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SPECIALISM PORTFOLIO cinematography by JOSEPH GUY


Specialism portfolio – Cinematography BA Film & Television – Year 3 London College of Communication University of the Arts London Project: BELLEVILLE By: Joseph Guy (GUY10292779) www.josephguy.co.uk josephalexanderguy@gmail.com 07789425195

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CONTENTS 4

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CONCEPT

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INSPIRATION

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SCOUT

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STORYBOARDS

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EQUIPMENT

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TEAM

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PLANS

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SHOOT

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RUSHES

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COLOUR GRADE

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THAT’S A WRAP!

JOSEPH GUY


CONCEPT

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INTRODUCTION This portfolio is a chronological assembly of my journey and participation as the cinematographer for the film BELLEVILLE. It illustrates my ideas and workflow through each stage of production and underlines the roles and responsibilities of the specialist role within a collaborative team project. The film was introduced to me by its director Fanny Hoetzeneder, who become my key collaborator throughout its duration, starting with script development and influences through to the finalized look within the post production process. The first time I read the script of BELLEVILLE it was clear to me that the role of the cinematographer would have an even greater importance than within most films. This is what drew my attention so enthusiastically to the project. I understood that the film would heavily rely upon its visuals to translate the world of the script to the screen. I knew that it would be liberating as the cinematographer to be free to design a unique world from scratch, as the fictional town of BELLEVILLE would play the most important character within the film. This identity of the town would be the coherent link between the characters seen through a series of vignettes as they are visited and re-visited throughout the film.

SYNOPSIS Set against the continuous passing of high-speed trains, Belleville, is a forgotten suburb of clockwork routine, isolation, loneliness and mystery. On the outside Belleville’s people live a life of content and comfort but on the inside many of its inhabitants are challenged by the absurdity of life, the loss of identity and their own self-reflection. There is the like-clockwork young skater who repetitively circuits the neighbourhood; the retired man Roger who attempts to find himself through hobbies which become more and more unusual; two men in a car who discuss their future and dig strange body-sized holes by night; the gazing neighbours who peer through their windows; the young boy in a car-park playing with his toy car, patiently waiting for, what seems all of his childhood life; the high speed train that flies through Belleville, never stopping. Portrayed in surreal and cinematic mini-vignettes over a period of 24 hours, the audience witness episodic shorts that portray the repetitive, peculiar and mysterious nature of Belleville and some of its peaople. The sense of mystery is juxtaposed against the normality of suburbia where the familiar and bizarre collide.

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CHARACTERS

Character breakdowns written by director Fanny Hoetzeneder

HAL 45, is an industry engineer who mainly works in offices. He is washed out, divorced, alone. Hal has been living his life the same way for almost 30 years. He has lost his enthusiasm and youth through the routine of his life and the daily glass of whisky. He has always been uncomplicated, generous and kind, he has the strongest sense of integrity and life tradition. Hal is a very devoted father. Physically, Hal isn’t the traditional image of a father. STANLEY 22, is Hal’s son. Confused about the world around him, Stanley is scared to get ‘stuck’ like Hal who he visits monthly. He is reserved and always seems in his own thoughts. Stanley has managed to leave Belleville behind him. He loathes coming back as the place makes him feel guilty and existentially sick. There is a strong relation between Stanley and Hal. DANNY 9, is a little boy playing on an electronic remote car in abandoned parking lot. Danny is a memory of Stanley when he was younger . Danny is a mature boy who enjoys spending time on his own in this particular parking lot. ALEX 18, is a skater teenager. When Alex skates, he becomes one with his board and becomes the symbol of Belleville and its isolated, forgotten aspects. Belleville and Alex are one, he is the one who shapes it, keeps it ‘real’. Ultimately, Alex is the reminiscence of vintage 90s skateboarding and what it represented for the teenagers who grew up with it. Alex’s life only exists when he is skating the suburbs of Belleville. Alex is partly inspired by the kids in Spike Jonze’s Scene from The Suburbs.

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DAVE 55, begins and concludes Belleville. Dave is a whisky ambassador. Dave has strong physical features: tall, a large stomach, dark hair and a bushy bear. Dave has been aged greatly over the years of his life. It is a routine for him to fall asleep in front of the television. ROGER 72, is newly retired, his three children are now away and parents themselves. Roger lives with his wife in a ‘stuck-in-time’ bedroom. Roger struggles to find something to pass his days. He is aware of the finals days are soon to be which makes him become a home bird. Roger is also disinterested in the outside world. Roger goes through phases, he feels more and more existentialist and have the common fear of being forgotten. Physically, Roger is small and skinny, bald and have white hair. NORA 69, is Roger’s wife. Nora has a more mature perspective on her retirement than her husband. In a way she understands what Roger goes through as it happened to her after she got married. Nora plays Roger’s muse when he attempts to paint as a hobby. She also tries to get Roger to do something. Nora used to be a beautician, she likes to look after herself. LOLITA 32, is the owner of a launderette, she looks after the washing machines. She constantly hears the sound of the machines and creates her own reality within the place. When it is a sunny winter day, she catches the sun patch coming from the windows onto her body. Lolita is a lost kid but she is natural and instinctively at ease within Belleville and its aspects. Lolita is the only character that truly escapes from Belleville

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SCRIPT - 1st draft

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INSPIRATION

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There are many visual references that inspired BELLEVILLE. Not only its visuals but many of its characters and themes. Fanny [director] uses photography as a key influence within her filmmaking and BELLEVILLE is no exception to this. Photographers such as Gregory Crewdson, Larry Sultan and Phillip Lorca-diCorcia all influenced the story of the script. The initial idea was to take these inspired photographs and turn them into short film scenes, this is how the structure of BELLEVILLE arrived as a series of character vignettes. This idea also influenced a visual style to keep the camera static and allowing the viewing to observe the image from a perspective similar to a photograph. The position stays still and voyeuristic, yet inside the frame a world is observed in true real time and motion. As well as photography, films and music videos also inspired the look of BELLEVILLE particularly in terms of lighting. My rule was to show a combination of natural and artificial lighting meeting within a single exposure. The best time to achieve this is during dusk and dawn - this is when many of the scenes in the film take place. It creates a juxtaposition of man and nature connecting the two within a single frame. I wanted them to become inseparable from one another creating a unified identity the is BELLEVILLE.

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PHOTOGRAPHY LARRY SULTAN Practicing Golf Swing, 1986

This photograph was the inspiration behind the conception of ROGER - a retired man that has lost the meaning to life and attempts to find fulfilment by introducing himself to random hobbies.

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PHILLIP-LORCA DICORCIA Hartford, 1979 | W, March #14 , 2000 Brent Booth, 21 years old, Des Moines, Iowa $30, 1990-92 | Chris: 28 years old; Los Angeles, CA, 1990-92

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GREGORY CREWDSON Beneath The Roses, 2003

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Crewdson is a photographer known for his cinematic style of photography that concentrates on people within the landscape of American suburbia. He stages these scenes in a similar manner to film productions, but he is interested in telling the story within a single frame. His photographs heavily inspired the lighting and compositional approach that I would take for BELLEVILLE. It was this ability to show the emotions of the characters from a wide voyeuristic perspective and never cutting into a more intimate position. This allowed the landscape to maintain as a constant protagonist that swallows the individuals within the frame.

“…the photograph is still and frozen — like a story that is forever frozen in between moments, before and after, and always left as a kind of unresolved question”

It became an important rule for me to show clarity and depth by separating of light and shadow within a wide frame that divides the image. The use of colour also creates these different moments within a single moment where frequencies of energy vary.

- Gregory Crewdson

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MUSIC VIDEOS

SCENES FROM THE SUBURBS A film by Spike Jonze Music by Arcade Fire

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OPEN EYE SIGNAL MUSIC VIDEO Music by Jon Hopkins Directed by Aoife McArdle

These two music videos influenced the character of ALEX, a teenage skater who is travelling through BELLEVILLE every time we see him. The reference of the OPEN EYE SIGNAL music video was sourced very close to production and months after ALEX had been conceived, however its main influence was that he is the always moving with the frame and the camera following him. Within BELLEVILLE, the camera only moves in the scenes with ALEX allowing us to see the town fly past.

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JOSEPHGUY GUY JOSEPH

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FILMS

NIGHT ON EARTH (1991) Directed by Jim Jarmusch Photographed by Frederick Elmes

MYSTERY TRAIN (1989) Directed by Jim Jarmusch Photographed by Robby M端ller

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PARIS, TEXAS (1984) Directed by Win Wenders Photographed by Robby Müller

The films of Jim Jarmusch played a motivational role towards the cinematography of BELLEVILLE. I admire is patients to tell stories. He tends not to overcomplicate his films with cutting and angles for coverage. He often plays a whole scene on a single composition. He focuses on mood rather than plot and his cinematographic collaborations with Robby Müller and Frederick Elmes encourage this style and support it through their ability to use light to augment the mood. As well a Jarmusch Müller also worked with Wim Wenders whose film PARIS, TEXAS came as a great source of inspiration. He often uses available fluorescents and neon lights that give a distinct greeny cyan tone to the images. It is the combination of the available light reacting to the film stocks colour balance that gives the film a surreal quality. Elmes also worked with David Lynch on films such as BLUE VELVET, which inspired Fanny’s vision when conceiving the script to reveal the unknown mysteries of suburban life. This is most recognisable in the scene where two men are digging a whole in the woods at night – why they are dong this is left unknown to the viewer.

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SCOUT

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During the location scouting I worked closely with Fanny Hoetzeneder (Director) and Laura Little (Production Designer) to find the right look for the fictional town of BELLEVILLE. We really wanted to find locations that didn’t have an obvious identity of suburban Britain. We were looking for those landscapes, buildings and interiors that were slightly out of place and unique but would still work well together to create consistency within the setting. We travelled all around the south of the UK: London, Surrey, Hertfordshire, West Sussex, Hampshire and Kent, from inner city laundrettes to the costal towns of Peacehaven and Dungeness. I was also concentrating on the light available within certain locations, trying to find the perfect places that could also give me backlight or crosslight to heighten the contrast on a hopeful sunny day. This was difficult as it was winter and the days were shoot an nearly always overcast.

A collection of 35mm stills that I took on some of the first location scouts, two of which made their way into the final film - the mobile home park in Elstead (top left) and the broken down abandoned car in Zeneke in West Sussex (top right).

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(above) A 35mm still I took when loction scouting at Brookmans Park station in Hertfordshire.

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(left) Woods near Openwood house in Farnham

(right) the living room of Openwood house in Farnham

(right) A housing estate in Peachaven, West Sussex

(left) Bourne Woods in Farnham

(right) a wooden bungalow in Dungeness, Kent

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STORYBOARDS

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DAVE Here are the storyboards of DAVE during the opening of the film. I was able to draw an accurate composition after the locations had been decided and confirmed. Fanny had a strong idea of how positioning for the character should be, which enabled me to construct the framing.

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RO GE R & N O R A

Similarly to DAVE’S storyboards, the framing and blocking for ROGER’S AND NORA’S scenes within their home were assembled after the location had been locked. I was able to shoot still photographs to decide the frames months before shooting. This way a clear sense of the films visuals can be communicated between the director and me so that we are in agreement prior to shooting. This helps the production flow more easily on the day.

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HAL & STANLEY

This is a visual concept of the scenes with HAL and STANLEY sitting in a stationary car with the engine still turning. I took photographs on location and cut out a car from Jim Jarmusch’s NIGHT ON EARTH and placed it within the frame to understand its scale and placement within a composition.

LOLITA

This is a very early storyboard that I made for the final scene with LOLITA in the laundrette. It takes place in the morning as the sun provides the day’s first rays of light. LOLITA lies on her back in a patch of light on the laundrette floor. The drawing was based on a previous laundrette that we found prior to the one we ended up using.

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TESTS

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35mm filmstock

Fujifilm F-250D 8562

shot with thea ARRICAM Lite (LT) I wanted to do some tests to decide on a format most suiting for the look of the film. Initially through conversation with Fanny, we didn’t want a super clean look even though we wanted as much detail as possible. Film was the original preference due to the granularity texture that it gives to the image. We wanted a raw quality of life within the still images that film could offer over a clinical digital image. I didn’t think the resolution of 16mm would be adequate so I suggested 2-perf 35mm as a cheapest option to shoot on 35mm.

Fujifilm F-250 8552

Fujifilm Eterna vivid 500 8547

Fujifilm Reala 500D 8592

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I tested 4 Fujifilm stocks that were close to expiration to keep the costs down. I was overall happy with the look of the film when testing it from 2 stops under-exposed up to 2 stops-over exposed. However I decided that the 2-perf 2.40:1 frame size would not be suitable for the film. I wanted to gain more height within the frame to make it closer to a photography aspect ratio. Shooting 3 or 4-perf film was out of our budget to buy and process, so we had to think about a digital approach that could still give us the look we wanted.

JOSEPH GUY


EQUIPMENT

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LIGHTING

4x4 KINO FLOW

3 HEAD DEDO KIT ARRI M40/25

HERE ARE SOME OF THE LIGHTS THAT I USED

Lighting was of primary importance for me for during this film. The supernatural ambiance created through light in Crewdson and diCorcia photographs as well as films such as BLUE VELVET and PARIS, TEXAS inspired the look of BELLEVILLE. I wanted to play with colour and the separation of light through contrasting hues within the frame. I did not aim to be restricted by justified lighting but to create an unnatural ambiance with a surreal quality to enhance the fictionalised town that contrasts with the mundane activities of daily life that is easily relatable. Like Crewdson, twilight was an important time to capture the combinations of light sources and colour from the natural and artificial. I had strict lighting set-ups that I knew would take a while to perfect. I wanted a variety of different light sources to contradict one another, such as practical incandescent lamps, florescent tubes, car headlights, sodium street-lights and the flickering cold light from a TV. As well as using the available light I needed to maintain the control by using studio light such as HMI’s, Kino flo’s, LED light panels and tungsten lights s uch as a Dedo kit and 2k Blonde. I also used a variety of coloured gel filters to achieve the different light sources such as sodium street-lights, tinted fluorescents and the car break-lights.

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CAMERA My camera choice after turning down 35mm and 16mm had been narrowed down to a digital format. My aim was to use a sensor size as big as possible to give me the perspective I wanted, closer to the larger format within photography to allow me to get wide shots whilst feeling more intimate with the characters within the frame. I understood that this would not be possible, however, RED’S 5K sensor within the EPIC was slightly larger than its competitors in ARRI’S ALEXA and SONY’S F55 and F65. The RED EPIC would also be the cheapest way to internally shoot raw and allow me to gain even more control over the visual information within post-production. As well as this, it enabled the possibility to shoot HDR within the camera. I had done some photography HDR tests that proved effective within difficult lighting conditions. It gave me even more freedom in the exposure, giving me even more detail within the shadows and highlights if necessary.

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OPTICS I chose to shoot with Cooke’s Series 4 lenses because of its superior optical quality. It gave me the detail that was after but without the exaggerated sharpness of the image that is evident from many competing lenses. I didn’t necessary strive for sharpness; I wanted a softer glow to the image but at the same time retaining the detail in resolution and clarity from the lighting. The S4’s provided this subtlety to the sharp images produces by the EPIC. I pushed this even further by using Tiffens Digital Diffusion filters. This simply blends the sharpness of the pixels within a digital image to give it a smoother, creamier quality that feels less digitalised and more organic. I also used Tiffens ND’s, a Circular Polariser and Gradation filters to maintain control over the image within certain conditions. I shot mainly with the 18mm and 25mm lenses, with the occasional use of a 32mm and a 50mm, which was singularly used for the close-up of the car upside down in the woods.

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PLANS

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FLOOR PLANS DAVE | LIVING ROOM (right) This are the floor plans for the scene inside DAVES living room. It was a simply camera set-up with only two shots, the second of which didn’t make it into the final edit. However, the lighting took several hours to get right - as the opening to the film I wanted to perfect the scene as best as I could. We ended up using over 12 light sourced within a single shot.

DAVE | FUNERAL (left) This scene was to be shot in the tower block at LCC. It was not the ideal location for the scene but the team agreed that we could make it work. The difficulty for me would be the lack of space. I knew is would be hard for me to backlight anything to create depth. My plan was to incorporated that overhead fluorescents and contrast it against tungsten practical lamps within the scene.

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ROGER’S & NORA’S After finding the location for ROGER & NORA’S home I made a thorough plans for each scene that would take place. I had to be cautious to overload the circuit with to many lights. My Sparks were great at running the cabling from different circuits around the house and even pulling power from a generator outside. Within the space of 10 hours we had to light a scene for evening, dusk, night and morning. Making these plans was essential prior to shooting these scenes.

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HAL & STANLEY | WOODS I knew that the scene with HAL & STANLEY digging a hole in the woods at night would be difficult to execute. I wanted a to achieve a highly stylised, almost dream sequence, during the night scenes. My aim was to create clash of colours – a cold blueness from the moon in the night sky against the warm yellowish tungsten from the car headlights. I wanted this contrast of colour to brush on either side of every tree surrounding the two men. I also wanted the car headlights to act as the key light for the character digging the hole. Shooting digitally definitely helped during this scene as I was pushing the ISO further than its so-called 800 sweet spot that would have proven difficult with film.

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SHOOTING SCHEDULE Changes  to  schedule  

  Saturday  11th  January  –  Openwood  House     09.00  –  Unit  arrives  at  location  (2  ½  hours  before  first  shot)   09.30  –  Actors  arrive  at  Farnham  Station  (Check  train  times)     –  Meg  picks  up  (2  hours  before  first  shot)   10.00  –  Actors  in  hair  and  makeup  (1  ½  hours  before  first  shot)     10.30  –  Camera  crew  begin  set  up  (1  hour)  &  BLOCKING   11.30  –  First  shot  scene  6  (Golf  scene)  (30  minutes)   12.00  –  Change  of  set  up  (30  minutes)   12.30  –  Second  shot  scene  6  (Golf  scene)  (30  minutes)     13.00  –  LUNCH  BREAK  (1  hour)   14.00  –  Camera  crew  begin  set  up  for  next  scene  (2  hours)     16.00  –  First  shot  scene  14  (Roger  at  window)  (30  minutes)   16.30  –  Change  of  set  up  (30  minutes)   17.00  –  Second  shot  scene  14  (Roger  at  window)  (30  minutes)   17.30  –  Change  of  set  up  for  next  scene  (1  hour)     18.30  -­‐  First  shot  scene  10  (Roger  watching  TV)  (30  minutes)   19.00  –  Change  of  set  up  (15  minutes)   19.15  –  Second  shot  scene  10  (Roger  watching  TV)  (30  minutes)     19.45  -­‐  COFFEE  BREAK  (15  minutes)   -­‐  Meg  drops  actors  to  Farnham  Station     20.00  PACK  DOWN  (90  minutes)   21.30  Unit  moves  back  to  accomodations  (DINNER  AT  ACCOMODATIONS.)     Sunday  12th  January  –  Bourne  Woods     11.00  –  Unit  arrives  at  location  (4  ½  hours  before  first  shot)   11.30  –  Art  department  begin  set  up  (4  hours  before  first  shot)   12.30  –  Camera  crew  begin  set  up  (3  hours)  &  BLOCKING     13.30  –  Actors  arrive  Farnham  Station  (check  train  times)   -­‐  Meg  picks  up  (2  ½  hours  before  first  shot)   14.00  –  Actors  in  costume  and  makeup  (2  hours  before  first  shot)   15.00  –  BLOCKING  (1  hour  before  first  shot)     14.00  –  First  shot  scene  16  (toy  car)  (15  minutes)   14.15  –  Change  of  set  up  (15  minutes)   14.30  –  Second  shot  scene  16  (toy  car)  (15  minutes)     15.30  –  First  shot  scene  12  (Digging)  (30  minutes)   16.00  –  Change  of  set  up  (45  minutes)  

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15.30  –  First  shot  scene  12  (Digging)  (30  minutes)   16.00  –  Change  of  set  up  (45  minutes)   16.45  –  Second  shot  scene  12  (Hal  leaning)  (30  minutes)   17.15  –  Change  of  set  up  for  next  scene  (45  minutes)     -­‐  Actors  finished  filming  –  Meg  drops  actors  at  Farnham  Station.     18.45  –  PACK  DOWN  (2  hours)   20.45  –  Unit  moves  to  accommodations  (DINNER  AT  ACCOMODATIONS)     Monday  13th  January  –  Elstead  Park     06.30  –  Unit  arrives  at  location.  (1  ½  hours  before  first  shot)   07.00  –  Camera  crew  begin  set  up  (1  hour)    –  Actors  arrive  at  Farnham  station  (Check  train  times)   -­‐ Meg  picks  up  actors   07.15  –  Actors  in  costume  and  Makeup   07.30  -­‐  BLOCKING     08.00  –  First  shot  scene  17  (Roger  scene)  (30  minutes)   08.30  –  Change  of  set  up  (60  minutes)   09.30  –  Second  shot  scene  17  (Roger  scene)  (30  minutes)     10.00  LUNCH  AT  PRODUCTION  OFFICE?     10.30  –  Camera  crew  begin  set  up  (1  ½  hour)  &  BLOCKING   12.00  –  First  shot  scene  3  (Hal  &  Stanley)  (45  minutes)   12.45  –  Change  of  set  up  (45  minutes)   13.30  –  Second  shot  scene  3  (Hal  &  Stanley)  (30  minutes)     14.00  –  Camera  crew  begin  set  up  (1  hour)  &  BLOCKING   15.00  –  First  shot  scene  1  (Alex  skating)  (1  hour)   16.00  –  PACK  DOWN  (30  minutes)     16.30  Unit  moves  back  to  accommodations  (DINNER  AT  ACCOMODATIONS.)     Tuesday  14th  January  –  Zeneka     05.30  –  Begin  set  up  (90  minutes)     06.00  –  Actors  (Hal  and  Stanley)  arrive  at  Farnham  Station.   -­‐  Meg  picks  up  actors   06.15  –  Actors  in  costume  and  makeup   06.30  -­‐  BLOCKING     07.00  –  First  shot  scene  7  (Hal  &  Stanley)  (45  minutes)   07.45  –  Change  of  set  up  (30  minutes)   08.15  –  Second  shot  scene  7  (Hal  &  Stanley)  (30  minutes)   08.45  -­‐  PACK  UP  KIT  (15  minutes)   -­‐  Actors  finished  filming  –  Meg  drop  them  at  Farnham  Station.    

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09.00  -­‐  LUNCH  BREAK  BACK  AT  ACCOMODATIONS     11.00  –  Begin  set  up  (90  minutes)     11.30  –  Actor  (Danny)  Arrives  on  location  (does  the  Mum  drive?)   11.45  –  Actor  in  costume  and  makeup   12.00  -­‐  BLOCKING     12.30  –  First  shot  scene  5  (Danny)  (30  minutes)   13.00  –  Change  of  set  up  (30  minutes)   13.30  –  Second  shot  scene  5  (Danny)  (30  minutes)   14.00  –  Begin  set  up  for  next  scene  (60  minutes)     15.00  –  First  shot  scene  9  (Danny)  (30  minutes)   15.30  –  Change  of  set  (30  minutes)   16.00  –  Second  shot  scene  9  (Danny)  (30  minutes)   -­‐  Danny  finished  filming   -­‐  PACK  UP     17.00  –  Unit  leaves  for  accomodations     NB.  NO  ALEX     Wednesday  15th  January  –  Openwood  House     06.30  –  Begin  set  up  for  scene  (2  hours)   07.00  –  Actors  arrive  at  Farnham  Station     -­‐  Meg  picks  up  actor.   07.15  –  Actor  in  Costume  and  Makeup   08.00  –  BLOCKING     08.30  –  First  shot  scene  1  (Dave)  (15  minutes)   09.00  –  Change  set  up  (30  minutes)   09.30  –  Second  shot  scene  1  (Dave)  (15minutes)   09.45  –  PACK  UP     10.30  –  LUNCH  BREAK     11.30  –  Unit  moves  to  London/Alex  scenes?     Thursday  16th  January     11.30  -­‐  EVERYONE  OUTSIDE  WAITING   12.00  -­‐  Begin  set  up  (1  hour)     -­‐  LOLITA  ARRIVES   12.30  -­‐  BLOCKING   13.00  -­‐  First  shot  scene  4  (book)  (20mintes)   13.20  –  Second  shot  scene  4  (book)  (20  minutes)   13.40  –  Third  shot  scene  4  (book)  (20  minutes)  

14.00  –  Begin  set  up  for  next  scene  (1  hour)     14.30  -­‐  BLOCKING   15.00  –  First  shot  scene  11  (window)  (30  minutes)   15.30  –  Change  set  up  (15  minutes)   15.45  –  Second  shot  scene  11  (window)  (15  minutes)   16.00  –  Set  up  next  scene     16.15  –  BLOCKING   16.30  –  First  shot  scene  15  (sun  patch)  (30  minutes)   17.00  –  PACK  DOWN     -­‐  Lolita  finished  filming     18.00  –  LEAVE  LOCATION     Saturday  18th  January  -­‐  LCC     10.30  –  Arrive  at  location  à  Set  up   12.00  –  LUNCH  BREAK  (1  hour)   13.00  –  Continue  set  up     -­‐  Dave  arrives     14.00  –  First  shot  scene  20  (funeral)  (30  minutes)   14.30  –  Change  set  up  (30  minutes)   15.00  –  Second  shot  scene  20  (funeral)  (30  minutes)   15.30  –  Pack  up     Sunday  19th  January  –  Brookmans  Park     Need  to  discuss  since  no  trains,  who  can  drive.  


SHOT LIST Belleville Shot List

Running Order Scene # 1 1 2 1 3 2 4 3 5 3 6 4 7 4 8 4 9 5 10 5 11 6 12 6 13 7 14 7 15 8 16 9 17 9 18 10 19 10 20 11 21 11 22 12 23 12 24 13 25 14 26 14 27 15 28 16 29 16 30 17 31 17 32 18 33 18 34 19 35 20 36 20

Shot # 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 2

Shot Type static static dolly back crane/static static static static static static static static static crane/static static dolly back crane/static static static static static crane/static static static dolly back static static static static static static crane/static static crane/static dolly back static static

Shot Angle Eye Line High Eye Line High Eye Line Eye Line Eye Line Eye Line High Eye Line Eye Line Low High Eye Line Eye Line High Low Eye Line Eye Line Eye Line High High Eye Line Eye Line Eye Line Eye Line High High High Eye Line High Eye Line High Eye Line High High

Shot Size LS MS ELS ELS LS LS MS MS ELS LS LS LS ELS LS LS LS LS LS MS LS MS ELS LS LS LS MS LS LS MS LS LS LS ELS LS MS ELS

Duration 00:00:10

Location Openwood house Openwood house Elstead Park Elstead/ The Drive Elstead/ The Drive Barbican laundtrette Barbican laundtrette Barbican laundtrette Zeneka car park Zeneka car park Openwood house Openwood house Zeneka car park Zeneka car park The Drive, Ifold Zeneka car park Zeneka car park Openwood House Openwood house Barbican laundtrette Barbican laundtrette Bourne Woods Bourne Woods Maybe New Heaven Openwood house Openwood house Barbican laundtrette Zeneka or Bourne woods Zeneka or Bourne woods Elstead Park Elstead Park Brookmans Park station Brookmans Park station Not yet decided LCC T1402 LCC T1402

Description of Action Dave sleepng in Sofa Dave sleeping in Sofa Alex skating towards camera Hal and Stanley pulled up in a car Hal and Stanley pulled up in a car Lolita reading a book in laundrette Lolita reading a book in laundrette washing maching spinning Danny playing with remote car Danny playing with remote car Roger playing golf in living room Roger playing golf, Nora walks in Hal and Stanley talking in parked car Hal and Stanley talking in parked car Alex skating towards camera Danny playing with remote car Danny drives the car as far as he can Roger sits in chair watching TV Roger sits in chair watching TV Lolita walk to the window Lolita looks out the window stanley digging a whole in the woods Hal learning on the car watching Stanley Alex skating around Nora in Bed, Roger looking out window Roger looking out the window Lolita lying in a sun patch remote car upsidedown in muddy wood remote car upsidedown in muddy wood Roger walking down the street Roger looking up at telephone cable Hal and Stanley talking in parked car Hal and Stanley talking in parked car Alex stopping at the end of Belleville Dave, lying in a coffin Dave, lying in a coffin

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Actors Dave Dave Alex Hal, Stanley, Alex Hal, Stanley Lolita Lolita Lolita Danny Danny Roger Roger, Nora Hal, Stanley Hal, Stanley Alex Danny Danny Roger, Nora Roger Lolita Lolita Hal, Stanley Hal, Stanley Alex Roger, Nora Roger Lolita no one no one Roger Roger Hal, Stanley Hal, Stanley Alex Dave Dave

Lens 18mm 32mm 18mm 25mm 32mm 14mm 32mm 50mm 32mm 32mm 14mm 18mm 32mm 50mm 18mm 32mm 50mm 18mm 32mm 14mm 32mm 32mm 32mm 32mm 14mm 32mm 18mm 32mm 85mm 25mm 25mm 32mm 50mm 32mm 32mm 25mm

Filter Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff, Polar, sunset grad Dig diff, Polar, sunset grad Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, sunset grad Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff Dig diff, Polar Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff, Polar Dig diff Dig diff Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff, Polar Dig diff Dig diff

Equipment Short Legs Short Legs van/car moose bars/steadycam crane Short Legs Short Legs Short Legs Short Legs crane Short Legs Short Legs Short Legs crane Short Legs van/car moose bars/steadycam crane camera on sandbags Long legs Short Legs Long legs crane Long legs Short Legs van/car moose bars/steadycam Short Legs Long legs Long legs Short Legs Short Legs Long legs crane Long legs crane van/car moose bars/steadycam Long legs Long legs

JOSEPH GUY


SHOOT

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JOSEPH GUY


PRODUCTION STILLS by Stephanie Wilson

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ABOVE LEFT On location at Elstead park shooting HAL & STANLEY opening scene ABOVE RIGHT Openwood House shooting ROGER & NORA’S scenes CAMERA REPORTS (ABOVE) filled out by my 2nd AC Max MacGechan

LEFT On Location at Zeneka shooting the dusk scene with HAL & STANLEY

(ABOVE) Me on locatrion in the barbican laundrette

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JOSEPH GUY


RUSHES

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A selection of frames from the camera rushes.

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JOSEPHGUY GUY JOSEPH


COLOUR GRADE

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UN-GRADED

GRADED Here are 3 example of ungraded to graded shots used within the film. I wanted to have a very vivid and deep colour for the sodium streetlights, which is evident in some of the night scenes. I also wanted to add contrast but not by crushing the black, I still wanted to keep detail in the shadows. I also accentuated the blueness in the night sky to contrast the artificial light. A lot of the time I was simply adjusting the white balance to create a coherent look through the films.

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JOSEPH GUY


THAT’S A WRAP!

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REFLECTION The concept of BELLEVILLE really resonated with me and inspired my creative process as the cinematographer. Like with everything film I make, my individual workflow stems from the script which acts as a catalyst to my creativity. My collaborative workflow set the rules for my thinking and practice, always staying true to the intentions of the director. Yet, I was still able to have an enormous amount of freedom over the construction of the films visual language. As a student I was able to push the boundaries of my practice to areas that I hadn’t visited before, allowing me to grow in the role of a cinematographer. My primary interest is light and this project enabled me to be playful and experimental in my approach to achieve a surreal quality that contradicts the ordinary, repetitive nature of suburban life. This project taught me the essential need of planning within pre-production and the influence it can have over creative decision-making. I was able to study many inspiring artists that encouraged me as an individual as well as the production of the film, allowing me to stay motivated towards filmmaking and telling stories through images.

(above) The Belleville crew wrap photograph

It was also a great experience to work so closely with a camera and lighting team who were always reliant and the to support me. I feel that there are many things that I would have done differently if I were to do it again, which proves how much I learnt from the whole experience in both the creative and technical fields.

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JOSEPH GUY



Belleville cinematography portfolio