) CR 4106 over Long Creek branch (24.4; 1952) CR 4110 over Long Creek branch (24.2; 1983) CR 4127 over Roby Creek branch (17.6; 1960) CR 4137 over May Creek (28.4; 1952) CR 4142 over Pony Creek branch (31.7; 1960) CR 4167 over Black Creek branch (24.4; 1952) CR 4153 over Long Creek (35.9; 1960) CR 4204 over Taylor Creek (40.0; 1956) CR 4207 over Long Creek branch (19.3; 1974) CR 4210 over Taylor Creek (27.5; 1993) CR 4227 over Little Sharkey Creek (31.9; 1962) CR 5001 over Kelly Creek branch 37.0; 1961) CR 5120 over Lobutcha Creek branch (49.5; 1987) CR 5210 over Yockanookany River branch (35.0; 1994) CR 5224 over Yockanookany River branch (26.9; 1966) CR 5233 over Yockanookany River branch (38.0; 1993) Hannah St. over Old River Run (27.9; 1962) Knox Rd. over Munson's Creek (25.4; 1992) T&P Route 288 over Bear Creek (29.2; 1965)

Benton County Brent's Rd. over unnamed creek (39.9; 1960) Brent's Rd. over Oaklimeter Creek (39.9; 1960) Cathey Rd. over Pechahalee Creek (40.0; 1960) FAS 911 over Yellow Rabbit Creek (21.8; 1927) Goose Creek Rd. over unnamed creek (26.7; 1960)

Hebron Church Rd. over Gray's Creek (22.0; 1956) Liberty Rd. over unnamed creek (31.1; 1961) Route 0112 over Oaklimeter Creek (39.9; 1956) Route 0116 over Oaklimeter Creek (40.0; 1965) Route 0907 over Oaklimeter Creek (23.4; 1956) Royston Rd. over Big Snow Creek (39.9; 1965) Royston Rd. over unnamed creek (39.9; 1950)

Bolivar County Blue Cain Rd. over Hushpuckena River (40.0; 1979) Blue Cain Rd. over Hushpuckena River branch (40.0; 1980) Bullock Rd. over Snake Creek relief (32.8; 1975) Cedar Rd. over Big Bradford Bayou (40.0; 1975) Cleveland Crossing over East Bogue Hasty branch (36.8; 1976) Crosby Rd. over Pecan Bayou branch (41.0; 1975) \Cutoff Rd. over Laban Bayou (41.0; 1974) Ditch Bank Rd. over Ann Bayou (40.0; 1973) Ditch Bank Rd. over Christmas Lake branch (17.2; 1969) Elmore Rd. over Hushpuckena River branch (35.0; 1960) Gibert Rd. over Porter Bayou (29.7; 1970) Herbison Rd. over Icy Bogue Creek (40.9; 1973) Hiter Rd. over Big Bradford Bayou (41.0; 1974) Hiter Rd. over Snake Creek (40.9; 1974) Howden Lake Rd. over Howden Lake spillway (40.9; 1974) Jankins St. over Alligator Bayou (40.0; 1981) Laughlin Rd. over East Bogue Hasty (39.9; 1969) Laughlin Rd. over Jones Bayou (36.6; 1976) Laughlin Rd. over West Bogue Hasty (37.0; 1976) Lee St. over Jones Bayou (31.3; 1978) Litton Rd. over East Bogue Hasty Creek (39.8; 1974) Litton Rd. over Bear Pen Creek (39.8; 1971) Litton Rd. over Bogue Hasty Creek (39.8; 1974) Litton Rd. over Burrus Bayou (29.3; 1967) Litton Rd. over Burrow's Bayou (29.3; 1967) Litton Rd. over Pecan Bayou branch (36.6; 1968) Longshot Rd. over Ann Bayou (40.0; 1970) Longshot Rd. over Stillwater Bayou (41.0; 1976) Malvina Rd. over Dry Bayou (36.9; 1973) Marberry Rd. over Big Bradford Bayou (40.9; 1974) Ming Rd. over Holmes Lake (40.0; 1973) Monroe Rd. over Beaver Bayou (41.0; 1974) Mowimus Rd. over Tommie Bayou (40.0; 1974) Murphree Rd. over Hushpuckena River (36.0; 1974) Neblett Rd. and Christmas Lake branch (40.0; 1973) Newman Rd. over Laban Bayou (39.0; 1944) North Bogue Rd. over Bogue Phalia Creek (40.9; 1975) Old Hwy. 61 over Alligator Bayou (39.0; 1972) Old Hwy. 61 over Hushpuckena River (37.0; 1975) Old Hwy. 61 over Hushpuckena River (32.7; 1961)

O'Neal Rd. over Laban Bayou (40.0; 1974) O'Reilly Rd. over Pecan Bayou (39.9; 1974) Pemble Rd. over Big Bradford Bayou (36.7; 1970) Pemble Rd. over Bogue Phalia Creek (39.9; 1970) Pemble Rd. over Snake Creek (36.6; 1971) Prewitt Rd. over Porter Bayou (41.0; 1970) R.R. Ave. over Bogue Phalia tributary in town of Shaw (21.9; 1964) R.R. Ave. over Porter Bayou branch in town of Shaw (36.9; 1974) Rena Lara Rd. over Bland Brake branch (40.0; 1980) Sandpit Rd. over Porter Bayou branch (39.8; 1979) Schmidt Rd. over Turkey Bayou (35.8; 1976) Shaw-Skene Rd. over West Bogue Hasty Creek (40.9; 1974) Shelby-Deeson Rd. over Stokes Bayou (32.7; 1959) South Bogue Rd. over Snake Creek (40.0; 1972) Sunrise Dr. over Otter Lake (32.2; 1946) Thompson Way Rd. over Clear Creek (40.0; 1972) Warfield Rd. over Bogue Phalia Creek (41.0; 1974) West Mound Bayou Rd. over Big Bradford Bayou (32.7; 1980) West Mound Bayou Rd. over Six Mile Lake (39.7; 1972) West Second Ave. over Holmes Lake in town of Shelby (15.5; 1936) White Star Rd. over Jones Bayou (40.9; 1976)

Calhoun County CR 103 over Old River Run branch (28.9; 1954) CR 131 over Cowpen Creek (23.0; 1969) CR 167 over McGill Creek (33.9; 1965) CR 181 over Lucknuck Creek (21.8; 1969) CR 233 over Persimmon Creek (27.2; 1962) CR 233 over Persimmon Creek branch (47.9; 1996) CR 266 over Moorehead Lake creek (33.9; 1999) CR 267 over Lick Creek (23.7; 1954) CR 275 over Spring Creek (38.8; 1954) CR 282 over Spring Creek (26.3; 1955) CR 306 over big creek relief (21.9; 1945) CR 308 over Savannah Creek relief (27.5; 1957) CR 345 over unnamed creek (38.0; 1962) CR 346 over unnamed creek (39.0; 1989) CR 373 over unnamed creek (21.8; 1967) CR 392 over Little Horse Pen Creek (37.9; 1962) CR 392 over Little Horse Pen Creek (36.9; 1987) CR 392 over Little Horse Pen Creek branch (39.9; 1963) CR 392 over unnamed creek (33.0; 1963) CR 401 over Meridian Creek (47.1; 1983) CR 416 over Duncan Creek (46.6; 1964) CR 418 over relief (41.4; 1954)

See

BAD BRIDGES, Page 12


12 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 BAD BRIDGESContinued from Page 11 CR 418 over relief (26.0; 1954) CR 418 over Yalobusha River (14.0; 1955) CR 435 over Dry Creek (30.3; 1997) CR 442 over Cane Creek branch (26.4; 1962) CR 451 over Gordon Branch (45.0; 1999)

Carroll County CR 22 over Hurricane Creek (49.8; 1950) CR 22 over Hurricane Creek branch (41.1; 2000) CR 31 over Fannegusha Creek (45.2; 1972) CR 31 over Fannegusha Creek branch (36.6; 1960) CR 31 over unnamed creek (38.1; 1968) CR 32 over Peachahala Creek branch (41.1; 1968) CR 36 over Big Black River branch (43.7; 1995) CR 42 over Fannegusha Creek (27.2; 1964) CR 42 over Fannegusha Creek branch (45.2; 1992) CR 42 over Fannegusha Creek branch (39.4; 1960) CR 42 over Fannegusha Creek branch (28.5; 1960) CR 43 over Fannegusha Creek (17.0; 1960) CR 43 over Fannegusha Creek branch (25.5; 2000) CR 43 over Fannegusha Creek relief (18.2; 1960) CR 45 over Peachahala Creek branch (47.0; 1964) CR 46 over Peachahala Creek branch (49.7; 1968) CR 46 over Peachahala Creek branch (42.3; 1966) CR 46 over Peachahala Creek branch (35.1; 1968) CR 47 over Peachahala Creek branch (31.2; 1970) CR 47 over Peachahala Creek branch (44.3; 1986) CR 53 over Pelucia Creek (42.0; 1971) CR 57 over Pelucia Creek branch (40.0; 1953) CR 60 over Coila Creek (39.9; 1953) CR 61 over Big Black River branch (36.0; 1958) CR 61 over Hays Creek (34.0; 1961) CR 64 over Little Sand Creek (49.2; 1956) CR 67 over Big Sand Creek (49.8; 1999) CR 67 over Big Sand Creek branch (39.6; 1970) CR 67 over Big Sand Creek branch (30.5; 1985) CR 70 over Little Sand Creek branch (31.8; 1970) CR 70 over Little Sand Creek branch (38.9; 1960) CR 71 over Little Sand Creek (30.5; 1993) CR 72 over Little Sand Creek branch (25.9; 1960) CR 72 over Tanyard Creek branch (42.7; 1975) CR 78 over Little Rock Creek (48.8; 1999) CR 78 over Little Rock Creek branch (39.4; 1999) CR 81 over Magic Creek branch (43.5; 1973) CR 100 over Potacocowa Creek (28.7; 1964) CR 135 over Sand Creek branch (30.4; 1956) CR 144 over Abiaca Creek (.0; 1930) CR 153 over Coila Creek (45.4; 1963) CR 153 over Coila Creek branch (40.6; 1972) CR 157 over drainage ditch (29.4; 1993) CR 157 over drainage ditch (40.1; 1993) CR 166 over unnamed creek (33.9; 1980) CR 176 over marsh land relief (38.0; 2000) CR 176 over Yazoo River branch (37.7; 1960) CR 176 over Yazoo River branch relief (42.4; 2007) CR 183 over Abotcaputa Creek (34.9; 1989) CR 183 over drainage ditch (40.2; 1993) CR 183 over unnamed creek (40.7; 1995) CR 188 over unnamed creek (20.3; 1985) CR 212 over Big Black River branch (40.5; 1950) CR 214 over Gray’s Creek (39.9; 1955) CR 215 over Little Teoc Creek (39.9; 1972) CR 248 over Merrill Branch (37.8; 1992) CR 255 over Fannegusha Creek branch (28.5; 1975) CR 278 over Hays Creek branch (45.0; 1993) CR 278 over Hays Creek branch (40.6; 1960) CR 286 over Salem Creek (29.6; 1953) CR 297 over unnamed creek (28.5; 1980) CR 302 over unnamed lake relief (22.0; 1980) CR 316 over Big Sand Creek branch (46.0; 2006) CR 318 over unnamed creek (37.3; 1975) CR 369 over unnamed branch (27.9; 1978) CR 430 over Big Black River branch (22.5; 1960) CR 430 over Big Black River branch (22.5; 1954) Hwy. 430 over ditch (46.8; 1959) Old Hwy. 430 over Abotcaputa Creek branch (47.5; 1962)

Chickasaw County Chickasaw 20 over local stream (35.0; 1970) Chickasaw 407 over Topisaw Creek (33.9; 1955) Chickasaw 407 over unnamed creek relief (40.1; 1956) Chickasaw 413 over Chuquatouchee River (22.7; 1960) Pittsboro-Houston Thorn Rd. over Chico Creek (18.9; 1972) T&P 52 over Soctahoma Creek (33.5; 1999) T&P 124 over Davis Lake spillway (41.2; 1950) T&P Route 193 over Houlka Creek tributary (18.9; 1996) T&P Route 410 over Red Bud Creek (35.2; 1957) Thorn Houston Rd. over Yalobusha Creek (48.4; 1962)

Choctaw County Burdine-Sherwood Rd. over Cummings Branch (32.9; 1950) Chester-Mills Rd. over McCurtain Creek (48.2; 1999)

East Clear Springs Rd. over Little Bywy Creek (42.5; 1997) Gladney Rd. over Robinson Branch (33.9; 1958) Huntsville Rd. over Crape Creek (47.4; 1972) Pigeonroost Rd. over Pigeonroost Creek (18.9; 1950) Ruff Rd. over Jenkins Creek (40.5; 1997) Salem-Bywy Rd. over Little Bywy Creek (26.9; 1986) Salem-Bywy Rd. over Middle Bywy Creek (30.9; 1960) Sand Creek Rd. over Sand Creek (47.3; 2006) Sanders Rd. over Besa Chitto Creek (26.7; 1997) South Kennedy Rd. over Lobutcha Creek branch (36.3; 1982) Talley Rd. over Ebenezer Branch (32.6; 1958) Tollison Rd. over Tibby Creek branch (34.9; 1953)

Claiborne County Beech Grove Rd. over Clark’s Branch (26.9; 1954) FAS 1304 over Clark’s Creek (31.7; 1960) Schaefer House Rd. over Widow’s Creek (16.2; 1917)

Clarke County CR C511 over Double Creek (36.4; 1973) CR C511 over Tallabogue Creek (19.6; 1968) CR 210 over Bogue Flowers Creek (32.2; 1959) CR 216 over Mingo Creek branch (32.9; 1965) CR 216 over Wolf Creek branch (31.9; 1965) CR 378 over Okatibbee Creek (26.0; 1951) CR 430 over Brown’s Creek (27.6; 1967) CR 450 over Long Creek (32.5; 1979) CR 612 over Chickasawhay River (24.4; 1928) CR 630 over Bucatunna Creek (22.5; 1965) CR 631 over Tallabogue Creek (39.6; 1976) CR 643 over Cedar Creek (41.0; 1970) CR 650 over Bush Creek (31.9; 1960) CR 650 over Motts Creek (32.7; 1960) CR 650 over Motts Creek branch (21.5; 1964) CR 670 over Bucatunna Creek relief (38.1; 1981) State Park over Moore Mill Creek (42.2; 1994) State Park Spillway over Clarkco State Park spillway (35.3; 1961)

Clay County Bill Dexter Rd. over Chuquatonchee Creek (24.9; 1950 Caridine Rd. over Caridine Creek (41.0; 1970) Dean’s Rd. over Dean’s Creek (31.4; 1995) Dean’s Rd. over Reed Creek (42.6; 1965) Elmore Rd. over Sun Creek (38.7; 1997) Hugh Moseley Rd. over Moseley Creek (29.8; 1965) Joe Myers Rd. over Line Creek branch (48.6; 1996) Moon Valley Rd. over Long Creek (21.9; 1965) Pheba Colony Rd. over Line Creek (39.9; 1960) Siloam Una Rd. over Houlka Branch (35.4; 1978) TVA Station Rd. over TVA Creek (35.9; 1965)

Coahoma County Johnson Rd. over Sunflower River (49.1; 1969) Moon Lake Rd. over Yazoo Pass (16.1; 1974) Second St. over Sunflower River in city of Clarksdale (14.3; 1936)

Copiah County Bethel Ln. over Lick Creek tributary (40.0; 1991) Boyd-McCree Ln. over Saddler’s Creek (24.0; 1940) Broome Rd. over Anding Branch (29.7; 1992) Brushy Creek Rd. over Pearl River tributary (39.9; 1989) Cherry Grove Rd. over Chestnut Creek tributary (34.8; 1989) Clegg Rd. over Brushy Creek (47.5; 1955) County Farm Rd. over Jones Creek (31.9; 1975) Curtis Rd. over Anding Branch (40.0; 1989) Dear Rd. over Haley Creek (39.9; 1960) Dentville Rd. over Choctaw Creek (49.6; 1965) Holly Grove Ln. over Brushy Creek fork (38.9; 1975) John I. Hay Rd. over Homochitto River (47.7; 1973) John I. Hay Rd. over Homochitto River branch (44.3; 1987) Leggett Rd. over Brandywine Creek (39.8; 1967) Lomax Ln. over Pearl River tributary (35.0; 1965) Lookout Rd. over Homochitto River tributary (24.5; 1950) McCardle Rd over Sardis Branch (38.9; 1989) Raymond Rd. over Turkey Creek (39.9; 1982) Reese Rd. over Caney Creek (39.0; 1974) Reese Rd. over Valley Creek (43.0; 1975) Reeves Rd. over Little Beaverdam Creek (33.2; 1960) Shelton Weeks Rd. over Brandywine Creek branch (41.6; 1965) Six Mile Rd. over Brushy Creek (30.9; 1962) Steel Creek Rd. over Steel Creek (39.9; 1993) Sugarfarm Rd. over Pegie’s Creek (38.9; 1974) Swilley Rd. over Bahala Creek tributary (38.9; 1986) Turner Ln. over Pearl River tributary (38.7; 1995)

Covington County Blakey Creek Church Rd. over Rogers Creek (49.4; 1983) Coulter Rd. over Terrible Creek (19.1; 1960)

Elm Rd. over Dry Creek tributary (49.3; 2006) Garner Rd. over Dry Creek (31.9; 1952) Hopewell Rd. over Oakey Woods Creek (34.4; 1971) Joe Rawls Rd. over Station Creek (37.9; 1982) Loftin Rd. over Dry Creek (39.0; 1987) Loftin Rd. over Dry Creek relief (38.0; 1948) Lott Town Rd. over Bowie Creek branch (38.8; 1979) Oakahay Creek Rd. over Oakohay Creek (18.5; 1970) Old Hwy. 49 over Okatoma Creek branch (47.1; 1980) Pickering-Rogers Rd. over Station Creek (32.7; 1966) Shirley Sanford Rd. over Curry Creek lower prong (49.1; 1972) Sullivan Rd. over Okatoma Creek branch (29.8; 1964)

DeSoto County Cockrum Rd. over Short Fork Creek canal (49.1; 1968) Cockrum Rd. over Snell Creek (49.0; 1992) Fogg Rd. over Old Hurricane Creek (40.9; 1965) ICG R.R. over Church Rd. (.0; 1991) ICG R.R. over Star Landing Rd. (.0; 1950) Johnston Rd. over Short Fork Creek (28.3; 1965) Meadowbrook Dr. over Cowpen Creek in town of Horn Lake (40.8; 1971) Star Landing Rd. over Lake Cormorant Bayou (29.1; 1957) State Line Rd. over unnamed creek (18.6; 1968) Valleybrook Dr. over Cowpen Creek in town of Horn Lake (40.5; 1971)

Forrest County 12th Ave. over Gordon’s Creek in city of Hattiesburg (28.1; 1980) Broadway St. over Gordon’s Creek in city of Hattiesburg (18.8; 1937) Byron St. over Gordon’s Creek branch in city of Hattiesburg (23.3; 1975) Campbell Scenic Dr. over Mixon Creek in city of Hattiesburg (36.0; 1970) Cedar Rd. over Lott’s Creek (36.8; 1986) Chappell Hill Rd. over Green’s Creek in city of Petal (12.6; 1970) East Hardy St. over Leaf River in city of Hattiesburg (44.5; 1950) Grapevine Rd. over Poplar Creek (39.4; 1970) Hillendale Dr. over Gordon’s Creek in city of Hattiesburg (33.0; 1973) Hillendale Dr. over Gordon’s Creek in city of Hattiesburg (28.5; 1979) James St. over Burkett’s Creek in city of Hattiesburg (7.0; 1965) Lee Ave. over Illinois Central Gulf R.R. (.0; 1939) Lynn Ray Rd. over Boggy Branch (36.6; 1979) McLeod St. over Gordon’s Creek in city of Hattiesburg (25.8; 1929) Old Corinth Rd. over Dry Prong Creek in city of Petal (36.5; 1997) Pinehills Dr. over Gordon’s Creek branch in city of Hattiesburg (23.3; 1975) South 28th Ave. over Gordon’s Creek branch in city of Hattiesburg (46.1; 1978) Sunrise Rd. over Reese Creek (15.9; 1960)

Franklin County Barfoot Circle over small drain (32.0; 1993) Bonds Rd. over Morgan Fork Creek (19.2; 1960) County Lake Rd. over large creek (20.3; 1987) County Lake Rd. over small creek (38.3; 1992) Cowart Rd. over large drain (20.8; 1993) Davis Hill Rd. over large drain (29.8; 1969) Davis Hill Rd. over small drain (30.8; 1999) Ed Nelson Ln. over Booker Branch (26.5; 1965) Eddiceton Circle over small creek (41.6; 1980) Enterprise Rd. over Bayou Creek (16.7; 1988) Freewoods Rd. over Zeigler Creek (15.1; 1990) Godbold Rd. over small drain (27.2; 1985) Higginbotham Rd. over Sandy Creek (28.5; 1995) Horseshoe Rd. over small drain (30.3; 1991) Little Springs Rd. Goober Creek (38.0; 1980) Little Springs Rd. over small drain (36.0; 1990) Lowwater Bridge Rd. over McGeehee Creek (18.8; 1994) Lucian Rd. over McCall Creek (22.1; 1938) Lucian Rd. South over large drain (32.9; 1992) Lucian Rd. South over large drain (28.1; 1991) Middleton Creek Rd. Middleton Creek (28.9; 1973) Middleton Creek Rd. over small drain (38.9; 1967) Middleton Creek Rd. over small drain (39.9; 1968) Monroe Rd. over small drain (34.0; 1984) Oak Grove Rd. over North Dry Creek (39.3; 1998) Old Hwy. 33 over Wells Creek (33.9; 1948) Olympia Rd. over small creek (23.9; 1975) Pate Rd. over Owen Creek (49.0; 1983) Pleasant Valley Rd. Horse Creek (37.1; 1994) Pleasant Valley Rd. over Miller Branch (48.8; 2003) Pleasant Valley Rd. over small creek (37.9; 1995) Proby Rd. over small creek (33.9; 1993) Providence Rd. over small creek (20.8; 1976) Ramah Rd. over small drain (32.0; 1990) Scott-Murray Rd. over McGeehee Creek (24.3; 1962) Sullivan Rd. over North Dry Creek (44.3; 1940) W. L. Wallace Rd. over Cane Mill Branch (48.6; 1993) Wactor Rd. over Cameron Creek (16.0; 1969) Wright Rd. over Homochitto River (24.4; 1903)

George County Beesley Rd. over Lyon's Branch (44.5; 1993) CR 123 over Pascagoula River (21.6; 1915) East Wilkerson over slough (34.1; 1983) Ernest Pipkins Rd. over R.R. track (14.9; 1960) FAS 257 over Bushy Creek (14.6; 1954) Fig Farm Rd. over Toppley Branch (49.9; 1965) Vestry Rd. over Cooper Mill Creek (35.8; 1960)

Greene County Bothwell Old Alvera over Indian Camp Creek (38.9; 1963) Bothwell Old Alvera over Mason Creek (44.8; 1975) CR 54 over big branch (47.5; 1974) CR 58 over Mason Creek (38.8; 1974) CR 92 over Holy Creek (43.1; 1993) CR 127 over Hellhole Creek (48.5; 1974) CR 174 over unnamed creek (45.4; 1967) CR 241 over unnamed branch (37.9; 1974) FAS 298 over unnamed branch (18.8; 1963) Gatling Hills Rd. over Hogan Creek (26.9; 1962) Gatling Hills Rd. over unnamed creek (27.9; 1962) George Brown Vernal over Evan's Creek (32.9; 1959) Jones Rd. over FAS 237/Sand Hill Creek (22.6; 1956) Leakesville-Old Avera over FAS 298/Panther Branch (27.5; 1963) Old Avera Knobtown over FAS 298/Giffin Creek (48.3; 1956) River Rd. over FAS 256/Gin Creek (43.6; 1958)

Grenada County None

Hancock County Beach Rd. over Bayou Caddy (15.0; 1993) Flat Top Rd. over Bogue Homa Bayou (39.9; 1960) Flat Top Rd. over Everett Branch (35.8; 1966) Kapalama Rd. over unnamed branch (25.7; 1977) Kiln-DeLisle Rd. over Bayou Le Terre (7.0; 1960) Kiln-Picayune Rd. over Orphan Creek (32.7; 1959) Kiln-Picayune Rd. over Bayou Talla (32.4; 1959) Lagan St. over unnamed canal (23.3; 1983) Rocky Hill Dedeaux over Bayou Le Terre (7.0; 1966) Rocky Hill Dedeaux over Bayou Le Terre tributary (7.0; 1966) Washington Rd. over Edwards Bayou (21.5; 1956)

Harrison County 28th St. over Canal No. 2 (44.3; 1976) Bell Creek Rd. over Bell Creek (49.7; 1968) Cedar Lake Rd. of Tchoutacabouffa River (42.9; 1973) Cemetery Rd. over Sandy Creek (49.1; 1971) Commission Rd. over Canal No. 1 in city of Long Beach (48.6; 1971) Discovery Bay Dr. over Discovery Bay canal (1969) East Bayview over Bay Bayou in city of Biloxi (36.0; 1987) FAS 109 over Taylor Creek branch (44.7; 1955) FAS 128 over Pole Creek (45.8; 1953) FAS 139 over Biloxi River (27.8; 1975) FAS 147 over Bayou Bernard (43.5; 1974) FAS 147 over Sandy Creek branch (434.4; 1974) FAS 1138 over Hog Branch (49.3; 1962) FAS 1143 over Little Biloxi River (18.2; 1930) FAS 2109 over Bayou Bernard (43.8; 1965) Haley Rd. over Ship Branch (46.6; 1950) Herman Ladner Rd. over Little Biloxi River (47.7; 1971) Hewes Ave. over drainage canal in city of Gulfport (48.2; 1982) Joe Pete Ladner Rd. over unnamed branch (48.4; 1970) Lizana School Rd. over Windy Hills Lake (49.9; 1964) Moran Rd. over Pole Branch (49.9; 1971) Pineville Rd. over Canal No. 1 in city of Long Beach (8.6; 1971) Porter Ave. over Keegan's Bayou in city of Biloxi (21.2; 1950) Saucier Advance Rd. over Biloxi River branch (48.9; 1968) Spinaker Dr. over Discovery Bay canal (19.9; 1969) Tillman Rd. over Turkey Creek branch (13.2; 1983) Washington Ave. over Turkey Creek in city of Gulfport (41.4; 1991) Woolmarket Rd. over Parker Creek (44.9; 1964)

Hinds County Adkins Blvd. over Purple Creek in city of Jackson (45.2; 1993) Alexander Rd. over Bogue Falia Creek (39.9; 1974) Alexander Rd. over Cox Creek (39.9; 1974) Alta Woods Blvd. over small stream in city of Jackson (41.3; 1997) Barlow Dr. over Potter Creek (49.9; 1970) Beasley Rd. over Hanging Moss Creek in city of Jackson (41.6; 1990) Bill Downing Rd. over Turkey Creek (32.8; 1974) Brookwood Dr. over Hardy Creek in city of Jackson (31.0; 1986) Carol Johns Rd. over Baker's Creek branch (36.8; 1976)

Chapel Hill Rd. over Turkey Creek branch (40,0; 1976) Cavalier Dr. over Eubanks Creek branch in Jackson (38.9; 1991) Chapman Rd. over White Oak Creek branch (42.8; 1989) Clinton-Tinnin Rd. over Straight Fence Creek (25.8; 1973) Clinton-Tinnin Rd. over Straight Fence Creek branch (25.8; 1977) Country Club Dr. over Lynch Creek in city of Jackson (45.0; 1992) Country Club Rd. over unnamed stream in city of Jackson (39.0; 1990) Crisler Rd. over Elda Hill Creek (32.9; 1986) Cynthia Rd. over Bogue Chitto Creek in city of Jackson (36.4; 1971) Davis Rd. over big creek (21.7; 1979) Derrick St. over Town Creek tributary in city of Jackson (39.9; 1991) East Cox's Ferry Rd. over Big Black River branch (33.2; 1956) Flowers Rd. over Robertson Creek (32.5; 1964) Farr Rd. over Cox Creek (32.9; 1960) Farr Rd. over Porter Creek (49.3; 1960) Forest Hill Rd. over Prahon Creek (28.6; 1994) Frank Hall Rd. over Bogue Falia Creek branch (30.3; 1985) Gore Rd. over unnamed creek branch in city of Jackson (32.9; 1971) Greenwood Ave. over Hardy Creek in city of Jackson (25.3; 1985) Haley Rd. over White Oak Creek (40.0; 1975) Hanging Moss Rd. over Hanging Moss Creek tributary in city of Jackson (7.0; 1987) Hawthorne St. over Eubanks Creek in city of Jackson (40.9; 1961) Joe Coker Rd. over Lime Kiln Creek (26.5; 1955) Johnson Line Rd. over Bogue Falia Creek (39.7; 1977) Kimball Rd. over little creek (36.5; 1993) Lake Circle over unnamed stream in city of Jackson (28.1; 1959) Learned-Oakley Rd. over Hamilton Creek tributary (39.9; 1974) Lorance Rd. over west ditch (39.8; 1981) Louis Brown Rd. over White Oak Creek branch (32.9; 1973) Lowwater Bridge Rd. over White Oak Creek (15.9; 1962) Manhattan Rd. over Hanging Moss Creek in city of Jackson (3.0; 1964) Mayes St. over Illinois Central Gulf R.R. in city of Jackson (12.4; 1969) McCluer Rd. over Caney Creek tributary/relief in city of Jackson (35.5; 1996) McDowell Rd. over Caney Creek in city of Jackson (45.7; 1988) McGuffie Rd. over Straight Fence Creek branch (32.7; 1966) McGuffie Rd. over west ditch (32.7; 1967) Meadow Rd. over Hanging Moss Creek tributary in city of Jackson (48.2; 1988) Moncure Rd. over Pearl River relief (31.7; 1974) Monument St. over Town Creek in city of Jackson (35.5; 1950) Morrison Rd. over Tallahalla Creek (35.2; 1965) Nell Collins Rd. over Hamilton Creek (32.9; 1971) North Midway Rd. over Baker's Creek branch (21.5; 1965) North Norrel Rd. over Baker's Creek (42.4; 1961) Ofc. Thomas Catchin over Lynch Creek in Jackson (31.4; 1985) Old Hwy. 80 over Big Black River (4.0; 1929) Old Hwy. 80 over Big Black River relief (12.2; 1929) Old Hwy. 80 over Big Black River relief (14.5; 1929) Old Jackson Rd. over Robertson Creek (27.2; 1964) Old Jackson Rd. over Rhodes Creek (27.2; 1964) Owens Rd. over Rhodes Creek (32.6; 1963) Parks Rd. over unnamed creek branch in city of Jackson (27.0; 1968) Percy Davis Rd. over Lindsey Creek branch (40.4; 1997) Pinehaven Dr. over Bogue Chitto Creek in city of Jackson (46.6; 1959) Raymond Rd. over big creek in city of Jackson (49.7; 1976) Ready Mix St. over Town Creek tributary in city of Jackson (24.9; 1962) Robinson Rd. over Caney Creek in city of Jackson (47.8; 1966) Rosemary Rd. over Pearl River (19.3; 1945) Rosemary Rd. over Pearl Vaughn Creek (17.3; 1945) South Mill St. over Town Creek in city of Jackson (36.1; 1914) South St. over Town Creek in city of Jackson (25.7; 1914) South West St. over Town Creek in city of Jackson (42.9; 1959) Spingridge Rd. over Smith Creek in city of Jackson (45.4; 1984) Spingridge Rd. over unnamed creek in city of Jackson (40.9; 1980) St. Thomas Rd. over Baker's Creek (42.1; 1994) St. Thomas Rd. over Baker's Creek relief (39.8; 1982) Tank Rd. over Little White Oak Creek (26.9; 1963) Thomson Rd. over Bogue Chitto tributary (40.0;

1989) Trotter Rd. over Bogue Falia branch (39.8; 1977) Williamson Rd. over Straight Fence Creek in city of Jackson (27.9; 1966) Woodrow Wilson Dr. over Illinois Central Gulf R.R./Mill St. in city of Jackson (39.8; 1940)

Holmes County Ables Rd. over Harland Creek (31.9; 1974) Areniac-Mallory Rd. over Gourdvine Creek (38.8; 1970) Blissdale Rd. over unnamed stream (36.0; 1958) Blvd. Rd. over Owens Branch (39.7; 1973) Bowling Green Rd. over Black Creek branch (24.8; 1959) Brozville Rd. over Butterworth Creek (25.2; 1978) Christmas Place Rd. over unnamed stream (31.9; 1953) Christmas Place Rd. over unnamed stream (20.5; 1953) Ebeneezer-Coxburg Rd. over Harland Creek (31.3; 1958) Eddiesville Rd. over Big Black River tributary (30.9; 1974) Ellis Rd. over Black Creek branch (39.9; 1973) Eulogy Rd. over Harland Creek (28.2; 1927) Fowler Rd. over Box Creek tributary (24.4; 1956) Gray Rd. over unnamed stream (24.5; 1950) Gray Rd. over unnamed stream (19.5; 1948) Harrison Rd. over Tarrey Creek (40.0; 1973) Hatchcock Rd. over Big Black River tributary (25.8; 1998) Holly Grove Rd. over Chicopa Creek (31.2; 1960) Kimbrough Rd. over Long Creek (24.5; 1960) Little Egypt Rd. over Old Yazoo River run (24.5; 1958) Long Branch Rd. over Jordan Creek branch (40.0; 1973) Oak Grove Rd. over Harland Creek branch (16.6; 1925) Old Wilson Rd. over Black Creek branch (39.8; 1968) Old Wilson Rd. over Big Black River tributary (30.9; 1977) Old Wire Rd. over Black Creek tributary (34.0; 1980) Owens Wells Rd. over Harland Creek branch (16.6; 1925) Pea Ridge Rd. over Cypress Creek branch (27.4 1968) Pickens Garnett Rd. over Tarrey Creek branch (36.0; 1973) Pierce Rd. over Harland Creek branch (40.0 1973) Rathel Rd. over Owens Branch (25.9; 1973) Rayner Rd. over Black Creek (36.9; 1970) Springhill Rd. over Cypress Creek branch (32.9; 1974) Stockyard Rd. over Big Black River tributary (27.9; 1965) Stokes Cemetery Rd. over Black Creek tributary (24.4; 1965) Thornton-Tolarsville Rd. over Fannegusha & Black creeks (25.9; 1966) Thornton-Tolarsville Rd. over Hillside relief/watershed (26.2; 1966) Webster Creek Rd. over Big Cypress Creek branch (40.0; 1974) Yazoo St. over Big Black River tributary (32.0; 1950)

Humphreys County East Five Mile Rd. over Mile Lake (28.5; 1961) Entrance to cotton gin at Old U.S. 49 over Jackson Bayou (37.8; 1983) Entranceway to field at Windsor Court over left drainage ditch (28.4; 1940) Entranceway to school at Windsor Court over left drainage ditch (28.5; 1968) Isola Rd. over Jackson Bayou (21.7; 1936) Kilby Brake Rd. over drainage ditch (24.5; 1940) Lamkin Rd. over Little Kirby Creek (32.9; 1968) Minnow Pond Rd. over drainage ditch (31.9; 1975) Moore Rd. over drainage ditch (29.2; 1946) No. 4 Rd. over west ditch (40.5; 1961) Off of Canal Rd. over drainage ditch (39.9; 1971) Pecan St. over Fisk Bayou in city of Belzoni (49.3; 1939) Pecan Tree Rd. over drainage ditch (24.5; 1938) Ramp into field off unnamed Rd. over Jackson Bayou (39.4; 1983) Rice Rd. over St. Bayou canal (39.9; 1978) Royce Rd. over Sunflower River tributary (39.9; 1978) Seven Mile Rd. over St. Bayou canal (32.7; 1973) Tharp Rd. over Buck Bayou tributary (32.4; 1959) Tharp Rd. over Tupper Bayou (32.4; 1974) Violet Rd. over drainage ditch (24.3; 1958) Violet Rd. over St. Bayou canal (39.9; 1970)

Issaquena County Field Rd. over Steele Bayou-west prong (28.4; 1965) Mayersville-Glen Rd. over Washington Bayou (30.8; 1969) Willete Rd. over Steele Bayou-west prong (38.6; 1971) Willete Rd. over Whiting Bayou (33.3; 1971) Itawamba County Bankhead Rd. North over Johns Creek (31.9; 1955) Bankhead Rd. North over Johns Creek branch (48.3;

See

BAD BRIDGES, Page 13


June 21, 2013

BAD BRIDGESContinued from Page 12 1991) Boat Ramp Rd. over Donivan Creek branch (24.1; 1999) Boat Ramp Rd. over Tombigbee River (19.0; 1920) Boat Ramp Rd. over unnamed creek (19.5; 1999) Boat Ramp Rd. over unnamed creek (37.6; 1960) Cagle/Lindsey Rd. over Splunge Creek (32.0; 1984) Chester Shumpert Rd. over Greenwood Creek (39.3; 1993) Chester Shumpert Rd. over Greenwood Creek (39.3; 1993) Cummings Rd. over Greenwood Creek (43.0; 1995) Deer Hill Rd. over Bpguefala Creek (32.0; 1954) Fawn Grove Rd. unnamed creek (34.4; 1998) Fairview-Banner Rd. over Chaffin Creek-north branch (16.2; 1950) Greenwood-Hopewell Rd. over unnamed creek (39.0; 1980) Gum/Cobb Rd. over Bull Mountain Creek (20.7; 1964) Harmon Springs Rd. over Jim's Creek (33.0; 1960) Hurricane Creek Rd. over Hurricane Creek (36.0; 1965) Ironwood Bluff Rd. over Old Tombigbee River (22.7; 1946) Mattox Spring Rd. over Greenwood Creek (41.6; 1991) Mt. Pleasant Rd. North over Johns Creek (34.7; 1954) Mt. Pleasant Rd. North over unnamed creek (20.6; 1950) Mt. Pleasant Rd. Northeast over unnamed creek (36.9; 1969) Ozark/Baptist Rd. over Donivan Creek relief (39.8; 1965) Peppertown Rd. over Mantachie Creek (34.2; 1965) Petty Rd. over Ray Branch (38.9; 1969) Pugh Rd. over Gum Creek (24.3; 1964) Stateline Rd. over unnamed creek (40.0; 1961) Summerford Rd. over unnamed creek (29.5; 1960) Wiygul Rd. over Boguefala Creek branch (30.9; 1985) Young Rd. over Cummings Creek (37.9; 1964)

Church Hill Rd. over unnamed creek (34.7; 1985) Dillon Rd. over unnamed creek (28.2; 1958) Foster Rd. over Hurricane Creek (48.8; 1997) Foster Rd. over unnamed branch (32.0; 1978) Freeman Rd. over drainage ditch (31.0; 1956) Goodson Rd. over Homochitto River-middle branch (32.9; 1962) Goza Rd. over unnamed creek (33.9; 1969) Granger Rd. over Cameron Creek (27.8; 1959) January Rd. over unnamed creek (38.9; 1978) Lucky Hollow Rd. over Blue Goose Creek (27.8; 1970) Lucky Hollow Rd. over Sandy Bayou (41.2; 1974) Lucky Hollow Rd. over drainage ditch (31.9; 1970) McCormick Rd. over Homochitto River-middle branch (27.9; 1957) Pine Grove Rd. over Terry Creek (30.9; 1980) Texas Eastern Rd. over Buie Branch (37.0; 1965) Utility Rd. over Hughes Creek (33.0; 1959) Violet Rd. over unnamed creek (25.3; 1960)

Jefferson Davis County Carter Cemetery Rd. over Holidays Creek (35.0; 1983) Dykes Rd. over unnamed branch (39.9; 1984) Hartzog-Magee Rd. over Williams Branch (36.0; 1968) Hunnicutt Rd. over Choctaw Creek (39.9; 1982) Jones Ford Rd. over Silver Creek-west prong (40.0; 1985) Mt. Zion Rd. over Jay Bird Creek (41.0; 1988) Mt. Zion Rd. over Walker Branch (38.9; 1993) Rose Hill Rd. over Dry Creek (39.9; 1984) Sam Graham Rd. over Bouie River (48.0; 1969) Silver Swamp Rd. over Silver Creek-east prong (38.9; 1984) Thompson Rd. over unnamed creek (39.9; 1977) Willie Buckley Rd. over unnamed branch (40.0; 1982)

Jones County

CR 6 over Beaver Creek (17.2; 1955) CR 8 over Tallahala Creek (39.1; 1982) CR 8 over Tallahala Creek relief slough (39.1; 1982) CR 8 over Tallahatta Creek (39.6; 1973) CR 8 over Tallahoma Creek (35.5; 1972) CR 8 over Terrapin Creek (27.7; 1967) CR 12 over Etehomo Creek (27.3; 1966) CR 16 over Pachuta Creek (25.0; 1964) CR 16 over West Tallahala Creek (36.4; 1966) CR 20 over Tallhala Creek branch (39.2; 1970) CR 23 over Quarterliah Creek relief (32.2; 1959) CR 23 over Otakoocha Creek (32.2; 1959) CR 24 over Allgood Creek (37.3; 1969) CR 24 over Allgood Creek relief (37.3; 1968) CR 24 over Souinlovey Creek branch (39.6; 1969) CR 24 over unnamed creek (39.5; 1969) CR 24 over unnamed creek relief (38.5; 1969) CR 29 over East Tallahala Creek branch (39.7; 1964) CR 30 over Town Creek (31.2; 1968) CR 31 over Penantly Creek (21.4; 1964) CR 31 over Penantly Creek (26.3; 1964) CR 31 over South Tristwood Creek (22.2; 1974) CR 35 over Prairie Creek (24.6; 1966) CR 70 over Nuakfuppa Creek (36.4; 1973) CR 102 over Etehomo Creek (39.8; 1968) CR 113 over Little Bogue Homo Creek (43.3; 1980) CR 275 over Nuakfuppa Creek (38.9; 1966) CR 3511 over unnamed creek (40.0; 1972) CR 3511 over Bogue Homo Creek (40.0; 1972) CR 18244 over South Tristwood Creek (32.0; 1998) CR 52814 over Tallahala Creek branch (39.8; 1962) Southern R.R. over CR 8 (.0; 1954)

Alley off West 10th St. in city of Laurel (32.0; 1972) Augusta Rd. over Evans Creek (17.0; 1982) Bern's Hill Rd. over unnamed creek (46.2; 1974) Berry Rd. over Thomas Creek branch (36.0; 1966) Bush Dairy Rd. over Reedy Branch (47.8; 1963) Bush Dairy Rd. over Tallahoma Creek (47.8; 1963) Bush Dairy Rd. over Tallahoma Creek relief (47.8; 1963) Chester Mosley Rd. over Falls Branch (40.0; 1968) Courtney Creek Rd. over Courtney Creek (39.9; 1972) Dubose Rd. over Thomas Creek (32.9; 1982) Dubose St. over Rocky Creek branch in city of Ellisville (32.9; 1982) Ellisville-Tuckers Crossing Rd. over Flat Branch (7.0; 1957) Ellisville-Tuckers Crossing Rd. over Tallahoma Creek (12.4; 1967) Flynt Rd. over Horse Creek (19.5; 1964) Hoskins Creek Rd. over Hoskins Creek (40.0; 1978) Lower Ovett Rd. over Tiger Creek relief (35.6; 1977) Monroe Rd. over Lowery Creek (49.9; 1972) Monroe Rd. over Oakey Woods Creek (32.7; 1968) Monroe Rd. over Snow's Creek (36.4; 1971) Moselle-Seminary Rd. over Burr Creek (28.0; 1970) Myric Rd. over Swamp Creek (49.9; 1972) New Zion Rd. over Providence Creek (40.0; 1961) North Pumping Station Rd. over Sholar's Mill Creek (32.8; 1968) Oilwell Hill Rd. over Buck Creek (31.8; 1962) Old Hwy. 11 over Thomas Creek (40.0; 1978) Old Hwy. 15 over Abb's Branch (48.5; 1976) Old Hwy. 84 over Bogue Homa Creek (19.8; 1937) Old Hwy. 84 over Bogue Homa Creek tributary (21.2; 1932) Ovett-Moselle Rd. over Tallahala Creek (23.0; 1967) Pleasant Grover-Sandersville Rd. over Bogue Homa Creek (20.8; 1963) Pleasant Grover-Sandersville Rd. over Dry Creek relief (22.8; 1962) Phillips Rd. East over Burr Creek (39.0; 1961) Red Hill Cross Rd. over Bogue Homa Creek (35.8; 1978) Sanford Rd. over Shelton Creek (32.5; 1966) Sellers Rd. over Thomas Creek (40.0; 1972) Sharon-Moss Rd. over Reedy Creek (48.4; 1978) Sharon-Moss Rd. over West Reedy Creek (48.5; 1962) Sharon-Moss Rd. over West Reedy Creek relief (49.4; 1966) Spurline Rd. over Gator Branch (21.3; 1965) Stringer Rd. over West Fork Creek (39.9; 1967) Three Mile Stretch Rd. over Tallahala Creek (23.7; 1961) Tom Windham Rd. over Tallahala Creek (27.4; 1978) Walters Rd. over Hogpen Branch (36.0; 1964) West Dr. over Sandy Creek in city of Ellisville (49.0; 1974) West Main St. over Mayhew Branch (15.2; 1968) Will Holloway over Spring Creek (41.7; 1984)

Jefferson County

Kemper County

Brady Rd. over Brady Creek (37.0; 1979) Brown Rd. over drainage ditch (36.8; 1974) Cannonsburg Rd. over drainage ditch (37.0; 1958) Church Hill Rd. over Sandy Bayou (44.7; 1965)

Bethel Church Rd. over unnamed creek (20.4; 1984) FAS 546/Kellis Store Rd. over Running Tiger Creek (34.5; 1969) Neelytown Rd. over Sucamoochee Creek (24.2; 1985)

Jackson County Black Dot Rd. over Island Branch (48.9; 1985) Grand Rd. over unnamed canal (39.0; 1955) Hospital St. over Bayou Chico/Pascagoula River in city of Pascagoula (36.9; 1950) Martin Bluff Rd. over live stream (21.0; 1950) Old Biloxi Rd. over Little Red Creek (32.4; 1987) Old Fort Bayou Rd. over Bayou Talla (49.4; 1970) Old Mobile Hwy. Bypass over Bayou Casotte relief in city of Pascagoula (38.5; 1980) Shingle Mill Landing over unnamed canal (38.4; 1982) South DeSoto St. over Pascagoula River relief in city of Pascagoula (24.3; 1966) Summerlin Bayou Rd. over Johns Bayou (33.0; 1950) Vestry Rd. over Little Red Creek (27.4; 1976) Wade-Vancleave Rd. over Pascagoula River (48.3; 1959) Washington Ave. over unnamed bayou relief in city of Pascagoula (39.7; 1965)

Jasper County

Neelytown Rd. over unnamed relief (33.4; 1990) Odie Luke Rd. over unnamed creek (44.1; 1990) Paige Rd. over Snoody Creek (42.6; 1990) Sciples Mill Rd. over Running Tiger Creek (16.0; 1982) St. Johns Rd. over unnamed creek (34.9; 1980) Thomas Mill Pond Rd. over Thomas Branch (35.6; 1988) Unnamed Rd. off of Murry Tanksley Rd. over unnamed stream (19.5; 1984) Warren Town Rd. over Parker Creek (34.8; 1967)

Lafayette County CR 100 over Goose Creek (29.2; 1980) CR 100 over Toby Tubby Creek (30.3; 1980) CR 100 over Toby Tubby Creek branch (32.0; 1980) CR 106 over Dry Creek (38.9; 1985) CR 107 over Toby unnamed creek (39.9; 1971) CR 129 over Hurricane Creek (49.5; 1997) CR 164 over unnamed creek (39.9; 1984) CR 208 over Lee Creek (30.8; 1991) CR 210 over Lee Creek (46.5; 2000) CR 214 over unnamed creek (33.6; 1979) CR 225 over Yellow Leaf Creek (43.5; 1992) CR 225 over unnamed relief (41.4; 1993) CR 233 over unnamed creek (50.0; 1997) CR 244 over Cypress Creek (48.9; 1954) CR 244 over unnamed relief (31.7; 1955) CR 244 over unnamed relief (33.7; 1956) CR 249 over Puskus Creek (33.8; 1959) CR 249 over unnamed creek (45.8; 1963) CR 249 over unnamed creek (37.8; 1993) CR 254 over unnamed creek (26.2; 1958) CR 262 over unnamed creek (46.2; 2002) CR 287 over Jones Creek (46.0; 1992) CR 294 over Lee Creek spur (40.0; 1992) CR 296 over Graham Creek (24.4; 1959) CR 313 over Splinter Creek (19.4; 1963) CR 316 over Morris Creek (25.1; 1988) CR 317 over Hudson Creek (40.3; 1983) CR 319 over unnamed creek (46.7; 1997) CR 327 over Hudson Creek (48.0; 1992) CR 327 over Hudson Creek spur (39.0; 1973) CR 332 over Taylor Creek (44.6; 1986) CR 348 over Splinter Creek (47.5; 1998) CR 352 over Davis Creek (37.8; 1992) CR 369 over unnamed creek (47.1; 1997) CR 376 over Humphreys Creek (48.5; 1957) CR 380 over unnamed creek (47.3; 1993) CR 381 over Sarter Creek (47.3; 1994) CR 382 over Sarter Creek (49.5; 1997) CR 382 over unnamed relief (49.2; 1997) CR 383 over Otoucalofa Creek relief (48.0; 1998) CR 384 over unnamed creek (47.3; 1991) CR 391 over unnamed creek (50.0; 1991) CR 399 over Bynum Creek (49.6; 1999) CR 428 over unnamed creek (35.8; 1991) CR 418 over Burney Creek branch (49.0; 1959) CR 424 over Otoucalofa Creek (39.9; 1990) CR 428 over Potlockney Creek (25.9; 1992) CR 428 over unnamed creek (35.8; 1991) CR 423 over Kettle Creek (48.2; 1994) CR 432 over Hartsfield Creekreek (43.5; 1995) CR 432 over unnamed creek (49.5; 1994) CR 436 over Potlockney Creek (37.4; 1963) CR 442 over Coon Creek (49.0; 1994) CR 444 over unnamed creek (23.0; 1955) CR 444 over unnamed relief (24.7; 1961) CR 444 over Yocona River (23.0; 1955) CR 459 over unnamed creek (47.3; 1996) CR 459 over Yocona River (38.4; 1960) CR 473 over Murray Creek (22.3; 1990) CR 489 over unnamed creek (27.3; 1959) CR 2003 over Four Mile Branch (23.3; 1991) CR 3011 over Courtney Creek (42.5; 1994) CR 3011 over unnamed creek (44.5; 1997) FAS 849 over unnamed creek (45.5; 1955) Local unnamed Rd. at Prophet Bridge Recreation Area over unnamed creek (43.8; 1995) Retardation Center Rd. over Burney Branch (29.7; 1970)

Lamar County Hardie Rd. over Mill Creek (30.9; 1987) Purvis-Columbia Rd. over Gully Creek (49.7; 1959) Southern R.R. over Boggyhollow Creek (.0; 1966) Southern R.R. over T&P 16 (.0; 1965)

Lauderdale County 7th & 8th St. over unnamed branch in city of Meridian (45.5; 1930) 19th St. over Gallagher Creek in city of Meridian (31.0; 1914) 20th St. over Gallagher Creek in city of Meridian (47.8; 1940) 26th St. over Gallagher Creek in city of Meridian (45.6; 1945) 34th St. over Gallagher Creek in city of Meridian (20.7; 1971) 35th Ave. over Gallagher Creek in city of Meridian (20.3; 1975) 35th Ave. over old pedestrian bridge in city of Meridian (39.8; 1914) 40th St. over Gallagher Creek in city of Meridian

(30.4; 1970) 52th St. over Gallagher Creek in city of Meridian (27.6; 1975) Beaver Pond Rd. over unnamed creek (31.7; 1987) Betts-Radcliffe Rd. over unnamed creek (48.3; 1996) Brown-Hooke Rd. over unnamed creek (41.0; 1962) Buntin-Gunn Rd. over Gunn Branch (49.4; 1972) Center Hill Martin Rd. over Okatibbee Creek (44.7; 1967) Chandler Church Rd. over unnamed creek (40.0; 1970) Dale Dr. over unnamed creek in city of Meridian (43.1; 1930) FAS 1406/Old Hwy. 45 over unnamed creek (48.1; 1938) Greenhill Rd. over unnamed creek (38.8; 1974) Hawkins Crossing over Sowashee Creek in city of Meridian (45.4; 1966) Hookston Rd. over Suqualena Creek (49.0; 1993) Illinois Gulf Central R.R. over Old Hwy. 80 (.0; 1915) Kewanee Rd. over Sucatolba Creek (44.7; 1967) Knox Rd. over unnamed creek (47.4; 1926) Lakeview Golf Club Rd. over unnamed branch (48.3; 1993) Lauderdale/Lizelia Rd. over unnamed creek (35.6; 1970) Lee Cutoff over Gin Creek (48.5; 1940) Lizelia Rd. over unnamed creek (43.1; 1930) Lizelia Rd. over unnamed creek (29.5; 1925) Lizelia Rd. over unnamed creek (45.7; 1938) Lizelia Rd. over unnamed creek (16.9; 1938) M&B R.R. over Causeyville Rd. (.0; 1923) Mayatt Rd. over Gin Creek (35.9; 1940) McGlothin Rd. over unnamed creek (44.6; 1998) Meehan Savoy South Rd. over unnamed branch (31.9; 1926) Meehan Savoy South Rd. over Rock Creek (17.4; 1933) Mid South R.R. over 26th Ave. in city of Meridian (.0; 1946) Mosley Crossing Rd. over Suqualena Creek (20.8; 1915) Murphy Rd. over unnamed creek (49.1; 1987) Old Eighth St. Rd. over Okatibee Creek (48.5; 1991) Old Eighth St. Rd. over Okatibee Creek relief (48.5; 1991) Old Eighth St. Rd. over unnamed creek (48.2; 1920) Old Hwy. 80 over Burwell Creek (36.7; 1915) Old Hwy. 80 over Sowashee Creek (29.3; 1950) Old Hwy. 80 West over Illinois Central Gulf R.R. (13.2; 1920) Old Hwy. 80 over Okatibee Creek (38.8; 1926) Old Hwy. 80 West over unnamed relief (13.2; 1922) Oxford Rd. over unnamed creek (40.8; 1989) Pickard Campbell Rd. over Bucatunna Creek (33.9; 1987) Pine Springs Rd. over Rodgers Creek (43.2; 1930) Pine Springs Rd. over unnamed branch (18.9; 1930) Point Rd. over Wanita Creek (22.1; 1960) Pumping Station Rd. over unnamed creek (46.2; 1992) Purvis Rd. over Long Creek (39.9; 1991) Rabbit 6 Rd. over Horse Creek (22.8; 1965) Roy Dollar Rd. over unnamed creek (36.2; 1950) Royal Rd. over Gallagher Creek in city of Meridian (41.7; 1940) Sand Flat Rd. over Long Creek (49.3; 1993) Snowden Rd. over House Creek (45.3; 1991) Stuckey Bridge Rd. over Chunky River (11.7; 1901) Stuckey Bridge Rd. over Wanita Creek (12.0; 1955) Suqualena-Meehan Rd. over Statinea Creek (27.1; 1967) Sycamore Creek Rd. over Sycamore Creek (19.6; 1990) Vinville-Causeyville Rd. over M&B R.R. (20.0; 1968) Will Garrett Rd. over Toomsuba Creek (9.7; 1929) Will Garrett Rd. over unnamed branch (33.8; 1930) Woods Rd. over Harper Creek (29.9; 1987) Zero Rd. over M&B R.R. (21.1; 1964)

Lawrence County Ella Bryant Rd. over Pretty Branch (19.2; 1909) Felix Sartin Rd. over Tilton Creek branch (35.0; 1970) Foster Rd. over South Bear Creek (45.6; 1994) Foster Rd. over South Bear Creek branch (24.2; 1994) Givens Rd. over Tilton Creek branch (40.4; 1983) Gunnell Rd. over Topisaw Creek branch (47.3; 1970) Jim Stephens Rd. over Pearl River tributary (35.6; 1960) Johnson-Carr Rd. over Fair River tributary (33.0; 1971) M.W. Brister Rd. over Topisaw Creek (16.5; 1951) Nel Lambert Rd. over Halls Creek branch (35.0; 1950) Old River Rd. over unnamed branch (22.3; 1970) Rabbit Rd. over Hooker Hollow Creek (48.0; 1984) Rawls Rd. over Tilton Creek branch (38.9; 1952) Renfroe Rd. over Cooper's Creek branch (49.8; 1951) River Rd. over White Sand Creek (19.8; 1951) Robbins Rd. over Tilton Creek (40.0; 1983) Sandifer Rd. over Topisaw Creek (32.5; 1973) Tom Evans Rd. over Bear Creek branch (31.9; 1950) West Smith Ferry Rd. over unnamed branch (31.7; 1980)

Leake County Barnes Rd. over Cobbs Creek (26.3; 1948) Bilbro Rd. over unnamed branch (24.4; 1948) Center Rd. over Tuscolameta Creek (23.1; 1930) Dr. Brantley Rd. over unnamed branch (28.0; 1966)

I

Mississippi Business Journal

Franklin St. over Pollard Creek in town of Carthage (32.7; 1988) Hooper Mill Rd. over Hooper Mill Creek (49.0; 1976) Jack Boot Rd. over unnamed branch (39.0; 1974) Madden Rd. over Standing Pine Creek branch (31.9; 1946) Madden Rd. over Standing Pine Creek branch (30.7; 1998) Risher Rd. over Standing Creek (45.6; 1994) Shilo Rd. over Fisher Creek (40.0; 1963) Shilo Rd. over Fisher Creek (39.9; 1963) Singleton Rd. over unnamed branch (38.0; 1997) Union Rd. over Standing Pine Creek branch (27.9; 1956)

Lee County CR 109 over Tubbalubba Creek (30.3; 1990) CR 185 over Chiwapa Creek (29.0; 1965) CR 185 over Chiwapa Creek-north fork (36.9; 1966) CR 185 over Chiwapa Creek-south fork (49.9; 1994) CR 300 over Chiwapa Creek (14.0; 1946) CR 300 over Tubbalubba Creek (38.8; 1930) CR 520 over Town Creek (33.8; 1960) CR 521 over Mud Creek branch (15.7; 1960) CR 631 over Coonewah Creek (31.3; 1950) CR 681 over Mud Creek canal (41.0; 1994) CR 712 over Carmichael Creek (25.4; 1938) CR 878 over Boguebaba Creek (36.9; 1950) CR 900 over Gorman's Branch West (29.2; 1960) CR 901 over Coonewah Creek-north branch (32.2; 1970) CR 915 over Campbelltown Creek (40.0; 1964) CR 941 over Campbelltown Creek (38.3; 1990) CR 1027 over Garrett Creek (27.2; 1964) CR 1130 over Boguebaba Creek (39.5; 1979) CR 1149 over Leeper Creek (48.8; 1960) CR 1213 over Twenty Mile Creek (43.9; 1966) CR 1310 over Boguegaba Creek (29.2; 1965) CR 1400 over Boguegaba Creek (21.9; 1976) CR 1498 over Sand Creek (48.1; 1961) CR 1666 over Boguefala Creek (42.9; 1991) CR 2346 over Puncheon Creek (32.4; 1965) Eason Ave. over Town & Kings creeks in city of Tupelo (47.4; 1965)

Leflore County CR 167 over Blue Lake (29.1; 1953) CR 515 over relief ditch (49.0; 1968) CR 518 over Tallahatchie River (42.8; 1954) CR 537 over Henry Lake (39.9; 1956) CR 546 over Gin Bayou (47.4; 1965) CR 557 over Dell Lake (19.9; 1957) Lincoln County Acy Trace over Bear Creek tributary (33.9; 1964) Apple Trace Southwest over Gillis Creek tributary (34.9; 1999) Aspen Rd. Northeast over Little Fair River tributary (12.7; 1959) Aspen Rd. Northeast over Little Fair River tributary (18.3; 1989) Author Dr. Northwest over Blue Creek tributary (38.0; 1965) Bahalia Church Rd. over Little Bahala Creek tributary (47.2; 1948) Bahalia Church Rd. over Little Bahala Creek tributary (20.8; 1970) Bahalia Rd. Northeast over Little Bahala Creek tributary (40.0; 1975) Beard Rd. over unnamed branch (39.0; 1980) Beeson Rd. over Little Fair River (28.9; 1972) Big Creek Southwest over Amite River (39.9; 1975) Big Creek Dr. Southwest over Saw Dust Creek branch (20.3; 1975) Butler Ln. Southwest over Hurricane Creek tributary (34.9; 1972) California Camp Rd. over Shaw's Creek (39.9; 1999) California Camp Rd. over Shaw's Creek tributary (32.6; 1984) Caseyville Rd. Northwest over Lick Creek (27.2; 1998) Clark Travis Ln. Northeast over Isom Branch (34.9; 1990) Cotton Ln. Northeast over Bear Creek (37.9; 1990) Dalton Ln. Southwest over Amite River-east fork tributary (34.9; 1995) Delaware Ln. Southwest over Panther Creek tributary (40.0; 1992) Denton Trace Northwest over West Bogue Chitto tributary (35.0; 1990) Durr-Case Ln. Northwest over Blue Creek (27.3; 1970) Elm Ln. Southeast over Little Creek (38.9; 1975) Fairman Ln. Northwest over Blue Creek tributary (24.5; 1987) Fauver Rd. Southwest over Butler Creek (39.0; 1999) Flint Trace Southwest over Amite River (39.9; 1975) Foret Trace Northeast over Bayou Pierre tributary (31.9; 1975) Fox Rd. over Lazy Creek (17.8; 1966) Frances Rd. over Amite River branch (35.0; 1955) Gary Trace Northeast over Little Bahala Creek tributary (19.6; 1989) Gene Rd. Southwest over Panther Creek tributary (24.5; 1965) Greenview Trail Northeast over East Bogue Chitto River tributary in city of Brookhaven (35.6; 1959)

I

13

Harvey Dr. Northwest over Homochitto River tributary (33.0; 1990) Heuck's Retreat Rd. over Little Bahala Creek (20.6; 1974) Homesville Rd. Southeast over Sassers Mill Creek (32.9; 1975) Hoopewell Rd. Northeast over Little Fair River (35.9; 1975) Johnson Grove Rd. over Butler Creek tributary (39.9; 1989) Jordan Dr. Southwest over Amite River tributary (33.8; 1975) Junction Ln. Souteaest over Topisaw Creek branch (34.9; 1987) Kinder Trace Southeast over West Topisaw Creek branch (36.9; 1975) King Trace Southwest over Butler Creek tributary (38.0; 1965) Linfrank Line Dr. over Amite River tributary (34.9; 1965) London Rd. Southwest over Panther Creek tributary (34.8; 1965) Lott Smith Rd. over Bayou Pierre tributary (24.3; 1961) Lott Smith Rd. Northwest over Bayou Pierre creek (34.0; 1961) Maple Ln. Southwest over Dickerson Creek (38.0; 1932) Martin Ln. over Fair River tributary (34.9; 1990) McCullough Rd. Southeast over Greer Creek (20.8; 1965) Mission Hill Rd. Northeast over Bahala Creek tributary (39.9; 1989) Monument Trail Southeast over Topisaw Creek (40.9; 1974) Mound Rd. over Little Bahala Creek tributary (31.9; 1990) Mound Rd. over unnamed branch (34.9; 1982) Mt. Pleasant Church Rd. over Albritton Creek branch (16.1; 1960) Mt. Zion Rd. Northeast over Bayou Pierre tributary (30.1; 1965) Nola Rd. Northeast over Little Fair River (32.6; 1964) Old Hwy. 51 over Clear Creek (47.1; 1937) Palomino Loop over Shaw's Creek tributary (35.2; 1980) Palomino Loop over Shaw's Creek tributary (24.5; 1980) Percy Dr. Northwest over McCall Creek tributary (20.2; 1992) Pillars Trace Southeast over Myers Creek tributary (35.9; 1976) Peasant Grove Rd. over East Topisaw Creek branch (21.2; 1982) Peasant Grove Rd. over West Topisaw Creek (37.4; 1972) Pleasant Hill Dr. over Myers Creek branch (49.5; 1972) Posey Dr. Northwest over McCall Creek tributary (17.8; 1992) Primitive Church Dr. Southeast over Topisaw Creek tributary (35.0; 1966) Redwood Ln. Southeast over Richey Creek tributary (32.0; 1965) Richardson Ln. Southwest over Bogue River tributary (34.9; 1975) Rutland Ln. Northeast over Ford's Creek tributary (35.9; 1990) Strawberry Ln. Southwest over Dickerson Creek (38.0; 1992) Summers Ln. Southeast over Richey Creek tributary (49.5; 1989) Sykes Ln. over Fair River tributary (47.8; 1990) Tandy Trace Southwest over Hurricane Creek tributary (40.7; 1975) Thames Trace Northeast over Kee's Creek tributary (39.0; 1975) Tom Trace Southeast over East Topisaw Creek branch (48.1; 2001) Vienna Rd. over Shaw's Creek tributary (35.0; 1991) Warren Ave. over Illinois Central Gulf R.R. in city of Brookhaven (15.8; 1930) Washington St. Northeast over East Bogue Chitto River in city of Brookhaven (36.9; 1990) Washington St. Northeast over East Bogue Chitto River in city of Brookhaven (49.8; 2001) West Lincoln Dr. Southwest over Panther Creek tributary (27.6; 1974) Williams St. over East Bogue Chitto River tributary (35.8; 1968)

Lowndes County Armstrong Rd. over McCrary Creek (31.9; 1995) Canal Rd. over Sand Creek (37.8; 1999) County Line Rd. over James Creek (49.7; 1994) Nashville Ferry Rd. over Ellis Creek (40.8; 1994) Nashville Ferry Rd. over Ellis Creek (39.8; 1991) Ranson Rd. over Motley Creek (34.5; 1993) Red Bud Rd. over unnamed creek (39.0; 1994) Schaffers Chapel Rd. over relief ditch (20.9; 1920) Schaffers Chapel Rd. over Slough Creek (24.1; 1925)

See

BAD BRIDGES, Page 14


14 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 BAD BRIDGESContinued from Page 13 Madison County Ben Luckett Rd. over Kentustah Creek (31.9; 1955) Branscomb Rd. over Tilda Bogue tributary (31.8; 1973) Burns Rd. over drainage ditch (24.5; 1970) Cane Creek Rd. over Burnt Corn Creek (40.9; 1981) Dobbs Ave. over unnamed canal in city of Canton (41.1; 1980) Dry Creek Rd. over Dry Creek (39.0; 1974) East Dinkins St. over drainage ditch in city of Canton (40.9; 1980) Endris Rd. over Bear Creek tributary (31.9; 1984) Gluckstadt Rd. over Bear Creek (32.9; 1967) Gus Green Rd. over unnamed creek (39.9; 1987) Hart Rd. over Walnut Creek (38.8; 1978) King Ranch Rd. over Batchelor Creek (36.0; 1970) King Ranch Rd. over unnamed creek (32.9; 1976) Moore Ave./Livingston-Vernon Rd. over Burnt Corn Creek (47.7; 1973) Moore Ave./Livingston-Vernon Rd. over Cane Creek (13.9; 1973) Moss Rd. over Walnut Creek branch (39.0; 1979) Mount Elm Rd. over Beatties Creek branch (35.6; 1957) Mullinville Rd. over Parker Creek (32.0; 1967) Old Agency Rd. over White Oak Creek (27.5; 1979) O'Leary Rd. over drainage ditch (32.0; 1980) Permenter Rd. over Pellaphalia Creek tributary (34.9; 1971) Petrified Forest Rd. over unnamed creek (40.9; 1979) Rocky Hill Rd. over Rambo Creek (40.9; 1978) Simpson Rd. over Love's Creek (16.2; 1925) Steed Rd. over unnamed creek (25.0; 1975) Stokes Rd. over unnamed creek (39.7; 1958) Way Rd. over Doak's Creek tributary (18.7; 1953) Way Rd. over Hagin Creek (36.0; 1993) Yandell Rd. over Little Bear Creek (48.7; 1957)

Marion County Albert Rayborn Rd. over unnamed branch (39.5; 1964) Black Rd. over Black Creek (40.0; 1963) Bryant Rd. over Holiday's Creek (34.0; 1984) Camp Ln. over Pearl River backwater (19.0; 1970) Cavanaugh Rd. over unnamed branch (35.0; 1983) Columbia-Purvis Rd. over Measle Creek (47.8; 1965) Cooper Rd. over Dry Creek (39.0; 1951) Dewey St. over Dry Creek in city of Columbia (26.8; 1969) East Reservoir Rd. over unnamed branch (39.0; 1984) Graves Creek Rd. over Graves Creek (38.9; 1969) Holly Springs Rd. over Holly Spring Branch (39.9; 1984) McDonald Ln. over unnamed branch (36.9; 1968) Water Valley Rd. over Silver Creek (33.1; 1930) Old Foxworth-Jamestown Rd. over unnamed branch (49.0; 1950) Old Hwy. 35 South over Ball's Mill Creek (45.4; 1950) Old River Rd. South over unnamed branch (19.0; 1960) Old Sebe Watts Rd. over unnamed branch (34.9; 1955) Water Valley Rd. over Silver Creek (33.1; 1930) Water Valley Rd. over Silver Creek relief (49.3; 1951) Williamsburg Rd. over Holiday's Creek (22.2; 1956) Water Valley Rd. over Holiday's Creek (24.5; 1930)

Marshall County Atwood Rd. over unnamed creek (48.2; 2005) Beaver Dam Rd. over Spring Creek (43.8; 1994) Bethlehem Rd. over Big Spring Creek (46.1; 1959) Bethlehem Rd. over Tippah River (31.8; 1998) Callicut Rd. East over Big Spring Creek (39.8; 1994) Callicut Rd. East over Big Spring Creek (41.7; 1994) Callicut Rd. East over Little Spring Creek spur (48.5; 2003) Chulahoma Rd. over Dry Fork Creek (35.7; 1991) Concord Rd. over Golden Creek (43.7; 2000) Duram Rd. over unnamed creek (48.4; 1996) French Rd. over Barrow Creek (33.6; 1995) Hogan Rd. over Little Cold Creek (47.7; 1992) Hubbard Stinson Rd. over Big Spring Creek (24.5; 1960) Joe Cox Rd. over Chewalla Creek tributary (40.9; 2003) Lacy Ivy Rd. over Chewalla Creek (39.8; 1998) Marcon Farms Rd. over Carington Creek (46.5; 1999) McCauley Rd. over Pigeon Roost Creek (42.4; 1999) McCauley Rd. over Pigeon Roost Creek (45.1; 1997) McClure Rd. over Coldwater River (21.7; 1957) Mt. Carmel Rd. over Nonconnah Creek (16.8; 1965) Musgray Spring Rd. over Musgay Creek (39.8; 1995) Odell Rd. over Blackwater Creek (24.0; 1970) Old Hwy. 4 over Jones Creek (40.8; 1997) Old Hwy. 4 East over Hudsonville Creek (32.0; 1951) Old Hwy. 4 East over Hudsonville Creek (32.0; 1951) Red Banks Rd. over Pigeon Roost Creek (19.1; 1960) Red Banks Rd. over Pigeon Roost Creek (19.1; 1965)

Red Banks Rd. over Pigeon Roost Creek (18.2; 1965) Taska Rd. South over Coldwater Creek (42.8; 1989) Whaley Rd. over Tippah Creek (38.5; 2005)

Monroe County 12th Ave. North over Burkett's Creek in city of Amory (21.9; 1985) 109th St. over Roundhouse Creek in city of Amory (28.4; 1988) Bigbee Rd. over unnamed branch (24.4; 1971) Blackcat Bottom Rd. over unnamed creek (20.4; 1954) Buchanan Rd. over Devil's Den Branch (33.8; 1948) Burks Rd. over unnamed creek (46.3; 1960) Caldwell Rd. over Caldwell Creek (21.7; 1959) Coontail Rd. over Matubby Creek (40.1; 1965) Greenbriar Rd. over Tadpole Creek (28.0; 1969) Hatley-Detroit Rd. over Weaver Creek (24.8; 1951) Horseshoe Rd. over unnamed branch (34.4; 1978) Mobile St. over James Creek tributary in city of Aberdeen (35.0; 1984) Old Hwy. 25 over Tadpole Creek (32.7; 1973) Scott Land Rd. over Butler Creek (35.9; 1978)

Montgomery County Brooks Rd. over Crape Creek (31.4; 1979) Brooks Rd. over unnamed stream (25.9; 1989) Cartledge Rd. over unnamed stream (16.6; 1991) Cartledge Rd. over unnamed stream (16.5; 1991) Clark Rd. over Campbell Creek (49.3; 1993) Dividing Ridge Rd. over Eskridge Creek (49.6; 1962) Dorisville Rd. over unnamed stream (20.8; 1989) Fisher's Crossing Rd. over unnamed stream (24.5; 1956) Gum Branch Rd. over unnamed stream (46.5; 1960) Harmony Rd. over unnamed stream (44.8; 1995) Henderson Rd. over unnamed stream (19.7; 1983) King Hill Rd. over Crape Creek (25.9; 1987) King Hill Rd. over Crape Creek (25.9; 1988) Lodi Rd. over unnamed stream (20.1; 1955) Minerva Rd. over Mulberry Creek (15.4; 1965) North Mission Rd. over unnamed stream (33.2; 1994) Poe Rd. over unnamed stream (23.9; 1987) Riley Rd. over unnamed stream (39.9; 1993) Sawyer Rd. over unnamed stream (25.9; 1987) South Clark Rd. over unnamed stream (24.2; 1987) South Clark Rd. over unnamed stream (22.8; 1988) Sweatman Rd. over Little Mouse Creek (40.0; 1990) Sweatman Rd. over Mouse Creek (33.9; 1968) Thomas Rd. over Davidson Creek (22.9; 1988) Valley Hill Rd. over Worsham Creek branch (22.7; 1980) Watson Rd. over unnamed stream (24.9; 1988) Wilson Rd. over Little Bogue Creek (46.0; 1985)

Neshoba County CR 210 over Little unnamed R.R. (49.9; 1958) CR 298 over Threat Branch (39.0; 1988) CR 301 over Little Sipsey Creek (15.7; 1952) CR 397 over Jofuska Creek (37.9; 1992) CR 375 over Kentawka Creek in city of Philadelphia (21.2; 1937) CR 561 over unnamed branch in city of Philadelphia (6.0; 1940) CR 763 over unnamed branch (32.7; 1964) CR 834 over Pinishook Creek (36.9; 1988)

Newton County Bill Willis Rd. over Conehatta Creek (46.7; 1991) Bill Willis Rd. over Conehatta Creek relief (42.8; 1991) Blackwell Rd. over Chunky Creek branch (39.0; 1964) Buckley Rd. over Potterchitto Creek (49.3; 1992) Crosby Rd. over unnamed branch (40.0; 1978) Decatur St. over drainage ditch in town of Union (39.0; 1932) Erin-Lucem Rd. over Conehatta Creek (31.2; 1961) First Ave. over Tarlow Creek in town of Newton (39.9; 1976) Griffis Fountain Rd. over Chunky River (16.1; 1922) James Everett Rd. over Dunnagin Creek (31.9; 1970) Liberty Church Rd. over Bogue Falema Creek (28.0; 1962) Mapp Rd. over Turkey Creek branch (35.0; 1966) Morgan Field Rd. over Richardson Mill Creek (28.8; 1966) Newton Bethel Rd. over Bethel Creek (38.9; 1996) Newton-Conehatta Rd. over Potterchitto Creek branch (24.8; 1950 Pete Freeman Rd. over Conehatta Creek branch (48.8; 1995) Pinebluff Rd. over Dunnagin Creek (48.0; 2002) Pleasant Ridge Rd. over Chunky River (39.9; 1965) Porterchitto Rd. over Bogue Falema Creek (39.8; 1971) Roberts County Line Rd. over Quarterliah Creek (38.6; 1974) South Pilate St. over Tarlow Creek in town of Newton (39.9; 1976) Stratton Rd. over Bushy Creek (25.5; 1956) Third Ave. over Tarlow Creek in town of Newton (36.9; 1976) Vance Rd. over Dunnagin Creek (34.0; 1974)

Ww Rd. over Tuscolameta Creek branch (32.9; 1989) Wyatt Rd. over Okahatta Creek (36.9; 1970)

Noxubee County Buggs Farm Rd. over Plum Creek (39.9; 1980) Butler Rd. over Hashagua Creek relief (32.3; 1963) Butler-Shuqualak Rd. over unnamed creek (27.4; 1980) Carter Rd. over Brown Creek (24.5; 1942) Concord Rd. over Macedonia Creek (22.1; 1992) Concord Rd. over unnamed branch (18.9; 1939) Concord Rd. over unnamed creek (23.6; 1948) Conner Rd. over unnamed creek (24.3; 1952) Durr Rd. over Shuqualak Creek (24.3; 1938) Foxchase Rd. over unnamed creek (24.2; 1955) Jack Spann Rd. over Woodard Creek (38.8; 1938) Jack Spann Rd. over Woodard Creek relief (32.7; 1932) Macedonia Rd. over Jordan Branch (19.2; 1990) May Rd. over Lynn Creek (28.4; 1948) Old Factory Rd. over unnamed creek (24.4; 1952) Perkins Rd. over Mid South R.R. (31.8; 1948) Running Water Rd. over Running Water Creek (21.5; 1928) Singleton Rd. over Lynn Creek (42.1; 1980) Stores-Williams Rd. over unnamed creek (18.0; 1989) Togo Rd. over Pumpkin Creek (28.4; 1984) Tom Kinard Rd. over West Water Creek (24.3; 1984)

Oktibbeha County Barnett Rd. over Hollis Creek (26.6; 1951) County Lake Rd. over Long Branch Creek (42.3; 1970) Craig Springs Rd. over Sand Creek (45.0; 1967) Crawford Rd. over Catalpa Creek (39.8; 1965) Dotson Rd. over Sand Creek (49.6; 1984) Long View Rd. over Tobacco Creek branch (39.6; 1963) McHann Rd. over Big Creek branch (39.9; 1987) Moor High Rd. over Browning Creek branch (20.3; 1961) Morgan Town Rd. over Noxubee River (24.3; 1961) Mount Olive Rd. over Skinner Creek (33.7; 1961) Old West Point Rd. over Sand Creek (45.5; 1983) Old West Point Rd. over Sand Creek (32.3; 1984) Red Bank Rd. over Red Bank Creek branch (42.8; 1992) Self Creek Rd. over Tim Crane Creek tributary (18.5; 1966) Silver Ridge Rd. over Cypress Creek (48.0; 1983) Sturgis-West Point Rd. over Big Creek (49.5; 1989) Toby Henry Ln. over Lick Creek (39.9; 1984)

Panola County Ace Chapel Rd. over unnamed creek (27.3; 1958) Anthony Rd. over Kenny Creek (25.8; 1941) Ballentine Rd. over R.R. Creek (36.8; 1940) Ballentine Rd. over unnamed relief (34.2; 1960) Bell Rd. over Caney Creek (40.4; 1993) Benson Rd. over Peter Creek (48.7; 1970) Bobo Rd. over Bobo Canal (37.6; 2000) Bobo Rd. over drainage canal (18.0; 1994) Broom Rd. over Nelson Creek branch (20.2; 1951) Burdett Rd. over Crooked Creek (38.3; 1976) Bynum Rd. over unnamed creek (49.6; 2010) Central Academy Rd. over Woods Creek (24.3; 1947) Cline Rd. over Jones Creek (29.4; 1948) Compress Rd. over Porter Creek (46.7; 1945) Compress Rd. over unnamed creek (38.8; 1980) Crouch Rd. over unnamed creek (31.2; 1941) Dunlap Rd. over Arkabutla Creek (19.2; 1962) Farmer Rd. over unnamed creek (27.5; 1995) Ferrell Rd. over unnamed creek (49.1; 2008) Glover Rd. over drainage canal (21.2; 1965) Harry Taylor Rd. over Arkabutla Creek tributary (40.9; 2000) Henderson Rd. over unnamed creek (28.8; 1985) Hentz Rd. over Goodwin Creek (38.9; 1949) Holston Rd. over unnamed creek (25.3; 1955) Jeff Sanders Rd. over Yocona River tributary (43.6; 1992) Jr. Johnson Rd. over Claredon Creek (19.1; 1937) Lawrence Brothers Rd. over Hotophia Creek (48.3; 1992) Lucius Taylor Rd. over Arkabutla Creek (15.8; 1938) Melrose Rd. over Floyd Creek (21.6; 1963) Old Panola Rd. over Beartail Creek (24.1; 1971) Old Panola Rd. over McIvor Creek (36.8; 1967) Old Panola Rd. over unnamed creek (35.6; 1971) Orwood Rd. over Bynum Creek (38.9; 1975) Peagram Rd. over Crooked Creek (34.9; 2008) Peagram Rd. over unnamed creek (42.8; 1939) Phelps Rd. over unnamed creek (24.3; 1935) Rhodes Rd. over Greasy Creek (17.0; 1952) River Rd. over unnamed creek (20.4; 1953) River Rd. over unnamed creek (27.5; 1972) River Rd. over unnamed creek (18.5; 1955) Robinson Rd. over Bynum Creek (38.9; 1937) Robinson Rd. over North Bynum Creek (49.3; 1953) Rooks Rd. over Senatobia Creek (39.9; 1972) Rooks Rd. over unnamed creek (28.3; 1948) Sanders Rd. over Bear Creek (24.4; 1939) Silo Rd. over drainage canal (39.3; 1977) Snider Rd. over Caney Creek (33.8; 1949)

Still Rd. over Jones Creek (29.0; 1932) Tate-Panola/County Line Rd. over Arkabutla Creek (38.4; 1978) Viney Rd. over Viney Creek (32.9; 1969) Ward Rd. over Davis Creek (39.0; 1983) Ward Rd. over Peach Creek (22.0; 1983) Westbrook Rd. over unnamed creek (22.9; 1981) Whitehead Rd. over drainage canal (19.1; 1939) Whitehead Rd. over drainage canal (29.3; 1938)

Pearl River County Barth Rd. over Crane Creek (42.6; 1934) Darby Whitesand Rd. over Cypress Creek (39.3; 2003) E.T. Poole Rd. over drainage (38.0; 1982) Frank Seal Rd. over Parker Bayou (4.8; 1964) George Ford Rd. over Marsen Branch (32.7; 1965) Grady Lewis Rd. over unnamed branch (24.7; 1985) Harry Sones Rd. over Prince Creek (27.1; 1964) Hickory Grove Rd. over Parker Creek (38.9; 1982) Holden Rd. over Hobolochitto Creek (47.0; 1963) Holden Rd. over unnamed branch (32.6; 1964) Humphrey Rd. over unnamed branch (43.3; 1983) J.J. Holcomb Rd. over Alligator Branch (32.0; 1980) J.M. Tynes Rd. over unnamed branch (36.0; 1932) Jackson Landing Rd. over Mill Creek (36.4; 1964) McCarty Island Rd. over Mars Slough branch (33.8; 1996) McNeil Steep Hollow Rd. over unnamed branch (32.5; 1967) Old Hwy. 26 West over unnamed branch (15.2; 1938) Oscar Smith Rd. over Long Branch (35.9; 1964) Savannah Millard Rd. over Moran Creek (35.6; 1967) Springhill Rd. over Boggy Branch (39.8; 1963) Springhill Rd. over drainage (48.3; 1963) Springhill Rd. over drainage (39.9; 1963) Springhill Rd. over Wolf Creek (39.8; 1963) Perry County Arlington Rd. over relief channel (31.0; 1966) Benndale Rd. over unnamed branch (24.5; 1964) Kittrell Rd. over unnamed branch (49.3; 1958) Kittrell Rd. over unnamed branch (29.9; 1958) Mahned Rd. over Leaf River (17.0; 1903) Old Hwy 24 over Milky Creek (15.6; 1925) Old Hwy 24 over unnamed creek (15.6; 1925) Old River Rd. over Tallahala Creek (2.0; 1956) Otho Sellers Rd. over Piney Woods Creek (12.3; 1905) Otho Sellers Rd. over Sand Hill Creek (8.6; 1905) Snider Rd. over Cypress Creek (29.9; 1968) Wingate Rd. over Leaf River (39.7; 1962)

Pike County 1st Rd. West over unnamed creek (39.8; 1994) Adams Rd. over Town Creek (39.8; 1987) Blazo Rd. over drainage (39.0; 1991) Boyd-reeves Rd. over Carter’s Creek (45.5; 1982) Brent Rd. over Topisaw Creek (42.2; 1972) Chatawa Rd. over unnamed creek (46.2; 1999) Church Rd. over drainage (26.7; 1993) CR 93 North over Bogue Chitto River (38.5; 1963) Cutrer Dr. over Terry’s Creek (36.0; 1991) D.P. Guy Rd. over West Topisaw Creek (42.6; 1992) Dudley Rimes Rd. over Silver Springs Creek (47.8; 1986) Dunaway Rd. over Martin Creek (37.5; 1987) E.A. Thompson Rd. over West Topisaw Creek (37.0; 1981) Emerald-Stateline Rd. over drainage (48.3; 1983) Fernwood Rd. over Little Tangiaphoa River (20.2; 1965) Foxchase Rd. over McNab Creek (27.8; 1968) Gibson Rd. over unnamed branch (21.9; 1988) Glen Carter Rd. over unnamed creek (40.9; 1994) Hamilton St. over unnamed creek in city of McComb (48.1; 1976) High Point Rd. over Clabber Creek (28.7; 1994) Holden Rd. over Little Tangipahoa River (39.3; 1987) Hunt Club Rd. over drainage (48.0; 1985) Irma Dr. over Bala Chitto Creek (23.2; 1991) Joe Tucker Rd. over Silver Springs Creek (49.8; 1993) Johnston Station Rd. over Beaver Creek (26.5; 1970) Jewel Dr. over drainage (45.5; 1982) Lablanc Rd. over unnamed creek (39.0; 1987) Leatherwood Rd. over unnamed creek (29.1; 1978) Leatherwood Rd. over Topisaw Creek (42.9; 1972) Lindbergh Rd. over drainage (33.3; 1968) Love Creek Dr. over drainage (27.2; 1992) Love Creek Dr. over Love Creek (26.6; 1992) McComb-Holmesville over drainage (19.9; 1952) McKenzie Rd. over drainage (25.3; 1980) North St. over drainage (42.3; 1975) Old 51 South over drainage (28.8; 1987) Old 51 South over unnamed creek (31.9; 1964) Patsy Hill Rd. over Carter’s Creek (48.1; 1982) Progress-Lexie Rd. over Silver Springs Creek relief (31.0; 1987) Raborn Rd. over drainage (40.0; 1970) Raborn Rd. over unnamed creek (39.9; 1969) School St. over unnamed stream in city of McComb (24.9; 1983) St. Mary Rd. over Tangipahoa River (14.2; 1960) Spiers Rd. over Terry’s Creek (46.3; 1997) State Line Rd. over Bala Chitto Creek (26.1; 1981) State Line Rd. over Bala Chitto Creek (28.7; 1960)

Terrell Rd. over drainage (39.0; 1983) Terry’s Creek Rd. over Terry’s Creek (40.0; 1980) Terry’s Creek Rd. over unnamed creek (38.9; 1970) Union Church Rd. over drainage (21.8; 1993) Union Church Rd. over drainage (36.0; 1973) Union Church Rd. over Love Creek (39.0; 1985)

Pontotoc County Cane Creek Rd. over Cane Creek (35.4; 1970) Chicasa Rd. over Redland Creek (31.9; 1970) Cr 272 over unnamed branch (29.7; 1993) Garrett Creek Loop over Garrett Creek (42.8; 1975) Graham Rd. over Cane Creek tributary (48.3; 1985) Hitchcock Bend over Long Branch (49.6; 2003) John Bray Rd. over Honeyfork Creek (25.3; 1928) John Bray Rd. over Yocona Creek (24.2; 1950) North Brooks St. over Lyons Creek in city of Pontotoc (24.6; 1954) Rockhill Rd. over Owl Creek (39.4; 1975) Russell Rd. over Mubby Creek tributary (45.4; 1991) Sewell Rd. over Cane Creek (37.9; 1978) Ty Whiskey Rd. over Ty Whiskey Creek (21.4; 1969) Wicker Rd. over Goodfood Creek (24.3; 1928) Williams Rd. over Redland Creek (37.9; 1975)

Prentiss County Burns St. over unnamed creek in town of Baldwyn (36.6; 1968) CR 1101 over Tuscumbia River (28.8; 1967) CR 1121 over Polly’s Creek (38.9; 1969) CR 1121 over Polly’s Creek (25.1; 1985) CR 1121 over unnamed stream (24.7; 1981) CR 1150 over Tuscumbia River (26.1; 1967) CR 1150 over Tuscumbia River relief (38.1; 1992) CR 1475 over Clausel Creek (47.1; 1983) CR 2060 over unnamed creek (37.0; 1950) CR 3231 over unnamed creek (39.8; 1990) CR 3430 over Little Brown Creek (29.5; 1989) CR 3440 over Little Brown Creek (43.3; 1970) CR 4001 over unnamed creek (49.0; 1972) CR 4050 over Brown Creek (21.8; 1955) CR 4101 over Little Brown Creek (23.8; 1972) CR 4140 over Wesson Creek (43.6; 1955) CR 4251 over Caviness Branch (46.3; 1983) CR 5040 over Hurricane Creek (25.9; 1983) CR 5040 over Hurricane Creek (29.9; 1968) CR 5091 over Hurricane Creek (29.7; 1985) CR 5230 over Casey Creek (47.1; 1950) CR 5250 over Hurricane Creek (39.0; 1950 CR 5481 over Donivan Creek (47.6; 1966) CR 6200 over unnamed creek (25.8; 1962) CR 6391 over Tishomingo Creek (28.7; 1990) CR 6391 over Tishomingo Creek (28.7; 1972) CR 7040 over Wolf Creek (49.6; 1966) CR 7040 over unnamed creek (31.2; 1984) CR 7230 over unnamed creek (29.8; 1964) CR 7370 over Little Wolf Creek (38.0; 1983) CR 7370 over Little Wolf Creek (39.0; 1992) CR 7450 over Twentymile Creek (36.9; 1984) CR 7501 over unnamed creek (33.2; 1983) CR 7520 over Twentymile Creek (30.1; 1983) CR 8301 over Polly’s Creek (24.0; 1956) CR 8301 over Polly’s Creek (16.0; 1956) CR 8461 over unnamed creek (39.0; 1964) CR 8500 over Dry Creek (29.1; 1966) Jacinto Rd. over Tuscumbia River (3.0; 1967) Jefferson St. over Tuscumbia River in city of Booneville (28.3; 1964)

Quitman County Airport Rd. over unnamed bayou (29.3; 1960) Alex Gates Rd. over drainage (32.7; 1970) Bowles Rd. over South Lake drainage (37.3; 1979) Buck Armstead Rd. over Yellow Lake Bayou (16.7; 1992) Cook Rd. over drainage (23.7; 1940) Darling Rd. over Wilson Bayou (6.1; 1955) Dean Rd. over Yellow Lake Bayou Cutoff (19.0; 1940) Dry Bayou Rd. over Hurricane Bayou (18.5; 1958) Eason Rd. over Bobo Bayou (31.8; 1956) Flba Harbor Rd. over Old Coldwater River (25.6; 1960) Hood Rd. over Beech Bayou (22.7; 1965) Hood Rd. over Marks Cutoff (28.2; 1965) Hood Rd. over Quitman-Panola ditch (22.3; 1965) Jamison Rd. over Little Tallahatchie River (18.1; 1970) Jenkins Rd. over McNeil Lake drainage (31.9; 1942) Jenkins Rd. over unnamed bayou (24.3; 1938) Ponderosa Rd. over Four Mile Bayou (24.3; 1939) Ramp to field near Crenshaw Sledge Rd. over drainage (19.3; 1972) Ramp to field near Ballentine Rd. over drainage (3.0; 1963) Regal Rd. over unnamed bayou (24.3; 1930) Roosevelt Rd. over unnamed bayou (24.4; 1942) Sabino Rd. over Opossum Bayou (36.1; 1964) Sections Rd. over drainage (29.6; 1960) Shady Grove over drainage (36.9; 1986) T&P 29 over Old Coldwater River (24.3; 1950) Terry Rd. over unnamed bayou (34.0; 1935) West Main St. over Buck Bayou (18.9; 1936) Willis Rd. over Stovall Bayou (23.3; 1951) Wright Rd. over drainage (19.4; 1954)

Wright Rd. over drainage (40.0; 1969)

Rankin County Star Rd. over Steen Creek branch (48.5; 1965)

Scott County Midway-Odom Rd. over Shockaloo Creek (36.3; 1973) Morton Marathon Rd over Tallabogue Creek (23.3; 1962) Old Hillsboro Rd over Tallabogue Creek (27.6; 1966) Pea Ridge Rd. over Shockaloo Creek relief (34.6; 1966) Pea Ridge Rd. over Shockaloo Creek relief (31.6; 1950) Pea Ridge Rd. over Shockaloo Creek relief (33.6; 1950)

Sharkey County Box Estate Rd. over drainage canal (26.9; 1980) Cameta Rd. over Deer Creek (27.2; 1965) Cameta Rd. over drainage canal (32.1; 1962) Drybend Rd. over Deer Creek (35.9; 1975) Drybend Rd. over drainage canal (35.9; 1956) Ewing Rd. over Deer Creek (29.3; 2008) Lease Rd. over drainage canal (32.8; 1946) Omega Rd. over Coon Bayou (33.7; 1969) Spivey Rd. over drainage canal (20.7; 1969) Woods Rd. over drainage canal (35.9; 1970)

Simpson County Billy Joe Buckley over Weeks Mill Creek (31.0; 1974) Boss Steen Rd. over Pearl River branch (23.0; 1958) Chittling Rd. over Strong River branch (21.0; 1969) Clark Rd. over Big Creek branch (41.3; 1992) Cox Rd. over Dobbs Creek branch (38.7; 1991) D’Lo-Pinola Rd. over Sanders Creek (34.5; 1967) David Sherman Rd. over Pearl River branch (40.0; 1970) Deer Camp Rd. over Little Creek (36.0; 1975) Dollar Rd. over unnamed branch (28.5; 1973) East Shows Rd. over Strong River branch (48.3; 1986) Graveyard Rd over Riles Creek branch (28.4; 1993) Guy Sherman Rd. over Vaughn’s Creek branch (28.7; 1956) Lee Boggan Rd. over Riles Creek (29.5; 1974) Macedonia Rd. over Riles Creek (40.0; 1975) Matt Lee Rd. over Banks Creek (23.0; 1982) McCarty Rd. over Okatoma Creek branch (40.9; 1983) Neely Rd. over Harper Creek (27.8; 1968) North Jake Barnes Rd. over Westville Creek (37.3; 1974) Pokal Rd. over Pearl River branch (25.9; 1958) Robert Russell Rd. over Silver Creek-middle prong (38.3; 1960) Sofa Rd. over Silver Creek-middle prong branch (39.3; 1970) Star-Braxton Rd. over unnamed branch (22.9; 1949) Tom Berry over Sellers Creek (33.0; 1970) Tom Ware Rd. over Haw Branch (29.5; 1961) Tom Ware Rd. over Haw Branch (28.5; 1960) Van Zandt Rd. over Sanders Creek (29.6; 1946)

Smith County CR 18-8 over Tallahala Creek branch (16.8; 1961) CR 32-B over Oakohay Creek (31.8; 1968) CR 60 over Clear Creek (24.4; 1950) CR 67 over Hatchapaloo Creek branch relief (16.3; 1952) CR 67 over Hatchapaloo Creek branch (24.4; 1952) CR 71 over Little Hatchapaloo Creek (19.9; 1950) CR 102 over Ely Creek (36.0; 1997) CR 104 over Ely Creek (24.3; 1959) CR 110 over Hatchapaloo Creek (17.5; 1950) CR 113 over Big Shongelo Creek (24.4; 1963) CR 120 over Leaf River (31.3; 1974) CR 121 over Oakohay Creek branch (24.3; 1970) CR 126 over Leaf River (21.2; 1957) CR 131 over Jump Creek (32.8; 1969) CR 131 over Strong River branch (39.7; 1967) CR 131 over Strong River relief (32.5; 1962) CR 141 over Raspberry Creek (32.7; 1962) CR 146 over Raspberry Creek (18.8; 1966) CR 146 over Raspberry Creek relief (16.7; 1999) CR 150-A over Davis Creek branch (22.8; 1975) CR 502 over Oakohay Creek (40.9; 1976) CR 504 over Tishkill Creek (26.0; 1965) CR 526 over Little Oakohay Creek (24.5; 1928) CR 529 over West Tallahala Creek branch (21.4; 1958) CR 538 over Davis Creek (24.3; 1960) CR 538-B over Davis Creek (45.5; 1972) CR 538-B over Davis Creek branch (31.6; 1972) CR 538-E over Davis Creek branch (28.4; 1974) CR 539 over Little Oakohay Creek (39.4; 1978) CR 539 over Oakohay Creek (39.4; 1974) CR 559 over Oakohay Creek (25.3; 1967)

See

BAD BRIDGES, Page 15


June 21, 2013

BAD BRIDGESContinued from Page 14 Stone County Beaverdam Rd. over McHenry Branch (48.4; 1987) Big Four Rd over School House Branch (32.8; 1973) Hester Loop over Wolf River branch (40.0; 1960) J. Cooper Rd. over Mill Creek (39.0; 1974) Jub Hickman Rd. over Andrew Branch (47.6; 1995) Old Hwy. 26 over Biloxi River (36.6; 1976) Old Hwy. 26 over Silver Run (26.9; 1975) Old Hwy. 26 over Silver Run branch (27.9; 1975) Perkinston-Silver Run Rd. over Ten Mile Creek (26.9; 1974) Project Rd. over Double Branch (42.1; 1962) Shadeville Rd over Chaney Creek (36.1; 1970) Ten Mile Church Rd. over Black Branch (15.2; 1960) Ten Mile Church Rd. over Black Branch (47.1; 1960) Tyner Branch Rd over Bluff Creek (40.0; 1980)

Sunflower County Adair Rd. over Pecan Bayou (35.0; 1972) Allendale-Tindall over Ditch No. 23 (38.9; 1947) Bay Lake Indianola over Indian Bayou (35.5; 1975) Benson Lake Rd. over Natural Slough (26.8; 1949) Blackwood Rd. over Quiver River (38.9; 1974) Blackwood Rd. over Wild Bill Bayou (34.9; 1977) Bland Rd. over Ditch No. 34 (39.9; 1976) Bowles Rd. over Mound Bayou (39.9; 1975) Braswell Rd. over Short Bayou (40.0; 1978) Brumfield Plantation Rd. over Natural Slough (38.8; 1978) C. Kemp Rd. over Dutch Bayou (39.9; 1978) Cemetery Rd. over Dougherty Bayou (35.0; 1977) Clark Rd. over Jones Bayou (34.9; 1966) Clay Ridge Rd. over drainage ditch (34.9; 1973) College Ave. over Indian Bayou in city of Indianola (16.8; 1950) Dockery-Ralph Ray Rd. over Natural Bayou (35.9; 1970) Donahoe Rd. over Jones Bayou (26.8; 1950) Donahoe Rd. over Natural Slough (26.8; 1951) East Caile Rd. over Brown’s Bayou (40.0; 1975) East Delta Ave. over Moorhead Bayou in town of Moorhead (40.0; 1976) East Minot Rd. over Bear Bayou (35.0; 1970) East Minot Rd. over Quiver River (39.9; 1966) Fisackerly Rd. over Drainage Canal (29.6; 1971) Givens Rd. over Jones Bayou (40.0; 1977) Gwin Lipnick Rd. over Beaver Dam Bayou (40.0; 1953) Heathman Holly R1D over drainage canal (31.8; 1976) Hobbs Brick Rd. over drainage canal (39.9; 1969) Hobbs Rd. over Cat Lake (34.9; 1978) Hughes Ertle Rd. over Natural Slough (19.3; 1954) Jefcoat Lehr Rd. over Natural Slough (39.9; 1975) Joe Stephen Rd. over Black Bayou (39.9; 1972) Linn Dockery Rd. over Jones Bayou (34.9; 1973) Linn Dockery Rd. over Natural Bayou (30.9; 1977) Lyon Bridge Rd. over Porter Bayou (40.0; 1977) Madden Rd. over Natural Slough (32.0; 1966) Mallette-Jones Rd over Jones Bayou (39.9; 1976) Mallette-Jones Rd over Natural Bayou (34.9; 1974) McDaniel's Rd. over Wild Bill Bayou (33.8; 1958) Mound Rd. over Mound Bayou (30.9; 1975) North Bolivar County Rd. over Natural Slough (41.0; 1975) North Sheffield Rd. over drainage canal (36.0; 1970) North Sheffield Rd. over Moorhead Bayou (39.9; 1978) Patterson Rd. over Quiver River (34.9; 1968) South Sheffield Rd. over Wixon Slough (40.0; 1975) South Taylor Rd. over drainage canal (39.9; 1976) Spam Rd. over Swede Lake (40.0; 1978) Stacey Bauchman Rd. over Hyde Bayou (40.0; 1978) Steed-Mixon Rd. over Natural Slough (34.9; 1960) Stillman Rd. over drainage canal (34.9; 1973) Sunflower-Itta Bena Rd. over drainage canal (24.3; 1963) Sunflower Rd. over Shackleford Lake (31.1; 1936) Three Mile Lake Rd. over Browns Bayou (23.4; 2001) Wade Rd. over Powell Bayou (32.7; 1970) Wade Rd. over Wild Bill Bayou (33.8; 1977) Walker Rd. over Natural Bayou (34.9; 1977) Ward Riddick Rd. over Bear Bayou (38.0; 1961) Ward Riddick Rd. over Bear Bayou (40.0; 1976) Watson Rd. over drainage canal (34.9; 1969) West Minot Rd. over drainage canal (40.0; 1971) West Minot Rd. over Natural Bayou (34.9; 1970)

Tallahatchie County Allison Rd. over Tippo Bayou (28.3; 1987) Back Rd. over ditch (35.0; 1980) Back Rd. over ditch (47.1; 1978) Back Rd. over ditch (28.5; 1980) Brewer Rd. over ditch (19.0; 1975) Byars Rd. over Patterson Bayou (30.0; 1985) D. E. Denman Rd. over unnamed creek (39.9; 1990) Fairview Rd. Extended over Patterson Bayou (44.8; 1975) Fairview Rd. Extended over South Lake Bayou (17.0; 1978) Flautt Rd. over Cassidy Bayou (35.8; 1968)

Flautt Rd. over Cassidy Bayou tributary (39.8; 1968) Government Rd. over Long Bayou tributary (32.0; 1972) Hampton Lake Rd. over Mathews Bayou (18.2; 1969) Hayward Jacks Rd. over Tippo Bayou (39.9; 1975) Hayward Jacks Rd. over unnamed bayou (39.9; 1960) Hicks Dr. over Opposum Bayou (32.0; 1968) Island Rd. over Tippo Bayou (23.5; 1940) Levee Rd. over Tallahatchie River (24.0; 1918) Long Rd. over unnamed creek (39.0; 1970) McNulty Rd. over unnamed creek (45.3; 1935) Melton Rd. over Brushy Bayou (39.9; 1982) Melton Rd. over Muddy Bayou (39.9; 1971) Murphree Rd. over Tippo Bayou (18.3; 1961) North Creek Rd. over Tillatoba Creek (31.2; 1985) Orr Dr. over Robinson Bayou (17.0; 1982) Ruffin Rd. over unnamed creek (35.9; 1945) Ruffin Rd. over unnamed creek (39.9; 1945) Sharkey Rd. over Mathews Bayou (35.1; 1978) Shoestring Rd. over Sandy Bayou (35.9; 1973) Staten Rd. over ditch (24.5; 1945) Thornton Rd. over Hobson Bayou (39.9; 1973) Thornton Rd. over Hobson Bayou tributary (39.9; 1972) Thornton Rd. over Muddy Bayou (39.9; 1972) Tutwiler Rd. over Upper Quiver River (27.1; 1965) Waldrop Rd. over Quiver River tributary (31.8; 1972) White Lake Rd. over Brushy Bayou (39.8; 1964) White Lake Rd. over Opposum Bayou (39.0; 1966)

Tate County Barr Rd. over Hickahala Creek branch (49.5; 1992) Brown's Ferry Rd over Strayhorn Creek (46.6; 1969) Copperlow Rd. over Arkabutla Creek branch (18.7; 1962) Country Club Rd. over Senatobia Creek branch (44.2; 1992) Crossover Rd. over Arkabutla Creek (44.6; 1992) East Tate over Hickahala Creek branch (49.2; 1990) Evansville Rd. over Arkabutla Creek branch (40.9; 1974) Hugh Taylor Rd. over Porter Creek (48.2; 1992) Rock Hill Rd. over unnamed creek (35.7; 1990) Scott Rd. over Beartail Creek branch (40.9; 1975) Shans Bottom Rd. over Senatobia Creek branch (36.6; 1993) Strayhorn-Sarah Rd. over Strayhorn Creek (41.6; 1960) Thomas Rd. over Strayhorn Creek tributary (20.3; 1950) Walker Rd. over Hickahala Creek branch (22.5; 1974)

Tippah County CR 015 over Short Creek (38.0; 1960) CR 102 over Big Creek (32,8; 1954) CR 123 over Mix Branch (36.0; 1969) CR 200 over Walnut Creek (33.1; 1956) CR 238 over Muddy Creek (25.6; 1965) CR 254 over Panther Creek (16.9; 1965) CR 349 over Buff Creek (17.0; 1960) CR 422 over North Tippah Creek relief (29.7; 1962) CR 425 over North Tippah Creek (35.2; 1967) CR 427 over North Tippah Creek (32.7; 1989) CR 433 over Shelby Creek (24.4; 1979) CR 512 over White Oak Branch (26.4; 1965) CR 522 over Little Hatchie River (24.3; 1973) CR 543 over Hatchie River (30.5; 1968) CR 600 over Cox Branch (24.7; 1958) CR 600 over Hatchie River (24.1; 1958) CR 600 over unnamed creek (22.9; 1958) CR 612 over Burton Branch (29.7; 1978) CR 612 over Burton Branch relief (29.7; 1978) CR 618 over Clear Creek (21.4; 1993) CR 627 over Stubb Branch (32.3; 1964) CR 632 over Hatchie River (31.1; 1970) CR 640 over Dry Run Creek (26.5; 1958) CR 700 over Foley Creek (24.3; 1955) CR 700 over unnamed creek (26.5; 1994) CR 704 over Town Creek (29.7; 1955) CR 706 over Tippah Creek South (18.7; 1964) CR 718 over Cane Creek (28.4; 1980) CR 724 over Cane Creek (43.0; 2000) CR 728 over Cane Creek (22.2; 1960) CR 730 over Foley Creek (25.4; 1964) CR 738 over Tallahatchie River relief (42.6; 2002) CR 750 over Little Creek (37.9; 1992) CR 800 over Sorghum Creek (24.2; 1955) CR 802 over Gray Creek (32.0; 1955) CR 813 over McAllister Creek (18.6; 1960) CR 825 over Hell Creek (24.6; 1960) CR 833 over Middle Creek (22.6; 1998) CR 833 over Turkey Branch (26.3; 1964)

Tishomingo County CR 9 over Red Bud Creek (40.0; 1960) CR 71 over Redmont R.R. (20.1; 1970) CR 147 over Cripple Deer Creek (24.5; 1950) CR 147 over Cripple Deer Creek (19.4; 1950) CR 025 over Redmont R.R. (24.5; 1960) CR 050 over Redmont R.R. (19.3; 1979) CR 068 over Bear Creek (16.5; 1952) CR 068 over Brumley Branch (29.6; 1956) CR 086 over Union Branch (17.1; 1960)

CR 133 over Yellow Creek (27.5; 1961) CR 298 over Caney Creek (39.7; 1971) CR 961/Crow Neck Rd. over King Creek (24.6; 1955) CR 961/Crow Neck Rd. over Panther Creek (24.6; 1955)

Cutoff Rd. over McKinney Lake (48.4; 1968) Old Hwy. 61 South over Beaver Dam Lake Bayou (48.8; 1971)

Haining Rd. over Midsouth R.R./unnamed Rd. in city of Vicksburg (50.0; 1958) Kemper Bottom Rd. over Hennessee Bayou (43.4; 1965) Monroe St. over Midsouth R.R. in city of Vicksburg (47.2; 1965) Old Hwy. 3 North over Skillikalia Bayou (18.3; 1937) Old Hwy. 27 over unnamed creek (47.9; 1928) Redbone Rd. over Pace's Bayou (11.7; 1957) Washington St. over Midsouth R.R. in city of Vicksburg (24.9; 1984)

Union County

Washington County

Burlington Northern R.R. over Snyder Ave. in New Albany (.0; 1970) CR 43 over ditch (48.0; 1989) CR 46 over Tallahatchie River (6.8; 1971) CR 46 over Tallahatchie River relief (6.0; 1963) CR 46 over Tallahatchie River relief (21.0; 1963) CR 46 over Tallahatchie River slough (8.9; 1964) CR 47 over Mud Creek (37.6; 2001) CR 50 over Locke’s Creek (35.8; 1973) CR 86 over Tallahatchie River (15.7; 1968) CR 87 over ditch (30.7; 1992) CR 87 over Jones Creek (28.4; 1991) CR 90 over Jones Creek (35.7; 1990) CR 113 over King Creek (47.8; 2006) CR 128 over King Creek-north branch (44.6; 2001) CR 130 over Floyd Creek (17.0; 1930) CR 137 over Cane Creek (43.4; 1991) CR 147 over Pinhook Creek (41.6; 1990) CR 153 over ditch (35.5; 1997) CR 153 over Wilhite Creek-south branch (45.5; 2001) CR 158 over Bussell Creek (39.3; 1991) CR 171 over Bridge Creek (42.7; 1968) CR 171 over Sawmill Creek (37.6; 1991) CR 185 over Sawmill Creek (25.3; 1989) CR 188 over Camp Creek 34.1; 1990) CR 189 over Bridge Creek (48.5; 1989) CR 189 over Sawmill Creek (38.9; 1978) CR 194 over McWhorter Creek (39.7; 1974) CR 216 over Okannatie Creek-west branch (36.6; 1996) CR 238 over Wilhite Creek (49.8; 1994) CR 278 over Okannatie Creek (25.8; 1918) CR 242 over Tallahatchie River canal (44.7; 1990) CR 260 over ditch (42.9; 2004) CR 260 over Hatchie River (28.3; 1990) CR 478 over Hell Creek canal (16.1; 1918) CR 515 over ditch (45.2; 1999) Mississippi & Tennessee R.R. over Main St. in New Albany (.0; 1950) Oxford Rd. over ditch (24.0; 1971)

Abide Rd. over Canal No. 9 (33.9; 1963) Airport Rd. over canal (38.9; 1961) Archer Range Rd. over Ditch No. 7-1092 (32.0; 1950) Baker Rd. over Ditch No. 31 (34.9; 1970) Bassi Rd. over Bear Lake (38.9; 1960) Bayou Rd. over canal in city of Greenville (38.8; 1965) Eifling Rd. over canal (34.9; 1982) Bear Garden Rd. over ditch (36.9; 1969) Bogue Rd. over Four Mile Bayou (40.0; 1970) Burdett Rd. over Ditch No. 1 (38.9; 1984) Burdett Rd. over Ditch No. 2 (39.9; 1970) Carry Rd. over Granicus Bayou (38.9; 1972) Collier Rd. over Ditch No. 16 (33.9; 1977) County Line Rd. over unnamed creek (36.0; 1960) County Line Rd. West over ditch (33.9; 1965) Dickens Rd. over Bogue Phalia Cutoff (26.8; 1989) Ditch Bank Rd. over canal (32.9; 1990) Dogleg Rd. over Ditch No. 11 (39.0; 1961) Eifling Rd. over canal (34.9; 1982) FAS 616-Priscilla Rd. over Williams Bayou (30.2; 1972) FAS 619-Nepanee Rd. over Old Bogue Phalia (34.8; 1972) FAS 619-Tribbett Rd. over canal (35.8; 1985) FAS 619-Tribbett Rd. over canal (23.1; 1958) FAS 619-Tribbett Rd. over canal (24.4; 1958) FAS 619-Watson Rd. over canal (36.0; 1967) FAS 624-Avondale/Darlove Rd. over canal (30.3; 1966) FAS 624-Avondale/Darlove Rd. over canal (28.7; 1968) FAS 697-Rexburg Rd. over canal (18.8; 1959) FAS 1505-Murphy Rd. over canal (17.7; 1958) FAS 1505-Murphy Rd. over Deer Creek (25.0; 1955) FAS 1505-Murphy Rd. over unnamed bayou (33.6; 1958) FAS 1600-Kennedy Rd. over Deer Creek (29.8; 1991) Fire Tower Rd. over Widow Bayou (38.9; 1962) Fontenot Rd. over Ditch No. 11 (32.6; 1982) Frazier Rd. over canal (39.9; 1960) Fyre Rd. over Canal-1064 (44.3; 2001) Geneille Rd. over Johnson Slough (39.9; 1987) Highland Rd. over canal (37.9; 1972) Horseshoe Bayou Rd. over unnamed creek (30.8; 1957) Ireland Rd. over canal (32.9; 1965) L&N Rd. over Bear Lake (33.9; 1975) Longwitch Rd. over Six Mile Bayou (38.9; 1961) Lowe's Rd. over Main Canal in city of Greenville (8.0; 1954) Marta Plantation Rd. over Canal-0930 (45.3; 1998) McCullum Rd. over Ditch No. 5 (41.0; 1978) Myers Rd. over canal (33.8; 1975) Nightingale Rd. over Ditch No. 9 (36.0; 1987) Pete's Dump Rd. over unnamed bayou (38.9; 1972) Pete Wood Rd. over canal (49.8; 1995) Pete Wood Rd. over Ditch-0995 (35.0; 1960) Pickett St. over Legion drainage (45.4; 1965) Poge Rd. over ditch (39.9; 1976) Possum Ridge Rd. over canal (45.3; 1962) Potter Rd. over Canal-0867 (31.1; 1948) Rexburg Rd. over Canal-2006 (49.3; 1967) Richland Rd. 0953 over canal (47.3; 1999) Russell Rd. over Ditch No. 14 (33.9; 1969) Russell Rd. over Six Mile Bayou (30.9; 1969) Sandifer Rd. over ditch (32.9; 1961) Slago Dairy Rd. over canal (36.9; 1974) Slago Dairy Rd. over canal (37.9; 1969) Slago Dairy Rd. over canal (30.9; 1969) Stone Airport Rd. over canal (33.9; 1969) Tennison Rd. over canal (33.9; 1979) Tootie Bratton Rd. over Ditch-0960 (36.9; 1955) Treadway Rd. over canal (37.8; 1961) Watson Rd. over Canal-1024 (44.6; 1997) Wilcox Rd. over Black Bayou (35.9; 1973) Wilcox Rd. over canal (49.1; 1967) Wilcox Rd. over Ditch No. 6 (34.9; 1969) Wilmot Rd. over Ditch No. 11 (35.8; 1977) Winterville Rd. over ditch (38.0; 1962) Woodsawmill Rd. over Bayou-2022 (38.9; 1967)

Tunica County

Walthall County Akin Luther Rd. over McGee's Creek branch (33.0; 1960) Beardon Rd. over Leatherwood Creek branch (31.9; 1940) Boone Rd. over McGee's Creek branch (35.0; 1960) Dexter-Centerville Rd. over unnamed branch (29.8; 1960) East Sartinville Rd. over McGee's Creek branch (35.8; 1991) Herbert Thomas Rd. over unnamed branch (26.9; 1960) Hope Rd. over McGee's Creek branch (23.9; 1988) Hope Rd. over McGee's Creek branch (30.3; 1980) Horseshoe Rd. over unnamed branch (29.8; 1960) Howell Rd. over Carter's Creek branch (32.0; 1951) Morris-O'Quinn Rd. over unnamed branch (26.8; 1960) Mt. Moriah Rd. over Kirklin Creek branch (39.0; 1967) Nation Rd. over Carter's Creek branch (39.0; 1960) Old Bethel Rd. over unnamed branch (47.3; 2002) Old Hwy. 24 East over McGee's Creek (36.0; 1973) Old Sandy Hook Rd. over Sandy Hook Creek (35.0; 1979) Old Settlement Rd. over Pushepatapa Creek-east fork (24.4; 1998) Pine Grove Rd. over ditch (35.7 1998) Reagan Rd. over Pushepatapa Creek-east fork (25.6; 1930) Robey Jefferson Rd. over McGee's Creek branch (36.5; 1970) Sims Thornhill Rd. over McGee's Creek branch (40.0; 1955) St. John Rd. over unnamed branch (32.9; 1960) Sunlight Rd. over unnamed branch (31.9; 1960) Tommy Rushing Rd. over unnamed branch (35.9; 1998) Van Holmes Rd. over unnamed branch (34.9; 1960)

Warren County Baldwin Ferry Rd. over Midsouth R.R. in city of Vicksburg (48.1; 1958) Ballground Rd. over unnamed creek (49.7; 1963) Bazinsky Rd. over Durden's Creek (31.7; 1962) Cario St. over unnamed creek (28.9; 1938) Cherry St. over Glass Bayou in city of Vicksburg (44.0; 1910/rehab 2010) Cherry St. over Midsouth R.R. in city of Vicksburg (45.8; 1910) Fisher Ferry Rd. over relief (20.4; 1957) Freetown Rd. over Muddy Creek (44.7; 1959)

Wayne County Big Rock Rd. over Turkey Creek (32.7; 1962) Bucatunna-Chicora Rd. over Chickasawhay River branch (27.2; 1973) Bucatunna Millry Rd. over Red Creek (20.9; 1962) Chicora Greene County Rd. over Henry Creek (39.9; 1974) Chicora River Rd. over Patrick's Creek (27.9; 1974) County Lake Denham Rd. over Patton Creek (48.8; 1975) Dyess Bridge Rd. over Waynesboro Lake arm (49.1; 1972)

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Mississippi Business Journal

Jordan Sumrall Rd. over Bucatunna Creek (14.6; 1935) Matherville Poplar Springs Rd. over Mill Creek (32.6; 1968) Maynor Creek Rd. over Maynor Creek (39.9; 1972) Reynolds-Eucutta Rd. over Little Eucutta Creek (48.5; 1963) Reynolds-Eucutta Rd. over Wagon Branch (48.5; 1963) Strengthford-Clara Rd. over Little Thompson Creek (24.5; 1960) Tokio Frost Bridge Rd. over Cypress Creek (39.9; 1972) Tokio Frost Bridge Rd. over Tick Creek (44.7; 1940) Waynesboro-Matherville Rd. over Shiloh Creek (38.0; 1993) Wilburn Taylor Rd. over Little Red Creek (32.4; 1978)

Webster County CR 4 over Horse Pen Creek (29.7; 1955) CR 4 over unnamed stream (49.8; 1965) CR 9 over Saboulga Creek (43.3; 1960) CR 9 over unnamed stream (43.1; 2003) CR 14 over Little Creek tributary (26.6; 1970) CR 26 over Pryor Creek (28.3; 1960) CR 61 over unnamed stream (28.7; 2001) CR 93 over Little Black Creek (28.7; 1980) CR 93 over Little Black Creek branch (24.4; 1980) CR 97 over Saboulga Creek (24.4; 1966) CR 100 over Saboulga Creek (29.8; 1954) CR 100 over Saboulga Creek tributary (39.9; 1954) CR 100 over Shutispear Creek branch (37.2; 1964) CR 100 over Shutispear Creek tributary (32.4; 1964) CR 116 over Big Black River tributary (24.4; 1961) CR 128 over Buttermilk Creek (49.9; 2002) CR 132 over Spring Creek relief (39.8; 1954) CR 166 over Dry Creek (24.5; 1980) CR 252 over Patt's Branch (42.7; 1975) CR 263 over Big Black River (26.4; 1970) CR 263 over Savannah Creek branch (25.3; 1968) Old Congress Rd. over Sewayiah Creek branch (46.8; 1988)

Wilkinson County Ancil Cox Rd. over Thompson Creek (36.7; 1940) Beaver Creek Rd. over Beaver Creek (36.8; 1945) Bowling Green Rd. over Thompson Creek (37.8; 1940) Bowling Green Rd. over Thompson Creek-middle fork branch (37.8; 1950) Carter Loop Rd. over Mill Creek (34.9; 1961) Cold Springs Rd. over Cypress Branch (36.8; 1961) Cold Springs Rd. over Hazlit Creek (34.8; 1961) Coons Mill Rd. over Brown's Creek (14.1; 1950) Crooked Creek Rd. over Crooked Creek branch (41.9; 1961) Crooked Creek Rd. over Crooked Creek branch (24.7; 1935) Crooked Creek Rd. over Crooked Creek branch (48.3; 1991) Crooked Creek Rd. over unnamed creek (42.2; 1945) Donegal Rd. over Bayou Sara (20.0; 1940) Fort Adams-Pond Rd. over unnamed creek (37.8; 1972) Fort Adams-Pond Rd. over unnamed creek (42.5 1970) Hackett-Ford Rd. over Ford's Creek branch (39.0; 1935) Henley Rd. over Dixon's Creek (26.5; 1940) L. Leake Rd. over Caledonia Creek (24.8; 1935) L. Leake Rd. over Caledonia Creek branch (24.8; 1991) L. Leake Rd. over Willis Branch (24.4; 1940) Lovers Ln. over Sara Bayou branch (36.0; 1945) Lovers Ln. over Sara Bayou branch (40.0; 1945) Lower Gloster Rd. over Little Buffalo River (37.9; 1935) Macedonia Rd. over Little Buffalo River (29.5; 1961) Millbrook Rd. over Millbrook Creek (31.9; 1945) Mount Carmel Rd. over Little Buffalo River branch (39.9; 1940) Old U.S. 61 over Crooked Creek (33.8; 1958) Old U.S. 61 over relief drain (39.8; 1988) Percy Creek Sand Rd. over Percy Creek (25.5; 1940) Percy Creek Sand Rd. over Percy Creek branch (25.5; 1940) Perrytown Rd. over Cahal Creek (31.2; 1958) Perrytown Rd. over relief drain (38.7; 1955) Perrytown Rd. over Turkey Creek (49.0; 1962) Possum Corner Rd. over Homochitto River branch (32.0; 1950) Raccoon Rd. over White Creek (41.2; 1935) Smith Rd. over Crooked Creek branch (31.9; 1958) Smith Rd. over Phipps Creek (35.8; 1946) Turkey Creek Rd. over Turkey Creek (40.3; 1935) Turnbull Rd. over Thompson Creek-west fork (44.5; 1940) Whetstone Rd. over Dry Fork Creek (29.5; 1940)

Winston County Betheden Rd. over Mill Creek (32.2; 1966) Bevil Hill Rd. over Yellow Creek (38.9; 1970) Bluff Lake Rd. over Loakfoma Creek (11.6; 1955) Curtis Hamil Rd. over Jones Creek (20.0; 1950) Curtis Hamil Rd. over Jones Creek tributary (29.0; 1975) Lobutcha Rd. over Sand Creek (32.8; 1967) Mill Creek Rd. over Mill Creek tributary (39.8; 1964) Old Robinson Rd. over Tallahaga Creek (23.6; 1957)

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15

Shiloh Rd. over Noxapater Creek (41.0; 1965) Sims Rd. over Tallahaga Creek tributary (32.5; 1960) Triplett Store Rd. over Blackwater Creek (38.3; 1960) Yellow Creek Rd. over Nanih Waiya Creek (32.5; 1965)

Yalobusha County CR 18 over Mooney Creek (16.7; 1963) CR 27 over Jones Creek (31.2; 1970) CR 46 over Long Branch (16.7; 1967) CR 84 over Simpson Branch (30.3; 1972) CR 90 over unnamed stream (39.9; 1971) CR 131 over Turkey Creek (26.4; 1978) CR 154 over Simmons Creek (37.9; 1981) CR 212 over Carr Branch (29.7; 1954) CR 212 over Coleman Creek (29.6; 1954) CR 212 over Durden Creek relief (24.4; 1954) CR 428 over unnamed stream (20.1; 1972)

Yazoo County Anding Oil City Rd over Illinois Central Gulf R.R. (12.3; 1948) Ashwood Rd. over Old Creek (42.3; 1993) Beale Rd. over Hurricane Creek (46.0; 2000) Breakwater Rd. over drainage canal (25.0; 1968) Brown Rd. over Ellison Creek (41.1; 1980) Campbell Rd. over drainage canal (40.7; 2002) Carson Rd. over Hurricane Creek (39.8; 1952) Cessna Rd. over Thompson Creek (46.6; 2004) Christmas Rd. over unnamed creek (37.9; 1956) Cox Ferry Rd. over unnamed creek (41.8; 1978) Cox Rd. over Walesheba Creek (38.0; 1976) Cox Rd. over Walesheba Creek (42.6; 1955) Cox Rd. over Walesheba Creek (30.8; 1991) Dark Corner Rd. over Walesheba Creek (36.9; 1988) Dark Corner Rd. over Walesheba Creek (46.6; 1993) Exum Rd. over drainage canal (28.2; 1987) Fordyke Rd. over Techeva Creek (38.8; 1989) Fordyke Rd. over Techeva Creek (32.8; 1950) Goodwin Rd. over drainage canal (45.2; 1993) Gordon Rd. over Pepper Creek (35.0; 1980) Graball Freerun Rd. over Martin Creek (30.1; 1994) Graball Freerun Rd. over Piney Creek (39.6; 1975) Grandoak Rd. over drainage canal (39.9; 1975) Greer Rd. over Vaughan Creek (40.6; 1996) Hebron Church Rd. over Beaver Creek (45.1; 1985) Hicks Rd. over Wolf Creek (38.0; 1953) House Rd. over Techeva Creek (24.0; 1970) Johnston Rd. over Piney Creek (43.3; 1991) Jones Rd. over Short Creek (20.9; 1960) King Rd. over drainage canal (29.5; 1991) Ledbetter Rd. over Deer Creek (41.1; 1971) Leeaubre Ln. over Turkeyfoot Branch (43.8; 1965) Link Rd. over Branch Creek (41.3; 1973) Link Rd. over Clear Creek (41.9; 1973) Link Rd. over Walker Branch (42.1; 1973) Locust Grove Rd. over Techeva Creek (41.2; 1980) Locust Grove Rd. over Techeva Creek (34.8; 1951) Molestage Slack Rd. over Dry Creek (45.0; 1996) Molestage Slack Rd. over Dry Creek (39.8; 1986) Myrleville Rd. over Cypress Creek (39.5; 1987) Nickelson Rd. over drainage canal (35.0; 1993) Old Hwy. 49 over Thompson Creek (13.1; 1983) Pearce Rd. over Techeva Creek (21.3; 1991) Pepper Wilson Rd. over Ellison Creek (38.9; 1979) Pepper Wilson Rd. over Vaughan Creek (38.8; 1980) Pepper Wilson Rd. over Vaughan Creek (41.3; 1958) Pepper Wilson Rd. over Vaughan Creek (36.9; 1987) Phillips Rd. over Silver Creek (39.0; 2006) Piney Springs Rd. over unnamed creek (46.8; 1994) Piney Springs Rd. over unnamed creek (34.9; 1994) Powell Rd. over unnamed creek (38.7; 1980) Powell Rd. over Piney Creek (37.7; 1991) Providence Rd. over Thompson Creek (39.8; 1979) Ridge Rd. over Short Creek (22.8; 1973) Rosehill Rd. over Bluff Creek (31.5; 1972) Saxton Rd. over Techeva Creek (40.5; 1982) Scotland Rd. over drainage ditch (27.2; 1966) Shannon Bottom Rd. over unnamed creek (47.6; 2006) Slick Rd. over unnamed creek (47.5; 1975) Strickland Rd. over Hurricane Creek (36.9; 1996) Strickland Rd. over Hurricane Creek (43.5; 1997) Upshaw Rd. over Big Cypress Creek (39.9; 1972) Vandevere Rd. over unnamed creek (40.0; 1999) Waller Rd. over Piney Creek (49.3; 1994) Warren Rd. over Wolf Creek (28.4; 1956) Whitaker Rd. over drainage canal (49.6; 2006) Wildwood Rd. over Vaughan Creek (31.6; 1988)


AN MBJ FOCUS: HEALTHCARE PROFILE

Teaching therapy and advocacy  Stogner spreads her knowledge to patients, therapists — and sometimes lawmakers

By BECKY GILLETTE I CONTRIBUTOR mbj@msbusiness.com

P

hysical therapist Jodie Stogner travels far and wide in her job as a rehab product specialist for Pride Mobility/Quantum Rehab. Stogner markets complex rehab wheelchairs to help people with disabilities get what they need, and also travels the country teaching physical therapists, occupational therapists, and medical equipment suppliers how to evaluate and recommend appropriate products. Jean-Michel Geoffriau, PT, director of rehabilitation for Sta-Home Health & Hospice, Jackson, said in the 10 years he has worked with Stogner, she has been of significant assistance to both patients and therapists at Sta-Home. “In addition to providing educational updates to our therapists regarding advancements in wheelchairs and power mobility devices, as well as payer-specific coverage criteria, she also has provided both guidance and direct consultation in the patients’ homes to ensure patients received the most appropriate wheelchair

 

for their condition,� Geoffriau said. “Jodie’s expertise and winsome personality, as well as her excellent communication and presentation skills, are recognized by all who have received her help. In addition, Jodie’s professional advocacy involvement to ensure adequate patient access to needed medical equipment is increasing, to the benefit of patients and caregivers alike.� Stogner grew up in Pearl, and went to college at the University of Southern Mississippi majoring in biology before getting a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from the University of Mississippi Medical Center in 2000. That was the last year that UMC offered the bachelor’s program before transitioning to a master’s degree and then a doctorate in physical therapy. She loved playing sports growing up, and feels physical therapy and anatomy go hand in hand with sports. “I was fortunate enough to do an eight-week clinical at UMC where a position came available after my graduation date, and found myself blessed that my first job was there at the Children's Re-

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habilitation Center,� Stogner said. “That opportunity has guided everything that has happened after that. I’m still amazed at all of the events of the last 13 years of my life. I live by the motto, ‘Everything happens for a reason,’ and look at each opportunity as an adventure that was just meant to be. I had always been involved with sports growing up and in college, and felt that the physical therapy profession was obviously a way for me to use my experiences on the field or on the court. But my path has led me far from the sports aspect of physical therapy.� Stogner became a sales representative after working for UMC for two years. Instead of working with athletes, she works with people at the other end of the spectrum with physical disabilities. Patients include children and adults with cerebral palsy, brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and strokes. “My client territory is Mississippi, and I have one account in Memphis,� she said. “I have also been traveling the country for the past five years doing continuing education for Pride Mobility and Quantum Rehab. I teach other durable

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medical equipment providers and therapists how to evaluate and recommend wheeled mobility devices.â&#x20AC;? There are a lot of factors for matching a patient to the right wheelchair: based size, fit, the goals of patient and family, and the physical and mental capabilities of the patients. One of the first considerations is whether the wheelchair is motorized. While it might be more exercise to have a manual wheelchair, Stogner said exercise isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the point. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The way I view it, mobility from point A to point B is just a basic part of life,â&#x20AC;? said Stogner, who has Assistive Technology Professional and Seating and Mobility Specialist certifications through the Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So basic mobility should not be considered exercise. Going to the bathroom should not make someone


June 21, 2013 • MISSISSIPPI BUSINESS JOURNAL • www.msbusiness.com

break out in a sweat. The goal of a physical or occupational therapist is to prescribe the device that maximizes the patient’s most basic mobility functions.” She thrives on meeting people throughout her industry, seeing each new contact as a potential opportunity to add to her network. She also finds it very rewarding to do work that helps patients become more independent after a stroke, illness or accident that causes a loss of mobility. Stogner is also known for her advocacy work. She belongs to some clinical work groups that are trying to preserve access for beneficiaries to get complex rehab wheelchairs. She is also the federal advocacy liaison for the Mississippi Physical Therapy Association. “Both of those efforts have led me to Washington, D.C., lobbying on behalf of people with disabilities who are dependent on complex rehab mobility devices,” Stogner said. “Sen. Thad Cochran has championed one of the Senate bills for complex rehab because of the efforts of not just myself, but my colleagues, also.” See

Courtesy of Jodie Stogner

Jodie Stogner’s professional advocacy involvement helps provide adequate patient access to needed medical equipment. She also stays involved away from work, such as a recent Muscular Dystrophy Camp she attended and got a helping hand from her son Stone Jackson, 4, (above, right)

STOGNER, Page 31

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D r. J o h n Tu r b a Orthopaedic Surgeon

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HEALTHCARE

June 21, 2013

I

Mississippi Business Journal

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19

NUTRITION

Yes, your favorite recipes can be revived

W

e all have that favorite dish that our mom or grandmother made when we were growing up. Perhaps you have several dishes that come to right now. You can actually taste and smell them as your memory takes you back. As you reflect on the ingredients, you are also aware now that those dishes were “heavy,” made with a lot of fat and sugar. You probably felt very full because you ate too much. You also might have wanted to take a nap afterwards. If you are trying to eat healthy and exercise, these dishes are probably not on your weekly menu. You probably just enjoy them on special occasions. Perhaps you have discovered that you have allergies and are trying to avoid certain foods such as dairy products or gluten. Learning “clean” and “non-allergenic” ways to cook and your food tasting good can be a challenging. You weren’t taught how to cook differently, and now there is a learning curve. I have good news.It is not as difficult as you may think. Food can taste even better than before, reduce the waistline, and decrease your time in the kitchen. Are you thinking: “How can this be done?” Healthy food doesn’t taste good and surely it’s not easy. First, let’s talk about some guidelines to go by in converting recipes. 1. Reduce the amount of fat in the recipe such as milk, butter, sour cream,

and cream cheese. Unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk can be substituted for milk. Low-fat sour cream, non-fat plain Greek yogurt and low-fat cream Melinda Duffie cheese can also be used to reduce the fat content. 2. Decrease or eliminate the amount of sugar by substituting stevia, agave, truvia and other natural alternatives. 3. Minimize starch in dishes like potatoes, rice, and grains. Using vegetables to replace starches is always a good choice. If bread is suggested in a recipe like a breakfast casserole, leave the bread out and add more vegetables. Instead of using pasta in spaghetti you can replace it with spaghetti squash or thinly sliced zucchini. 4. Consider food allergies such as dairy and gluten and make substitutions accordingly. Using unsweetened almond and coconut milk is a good alternative. Instead of using regular white or whole wheat flour substitute with gluten free all-purpose flour, almond flour, or coconut flour. At the right is an example of taking lasagna and making it healthier. It is easy to make with plenty left over. Melinda Duffie ofJacksonisafitnesscolumnistfor the MississippiBusinessJournal.

Zucchini Lasagna » 2 large zucchini » 1 tablespoon salt » 1 pound ground beef or turkey (preferably less than 1 percent fat) » 1 1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper » 1 small green bell pepper, diced » 1 onion, diced » 1 cup tomato paste » 1 (16 ounce) can tomato sauce » 1/4 cup red wine » 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil » 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano

» Hot water as needed » 1 egg » 1 (15 ounce) container low-fat ricotta cheese or low-fat cottage cheese » 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley » 1 (16 ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained » 1 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced » 8 ounces shredded low part skim mozzarella cheese » 8 ounces grated Parmesan cheese

Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Coat a deep 9x13 inch baking pan with nonstick cooking spray. 2. Slice zucchini lengthwise into very thin slices. Sprinkle slices lightly with salt; set aside to drain in a colander. 3. To prepare the meat sauce, cook and stir meat and black pepper in a large skillet over medium high heat for 5 minutes. Add in green pepper and onion; cook and stir until meat is no longer pink. Stir in tomato paste, tomato sauce, wine, basil, and oregano, adding a small amount of hot water if sauce is too thick. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer sauce for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently. 4. Meanwhile, stir egg, ricotta or cottage cheese, and parsley together in a bowl until well combined. 5. To assemble lasagna, spread 1/2 of the meat sauce into the bottom of prepared pan. Then layer 1/2 the zucchini slices, 1/2 the ricotta mixture, all of the spinach, followed by all of the mushrooms, then 1/2 the mozzarella cheese. Repeat by layering the remaining meat sauce, zucchini slices, ricotta mixture, and mozzarella. Spread Parmesan cheese evenly over the top; cover with foil. 6. Bake for 45 minutes. Remove foil; raise oven temperature to 350 degrees, and bake an additional 15 minutes. Let stand for 5 minutes before serving. Remember recipes are a suggestion on how to make a dish. It is up to you as to how the dish is made. If you don’t like certain ingredients just replace them accordingly. You can develop new favorite healthy dishes that you can enjoy on a regular basis.

SPORTS MEDICINE CLINICS Clinic/ Specialties/Services

Address

Phone

Website

Capital Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center Hip; knee, elbow; shoulder; hand; foot/ankle; sports medicine

290 E. Layfair Dr., Flowood, MS 39232*

(601) 987-8200

www.capitalorthosports.com

KDMC Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Clinic Muscle/ligament injuries; rehabilitation; sports medicine

King’s Daughters Medical Center, 950 Broadway Blvd., Brookhaven, MS 39601 (601) 833-5275

www.kdmc.org

Mississippi Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center 1325 E. Fortification St., Jackson, MS 39202* Shoulder; elbow; arm; hand/wrist; knee; foot/ankle; hip; leg; fractures; arthritis/joint replacement; physical therapy

(601) 354-4488

www.msmoc.com

North Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Clinic, PLLC 4381 S. Eason Blvd., Tupelo, MS 38801 Hand/wrist; sports medicine; fractures; upper extremity; surgery; arthritis/joint replacement; children’s services; foot/ankle

(662) 377-6610 www.northmssportsmedicine.com

Weatherly Sports Medicine Family Orthopaedic Clinic 804 U.S. Hwy. 51, Madison, MS 39110* Knee; hip; surgery; shoulder; foot/ankle; elbow; Achilles tendon; back; fractures; rotator cuff; hand/wrist; sports medicine

(601) 856-KNEE

www.weatherlyortho.com

* Capital Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center also has locations in Madison and Vicksburg; Mississippi Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center also has locations in Madison, Flowood, Brookhaven, Cleveland, Magee and Yazoo City; Weatherly Sports Medicine Family Orthopaedic Clinic also has a location in Brookhaven


Left to right: Dr. Kimberly Simpson, Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Anatomical Sciences; Dr. James E. Keeton, Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs; and Alon Bee, City President of Regions Bank Metro Jackson

Expect more admiration. Congratulations to Dr. Kimberly Simpson, an associate professor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC), for being awarded the ďŹ rst Regions Bank TEACH Prize. This award recognizes a faculty member who best exempliďŹ es the values of student engagement, intellectual challenge and dedication to the craft of education that drive UMMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s educational mission. As a proud corporate citizen, Regions is always excited to support those in our community who work so tirelessly to make a difference in the lives of others. To Dr. Simpson and everyone striving to improve our communities, we offer our thanks, our assistance and our commitment to making life better.

   


Spot a Stroke?

Call 911! Drooping face Weak arm Slurred speech

Learn how to protect yourself from stroke at ummchealth.com/stroke

                  !        


22 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013

HEALTHCARE

HOSPITAL FOOD

FEEDING THE MASSES » For patients, visitors, it’s all about the choices By LISA MONTI I CONTRIBUTOR mbj@msbusiness.com

If the words “hospital food” conjure up memories of mystery meat and green Jello, you should know that the food being served today in some hospital cafeterias and on patient trays is all about healthier, tastier choices. But if you’re craving fried chicken, you can have that, too. Morrison Healthcare, a leading health care food service company, feeds the staff and visitors at Memorial Hospital in Gulfport some 1,200 meals a day, plus three meals a day for about 225 patients. The company is a spinoff of the popular cafete-

ria chain once found throughout the South and known for fried chicken and liver and onions. Morrison also serves Biloxi Regional Medical Center and Singing River Health System hospitals in Pascagoula and Ocean Springs. Cynthia Sanders, food services director with Morrison Healthcare at Memorial, said Morrison’s food is light years beyond the hospital meals in the past. “As far as our patient satisfaction, we are doing very good,” she said. Atlanta-based Morrison announced last year its commitment to a wellness initiative aimed at healthful eating in the approximately 550 hospitals it serves nationwide. New menu items cut back

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Memorial Hospital in Gulfport feeds about 1,200 staff and visitors a day, plus three meals daily for about 225 patients.

on salt, calories and sugar and pasta is the standard Morrison menus. The healthier food choices also are whole grain. The changes to recipes doesn’t hurt the found in the hospital’s small coffee shop flavor. “From a taste standpoint, you could- and expansive food court. Both are popular with staffers and visitors. n’t tell the difference,” said Sanders. Cafeteria and food court items are more Good intentions aside, here in the Deep South where calorie laden favorites are always staff driven, Sanders said. “They are our capin demand, “You put the fried chicken there tive audience. We try to gear more to them.” Popular items include tomato basil but next to it is baked chicken. It’s a matter grilled chicken, liver and onions of personal choice,” Sanders said. The made from the original Morrison’s counterpart to Bananas Foster is recipe, and a dish named Chicken yogurt with a choice of toppings. Tampico, a fried chicken breast with Most customers are Memorial Jalapeno cheese sauce, topped with staffers and visitors but there are resshredded cheese and baked. idents of nearby neighborhoods and “We have lines waiting on it,” the Naval Construction Battalion Sanders said. Center who are regular customers. Employees get a discount and can “We call them frequent fliers,” order an affordable meal deal: a vegSanders said. “You know who’s going Cynthia Sanders etable, starch and entree. to come in for fried chicken, who “We want to give them a hot, home lives right around corner. They just come cooked meal for a good price,” she said. here for the food.” Patients at Memorial get some wiggle Feeding such a large and diverse group of diners every day is a challenge, room with their menu choices, but can’t Sanders said. “You have to be able to try to always get what they want because of diet restrictions. please everyone.” Melissa Ladner, manager of the hospiIn Memorial’s cafeteria, workers prepare and serve red beans on Monday, fried chicken on Wednesday and fried catfish on Friday. All are high demand items not on See HOSPITALS, Page 31


WE HAVE A FULL SERVICE THERAPY CLINIC RIGHT HERE IN BROOKHAVEN JUST FOR YOU At King’s Daughters Therapy Center it has always been about quality and taking care of our community. From pediatric services , sports rehab and therapy for our senior adults to our state-of-the-art aquatic programs we have had you needs in mind. The therapy center is a full service clinic offering physical, occupational and speech therapy for all ages. In order to provide one –on-one care our staff of over twenty licensed therapists and trainers makes us one of the largest therapy clinics in the state. Quality therapy services in a Christian environment … that’s King’s Daughters Therapy Center. – Christi Mills, PT Director of Therapy Services

KDMC

THERAPY CENTER www.kdmc.org 507 Highway 51 N Brookhaven, MS 39601 601-823-5255


24 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 SPORTS BUSINESS

Biloxi stadium protest falls short » Council moves closer to selling bonds By FRANK BROWN I STAFF WRITER frank.brown@msbusiness.com The Biloxi City Council took another step Tuesday in an effort to attract a minor league baseball team to the city by passing a resolution to issue $21 million in general obligation bonds to help finance a $35 million a $35 million stadium. The measure passed 4-2. The 7,000-seat stadium will be built on U.S. 90, on land leased from the Beau Rivage Resort & Casino. The city bond counsel and financial consultants now will obtain rates for the bond issue, which will be voted on by the new city council in late July. “It will probably take about 30 days to come back with rates,” said David Nichols, the city’s chief administrative officer. The remaining funding for the stadium will come from the Gov. Phil Bryant, through funds BP granted to Mississippi in 2010 during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The city will lease the site from Beau Rivage — its current employee parking lot — to the city for $1 a year for 20 years, with an option to extend it for multiple years. The stadium will be built by Dale Partners architects, which has offices in Jackson and Biloxi. Plans call for it to eventually include a parking garage, entertainment area and hotel overlooking the playing field. It is expected to be completed in time for the start of the 2014 Southern League season in April. “So far, it’s all been about the money,” said Vincent Creel, Biloxi’s director of public affairs. “The council still hasn’t see the terms of the lease, and they’ll want to see that before the vote on any loan rates.” The lease contract is expected to be ready before the rates are presented to the council.

For the Mississippi Business Journal

A computerized model of the view from the northeast of what a minor league baseball stadium may look like in Biloxi, across from the Beau Rivage Casino. The 7,000-seat stadium is expected to be home to a Double-A baseball franchise in the Southern League. Negotiations are underway to bring a Double-A level team to Biloxi. Ken Young, a former minor league executive of the year and owner of four minor league baseball franchises, is in the process of purchasing an existing minor league team and relocating the team to Biloxi. The bonds will be paid back from stadium project revenues. The stadium will host at least 70 minor league games a summer and will be available for other events such as concerts and college baseball games.

The Gulf Coast Business Council’s research foundation estimates the stadium development will spur an additional $10 million annually in visitor spending on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. There was no significant opposition to Major A.J. Holloway’s request for the bond issue. Efforts by the STEPS Coalition in Biloxi to collect a 1,500signature petition to force a referendum were unsuccessful. The group collected 888 signatures.

AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURE

State’s blueberry farmers fighting weather, insects ACROSS MISSISSIPPI — Late-spring cold snaps and untimely freezes have delayed harvests and reduced yields for Mississippi’s 2013 blueberry crop. George Traicoff of Hernando runs a family owned and operated you-pick operation in DeSoto County. He started Nesbit Blueberry Plantation with 6,000 plants in 1984, and today his family tends 16,000 plants. “We are running about a week later than normal and hope to be open by June 25,” he said. “We had some cold days, but no losses to freezes. We have gotten a lot of rain, maybe the best in recent years, and that helped produce larger berries.” Traicoff said the rains did not increase disease pressure, but insects were a challenge. Blake Layton, entomologist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said the spotted wing drosophila — a type of fruit fly — is causing huge losses nationally. The invasive species arrived in the Northwest in 2008 and in Mississippi in 2010. “The flies also attack other soft fruits like blackberries and wild dewberries. Once detected, growers need to treat plants to keep the larvae out of the fruit,” he said. “The larvae can reduce yields and berry quality.” Layton said the economic impact includes the increased cost of pesticides and reduced yields and

Late cotton planting could boost pest species

fruit quality. “These flies are causing hundreds of millions of dollars in losses across the United States,” he said. Eric Stafne, Extension fruit specialist at MSU’s South Mississippi Branch Experiment Station in Poplarville, said the fruit flies have not been found in large numbers like last year. “We don’t know what environmental factors impact their numbers yet, but we are watching closely,” he said. Stafne said late frosts did quite a bit of yield damage to blueberries, especially on plants located

below Interstate 20. “Commercial growers with frost protection — wind machines, helicopters or overhead protection — were able to save most of their crop,” he said. “But those that did not have frost protection lost up to 50 percent of their potential yields.” Stafne said the earliest varieties were hurt the most, while other varieties — including some relatively early varieties like Prince and Alapaha — did better. South Mississippi harvests started the end of May to the first of June.

— from staff reports

ACROSS MISSISSIPPI — Farmers are finally catching up on cotton planting, but experts are worried that the late start could expose the crop to more insects than if wet weather hadn’t delayed planting. Mississippi farmers had intended to plant corn on many acres in hopes of cashing in on high prices. But winter and spring rains left many fields waterlogged, making it hard for tractors to plant as early as required for corn. Cotton and soybeans can be planted later, and farmers’ plans for cotton ballooned to 340,000 acres from what had been projected to be a historic low of about 200,000. Mississippi farmers planted 580,000 acres of cotton in 2012. With some dry weather, cotton planting has sprinted ahead. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, in its June 3 crop report, said 77 percent of cotton had been planted, up from 36 percent the previous week. Much cotton died and had to be replanted, and Mississippi State University experts are warning that insect populations could build because of the late start. — from staff reports


June 21, 2013

EDUCATION ROUNDUP

Report: State’s teacher education programs ‘mediocre at best’ ACROSS MISSISSIPPI — A group pushing for changes in how the nation trains teachers says Mississippi’s teacher training programs are mediocre at best. The report is from the National Council on Teacher Quality, and is backed by Mississippi groups pushing for educational improvements. However, leaders of some colleges of education say the council’s report either misconstrues information or is based on incorrect information. William Carey University and the Mississippi University for Women generally did the best on the ratings, while the council issued a “consumer alert” over some programs at Delta State University, warning students to avoid them. NCTQ is influential. Gov. Phil Bryant pushed its recommendations to raise entrance standards for teaching programs during the 2013 legislative session. The report faults most Mississippi colleges on student teaching, lesson planning and classroom management.

COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Most two-year schools asking for more tuition JACKSON — Tuition will rise at 11 of Mississippi’s 15 public community colleges this fall, with average tuition for two semesters (fall and spring) rising about 6 percent to $2,376. Here are the rates that each college has approved or has projected to the state Community College Board, as well as the percentage change from the 20122013 academic year: » Coahoma: $2,300, unchanged » Copiah-Lincoln: $2,350, 10.6 percent » East Central: $2,210, 4.5 percent » East Mississippi: $2,600, 5.8 percent » Hinds: $2,260, 8.8 percent » Holmes: $2,288, 6.6 percent » Itawamba: $2,200, 9.1 percent » Jones: $2,722, 8.9 percent » Meridian: $2,314, 3 percent » Mississippi Delta: $2,450, unchanged » Mississippi Gulf Coast: $2,472, unchanged » Northeast Mississippi: $2,322, 6.5 percent » Northwest Mississippi: $2,250, unchanged » Pearl River: $2,510, 8.4 percent » Southwest Mississippi: $2,400, 12.9 percent

— staff and MBJ wire services

I

Mississippi Business Journal

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REAL ESTATE

Hosemann recruiting Realtors to market tax-forfeited property JACKSON — Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann is partnering with licensed real estate brokers in Mississippi to actively market tax-forfeited properties in the State. “If you want property sold in Mississippi, you sell through a licensed Realtor,” says Hosemann. “The growing number of tax-forfeited properties in our state is an epidemic, and I can think of no one better than a licensed Mississippi Realtor to help us get these properties back into productive use.” Currently, the Secretary of State’s Office holds over $66.2 million worth of property forfeited to the state for non-payment of ad valorem taxes. To accelerate the sale of these lands back in the hands of taxpayers, any licensed real estate broker in Mississippi may bid on marketing tax-forfeited lands in a

MANUFACTURING

Yokohama Tire sees uptick since announcement WEST POINT — Since the recent announcement that tire manufacturer Yokohama Tire Company would be locating a plant in Clay County, area distributors have noticed an increased demand for the brand. Although the West Point plant will not make passenger car and light truck tires when it begins production in 2015, the company’s decision to locate in Clay County has been met with enthusiasm. Customers of George’s Tire in West Point are specifically ordering Yokohama’s car and light truck tires, said owner Todd Glusenkamp. Glusenkamp said he has seen an overall sales increase of about 20 percent to 30 percent since he started distributing Yokohama tires just over a month ago. “It has really taken off. That’s my top seller right now. Everybody in West Point is really on fire about it,” Glusenkamp said. “They really want to support it. I never thought anything about it because they’re going to do the commercial truck tires at first. I never thought anything about the passenger and small truck stuff.”

POLITICS

Senators: Anti-dumping orders should stand WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sens. Thad Cochran and Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) are supporting a decision to maintain existing anti-dumping orders against unfairly subsidized imports of steel concrete rebar that harm American manufacturers. Cochran and Wicker in April signed a letter encouraging the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) to extend the anti-dumping duties now imposed on rebar produced in China, Indonesia, Ukraine, Latvia, Belarus, Moldova and Poland. The USITC completed its review of the anti-duty case and determined “the existing orders on the rebar under review will remain in place.” Cochran and Wicker were among a dozen senators who argued that extending the duties would

particular county for an increased commission rate. “Tax-forfeited lands are a drain on the community,” added Hosemann. “Placing these lands back in private ownership will generate more revenue for our cities and counties, while cleaning up potential eyesores. Realtors will be able to assist our agency in expediting the process.’

— from staff and MBJ wire services

MISSISSIPPI

Hood subpoenas Google’s records over online drug sales JACKSON — Attorney General Jim Hood says he still considers Google’s responses to allegations that it’s not doing enough to prevent illegal online sales of drugs without prescriptions and says he’s sending out subpoenas for company documents to further his investigation. Hood urged fellow attorneys general from other states to do the same at a meeting in Boston Tuesday, even as Google made its fullest response to date to the allegations. Hood, a Democrat, says the Mountain View, Calif.based company hasn’t adequately responded to requests by himself and the National Association of Attorneys General to discuss sites that sell drugs without prescriptions, as well as that improperly link to copyrighted music, videos and other material. “We in good faith invited Larry Page, chief executive officer of Google, to have an open, honest and transparent conversation about these important issues that are putting consumers at risk and facilitating wrongdoing, all while profiting handsomely from this dangerous behavior,” Hood said in a statement. “Google’s lack of response leaves us no choice except to issue subpoenas to Google for possible violations of state consumer protection acts and other state and federal civil and criminal laws.” The move could be the first step toward a criminal or civil prosecution of the company, and Hood has likened the possibility to the blockbuster litigation that a predecessor of his pursued against tobacco companies.

— from staff and MBJ wire services

be critical to protecting American-made rebar imports that are illegally undercutting the U.S. market.

NORTHEAST MISSISSIPPI

Workers find damage to arena; renovations delayed TUPELO — Renovations at the BancorpSouth Arena in Tupelo are going to take a little longer. The arena is undergoing a $1.8 million project to repair, replace and paint the exterior insulation

finishing system that covers the building. Director Todd Hunt says workers found more water damage than expected, including a few rusted columns and metal studs, so more work must be done. The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal reports Hunt says the extra work totals $91,130 and will add 34 days to the completion date, which is now Sept. 19. The arena will celebrate its 20th anniversary this fall, with a special concert season planned. So far, two concerts for this season have been announced: Backstreet Boys on Aug. 28 and John Fogerty on Oct. 22.


NEWSMAKERS

26 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 Profiles of growing young professionals in Mississippi

Age: 33 Attorney, Adams & Reese LLP

Keeping our eye on... BRANT RYAN Jackson attorney Brant Ryan says Adams & Reese was the only place he was interested in working after law school. “The people, the office culture and the quality of work are truly special,” he says. “The firm is intentional about teaching and growing itsassociates,whichissomethingthatIvalueandappreciategreatly.” As an attorney specializing in health care law, Ryan represents hospitals, physician groups, imaging centers, laboratories and other organizations making sure they meet compliance obligations and navigate through the federal regulations maze. “I enjoy working with a group of people who are passionate, intelligent and dedicated to making things better,” Ryan says. “The health care industry is constantly evolving which makes it easier for someone new to make a mark. There is always a new piece of legislation or federal rulemaking to learn.”

Ryan grew up in Bay St. Louis and earned a bachelor of arts in speech communication from the University of Southern Mississippi. He also earned a master of education from the University of South Carolina and his juris doctor from the University of Mississippi where he was an associate editor for the state law journal. Ryan is a member of the USM Hall of Fame and a past recipient of the Mississippi Bar Association Health Law Award. When he’s not in the office, Ryan enjoys playing golf, following Southern Miss athletics and spending time with his wife, Lauren, and son, Owen. The Ryan family attends North Ridge Church in Madison where on the second Sunday of each month the church forgoes its morning services to do community volunteering in Metro Jackson. — By Stephen McDill

Heroes: My mother and father, Jeannie and Tim Ryan Best thing about Mississippi: Family and great food Best Mississippi event: Great Mississippi River Balloon Race in Natchez Favorite Mississippi food: Pirate’s Cove in Pass Christian, Ajax in Oxford and Crescent City Grill in Hattiesburg Favorite TV show: “Person of Interest” Favorite movie: “Good Will Hunting” Favorite music: Contemporary Christian or county

Read the full biography at www.msbusiness.com

ERDC adds Beers

Firm adds attorneys

Jones, Sutherland make ranking

The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) in Vicksburg has selected Dennis J. Beers as chief of contracting. Prior to joining ERDC, Beers was director of contracting for the Mission and Installation Contracting Command at Fort Bliss, Texas. In addition to his tenure at Fort Bliss, Beers has also served as a professor at the Defense Acquisition University (DAU), Fort Beers Belvoir, Va. During his stint with DAU, he co-authored the Department of Defense Guidebook for the Acquisition of Services. A retired U.S. Air Force colonel, Beers’ previous assignments include group commander of the Air Force Automatic Test Systems/Equipment at Warner Robins Air Logistics Center, Ga., and as deputy director of contracting at that facility. Beers’ experience also includes serving as chief of the Oklahoma Air Logistics Center; commander of the 81st Contracting Squadron at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi; and, executive officer to the commander at Warner Robins Air Logistics Center. Other assignments include serving as a Minuteman II launch officer and instructor at Whiteman AFB, Mo. and Vandenberg AFB, Calif. Beers is Level III Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act-certified in contracting, program management and acquisition logistics. He holds a master’s degree from Strayer University and a bachelor’s from the University of Florida.

Copeland, Cook, Taylor, & Bush recently welcomed attorneys to the firm’s Jackson office. Jeffrey Graves has joined the Insurance Litigation Division. Graves received his J.D. from the University of Mississippi School of Law and his B.A. from Jackson State University, where he graduated magna cum laude. He is a Graves member of Jackson Young Lawyers and The Mississippi Bar, and is a native of Jackson. Laura Givens, a Baton Rouge, La., native, has joined the litigation practice area. Givens is a graduate of Mississippi College School of Law and received her undergraduate degree from Givens the University of Mississippi. Givens is a member of The Mississippi Bar, Jackson Young Lawyers, Mississippi Women Lawyers Association and Capital Area Bar Association. Matt Sitton is now practicing in the healthcare and litigation practice areas. Sitton, originally from Olive Branch, received his J.D. from the UniverSitton sity of Mississippi School of Law, where he graduated summa cum laude, and his B.A. from the University of Mississippi.

Butler, Snow, O’Mara, Stevens & Cannada, PLLC attorneys Christy D. Jones and Kari L. Sutherland have been named in Benchmark Litigation’s second edition of “Top 250 Women in Litigation.” Jones and Sutherland are members of the firm’s Pharmaceutical, Medical Device and Healthcare Industry Team. Jones focuses her practice on drug and medical device, product liability law and mass torts. Sutherland serves clients in the areas of drug and medical device, product liability and appellate litigation.

Bomgar named finalist Joel Bomgar, founder and CEO of Bomgar Corporation, has been selected as a finalist for the 2013 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year Program for the Gulf Coast area. The award is recognizing senior-level business leaders, business owners and founders who inspire others, have a track record of achievement and continue to build, lead and grow dynamic businesses. Bomgar is the only finalist seBomgar lected from the state of Mississippi for the Gulf Coast area.

Pittman replaces Chataginer Lt. Col. Rusty Pittman, Marine Patrol's assistant chief at the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, is now the interim chief of enforcement. Pittman is interim replacement for Walter "Tiny" Chataginer, who has retired. Pittman has more than 23 years of law enforcement experience. He has been assistant chief of the Marine Patrol since January 2006. He was a district supervisor from November 1999 to December 2005. Pittman's first state job was in 1990 with the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks' Bureau of Marine Resources. He was born in Gulfport and has lived in Hancock County since 1980.

of science degree in medical records from Hinds Community College. She and Gov. Bryant have been married for 36 years, and have two children, Katie and Patrick.

MSCUA elects, honors members

Jones

Sutherland

First Lady joins board First Lady of Mississippi Deborah Bryant has joined the board of directors for Community Bank. Bryant recently retired after more than 39 years of service from St. Dominic Hospital in Jackson, where she focused her professional efforts on quality and performance improvement within the hospital. Her love for children moves her to support Batson Children’s Hospital in Jackson, along with Bryant many other worthwhile children’s centers throughout the state. She serves as honorary chair of the 2013 Susan G. Komen Central Mississippi Race for the Cure, Volunteer Mississippi and the Festival of Trees at Beauvoir. She works closely with her husband Gov. Phil Bryant’s Teen Pregnancy Task Force and is the honorary chair for the Mississippi Center for Obesity Research. Bryant is also an advisory board member for the Mississippi Arts & Entertainment Center, board member of the International Ballet Competition and is an honorary member of The Research Club. She is the 2012 recipient of the Salvation Army Angel Award and was recently recognized by the Junior Auxiliary of Rankin County as Community Volunteer of the Year. Bryant is a Jackson native and holds an associate

Credit union delegates, during the Mississippi Credit Union Association’s (MSCUA’s) 76th Annual Meeting & Convention, re-elected board members and recognized individuals for outstanding achievements. Four MSCUA board members were re-elected for a three year term: Shelia Bridges, president/CEO, MBHS FCU, Jackson; John Gibbons, president/CEO, Triangle FCU, Columbus; Kaye Ray, director, Central Sunbelt FCU, Laurel; and, Jimmy Smith, president/CEO, Singing River FCU, Moss Point. The MSCUA board re-elected the following officers: Chairman Jimmy Smith, Singing River FCU, Moss Point; vice chairman Billy Bridges, Mutual CU, Vicksburg; treasurer Ray Scott, USM FCU, Hattiesburg; and, executive committee member John Gibbons, Triangle FCU, Columbus. MSCUA board members are: Laurin Avara, Navigator CU; Sheila Bridges, MBHS FCU; Elmer Dickens, Gulf Coast Community FCU; Dennis Florreich, Meridian Mutual FCU; Brig. Gen. Richard Moss (ret.), Keesler FCU; Katie Nelson, Mississippi Postal EFCU; Steve Pollman, Magnolia FCU; and Kaye Ray, Central Sunbelt FCU. With a combined 271 years of volunteer service to credit unions, seven individuals received the state’s highest honor, induction into the Mississippi Credit Union Hall of Fame. They are: John Wesley Abrams, B&W FCU, West Point; Howard Austin, Vickswood CU, Vicksburg; Elmer Dickens, Gulf Coast Community FCU, Gulfport; Don Lee, Mississippi Farm Bureau Employees CU, Jackson; Charles Marshall, Mississippi Farm Bureau Employees CU, Jackson; Jackie Roberson, Meridian Mutual FCU, Meridian; and, Helen Walker, Gulf Coast Community FCU, Gulfport. Lisa Lindsey, president/CEO of Gulf Coast Community FCU, received the CEO of the Year Award from the Mississippi Credit Union Managers Association. MSCUA staff members Sonny Green and Cheryl Oggs were recognized for 10 years and five years of service, respectively.

For announcements in Newsmakers; Contact: Wally Northway (601) 364-1016 • wally.northway@msbusiness.com


June 21, 2013

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Mississippi Business Journal

DeSoto 6.6

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Tunica 15.6

MISSISSIPPI’S APRIL UNEMPLOYMENT FIGURES March ’13 1,309,400 113,800 9.4 8.7 1,195,600

April ’12 1,318,100 109,500 9.0 8.3 1,208,600

’12 Avg. 1,333,100 122,100 xxx 9.2 1,211,000

Moving Avg.** 1,330,800 122,800 xxx 9.2 1,208,000

UNITED STATES Labor Force Data Civilian Labor Force Unemployed Unemployment Rate (Adjusted) Unemployment Rate (Unadjusted) Employed

April ‘13 154,739,000 11,014,000 7.5 7.1 143,724,000

March ’13 154,512,000 11,815,000 7.6 7.6 142,698,000

April ’12 153,905,000 11,910,000 8.1 7.7 141,995,000

’12 Avg. 154,975,000 12,506,000 xxx 8.1 142,469,000

Moving Avg.** 155,221,000 12,233,000 xxx 7.9 142,988,000

April 2013 11,478 91,792 $14,551,596 76,798 4,540 2,339 $189.48

March 2013 9,488 102,861 $13,626,717 71,631 4,074 1,886 $190.23

Lafayette 6.0

Yalobusha 8.3

Bolivar 9.3 Leflore 11.5

Humphreys 14.0 Sharkey 9.4

Carroll 8.7

Montgomery 11.3

Holmes 15.7

Monroe 11.7

Clay 17.0 Lowndes 9.0

Oktibbeha 7.8

Choctaw 8.7

Winston 11.0

Attala 9.7

Yazoo 10.4

Issaquena 17.3

Leake 9.3

Neshoba 6.2

Scott 6.1

Newton 7.2

Noxubee 13.4

Kemper 11.8

Madison 5.8 Warren 9.8 Rankin 4.8

Hinds 7.4

Claiborne 14.2

Wilkinson 10.1

Smith 7.6

Simpson 6.8

Copiah 9.1

Covington 6.8

Franklin 8.7

Lincoln 7.9

Amite 8.4

Pike 9.6

Lawrence Jeff Davis 8.4 10.1

Walthall 10.1

Unemployment Rates Unem ates

— Mississippi Department of Employment Security

Tishomingo 8.4

Itawamba 8.0

Chickasaw 10.3

Webster 11.6

Washington 13.0

Adams 8.2

** Average for most recent twelve months, including current month •• Unemployment Insurance amounts presented in this section only represent regular UI benefits, federal program amounts are not included. Labor force amounts are produced in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Note: Unless indicated state and county data presented are not seasonally adjusted.

Calhoun 9.1

Grenada 8.5

Sunflower 13.0

Lee 7.5

Pontotoc 7.6

Jefferson 15.1

April 2012 10,417 112,902 $15,383,991 82,758 4,648 2,718 $185.89

Alcorn 7.4

Tippah 9.9

Prentiss 8.3

Quitman 12.4 Tallahatchie 10.9

April ‘13 1,309,200 107,300 9.1 8.2 1,201,900

Benton 10.7

Union 6.8

Labor force and employment security data

STATE OF MISSISSIPPI Unemployment Insurance Data •• Initial UI Claims Continued Claims Benefits Paid Weeks Paid First Payments Final Payments Average Weekly Benefit

Tate 9.0

Panola 10.8 Coahoma 12.2

STATE OF MISSISSIPPI Labor Force Data Civilian Labor Force Unemployed Unemployment Rate (Adjusted) Unemployment Rate (Unadjusted) Employed

Marshall 10.3

4.8 - 6.1 6.2 - 9.0 9.1 - 14.2 14.3 - 17.3

Marion 9.2

Lamar 5.9

Pearl River 7.7

Hancock 7.7

Jasper 8.8

Clarke 9.7

Wayne 10.1

Jones 6.1

Forrest 7.4

Lauderdale 8.7

Perry 8.3

Stone 6.5

Harrison 7.8

Greene 9.5

George 9.4

Jackson 8.9

Source: Labor Market Data Publication April 2013 Design: Labor Market Information Department, MDES

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28 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 MISSISSIPPI BUSINESS PROFILES: DANIEL, COKER, HORTON & BELL

Ed Taylor of Daniel, Coker, Horton, and Bell sees “jackpot justice” as a thing of the past here in Mississippi. “If someone is trying to get something for nothing, it doesn’t usually work with today’s jurors,” he added.

STEPHEN MCDILL / Mississippi Business Journal

The new legal landscape Taylor sees change — for the better — in state’s legal environment n a recent meeting with Ed Taylor, a director and litigation practice manager for Daniel, Coker, Horton, and Bell, we talked about how the practice of law has changed in Mississippi in recent years. On the whole, Taylor believes that the system has improved considerably since the institution of tort reform. He has good reason to know, as the firm is one of the largest in Mississippi, with 51 attorneys and more than 100 total employees on its payroll. The firm’s key specialty is litigation, and it most often represents defendants in insurance cases, along with other civil cases. Among the firm’s clients are insurance companies and their client businesses and individual policyholders, as well we cities and counties that are sued, and many others. Taylor grew up in Lake Charles, La., attended McNeese State University and went on to law school at Mississippi College School of Law. He’s been in Mississippi ever since, and considers it his home. Based in the firm’s Gulfport offices, he tries cases throughout the state. Daniel, Coker, Horton, and Bell was founded in 1946, and today has offices in Gulfport, Jackson, and Oxford. The firm prides itself on its stability and reputation, and has never laid off an attorney due to tort reform or economic conditions. Taylor points to the firm’s commitment to provide “great service to our clients, at rates that are not extravagant” as a key element in their success.

I

Asked how he views settlement awards today, Taylor said that “juries nowadays seem to have a good measure of common sense. If someone is trying to get something for nothing, it doesn’t usually work with today’s jurors.” He thinks that by and large, “jackpot justice” has gone away in Mississippi, and he thinks that the Alan Turner concept of a “fair trial” is alive and well in our state. “There seems to be the misconception that if you defend an insurance company or business, you’re bound to lose,” he said. “That is just not the case today. Cases today get decided on their merits.” When asked what he thought of as some of Mississippi’s best assets, he pointed to people. “We have a great bunch of folks in our state, who have great work ethic and determination to succeed.” He pointed out some of the state’s great success stories, including Ingall’s Shipbuilding, Sanderson Farms and others, as being companies that are build on the great work done by their employees and managers. “We have a strong and stable business community in Mississippi,” he said. “Our state is business friendly, and this a great place to work, live, and ultimately, to retire.” That doesn’t mean the state is perfect, he pointed out. “Obviously, the most important issue in our state is improving our education system at all levels. That also means improving our technical education options,” he said. He also thinks there may be a need for some tax reform

in Mississippi, and suggests that this might be crucial to attracting more business to the state. “Other states are addressing this,” he said, “and we should probably do the same if we want to be competitive.” He thinks there will be strong growth in onshoring, health care, and other areas in years to come, “and we should be ready for it.” One concern he expressed is the whole issue of flood insurance in coastal zones. “The cost has just about gone out of sight,” he said, “This clearly has a strong impact on the affordability of homes at all level.” Aside from that, he believes the Coast has a “very bright future” once it has fully recovered from the negative effects of Hurricane Katrina. He also expressed concerns about how businesses and individuals will be impacted by the Affordable Care Act. “In particular, I know that many hospitals and medical facilities are deeply concerned about what’s coming their way. It’s difficult to know how it will all shake out.” What does Ed Taylor like most about practicing law? “Well, it’s stimulating and nerve-wracking at the same time,“ he said. “I love trial work, and I’m not the type to be happy sitting at my desk all day every day. I love getting in front of a jury, and when I win a case, it’s a great thrill and satisfaction. Of course, losing is something else, but you have to take both winning and losing as a part of the process.” With the number of cases he tries, and a strong record of successful outcomes, it would certainly seem that Ed Taylor is in the right job. Contact Mississippi Business Journal publisher Alan Turner at alan.turner@msbusiness.com or (601) 364-1021.


June 21, 2013

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» MISSISSIPPI LEADERS by Martin Willoughby

The road less traveled Wade takes chance, finds success with Harley-Davidson franchises

S

ometime in my teenage years, I came across Robert Frost’s moving poem The Road Less Traveled. As I have faced divergent paths in my journey in life, I think of his words, “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I, I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.” We all face these crossroads in life. The challenge is whether to “play it safe” or perhaps step out and take a risk. Most of the entrepreneurs and successful leaders I have interviewed took that road less traveled. It takes courage and commitment but as Frost would say – “It makes all the difference!” Lisa Wade, owner of the Southern Thunder Harley-Davidson, is one of those courageous entrepreneurs who took the divergent path. In 2006, after 26 years working in the non-profit world, she opened her HarleyDavidson dealership in Southaven, expanded to a second location in Memphis – Graceland Harley-Davidson in 2007 and a third location at Memphis Airport – Blues City Harley-Davidson in 2012. Wade attended West Virginia University and went

Up Close With ... Lisa Wade Title: Dealer/principal Southern Thunder Harley-Davidson; Graceland Harley-Davidson, Blues City Harley-Davidson Favorite Books: From Dawn to Decadence: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life 1500 to the Present — Jacques Barzun; John Adams — David McCullough; Love in the Time of Cholera — Gabriel García Márquez; When You Are Engulfed in Flames — David Sedaris First Job: “14 years old — mucking barns” Proudest Moment as a Leader: “During an employee breakfast, we were doing an ‘ice breaker’ to have the staff get to know one another better. The task was to go around the room and tell what your proudest moment was sofar. Joining the Southern Thunder Family was second only to the birth of children. That made me proud of what my team has accomplished.” Hobbies/Interests: Reading, travel, riding

on to obtain a doctorate of optometry from Southern College of Optometry in Memphis and a master’s in public administration from Memphis State University. She returned to Southern College of Optometry and served for years as a professor and in the administration of the college. She shared, “One of the most difficult decisions of my life was leaving a career I loved and upending my family’s life with the hours required in a retail operation.” Wade said that her business philosophy is the same that she gives her children. “If you want to succeed in any position, be the first

to arrive, be the last to leave, and as long as it is not illegal or immoral, be willing to do whatever it takes to care for your customer/client/patient.” That kind of work ethic is what it takes to succeed in business. I find that too many entrepreneurs today often don’t count the costs of what it will take to truly be successful. She added, “I believe that you do well by doing good.” I have been to her dealership and seen her passion for service and creating “community” with customers. Because of its strategic location along Interstate 55, she gets visitors from all over the world. Wade’s work

ethic and commitment to excellence have paid off as she has significantly grown her business. She has received numerous awards within Harley-Davidson and in her community, but Martin Willoughby she shared that a real turning point was “being selected by the Harley-Davidson Motor Company as one of the top six dealers in the U.S. based on customer satisfaction scores and business metrics such as growth and profitability.” Wade has a clear definition of success in her business. “When our customers are enjoying their Harley-Davidson ownership experience, our staff is successfully caring for their families, we're making a difference in the lives of those in need, and the business is making a great ROI — the business is successful.” Harley-Davidson is one of those iconic brands that allows customers to really connect with the brand. Their dealers like Wade play an integral part in that as they create a true “experience” and promote a family feeling with customers. Wade works hard, but you can tell she loves what she does. She shared her five-year plan with me which I loved: “Ride safe, play hard, work smart!” Wade is a great Mississippi success story and should serve as an encourager to anyone considering taking the “road less traveled.” Martin Willoughby is a business consultant and regular contributing columnist for the Mississippi Business Journal. He serves as Chief Operating Officer of Butler Snow Advisory Services, LLC and can be reached at martin.willoughby@ butlersnow.com.

This rebellious Rothschild was ahead of her time

T >> The Baroness By Hannah Rothschild Published by Alfred A. Knopf $26.95 hardcover

his is the fascinating story of a member of a fascinating family and written by a member of that family. The Baroness is the biography — or search for, as the subtitle says — of Nica, the rebellious Rothschild. By the time Nica was born in England in 1913, the Rothschilds were several generations removed from the Jewish slums of Frankfurt, Germany, and were the leading bankers of Europe. There had also been time for lots of Rothschilds to marry Rothschilds cousins, which may explain why some of them, including her father, were quite eccentric. Her father cared more for studying and collecting butterflies than banking. Thus, he gave his youngest daughter the unusual name of Pannonica, a rare butterfly. Little Nica, as she was called, grew up in extraordinary privilege. Winston Churchill attended her coming out party and many famous people were guests in the palatial Rothschild home in Hertfordshire. As a debutante she was taught to fly airplanes and intro-

duced to jazz. She married Baron Jules de Koenigswarter, settled in a chateau in France and had five children. She and her children narrowly escaped to England during World War II. Nica fought along side her husband with the Free French Army in Africa. She was a decoder, a driver and organized supplies and equipment. She became restless after the war and in the 1950s abandoned her marriage and moved to New York to be with jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk. The rest

of her life is devoted to helping Monk and other musicians. She was the ultimate groupie. Hannah Rothschild became curious about her great aunt and spent years talking with family members and others and drawing on archival material to find out who Nica really was. Nica had a passionate, colorful life in the New York jazz scene. Hannah Rothschild writes that Nica was ahead of her time, daring to live as she wanted. Literary Review writes of the book, “An honest portrait of an extraordinary life. It’s a gripping yarn that more than proves that life is stranger than fiction.” This book is interesting, easy to read and has 69 photos. The author has written for British Vanity Fair, Vogue, The Independent and The Spectator.

— Lynn Lofton, mbj@msbusiness.com

“An honest portrait of an extraordinary life.”


30 I Mississippi Business Journal I June 21, 2013 SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT: M!SO

Photos by Stephen McDill / MBJ

Right: The “i” in Miso is a stylized exclamation point. Left: Miso’s Larry Ratliff fires up a stir fry order for a customer. Below: Lunchtime itamae Jaclynn Leggett puts together a California sushi roll. Balls of white rice are pressed and rolled onto seaweed strips and topped with crab stick, avocado, cucumber and masago.

More than just sushi here. They want to see all the businesses thrive.” Customers can order from the restaurant’s brightly lit electronic menu and beginning at 4:00 PM Miso goes full service with wait staff available to By STEPHEN McDILL I STAFF WRITER come to the table and take orders. stephen.mcdill@msbusiness.com Miso diners can start their lunch or dinner off with a tasty selection of xclamations of praise for Jackson’s newest soups, salads or appetizers including Asian-themed dining spot have been flowedamame, spring rolls, lettuce wraps ing across the restaurant’s Facebook page and salmon carpaccio. since its May opening. For the more hungry diners, Miso “Drunken noodles and spring rolls are has a full-service stir fry, sushi and great,” says Carolyn Swanson. noodle bar. “Best red curry I’ve ever “One of the big, fun things about it is tasted. I’ll be back many, many times,” the people can build their own dishes,” says Pamela Gressett. Nooe says. “We do have some tradiAfter working at prominent restaurants in Chicago, Miso owner Grant Nooe is happy to Nooe returned home to start his first restaurant 400 East tional noodle dishes. Most people think of the Ramon nooget back to Far East cuisine years after dles as dried with a bunch of chemicals (but here) they are Capitol in 1989. selling his successful PanAsia restaurant fresh and cooked to order. We drop the pots in the water.” “It was ahead of its time,” Nooe says, adding that it concept to Canton-based hospitality corCustomers can also build their own stir fry at a wok bar would have worked better with today’s more active and reporation Jackie’s International. by picking fresh vegetables, meat and adding rice or noovitalized downtown Jackson. “This is something I’ve been working dles along with their favorite sauce. Nooe opened the Brick Oven Cafe in 1993 then conNooe on for years in my mind,” Nooe says. “I Those drunken noodles that diners are raving about are verted it to PanAsia in 2003. He moved out to capture realized there was a need for a quick caReservoir customers with the Fresh Market Cafe in 2002 made from seared ground chicken, onions, sweet peppers, sual approach especially at lunch.” tomato, basil, chilies and lo mein served on iceberg lettuce. then made a play for Lakeland Drive’s busy lunch crowd At Miso, people can get in and out of the restaurant near with Grant’s Kitchen in 2010. There are also plenty of maki sushi rolls to choose from the corner of Duling and State all conIn addition to managing his Street fairly easily. Parking constructed with restaurants (Fresh Market has gestion is mild for the early the freshest also since been sold to Jackie’s lunch crowd and there’s plenty ingredients International), Nooe is a Address: 3100 N. State Street, Jackson of spaces behind Duling Hall like avocado, EDAMAME: immature soybeans that are restaurant consultant working Hours: Monday-Saturday 11 AM-10 PM, cucumber, for those that can’t park on the on projects in Mississippi and boiled or steamed in the pod and served salted. street. Nooe says the key is to tuna, salmon Bar opens at 10 PM the Carolinas. SUSHI: a Japanese food usually consisting of have a destination for both the and yellowtail. When the backers behind the Contact: (769) 251-0119 rice, vegetables and raw fish. leisure lunch diners and the to“The thing struggling Fatsumo’s sushi bar Social Media: facebook.com/EatAtMiso about the go crowds. MAKI: a form of sushi that is rolled on in Fondren asked Nooe to help Raised in Jackson and a restaurant them with operations, he bamboo makisu and cut in cylindrical pieces graduate of Murrah High business is I jumped at the chance and the LO MEIN: a Chinese dish made with wheat School, Nooe studied music at listen to the people that come in here,” Nooe says. “Those restaurant was reborn as Miso. flour noodles the University of Southern “Fondren is a great area, such are the people that tell me the truth. If they have suggesMississippi before pursuing the WOK: round-bottomed cooking utensil a supportive community,” Nooe tions or things I listen to them and make changes. They culinary arts at the Le Cordon are the ones that ultimately keep the doors open.” says. “Its been a great thing for commonly used for stir fry, originated in China Bleu-owned Culinary & Hosme to be back in this area. The SAKI: Japanese rice wine pitality Institute of Chicago. lunch market is really strong

» Restaurant veteran brings Far East to Fondren

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FAR EAST GLOSSARY

M!SO


SALES MOVES

June 21, 2013

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>> JEFFREY GITOMER

Social media attraction can lead to a sale I am on it. I am into it. It’s attracting customers. It’s making sales. It’s free! What is it? It’s almost social media. It’s BUSINESS social media. It’s your ticket to customer and prospect awareness — who you are, how you think, how you serve, what you believe, what your value messages are, and what others think of you. And did I mention? It’s free. But the mere fact you participate isn’t any assurance it’ll pay off. In fact, the opposite is the norm. Most companies, most business people, and most salespeople have no idea of how to actually ATTRACT customers, potential customers, new followers, and connections. Even fewer companies and salespeople understand that business social media must be combined with, in conjunction with, and in harmony with all other internet and face-to-face marketing outreaches. The key word to understanding and implementing business social media actions that lead to attraction and connection success is VALUE. Value in the messages you tweet, post, and share. Value to your customers and prospects so they pass your message on to THEIR connections. SCENARIO: I tweet to my 65,000+ followers.

HOSPITALS

They resonate with it, and those who believe it’s worthy or applicable to their followers RE-TWEET it, or FAVOR it for their followers to see. That allows me to pick up another 100+ followers a day. SCENARIO: I post a thought, or a quote, or an idea on my LinkedIn home page. It’s broadcast to my 15,000+ LinkedIn connections. Many of them “share” it with all of their connections. It allows me to pick up more than 100 connections a week. SCENARIO: I upload a new video each week on YouTube. It’s posted on my ezine, on my blog, in my tweets, and on my Facebook page. Somewhere between 1,000 and 5,000 people will view it, like it, and not want to miss the next one — so they subscribe to my YouTube uploads. Those are real world examples that represent a small part of my attraction process. They give you a solid idea it’s not about what I write, post, or do; it’s about the RESPONSE to what I write, post, or do. It’s not about tweeting. It’s about being re-tweeted. I REPEAT: All business social media must be combined with your traditional business and Internet outreach. Here are the business, internet, AND business social media value-based messaging and marketing elements I use to transfer my messages and posts that attract and connect. Study them. Implement yours. » LinkedIn Jeffrey Gitomer – The number one business resource. I post my thought of the day or link of the day. RESPONSE: People like it and share it with their connections. That has lead to more than

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tal’s clinical nutrition services, said her staff works closely with the food services department, “making sure patients are getting what they need.” Patients on a regular diet have the option of ordering something off menu. “If meat loaf isn’t what they want, our staff is empowered to give them another option, even if it comes from the retail menu,” Sanders said. The food preparation schedule at Memorial is round the clock. Sanders said the cooks start work at 5:30 a.m. and the cafeteria opens for breakfast at 6:30 a.m. Patient trays have to be ready by 7 a.m. “After that it’s just nonstop,” she said. “We roll right into preparing for lunch at 11 a.m. Then after lunch, dinner starts up at 4 p.m.” The main cafeteria is not open for dinner but the food court offers burgers, fries and wraps until 11 p.m. On an average day, six employees do the cooking with oversight by chef Rodney Williams, a New Orleans native. Seven employees handle patient meal selection, deliver meals to patient rooms and retrieve dishes. “It’s a well-oiled machine,” said Sanders.

STOGNER

15,000 connections. » Twitter @gitomer I tweet three or four times a day. I usually send out one link a day. RESPONSE: I am re-tweeted or favored more than 100 times a day, and I gain between 50 and 100 new followers a day. Jeffrey Gitomer » Facebook business /jeffreygitomer — Like me, then read a bunch of the posts, then be inspired to comment or post. RESPONSE: All of my followers (likers) read it and all of the poster’s connections can see it, too. » YouTube channel BuyGitomer — People watch a few of my 300+ videos, RESPONSE: Subscribe » SalesBlog.com daily posts – Daily value-based posts sent to subscribers and available by search. All emails get you back to the blog. There are lots of offers on the landing page. RESPONSE: People become loyal followers, buy products, and tell others to subscribe. » Weekly e-zine SalesCaffeine.com — Ten years of weekly, real-world, value-based sales information. E-zine also has several offers to buy products and services. RESPONSE: People become loyal followers, buy products, and tell others to subscribe. » Bought “The Little Red Book of Selling,” or one of my other 11 books. RESPONSE: Loved it, bought more books, or bought a book for the whole team, or went online and found more about me.

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She and the Physical Therapy Association also have worked to advocate removing a therapy cap on the amount Medicare beneficiaries can receive. “We are working with senators and representatives to eliminate the therapy cap so it doesn’t limit the service patients can have access to,” Stogner said. Stogner posts most of her work-related advocacy information on Twitter with the handle @jstogner. Stogner would like employers to know that many people in wheelchairs have good mental abilities and make great employees. With proper assistive technologies, they can live life to the fullest, including holding a job,” Stogner said. “I wish the system was set up to support them better. Sometimes federal or state aid is lessened if they are able to get a job. They aren’t really encouraged to find work because there are actual penalties. Over the past few years, things have improved. But it still seems to be an obstacle.” In her time off, Stogner is still a sports fan. She considers one of the highlights of the out-of-state travel part of her work being able to catch a St. Louis Cardinal’s baseball game. She also enjoys her children’s sports activities. Stogner and her husband, Jason, have two children. Sam is 8, and Stone Jackson is 4. Sam plays baseball at Northwest Rankin Athletic Association, while Stone Jackson is more into soccer. “Even though I travel a lot, the job fits well with being a mom,” Stogner said. “My husband is also in outside sales, so

» Attended one of my public seminars. RESPONSE: Bought a ticket, had a blast, learned a ton, bought more books after the event and subscribed to my full suite of social media offerings. » Paid to hear one of my webinars. This came about as a result of our internal electronic marketing. RESPONSE: Person loves it, resonates with it, buys more, becomes loyal. » Spent some time on gitomer.com reading my free resources. Found me by searching. RESPONSE: Loved my free stuff, browsed my things for sale – and bought something. » Googled Jeffrey Gitomer to find out more about me. RESPONSE: Said WOW when 500,000+ entries appeared. Clicked around and bought something. » Googled “sales training” and found me on the first page. That’s a real lead. RESPONSE: Clicked. Called. Bought. You cannot control how people search. You must be findable by company, person, product, topic, and keywords that will get your name to pop up. It’s not one thing that creates attraction. It’s a strategic combination of a social, online, and faceto-face outreach MIX to attract interested buyers. It’s a confluence of value-based things that are available to customers and prospects. Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of 12 best-selling books, and his forthcoming book, “21.5 Unbreakable Laws of Selling,” will be available Sept. 3. Get the details at www.gitomer.com.

it is a team effort. Extreme communication is key.” Stogner is also a big fan of the family’s bands. Sam plays drums with the Fondren Guitars Rock Band while Jason plays in the Dirty Laundry Band, a country\Southern rock band. “I make a good groupie and a good band promoter,” Stogner said. “In my travels if I have to stay overnight, I do try to reach out and book gigs at local places that have music the Dirty Landry Band is appropriate for.”

Jack100.9FM, US 96.3, Mix 98.7, & Y101.7 The Radio People of Jackson Sales Executive Innovative company looking for our next top biller. Commission w/draw. EOE. Mail resume to:

New South Communications Attn: Sales Manager 265 Highpoint Dr. Ridgeland, MS 39157



Mbj june21 2013