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Baylor Lariat W E ’ R E T H E R E W H E N YO U C A N ’ T B E MONDAY

AUGUST 21, 2017

B AY L O R L A R I AT. C O M

Opinion | A2

Arts & Life | B1

Sports | C4 & C5

Dear President...

Waco’s art culture

Football is upon us

Expectations and gratitude in a letter to our new president.

See our players prepare for the upcoming season.

Waco artists are featured in Waco 52 until Aug. 31.

Free Food, Festivities, Family Lariat

transitions to two days of print PHOEBE SUY Staff Writer

Jessica Hubble | Lariat Photographer

FUN ON THE FOUNTAIN Festival at the Fountain took place Thursday night, welcoming freshmen from near and far to campus and giving parents a chance to say goodbye. The festival kicked off the start of Welcome Week and featured local vendors from around Waco, such as Lula Jane’s, Steel City Pops and Club Sandwich.

Times are changing, and so is The Baylor Lariat. Beginning this fall, the Lariat will only publish in print on Tuesdays and Fridays while broadening its digital presence. Breaking news and university developments will be published on the Lariat website, mobile app, social media accounts, Waco Cable Channel 18 and Morning Buzz e-mail newsletter. “Our goal is to be the best source of information about Baylor,” said assistant media adviser Julie Reed. “None of that is changing. What is

LARIAT >> Page A7

New president, new beginnings Livingstone shares summer experiences and vision for university BAILEY BRAMMER Editor-in-Chief After a summer spent interacting with incoming freshmen and receiving her Baylor Line jersey, as well as being hard at work as president of the university, Dr. Linda Livingstone is eager to take on the new school year and welcome the class of 2021. Livingstone spoke with Lariat about her and her husband’s experiences on campus this summer, as well as her plans to continue to move the university toward a bright future in spite of the turmoil of the last year and a half. Q: You and your husband came from Move-In today. Tell me a little bit about what that experience was like. I have to tell you, it was an amazing experience. I had heard about it, people had described it, but you really don’t get a feel for it until you actually are there and see it and experience it or participate in it. We loved being there and helping. We loved seeing our students and faculty and the staff actually moving people in, but it was just really fun to see some of the new students and their parents, and the way we do move

Baylee VerSteeg | Lariat Photographer

MOVE IT, MOVE IT President Livingstone showed her appreciation and care for the Baylor community by helping freshmen move into their dorms on Wednesday.

in reduces the stress so dramatically for people in the move-in process, I mean I remember when I moved in, and I was by myself, and my parents couldn’t come with me and I had to empty my car by myself. And I don’t know how many carloads I had to take up to my room by myself, and

you’re just exhausted, and you’re overwhelmed. And so the way we do this is spectacular. Q: I know you also took part in some Line Camp activities as well this summer and you did the trip to Independence to see where Baylor

began. How was it seeing students see that and see that’s where the school’s foundations started? I had heard what a fabulous and moving experience it was. It is one of those things that you kind of have to do it and experience it to really understand it because, again, I had heard it described, and after the students all got there in their jerseys and went through the columns, they had Brad and I go through as well. And when we walked behind the columns and the students and Line Camp leaders are lined up and they are all high-fiving us and saying “welcome home, President Livingstone, and they gave us our jerseys and we put them on, it was a very emotional experience and very moving. And then you walk through those columns, and I can just see how profound an experience it is, particularly, it certainly was for us, and for these freshmen to really sort of be walking into the Baylor family in a very significant and very visual and symbolic way. Q: Last time we spoke, we talked about you and your husband finding your own way to impact students and interact with them. How’s that going? A couple things, I would say.

We’ve eaten at Penland several times this summer, so one of the things we’re going to try to do this summer is get around to the dining halls. I’ve heard we need to have pancakes at Teal on Thursday nights, and go to Brooks for their family dinner some Sunday evening. To see students in the setting where they are, living life, is a great thing and I really don’t like to cook either, so any chance I can let someone else cook for me, I’m happy to do. We’ll certainly do as much of that as we can since we live right on campus and that’s easy to do. Q: Are you excited for the upcoming football season? I am excited! I have to say, I’m excited about all our sports coming up. We have volleyball and soccer as well as football coming up, so we’re going to certainly try to get around and spread our attendance to catch a variety of sports and support all of our athletic teams. It’s an exciting time with a new coach, and I know Coach Matt Rhule has been working very hard with the team, and he’s done such a great job of representing the university since he’s been on board. I’m looking forward to his

PRESIDENT >> Page A7

Sexual assault lawsuits continue as school year begins PHOEBE SUY Staff Writer While welcoming a new president this summer, Baylor’s recent sexual assault scandals continue to follow the university. In addition to the filing of the latest in a series of lawsuits against Baylor and the settlement of a previous suit in the span of four months, the university was ordered in a third existing lawsuit to release underlying information from the Pepper Hamilton investigation. Baylor hired Pepper Hamilton law firm in fall 2015 to conduct an independent review of Baylor’s institutional response and compliance to Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The nine-month investigation ultimately found that Baylor failed to implement Title Vol.118 No. 1

IX and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA). Pepper Hamilton provided Baylor with 105 recommendations, 80 percent of which have been implemented and the remaining 20 percent are in various stages of work, according to Baylor’s “Our Progress” website. HERNANDEZ LAWSUIT SETTLED One of five Title IX lawsuits against Baylor was settled on Aug. 15. Plaintiff Jasmin Hernandez settled with the university and requested to dismiss former Baylor Head Football Coach Art Briles and former Athletic Director Ian

LAWSUITS >> Page A6

Lariat File Photo

LEGAL STRIFE Baylor has had three sexual assault lawsuits filed against them in the past four months, with the Hernandez lawsuit being settled on Tuesday

© 2017 Baylor University


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opinion

Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

b ay lo r l a r i at.c o m

We want to hear it. Send us your thoughts: LariatLetters@baylor.edu

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COLUMN

EDITORIAL

Embrace change with The Lariat BAILEY BRAMMER Editor-in-Chief

If this is your first time picking up an issue of the Baylor Lariat, or first time scrolling through o u r app or website, welcome to your No. 1 source f o r Baylor news. Whether you are brand new to our publication or are a longtime follower of our work, thank you for readership and support. This year, the Lariat has made a few considerable changes that may or may not affect the way you receive your news. Baylor’s school newspaper has been around since 1900 and has most recently been printed four days a week. However, as technology and society continue to evolve, journalism has made leaps and bounds in the digital world, the Lariat is no exception to this. Our staff of around 40 students has the unique opportunity this year to redefine the way we present news to the Baylor community. While we are decreasing our print days to twice a week, this does not mean that we will be producing less content. Instead of classifying our publication as “print first” or “digital first,” I’d like to set the standard that we will do our very best to simply have your Baylor news first. As someone who has always enjoyed unfolding a freshly printed newspaper and running my fingers over the pages to see if the ink has dried yet, this change was a bit difficult for me to grasp at first. However, as many of us learn when we embark on a new adventure, such as college in an unfamiliar city or taking on a different job or beginning a new friendship or relationship, change can be a

good thing. This semester, as you dive into your classes and extracurriculars, whether for the first time as a wide-eyed freshman or the last time as a seasoned senior, remember that nothing stays the same for very long. Change occurs whether we seek it or not, and we can fight it all we want, but it will happen regardless, so why not embrace it? And while change will develop of its own accord, do not forget that you can also catalyze change. If you are unhappy with a situation in your own life, or perturbed by the treatment of others, you have the ability to make a difference (it may be cliche, but it’s true). Speak up and share your thoughts with others, and with the Lariat. We are always honored to receive and publish letters from our readers on issues they are passionate about. As playwright and screenwriter Tom Stoppard said, “I still believe that if your aim is to change the world, journalism is a more immediate shortterm weapon.” And as you partake in your own natural and purposeful transitions throughout this semester, we hope you will continue to pick up the Lariat on Tuesdays and Fridays, that you will continue to visit our website at baylorlariat.com, that you will continue to scroll through the Morning Buzz before class, that you will continue to tune in to our Lariat Radio play-by-play and that you will continue to watch LTVN tackle breaking stories on camera. While we are changing just as much as you are, we still strive to be your source for all things Baylor and appreciate every viewer and reader, even if you just pick up the paper for the crossword. Our staff works day and night to deliver to you the most accurate, timely and interesting news possible, and it is our privilege to continue to do so. Bailey Brammer is a junior journalism and history major from Phoenix.

Rewon Shimray | Cartoonist

Dear President Livingstone

The Baylor Family is opening our arms to you Welcome to Baylor! It’s been evident throughout the summer that your involvement in the Baylor community and your desire to engage with everyone is genuine. We appreciate that, and we wanted to let you know. The level of respect you have for our traditions, as well as the characteristics that make Baylor unique, is a testament to the way we want to see Baylor move forward. We hope you continue this constant communication throughout the year. You’ve made an impact on students so far with the continued communication, that we hope it doesn’t stop as the year picks up and the “newness” of your presence wears off. We like the transparency of your priorities and your goals as president this year. Communication is the best

way to facilitate collaboration, and they always say that two are better than one. We hope through your constant openness and Presidential Perspective emails, everyone stays on the same page. As you said in your first Presidential Perspective email, Baylor has experienced periods of triumph and turmoil since 1845, so the next actions that you take will define Baylor moving forward. We no longer want to be “that school.” You know, the “one with the Title IX problem.” We hope that a focus of your time here is to restore the Baylor tradition, the tradition of excellence, the vision and values, the “Pro Ecclesia, Pro Texana, Pro Futuris” motto. It’s important to reflect on and learn from the past, but also important to look forward.

We hope part of your mission is to link the past to a positive vision for what is to come around the corner. Part of Baylor’s vision is to “offer a distinctive voice to global conversations about crucial issues - such as social responsibility, health care, economic growth, human rights, poverty, diversity, and sustainability in a way that few others can.” Baylor has a global imprint, and we believe that with you as our president we can maintain that. This is a place of growth and development, and we want for you to continue to push this university to do just so. We have confidence that you will carry on the legacy of the footprint this university has, and that you lead it to make strides rather than plateau. You’re the new face of

Baylor, and that is an honor. Everything you do represents the university. Our wish is that you represent this school in the best way possible. We hope that you are able to represent Baylor’s values well in public. Being under the public eye must be hard at times, but you get to do so for this amazing Baylor family, and for that we are appreciative. We have faith that you will lead Baylor to take a stand for the future. We will no longer be bogged down by past events. We will move forward. We will look out for each other. We will keep our arms around each other’s shoulders. And we believe that you will keep your hands over all of us, as a past president once said, helping the Baylor family to “face the future boldly.”

COLUMN

Beginning again: Baylor chaplain welcomes students DR. BURT BURLESON Guest Columnist

And so, we begin again. This is the way of things in our world... the planet spins and a new day dawns... things tilt and fall ushers in another school year... we leave one chapter of life to enter a new one. We’re always beginning again and though not “starting from scratch,” the canvas is often pretty clean. Beginning again is the way God infuses grace into the universe and into our lives. Though our stories have

predictable plots and themes, we’re never bound by them because the nature of... nature is that we can always s t a r t over. We always get “doovers.” A n d so, we b e g i n again. This is the way of things in any human story. Though there are so many frustrating

limitations, there are infinite possibilities. Human beings can make choices and we can make an effort. We can plan a plan, dream a dream, risk a risk, see what needs to be seen. We can get rid of an old habit and create a new one. There is this capacity for intention, where we are made to “mean to.” We have a will that can be directed and changes things. And so, we begin again. But it’s never something we do alone. This, I think, is what the Psalmist gets at by saying, “God’s mercies are new each morning.” It’s not just that God

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bailey Brammer*

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STAFF WRITERS Brooke Hill Julia Vergara Phoebe Suy Savannah Cooper

DESIGN EDITOR Kaitlyn DeHaven* COPY EDITOR Adam Gibson

seems to shake our lives like an Etch A Sketch artist and offer us a clean slate, it’s more like there’s a new gift, some new grace that is operative. It’s a new mercy and it wasn’t quite there in the same way the day before, so that when we step into a new day, a new semester, a new home, a new chapter... a new anything, when we step forward, we step into some merciful flow. There is an eternal yes to our yes when we choose to begin again. The Apostle Paul names this synchronicity when he writes that “all things are

SPORTS WRITERS Ben Everett Collin Bryant

MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISTS Baylee VerSteeg Jessica Hubble Will Barksdale AD REPRESENTATIVES Josh Whitney Evan Hurley Cooper Hess Quinn Stowell MARKETING REPRESENTATIVE Luke Kissick Tobé Ulokwem

General Questions: Lariat@baylor.edu 254-710-1712 Sports and Arts: LariatArts@baylor.edu LariatSports@baylor.edu Advertising inquiries: Lariat_Ads@baylor.edu 254-710-3407

working together for those who love God and are called according to God’s purpose.” This creative, alchemical and redemptive interaction is what happens when we say yes to a life that is unfolding. Our willingness is met by God’s willingness. And so, we begin again. We all do, here in the fall semester at Baylor University in 2017. What do you want in this new beginning? Your desires are a part of this school year’s equation. What are you willing to do? Your willingness to direct your intention, to

“mean to,” is going to matter. What seems to be unfolding in front of you? Can you perceive it? That’s often the fun part of beginning again. Be watching for something that seems to be served up just for you. Live each day assuming there might be some really wonderful surprise and ready to say, “well how ‘bout that.” It’s a wonderfully, magical universe, a holy and sacramental world surrounds us. And so, we begin again. Dr. Burt Burleson is the University Chaplain and Dean of Spiritual Life & Missions.

Opinion The Baylor Lariat welcomes reader viewpoints through letters to the editor and guest columns. Opinions expressed in the Lariat are not necessarily those of the Baylor administration, the Baylor Board of Regents, the student body or the Student Publications Board.

Editorials, Columns & Letters Editorials express the opinions of the Lariat Editorial Board. Lariat letters and columns are the opinions of an individual and not the Baylor Lariat.

Lariat Letters To submit a Lariat Letter, email Lariat_Letters@baylor.edu. Letters should be a maximum of 400 words. The letter is not guaranteed to be published.


News

Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

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Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

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ON THE WEB >>

Off-campus housing and how to avoid break-ins

By: Jessica Babb

Move-In 2017

WELCOME, BABY BEARS! Baylor’s newest freshman class moved into campus on Wednesday and Thursday with the help of current students, staff and faculty members. Among the move-in volunteers was university president, Dr. Linda Livingstone, who welcomed the freshmen and their families. Baylee VerSteeg | Lariat Photographer

Class of 2021 arrives at Baylor, gears up for start of fall semester JULIA VERGARA Staff Writer For many new students, two events kick off their Baylor experience: Move-In Day and Welcome Week—both of which serve to connect freshmen to the Waco and Baylor community. Incoming Baylor freshmen and transfer students moved into the residence halls on Aug. 16 and 17, then participated in Welcome Week events throughout the rest of the week. “Part of this idea of living in a community is something that is such a valuable experience and we want it to be positive so we’re going to help in every way that we can,” said Tiffany Lowe, director for Campus Living & Learning. Lowe said that Baylor has a “well-oiled” system for move-in. Once students arrive at Baylor, hundreds of Move2BU volunteers consisting of faculty members, staff and students are there to help them move in. The hundreds of volunteers helping with Move-In is a demonstration of what it means to be part of a community, Lowe said. New Baylor President, Linda Livingstone also helped the incoming class move into their residence halls. Livingstone said that she was unbelievably impressed with the system and

how it reduces the stress of the students in such a welcoming and warm way. “Being engaged with our students and spending time with our students is one of the most important things that I can do,” Livingstone said. “Doing that on welcome day is a great time to do that for our new students.” After Move-In Day, Welcome Week kicked off with Festival at the Fountain— an event that showcases “the best of Baylor and the best of Waco,” Tripp Purks, assistant director of New Student Programs, said. In order to showcase the best of what Waco has to offer at this event, New Student Programs partnered with different vendors and caterers throughout the community, Purks said. “Anytime we think about putting an event together, we’re thinking about how this helps new students be authentically connected to the institution that’s going to be their home for the next four years,” Purks said. Once Festival at the Fountain ended, new students had the chance meet with their small groups—a group that “journeys throughout Welcome Week together,” said Nathan Shelburne, director of New Student Programs. Being in small groups serves to connect new Baylor students to each other as well as upperclassmen—which are their Welcome

Men’s choir video goes viral during Kenya mission trip with music teams have sponsored girls so that they are able to go to school to escape female genital mutilation or female circumcision, a consistent problem in this region of Africa. On this trip, students met the girls they Kenya believe what the men’s choir did this summer? have been sponsoring. In May, a team of 75 members from the Baylor Men’s “The money that we give fully supports a girl to Choir journeyed to Kenya on a mission trip in hopes go to boarding school where she is able to continue of uplifting people through the gift of music, while also her education without the threat of [female genital serving the communities. mutilation],” Bradley said. A video of the group singing the song “Da Coconut” Choir members served in various capacities during was posted to the Emirates Airlines’ Twitter account and their Kenyan visit, but among the trip’s highlights was has since gone viral. News outlets around the world have the group’s service at a Komolion village. posted the video and published stories, including People The group held a medical clinic that served over 400 Magazine. people, helped create a community garden, contributed During their two week visit, from May 14-29, the toward financial security by providing hens and bee group traveled to a variety of villages hives for families, fit each child in Kenya, including Nairobi, Masaii, ONLINE EXTRAS with a pair of new shoes, painted Komolion, Marigat, Pokot, Secenanri their school and rebuilt some You can check out the and Kajiado. In addition to serving, walls in their school that had been the men were able to make memories Baylor Men’s Choir destroyed by termites. by enjoying the Masaii Mara Safari performance at: “We did all of this in addition and taking pictures at the equator. to singing and dancing with the b a y l o r l a r i a t . c o m “Our work with the Pokot Village people. We also outfitted each of Komolion as the ‘change the world child with pairs of new underwear, and we gave everyone in a day’ project allowed us to have the resources to T-shirts donated by Baylor students,” Bradley said. make a significant impact on the most recent visit,” said Students enjoyed working and playing with the Dr. Randall Bradley, Baylor Men’s Choir director. children in the village. The group kept a blog while they were abroad that “The most fun memory I had on the trip was when was updated with a new post and multiple pictures every we were painting the walls of a school we visited and day. The blog team consisted of four members, with 15 everyone was singing Disney songs, which made the contributing authors, so a diverse set of perspectives and work go much faster,” McWhirter said. experiences were shared. The most meaningful moment of the trip for Eden “I decided to go on this trip because I knew that Prairie, Minn., senior Zach Schaser, the president of the something as big as this trip with this many people group, occurred while working and serving in the Pokot would never happen again and I wanted to be a part Village. of something unique,” said Austin sophomore Lucas “I got to see God work through me even in the McWhirter. midst of my discomfort and bring people from across Since 2007, students who have traveled to Kenya the world together with music,” Schaser said. “It was

Third Street closure affects students’ paths to class as year starts

Week leaders. These groups are built in social and academic communities, Purks said. Austin freshman Samantha Soto, said that it was good to have a group of people that she will be seeing more often rather than just being a “fish in a big tank”. Shelburne said that new students, in general, have a mix of two strong emotions as they step out on their own for the first time: excitement and anxiety. Welcome Week leaders help students deal with both emotions before school even begins. Lily Covey, a Welcome Week leader and Marion, Ill., junior, said welcome leaders are important because college is a big adjustment from high school. “I think it’s important that as soon as freshmen hit campus, they have an upperclassman to show them the ropes and that way they know they have someone to trust right off the bat,” Covey said. Purks said the end goal of Welcome Week is to warmly welcome all new students to their new home at Baylor, whether they are a first-year college student or a transfer student. “Our department feels strongly that we have a critical role in helping each and every single student at Baylor feel like they belong here,” Shelburne said. “That this is their place and this is their home.”

By: Jessica Babb

Move2BU welcomes the freshman class of 2021 to campus

By: Christina Soto

NCAA conducts investigation into Baylor sexual assault allegations

A sneak peek inside Mclane Stadium By: Elisabeth Tharp

BROOKE HILL Staff Writer

BROOKE HILL Staff Writer

Photo Courtesy of Lucas McWhiter

BEARS ABROAD The Baylor Men’s Choir traveled to Kenya over the summer. The group, which takes an international trip every four years, went viral after a video of the choir singing “Da Coconut” was posted to the Emirates Airlines’ Twitter account.

a powerful moment for me, and one that continues to leave me humbled and inspired by what is possible when we trust God to work in us.” The choir members used their different strengths in order to serve the community in a variety of ways. “Some pre-med students were working with our doctor on a medical clinic, some engineering majors were constructing room dividers and wooden stands for a hand-washing station, other choir guys were painting, and others were working with a water pump and clearing a garden,” Schaser said. Another fun moment for the group was getting to spend the night in the Masaii Mara Safari. “I was in awe at the open expanse of the Africa plains, the patterns of distant trees and clouds on the horizon and the vibrant colors that blossomed across my entire field of vision,” Schaser said. In addition to appearing on a local television morning show, Bradley said the group was interviewed by a top-rated talk show host in Manilla and Skyped with the Philippine writer of the song. The men’s choir has a history of going abroad every four years, so if a student stays in the group for four years, he is able to make one international trip. The Men’s Choir has been to Kenya in 2005, to Argentina in 2009, back to Kenya in 2013 and again this summer of 2017.

The NCAA is conducting an “ongoing, pending investigation” into Baylor’s handling of various sexual assault allegations, the school’s lawyers confirmed in a federal court filing. Baylor officials said the school must maintain the confidentiality of the NCAA’s investigation process. Baylor lawyers argued in court that providing all of their communications with the NCAA could compromise the investigation. The NCAA is a voluntary organization composed of hundreds of colleges and universities throughout the United States. One of the primary duties of the NCAA is to enforce regulations governing issues such as recruiting, admissions, financial aid, impermissible benefits and academic standards. NCAA bylaws mandate that NCAA investigations be maintained as confidential. “I find it significant that for over a year Baylor has been going around talking about transparency, but tells the court it wants to turn over no records,” Chad Dunn, one of the attorneys representing several women who have sued Baylor, told the Associated Press. In a separate filing, Baylor officials told the federal judge they may compile a spreadsheet for the court of all alleged sexual assaults at Baylor from 2003 to February 2016 to quantify the history of the problem without compromising private student information, AP reported. “It talks about NCAA disclosures, which is why we will decline to comment,” said Lori Fogleman, Assistant Vice President for Media Relations and Crisis Communications about the filing. The Baylor athletic department said it is doing everything they can to make the investigation go as smoothly as possible. “I think we’ve been extremely cooperative with the NCAA. We’re still in that timeframe of learning more. We’ve been extremely transparent and we continue to be. It’ll lead us where it leads us,” said Baylor Athletic Director Mack Rhoades to the Associated Press. The Baylor Athletic Department declined to comment. The Lariat reached out to the NCAA but did not get a response. The national media attention surrounding this investigation and the sexual assault allegations have been largely felt on Baylor’s campus, especially by student athletes. “The change in media presence and a negative national spotlight on the athletics programs was definitely something I was aware of,” said Seattle junior Lizzie Armstrong, who is on the Baylor Track & Field team. “Although the atmosphere has changed, I still feel the welcoming community and strong connection between teams that I experienced when I first came to Baylor. I have met many amazing individuals through Baylor athletics that I consider family, and am still proud to say that I am an athlete here.”

“Speed in Motion” exhibit opens at the Mayborn Museum

By: Rylee Seavers

ONGOING INVESTIGATION The NCCA, an atheltic association dedicated to regulating member universities, is conducting an investigation into Baylor’s handling of sexual assault allegations.

The sexual assault allegations first surfaced in May of 2016, when the university fired head football coach Art Briles and athletic director Ian McCaw and demoted former Baylor President Ken Starr, who later resigned. Since then, more than a dozen women have filed lawsuits claiming that the university mishandled or ignored their complaints. This led to an internal investigation of the university by the law firm Pepper Hamilton, which resulted in 105 recommendations from the law firm for Baylor to improve upon. By May 2017, Baylor had implemented all 105 recommendations, according to university’s website.


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Tuesday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

News

Festival at the Fountain

Jessica Hubble | Lariat Photographer

GATHER Freshmen students get to know each other over some tasty treats at Festival at the Fountain on Thurs., Aug. 17. Welcome Week begins every year with this gathering which gives students a chance to bid a final goodbye to their parents and say hello to their first friends at Baylor.

McLendon appointed as Baylor interim provost SAVANNAH COOPER STAFF WRITER Interim Provost Michael McLendon, President Linda Livingstone and head football coach Matt Rhule might have different titles, but they share a commonality of a wave of change in Baylor’s leadership. President Livingstone hired McLendon as Interim Provost on July 1, succeeding Executive Vice President and Provost L. Gregory Jones, who resigned to return to Duke University. The seventh-generation Texan and third-generation Baylor-ite, McLendon told his family that he’d be back in Texas no longer than six months after graduating and moving to D.C. for an internship. His time away lasted much longer than six months and 25 years later McLendon returned to Baylor as the dean of the School of Education in 2015. Prior to Baylor, McLendon worked as the academic associate dean for the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

at Southern Methodist University. McLendon said he is excited to be a part of Baylor during a time of effective change. “It’s the right time in Baylor history where my talent and interest could best be used,” McLendon said. “It’s a very exciting and momentous year and I’m grateful and privileged to be a part of it.” In Baylor’s Media Communications announcement of McLendon’s hiring, Livingstone also highlighted how important his expertise will be fully utilized. “We are blessed to have such a noted higher education scholar on the Baylor campus who can immediately step in and serve the university as interim provost during this important time of transition,” Livingstone said. The role of provost is a dated term that inflicts confusion among students, faculty and staff members alike. From McLendon’s perspective he wants to use his position to recreate the experiences he had as an undergraduate student. “I was here as an undergraduate

and Baylor changed my life,” to parcel talent and be able to fund McLendon said. “I view the role of important initiatives and be able to at provost as providing me to do the a very high level lead the university.” same thing in the lives of others.” Thomas Hibbs, Dean of Baylor’s McLendon’s leadership style will Honors College, has worked with play into his role as provost, and McLendon and Hibbs noted how said he knows that his personality and McLendon is the right hobbies converge person for the job. into his work. “He will engage “He’s a all the constituencies voracious reader, of Baylor to get their he’s a great film input and learn buff, so he likes from them,” Hibbs ideas, he likes said. “He’s also a talking about person who has been ideas,” Hibbs said. involved in leadership “He likes talking McLendon at top-ranked about the culture, universities, so I think both high and low, that combination is exactly what we he’s also got a voracious appetite as need.” well for conversation.” As a chief academic officer of a Throughout the academic year, university, the provost wears several McLendon plans to implement hats to ensure the productivity of a change across campus to better serve university. the community. “It provides for those who want “At the last Board of Regents to play that role,” McLendon said. “It meeting...developing a plan which is the individual who has the ability we’re calling an academic strategic

plan,” McLendon said. “A plan that will drive the university’s investments and help direct it toward tier one university status.” During his 25-year gap from Baylor, McLendon said Baylor has made great strides while still staying firm in its Christian values and beliefs. As an alum and now provost, he said is proud of Baylor’s efforts. “Baylor could do what virtually no one else in the country has done, which was to remain a place where teaching is highly valued and where excellence and teaching is expected upon the faculty,” McLendon said. McLendon said that as a worldclass Christian research university, Baylor has a distinctive role to play among all colleges and universities in the United States, which he looks forward to working with this upcoming academic year. “The most exciting part of the role for me is try to do for others what was done for me, unbelievable almost thirty years ago,” McLendon said.

LAWSUIT from A1 McCaw as defendants, according to her lawyer Alexander Zalkin. In March 2016 Hernandez filed the lawsuit against Baylor accusing the university of acting “with deliberate indifference towards Hernandez’s reports of rape to several different Baylor departments,” the complaint stated. According to court documents, Hernandez was raped twice by Tevin Elliott, a former Baylor football player, in April 2012. In 2014, Elliott was sentenced to 20 years in prison for two counts of sexual assault. Given the nature of sexual assault cases, victims often go by pseudonyms such as Jane Doe. Zalkin said he believes Hernandez’s decision to go public was very courageous. “Her decision to do that really exemplifies her motivation for bringing this lawsuit, which was really to try to bring attention to the issue of sexual misconduct on campus at Baylor, and really, nationwide,” Zalkin said. “By going public, I think she really accomplished that.” When asked in a March 2016 video press release if she felt justice was served after Elliott’s conviction, Hernandez said she felt that Baylor did not play a part of that justice. “The city of Waco and then the state of Texas have allowed some justice to occur. But in regards to Baylor, I don’t think justice has been done in regards to their interaction with me as a student,” Hernandez said in the video. This settlement does play a part in remedying that, Zalkin said. “We certainly feel that justice, some measure of justice, has been served. Jasmin brought this lawsuit to effect change and she’s accomplished that and some. So, you know, in that regard, justice has been served,” Zalkin said.

Zalkin said as part of the settlement, the details were confidential. Baylor declined to comment. MOST RECENT TITLE IX LAWSUIT In May Baylor was served its latest Title IX lawsuit. It accused the university of failing to provide sexual assault victims with legally mandated support systems and denying them educational opportunities. The plaintiff, named in the lawsuit as Jane Doe, was a student-athlete on the women’s volleyball team in February 2012 when the alleged sexual assault took place. According to the court document, Doe said she was gang raped in an off-campus residence by a group of Baylor football players – at least four and as many as eight. Early spring 2013, Doe said she attended a few sessions at the Baylor Counseling Center. The filing states that when Doe informed her counselor of the sexual assault, the counselor cited statistics about the number of women who decide not to report sexual assaults in an apparent effort to persuade Doe to do the same. According to Doe, the counselor mentioned neither Title IX nor her rights or options. The lawsuit states that McCaw and the football chaplain were informed of the sexual assault but failed to report the sexual assault to anyone outside of the Baylor football program. Lack of Title IX training was cited as the reason. Doe also asserted in the court filing that Baylor’s failure to properly investigate and/ or address her allegations of sexual assault contributed to a hostile educational environment that prevented herself and other female students from accessing educational opportunities. Doe

specifically cited attending classes with two of her accused rapists as such an environment. In a statement released by Baylor following the lawsuit filing, the university stated it had “been in conversations with the victim’s legal counsel for many months in an attempt to reach an amicable resolution.” “As this case proceeds,” the statement said, “Baylor maintains its ability to present facts - as available to the University - in response to the allegations contained in the legal filing.” On June 27, Baylor moved to partially dismiss certain claims in Doe’s complaint, citing that the plaintiff’s claim expired in spring 2015 at the latest. “The plaintiff’s complaint shows that she knew for at least three years that nothing had been done to investigate her claim or help her,” the dismissal motion said. Title IX claims in Texas are subject to a twoyear statute of limitations. In the court motion, Baylor contended that the statute of limitations in this case began when the plaintiff became aware that she had suffered an injury or had sufficient information to know that she had been injured. The lawsuit is currently in litigation and both the plaintiff and the defendant declined further comment. EXISTING LAWSUIT DEVELOPS Baylor is also involved in another Title IX lawsuit in which the plaintiffs, 10 anonymous women, accused the university of mishandling their sexual assault reports. U.S. District Judge Robert Pitman ordered on Aug. 11 that Baylor produce “all materials, communications, and information provided to

Pepper Hamilton as part of the investigation.” Communications between Baylor and Pepper Hamilton were once protected by the attorney-client privilege, but Pitman’s court ruled that Baylor waived that protection when it repeatedly released findings and conclusions made by Pepper Hamilton. “Would it be fair to allow Baylor to protect remaining undisclosed details regarding the Pepper Hamilton investigation when it intentionally, publicly and selectively released certain details of the investigation, including attorney-client communications?” the court order stated. “The Court concludes, with respect to materials covered by the attorneyclient privilege, that it would not.” The referenced findings include the “Findings of Fact” document and the 105 Pepper Hamilton recommendations. “Baylor recognizes this is a complex order, and the university appreciates the court’s ruling that attorney work product privileges continue to apply in this case,” Fogleman said in a statement. “All of the work product and related materials prepared by Pepper Hamilton are currently protected from discovery, with the provision of the university being required to produce a detailed log of certain work product and to identify witnesses who were interviewed. Baylor continues to express concerns regarding the protection of students’ personal records, specifically the desire of many students - who are unrelated to this case - that their identities remain anonymous and their information confidential.” The trial for this case has been set for October 2018.


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LARIAT from Page A1 changing is the medium.” The switch from physical papers to scrolling screens is a natural progression, given the development and accessibility of social media. Pew Research Center reported in August 2017 that roughly nine in 10 adults get news from a mobile device or desktop. “It’s just the changing nature of the media,” Reed said. “People are not picking up papers. They are reading online, they’re going to their apps, they’re reading social media.” Reed said she believed it was good stewardship to decrease the number of print papers because the Lariat was having to recycle many of them. “We are just trying to pick up where the industry is changing right now,” Reed said. “We are not doing

PRESIDENT from Page A1

leadership of that team and seeing how the team does this year. What’s really impressed me about Coach Rhule is that he views his job as a coach as being much much more than what he does with the players on the field. Q: You’ve stated before that one of your focuses as president is to ensure the Baylor mission as well as academic excellence and student success. Do you feel like your implementation of this has been good in your first few months, or is there anything you’d like to change? I think that one of the things you learn while you’re out talking to people is about how important the core of our mission is to the Baylor community, and that our Christian mission and our academic mission at our core matter a lot to people. We do have to protect that and we do have to strengthen that. I knew this, but I think I’ve learned it more… There’s been a lot of pain in the community in the last year and a half, and that pain was felt very, very deeply because people love the university so much. Because they care so much about the community, they really are ready to come together and move forward, and I think it provides a tremendous opportunity as a new president to take advantage of that core love and support of Baylor to help us strengthen our mission and continue to enhance our Christian identity. I don’t know that it’s made me think differently about anything than I thought coming in, but I think it’s reinforced why it’s so important to focus on the core of our mission, and given me great optimism for the future. Q: We’ve talked a lot about what you’re going to do for Baylor, and what you’re going to do for students and faculty and staff. What can students do for you? I love that question. Thank you for asking that. One, I would say to pray for me and my leadership and that I have good judgement and wisdom in the decisions that we have to make, but I would also just ask students to approach their life on campus in a way that allows them to fully experience what it means to be in college. There’s so much rich life you can get out of college, and I want students to experience that in healthy ways so that they leave here feeling like they got everything they possibly could out of every minute that they’re here. I would also want students to think about how they engage with one another, and how they respect one another and care for one another in ways that are healthy and supportive and fun and challenging, all at the same time, but knowing that in this diverse community we can come together in healthy ways and have interesting discussions, but if we respect each other and listen to each other, even in times we disagree, we can have a healthy environment and one that helps move us forward as an institution.

We’re not doing less. We are actually doing more.

JULIE REED | ASSISTANT MEDIA ADVISER

less. We are actually doing more.” Online readers can expect to see updated features in the Lariat app, interactivity on the Lariat website, multimedia-focused design and more social media usage. The print version of the Lariat will be larger and primarily feature-based. For example, the Friday edition will feature much more arts, life, entertainment, student activities and events.

“We [at the Lariat] have the liberty of experimenting as students,” said digital managing editor Katy senior Deidre Martinez. “I would argue that really makes for great content because we are not afraid to make mistakes.” The Baylor Lariat is not alone in its effort to go digital. University newspapers such as The Cornell

Daily Sun, Alabama’s Crimson White and Duke’s Chronicle have also adjusted their publication strategies to suit their audiences’ needs. “In reality, we are adapting,” Martinez said. “In order for the paper to do well, that’s what needs to happen.” Bruce Gietzen, the new director of student media, said he’d like to see Baylor publications continue to expand their digital capacity as they adapt to the changing journalism industry. Gietzen began his position as director of student media on Aug. 7, and he oversees the Baylor Lariat, Roundup yearbook, Focus Magazine and Lariat TV News. He was KXXV Channel 25’s primetime news anchor for 13 years before transitioning to Waco ISD to serve as director of communications for one year.

“Some of the basics from journalism are universal no matter what format you are in,” Gietzen said. “You’ve got to learn to be a good writer, how to think out of the box and be a good storyteller. I think that’s true whether it’s a print, broadcast or digital format.” Shifting from a print emphasis to a multimedia focus gives the Lariat the freedom to explore different methods of storytelling. Phoenix junior and editor-in-chief Bailey Brammer said that this transition offers the staff a unique opportunity to redefine what the Lariat looks like. “This year we get to say not necessarily digital first, or not necessarily print first, but news first,” Brammer said. “So, whatever avenue that comes in—print, digital broadcast or radio, we get to decide that and we get to define that.”

Welcome Back BU From UBreak and Dr Pepper® Hour to the launch of Sundown Sessions and Food Truck Fridays, there is something for everyone.

Monday, Aug. 21 Movie Mondays at the Waco Hippodrome: What the Health

7 p.m. Follow filmmaker Kip Andersen as he uncovers the secret to preventing and even reversing chronic diseases and investigates why the nation’s leading health organizations don’t want us to know about it. Pick up your free ticket at the box office. Doors open at 6 p.m.

Friday, Aug. 25 Late Night @ the SLC

9 p.m. Meet student leaders from over 225 student organizations and learn about the many ways to get involved on campus. Enjoy games, exhibitions, free food, prizes and more!

Saturday, Aug. 26 Kari Jobe – The Garden Tour with Cody Carnes 7 p.m. Worship leader and Grammy nominee Kari Jobe is coming to Waco Hall. Jobe’s new album “The Garden” was released February 2017. Tickets are available at baylor.edu/tickets; prices start at $19.95.

Monday, Aug. 28 Movie Mondays at the Waco Hippodrome: Unrest

7 p.m. Jennifer Brea, a Harvard PhD student was about to marry the love of her life when she was struck down by an illness that left her bedridden. After many doctors told her it’s “all in her head,” Brea set off on a virtual voyage, finding millions of people confined to their homes with the same symptoms and no answers.

STAYCATION WEEKEND

Stick around this Labor Day weekend. We’ve got some exciting plans you won’t want to miss!

Friday, Sept. 1 Food Truck Fridays

11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Every Friday, grab a friend and head to Fifth Street for a food truck feast. Food Trucks will be parked outside the Bill Daniel Student Center. All trucks accept cash or credit/debit card.

Friday, Sept. 1 Traditions Rally

5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Traditions Rally is a free, annual community-wide celebration held before the Bears kick off their first home game. Meet us at Fountain Mall to enjoy tailgating, a Baylor football pep rally, a free Judah & the Lion concert and a fireworks show!

Student Activities Presents:

Sundown Sessions Every Friday and Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Sundown Sessions offer entertaining late-night events, including movie nights, live musical performances and interactive activities. For a complete lineup, visit Baylor Connect.

Friday, Sept. 1 Sundown Sessions: Beauty and the Beast, Blacklight Bowling

9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Come to the Bill Daniel Student Center for the first movie night of the year, featuring Beauty and the Beast at 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. in Barfield Drawing Room. Blacklight bowling will take place all evening in the Baylor Gameroom.

Saturday, Sept. 2 Student Organization Tailgate

Noon. Meet us before the season opener near the football practice fields in Student Tailgating for a burger, fun with friends and one of the best views of McLane Stadium.

Saturday, Sept. 2 Baylor Bears vs. Liberty

6 p.m. Throw on your green and gold and join us at McLane Stadium as Baylor Football kicks off the season against Liberty University.

Saturday, Sept. 2 Sundown Sessions: Roller Skating, Karaoke and More!

9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Late-night fun will include Blacklight roller skating in the Barfield Drawing Room, Karaoke in the SUB Den and Blacklight bowling in the Baylor Gameroom.

Monday, Sept. 4 Labor Day Movie at McLane: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

9 p.m. Finish your Labor Day Staycation Weekend with a free movie night at McLane Stadium. Doors open at 8 p.m.

For more, join Baylor Connect at

baylor.edu/baylorconnect Follow @BaylorSA, @BaylorMA and @BaylorUB on Twitter.


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Pop-up gallery, please!

Courtesy Photo

INTO THE GARDEN Kari Jobe, Christian singer-songwriter, will be performing her newest album, “The Garden,” at 7 p.m. Saturday in Waco Hall. She will explore peace in the midst of profound tragedy with her newest album.

Courtesy Photo by Rae Jefferson

COME ONE, COME ALL Waco 52 Pop-up Gallery will exhibit 52 art pieces from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday until Aug. 31 at 712 Austin Ave. . The gallery showcases talented local artists and Waco’s cultural achievements.

Waco 52 pop-up gallery praises unappreciated cultural success KRISTINA VALDEZ Arts & Life Editor For the entire month of August, the Waco 52 pop-up gallery will be honoring the culture of Waco through the inspired work of talented Waco artists. This exhibition has found its home at 712 Austin Ave. From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, you can admire 52 art pieces that were delicately curated by Creative Waco, a nonprofit organization. “Creative Waco’s goals are to make Waco the kind of place that is vibrant and bursting with life in those kinds of community building and participationgenerating activities that help us all to thrive,” said Fiona Bond, executive director of Creative Waco and curator of Waco 52. Through the efforts of local leaders, Waco was recently named one of the Texas’ newest Cultural Districts— meaning that Waco has as much cultural activity as much larger cities in Texas. By collaborating with two state representatives, Doc Anderson and Kyle Kascal, Creative Waco first brought Waco 52 to the Texas State Capitol in May 2017. “It is about changing perception,” Bond said. “People outside of Waco already understand how [great] Waco is. From Austin, you hear visitors just raving about how lovely Waco is. But the last people to believe that is sometimes the people who have always lived in

Waco.” Visitors may be surprised by the variety of artwork that shows Waco from the perspective of 52 artists. “I want people to be inspired by what they could do and what their part is,” Bond said. “Whether they’re students, faculty or employees of Baylor, everyone has a part to play in making this community more culturally vibrant.” Of those artists, former Baylor student and artist of “The Professional,” Nathan Trampe, explored his fascination with street art and common stereotypes using acrylic, spray and oil painting. “The movement in the piece and the vaporizing nature of the subject represents the fluidity and ever-changing nature of our ideas and stereotypes,” Trampe said. “[It adds] to the question of how we view others and how it may change or stay the same in the future.” The subject of Trampe’s art is his former roommate, a black man, sprinting while dressed in a full suit and tie. The vivid color and harsh details sets the piece in motion. Trampe graduated from Baylor with his Bachelors of Arts in studio art in spring 2017. With Waco artists standing together, the thriving culture of Waco can be acknowledged and appreciated. Artist of “The Silos,” Susan Sistrunk, said artists in Waco have stopped looking at each other as competition and are more willing to help each other be successful. “[Waco] is culturally advanced,” Sistrunk said. “People should come to

[Waco 52] to see how this city is behind the artists, supporting the artists.” As artist of “The Silos,” Sistrunk gives a retrospective look into Waco’s iconic silos, now home to the tourist-alluring and popular Magnolia Market. Sistrunk’s oil painting is meant to transport viewers to a time when the silos were the key to economic prosperity in Waco. Artwork at Waco 52 also paints well-known characters in a different light. Shay MacMorran’s “Hero of Pearl Harbor,” done in pen and colored pencil, shows the historical Waco war hero Doris Miller standing tall with his dark skin, in his brilliant white navy uniform against a blinding blue sky. “There are not photos of [Doris Miller] in color,” MacMorran said. “I wanted to bring it to life and more close to home.” If you are unable to purchase the artwork from the gallery, you can take home a deck of playing cards that shows each piece of art on the card’s face. Preview the exhibit at https://www. creativewaco.org/waco52 and then take a stroll through the gallery before it leaves Aug. 31. “People would want to come to [Waco 52] because they will want to be a part of something very exciting that is happening in our community,” Bond said. “I think there will come a day where people who stepped through the door will say, ‘I was a part of that. I was there—I was saw it.’ Just like people say I was there at Woodstock.”

Kari Jobe speaks on finding peace during tragedy in ‘The Garden’ DIDI MARTINEZ Digital Managing Editor Christian singersongwriter Kari Jobe is ready to come home. Jobe, who was born in Waco, will be performing her newest album, “The Garden”, at 7 p.m. on Saturday in Waco Hall. The Garden is inspired by a series of event that have impacted her life within the past two years, including the birth of her first child and fetal death of her sister’s daughter. The 14 tracks, she said, are a reflection of her own faith journey and “seeing beauty in the brokenness again.” Q: How does it feel to be able to perform in the city where you were born? It feels really special and this one just feels like the most special. I think I’ve only been in one other event there and it was a Christmas tour a couple years ago. And I know a lot of people there because I have family there and then I have people I grew up knowing. It’s just going to feel like a hometown show somehow. Even though I didn’t grow up [in Waco], you know I was born there and moved out pretty quickly, but I was there all time because of family. So yeah, I’m excited. Q: You’re touring with your husband, Cody Carnes. How is that? Will your son Canyon also make an appearance? Cody plays with me in my band still as well. But I’ve known him for so

Q&A long and I’ve always known how talented and how ridiculously good at songwriting he is. And so I knew it was only a matter of time before he would do his own stuff and do this. So for him to open on this tour is like years of dreaming and years of even listening to him dreaming — of you know, coming and finally being time for it. It’s just been really fun. I stand on the side of the stage usually with Canyon and just dance and we sing along. And Canyon just wants to go up and see dad on the stage — he doesn’t understand why we he can’t go up there. Q: Your album seems to be inspired by the various changes in your life. What is the writing process like when your songs are heavily drawn from personal experience? Yeah, I mean there’s a lot of tears in the writing sessions. And thankfully, I was writing with a lot of my really good friends, which I think was really helpful because we were able to just really get very honest, very raw with where I was. So [with] every song I have really sweet memories of writing that song-just because it pulls everything out of you. When you’re trying to write about something that’s hard, it just pulls on all of those emotions.

JOBE >> Page B3

Artist gives insight into inspiration for his gallery LIESJE POWERS Multimedia Editor John McClanahan, a former Baylor art department chair and former director of the Allbritton Art Institute, will be speaking at an opening reception for his collection at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday at the Martin Museum of Art. The collection, named “The Velasco Paintings”, will feature his water paint works. “[The Artist Talk] is always a great chance to get a firsthand perspective and some information about what you’re looking at on the walls,” said Allison Syltie, director of

the Martin Museum of Art. The collection includes a variety of landscapes, something that Sylties sees as a draw to many people. “As a museum, our type of person is everybody, but we do want to entice our student body to come in so we are always looking for something that is going to touch them in a certain way,” Sylties said, “These are landscapes from Colorado, New Mexico, and things of that nature, so we are hoping that it piques the interest of maybe travelers, people who have been to those places, [or] people who enjoy watercolors.”

The museum hosts about three exhibits each semester, each lasting about six weeks. These collections can include multiple artists or a solo artist, like the McClanahan pieces. “We do a lot of solo exhibitions that gives students an opportunity to see more of a breadth of artwork from a single artist and how they progress through their body of work,” Sytlie said. Paul McCoy, Professor and director of the Allbritton Art Institute, is supportive of spotlighting McClanahan at the Martin Museum.

ARTIST >> Page B3

Will Barksdale | Lariat Photographer

LANDSCAPE ROAMING Admission is free to see former Baylor art department chair John McClanahan’s collection “The Velasco Paintings” from Tuesday to Sept. 24 at Martin Museum of Art. The collection will feature McClanahan’s landscape and water paint work.


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Mosaic Week welcomes new students to Baylor KRISTINA VALDEZ Arts & Life Editor Grab a seat on the lawn of the SUB Bowl this Wednesday with a Steel City Pop in hand and start the 2017 fall semester off with Mosaic Week. “For freshmen, especially [minority] freshman, it can be overwhelming trying to decide where they will fit in at [Baylor] as a predominantly white institution that it is,” said Kristen Williams, Cedar Hill junior and President of NAACP. “Mosaic Mixer gives freshmen the opportunity to find a place here at Baylor and join a lot of organizations that they are interested in.” Mosaic Mixer begins at 6 p.m. Wed. with an organization fair. Over 40 student organizations will be hosting tables outside of the SUB. Just as their Twitter boasts them as being “home of #freefoodalerts,” Baylor’s Department of Multicultural Affairs will serve free food to the first 500 students. From Shorty’s Pizza to Steel City Pops, the SUB Bowl will be a student’s haven from syllabus week. At 7 p.m., 10 organizations will step on stage to represent themselves in ways that go beyond traditional speeches. The organizations performing are Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Baylor Intellectual Property Organization, African Student Association, Heavenly Voices Gospel Choir, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Baylor Korean Student Association, Lambda Phi Epsilon, Filipino Student

Association, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority and Phi Beta Sigma. Each performance will be judged by a panel for first, second and third place. Students sitting in the audience can expect to see a wide range of performances from spoken word to step. “We will be giving away free T-shirts and other giveaways between acts,” said Kristin Koch, graduate apprentice of Multicultural Affairs. The following evening, Baylor’s Black Student Union will host Black Student Welcome in the Barfield Drawing Room of the SUB. The Black Student Union will present “House Party” on Thursday, as it begins its first year as an organization at Baylor. There will be an organization fair at 6 Lariat File Art p.m. and a program at 7 STEPPING UP Members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. perform at Mosaic Mixer 2016. Mosaic Mixer will be held at 6:30 p.m., p.m. “There are so Wednesday, August 23 at Vara Martin Daniel Plaza outside of the Bill Daniel Student Center. many different black organizations at Baylor each other.” 30. All events will be in the Barfield Association. “In the past, our events and it is important to see how they For the remainder of Mosaic Week, Drawing Room at 6:30 p.m. were more for the Asians at Baylor, but work together,” said San Antonio students can attend Mosaic Asian “We would like to have our cultural this year we are going to work toward sophomore Deana Lee, a finance Night on Monday, Aug. 28, LatinX events more well-known at Baylor,” including everyone and having events council member of Black Student Night on Tuesday, Aug. 29 and South said Garland senior Doc Nguyen, that everyone can enjoy.” Union. “They are all supportive of Asian Night on Wednesday, Aug. president of Baylor’s Asian Student

Downtown Farmers Market offers taste of Waco

MEREDITH WAGNER Social Media Editor For college students everywhere, managing a healthy diet can feel overwhelming. But for Baylor students, the pursuit of a wholesome lifestyle may begin and end just down the street. Open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday, the Waco Downtown Farmers Market is a hub for Wacoans both young and old seeking to support the local economy and purchase fresh products and ingredients. The market features a wide array of vendors from Waco and neighboring cities, each of which specializes in growing, raising or creating a unique product. Located at 500 Washington Ave., just across the street from the McLennan County Courthouse, the market is a mere five-minute drive from Baylor’s campus. Though accessible, relying on the farmers market as one’s primary source of groceries can feel difficult both practically and financially. Multiple market vendors said that feelings of the like can be overcome by smart budgeting and a good mindset toward food. Gala Gerber, market vendor at World Hunger Relief Inc., said she thinks that healthier food can actually be less expensive in the long run. “If you eat more natural and nutritional food, you don’t have to eat as much filler junk food,” Gerber said. But, according to Gerber, raw produce is not always nutrient-dense. “A carrot today isn’t the same as a carrot from ten years ago. It depends on the soil,” Gerber said. “It’s important to know where your food

“It’s important to know where your food comes from.”

GALA GERBER | VENDOR

Lariat File Art

BETTER FOR YOU The Waco Downtown Farmers Market exists to provide the greater Waco community with fresh produce and locally made goods. The market hosts vendors that each offer something different. The Market is open from 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. every Saturday at 500 Washington Ave. in Downtown Waco.

comes from.” Gerber has interned for World Hunger Relief Inc., a non-profit organic farm in Waco, for nearly one year. She said she plays a role in each step of growing its produce, from germinating seeds in the greenhouse and transferring small plants to the garden, to daily upkeep and eventual

harvest. According to Gerber, prioritizing responsibly grown food may be the first step to a smart budget. Happy Stuff, a small business dedicated to all natural home and body products, is stationed just a few booths away from World Hunger Relief. Jill Boman, founder and owner, said her products are priced

low compared to other natural, homemade products. She encouraged the use of natural products as opposed to the leading brands. “We are inundated nowadays with toxins, and many of these toxins are carcinogenic, endocrine disrupting,” Boman said. “It takes less than 30 seconds for some of the chemicals on

our skin to get to our bloodstream.” The largely unfamiliar names of chemicals that label mainstream products can be compared to Jill’s handwritten notecards, including ingredients as simple as baking soda or coconut oil. “It’s really important to put clean stuff on your skin, so that you’re not contributing to your toxic load,” Boman said. As for Jill, she said she cares about her community more than expansion or profit. With a wide variety of offerings and a community-oriented mission, the market has potential to help both students and Wacoans develop healthy habits. To stay on budget, it may help to create a meal plan for the coming week before your trip to the market, to compare prices between booths and to buy in-season produce. Seasonal produce offerings can be found at wacodowntownfarmersmarket.org.

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Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

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JOBE from Page B1 You know, I think sometimes people can just gloss over something for the sake of just finishing a song. In all of these songs, I didn’t want any of it to sound like just a passing phrase. I wanted it to feel like a very intentional phrase or a very intentional comment about pain. So it was hard, you know, it’s hard to dig for those things instead of just writing something that’s easy. There were many times where we hit a wall in these songs because I wanted to be as raw as I could but I didn’t want to leave people extremely sad. A lot of these songs we would wait to finish, we would what you call “let them simmer.” Q: What can young people learn about the “indescribable joy and unimaginable pain” that you talk about in your album? I didn’t realize how many people and how many women have dealt with losing babies and even people dealing with really traumatic experiences. When you walk through something really traumatic though, I think you have two options: you can turn your back

on God and get really bitter because you don’t understand Him or you can just really lean into knowing His character and asking Him to speak to you and show you what he’s up to in the midst of the really hard stuff — which is what I did. I know enough about the character of God and the things that I’ve walked though in my life to know that He is real, that His presence really does change lives. He’s a healing God, he’s a loving God even though sometimes we experience things that feel like it’s not love. We live in fallen world and we live in a world that Satan doesn’t want us to believe in God. He wants us to get bitter and turn our backs, but we have to use these things and really lean into God and he’ll show himself to be real if we let Him. Q: Can you tell us a little bit more about why you chose “The Garden” as the name of your newest project? It was a visual picture of God going before us. I felt seen because we had just bought this house in Nashville when this whole thing

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“I felt that it was important for Baylor to feature his work, to look at what he is doing and maintain that bond,” McCoy said. “But beyond that, having his work in our museum is a singularly important event because of the uniqueness and the potency of the work he does with the medium and his subject matter.” The collection has some specific qualities that are not found in others, according to McCoy. “This work is really significant for me because of the way he uses light and the manner in which he constructs his landscapes from both an intellectual and physiological knowledge of what he is painting, but also the emotional memory of those spaces,” McCoy said. McCoy compares the musical form of ad libbing, or performing without preparation, to the work of McClanahan and his use of memory in his compositions. “It oftentimes results in the structure of the painting being altered: sometimes in a subtle way, sometimes in a very very significant and flagrant way from the physical space. Emotional memory is as much a component in these paintings as are the actual spaces that he is painting,” McCoy said. “He is not constrained by the reality of the physical space.” Students, whether they are studying art or not, have something to gain by looking at these works of art, according to McCoy. “The paintings are exciting. They are immediately recognizable as landscape paintings. People who don’t feel like they know much about art but enjoy it will take comfort in being able to see things that they recognize in the work,” McCoy said. “But they are also landscapes like no one has ever seen before, so having the artist there to talk about the work will be very helpful to everyone and will add another layer of appreciation to the work.” McCoy said the paintings are made with watercolor, but not in the way they are usually seen. They are used in a manner similar to oil paints. “He is very physical with his use of the paint so these are, yes, technically these are watercolor paintings… but they are not like watercolors anyone is familiar with,” McCoy said. All exhibits at the Martin Museum of Art are free and open to the public, including the Artist Talk and reception for the Velasco Paintings. More information on the museum and their upcoming exhibits can be found on their webpage, as well as on their Facebook and Twitter. “I expect we will be watching students standing in the museum, pondering those paintings throughout the entire length of the exhibition because there is so much to learn from these paintings,” McCoy said. “I’ve been working in art now… well over 50 years and I can’t stand in front of one of his paintings without seeing something I hadn’t seen before.”

BENEFITING

from Page B1

happened. We bought a house kind of in a hurry because I was pregnant and didn’t know there was a flower garden in the backyard because it was still winter. So when Canyon was born, a few weeks after that spring came and all this ivy started budding and growing in my backyard and my niece’s name is James Ivy and so I just felt like it was literally this major massive picture of feeling seen by God. Like of all the houses we could buy, we would buy that one that had ivy growing. Someone planted that years ago for it to be as full and mature as it was too and it just felt like “Wow, God, you knew I would move here. You knew that this was growing here,”. And it just did something that day to unlock my heart. So when the ivy was growing that day I just realized, “Whoa, you are in this season with us and you do know what is going on and I need to trust you again.” And I just began to see beauty in the brokenness again and it’s just started healing me. Q: What is your favorite song out of the

album? There’s a song called “The Garden,” that one. I love a song called “Speak to Me” and I love a song called “Closer to Your Heart.” Those are like my top three. Q: What message would you like to leave with the Baylor community ahead of your concert? I’m just excited to be there. I love college events and being with college students. My favorite thing about this generation is that everybody is so real and everybody is so honest. And so I just want to honor that and tell them I just think they’re the best. And I think if somebody is in a season that you’ve really been questioning God or in a season of brokenness, this night would be really powerful for you and it’ll be fun but it will be really impactful talking about God and talking about life. * This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity.


B4

Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

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B6

Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

A&L

Baylee VerSteeg | Lariat Photographer

Liesje Powers| Lariat Photographer

Jessica Hubble| Lariat Photographer

Baylee VerSteeg | Lariat Photographer

EXPLORATION STATION (Left) An OMJ employee makes an acai bowl one afternoon in Waco. (Center top) Wilmer, Minnesota freshman Grant Duininck enjoys the various activites at BSR Cable Park. (Center bottom) Overland Park Kansas junior Alex Freeman canoes with Axtell junior Jessica Doyle at the Baylor Marina. (Right) The Waco Hippodrome lights up downtown Waco many nights.

More than Magnolia There’s more to do in Waco than you think, get out and explore the city SAVANNAH COOPER Staff Writer Over the last few years, Magnolia has become Waco’s most popular attraction, and because of that some people might think Magnolia is Waco’s only attraction. That couldn’t be further from the truth. Waco is filled with hidden gems, all you have to do is venture out of the Baylor Bubble to find them. The following is a list of Waco treasures in food, shopping, entertainment and adventure. There’s much more to do in Waco, but this guide will give you a taste of what this city by the Brazos has to offer.

Oh My Juice!

215 Mary Ave #101 At a past Fiesta Bowl game, Baylor alumnae, Denitia Blunt and Tierra Barber met and, unknowingly, Oh My Juice was born. Their blooming friendship, love for juicing and lack of healthy food options in Waco led the pair to create their own place. For the first time visitor, order their No. 1 acai bowls that are packed with antioxidants and taste great. “If we have a mission statement it would be, you can really have healthy food that tastes really good,” Blount said.

Lula Jane’s

406 Elm Ave. Lula Jane’s is a cozy, holein-the-wall cafe in East Waco whose mission is to help community and economic development. Owner Nancy

Grayson said she created the restaurant in 2012 with the vision of it becoming a community gathering point that serves the best food in town. If you’re a first time visitor, there’s no wrong choice, “We serve breakfast, lunch and baked goods we’re a three pointer,” Grayson said. P.S. Line Campers, your milk and cookies come from here.

Health Camp

2601 Circle Rd. As a joke, Jack Schaevitz created a restaurant that sells burgers, fries and milkshakes and called it Health Camp, the irony being that the only healthy ingredients are the fresh vegetables from the local farmers market. From 1948 to present day, Health Camp is now a historic Waco landmark that hasn’t changed locations or menu. For the first-time visitor, diligent employee-turnedmanager Ayanna Anderson has the ideal meal so you get the full Health Camp experience. “Get the number one, which is our Super Burger. That’s what we’re known for, with a side of onion rings and a milkshake from one of our million flavors,” Anderson said. Now that your tummy is smiling and you feel good, it’s time to look good with pieces from Waco’s stores.

you, filled with contemporary clothing, tasteful accessories and innovative home decor as well as Baylor gear. Several TripAdvisor users spoke positively of Spice Villages and their products, saying Spice Village is an absolute choice for those who enjoy home goods and one-ofa-kind presents. For a first-time visitor, look into their homemade and unique items that add a hint of Waco to your space.

The Findery

of downtown that provides a unique entertainment experience. Despite being a Waco staple, the Hippodrome fell on hard times and in 2012, Casey and Cody Turner, along with their brother-in-law Shane, bought the property as a side gig. The theatre reopened in 2014 and became a monster, as Turner described it. Collectively, the owners wanted to keep the Hippodrome tradition alive by keeping live acts and playing old movies for nostalgia as well as new movies. “We wanted to play old movies too. Just because of the nostalgia, the scenery and the ambiance we have so many people say, ‘Oh, I saw my first movie here back in the day,’” Casey Turner said. For the first-time Hippodrome visitor looking for a contemporary experience in a historical setting Turner suggests a movie with a great view to match. “Friday night movie where you’ll be waited on or our happy hour with a picturesque view,” Turner said. For Baylor students, the Hippodrome plays free movies for Movie Mondays with your student ID.

501 S 8th St. The Findery is a familyowned- and-operated business that has the passion to serve others with their motto “Marketplace for you, your home, your style.” Greeted by a set-up that inspires customers, The Findery has something for every customer, regardless of age, price point or need. “We’re more design orientated, rather than retailed orientated,” said Alison Sorley, native Wacoan, manager of operations and creator of Elevate. With the small business personality on their side, the Findery will deliver something for everyone. Waco Escape Rooms For the moments when 711 Washington Ave. McLane Stadium isn’t full of Owners Jared Dauenhauer cheering Baylor Bears here are and Cory Dickman met at some entertaining places. Baylor and became fast friends, Waco Hippodrome which eased the transition into a business partnership. Spice Village Theatre Together with Lee Wilson, 213 Mary Ave. 724 Austin Ave. they created Waco Escape Looking for several boutiques The Waco Hippodrome Rooms, a place that challenges wrapped up into one? Spice opened in 1914 and is a the mind while also building Village is the perfect stop for historic landmark in the heart

relationships. “We offer something fun to do on a Friday or Saturday night where you’re actually working together with people, putting puzzles together and communicating,” Dickman said. You’re given an hour to escape and for the new players the first 10 to 15 minutes are tough since you’re getting accustomed to navigating the room. The Waco Room is the best one to try first because it removes the initial fear of the unknown. Throughout the four rooms, you’re given clues and puzzles with your team that lead you toward escaping. Lastly, if you’re craving a Waconan style adventure, look here.

Baylor Marina

1512 S University Parks Dr. The Baylor Marina epitomizes the phrase “hidden in plain sight.” The beginnerfriendly marina offers canoeing, kayaking and the most popular, standup paddleboarding on the Brazos.

site, there are life jackets, boats and complimentary sunscreen along with a brief orientation. The marina is a bit of an on campus oasis, Manager and Baylor alum Daniel Gezell points out. “It kind of feels like your off campus, without going too far,” said Daniel Gezell.

Cameron Park

2601 Sturgis Rd. This 416-acre park has something for everyone, from the outdoorsy adventurer to the casual picnic group. Named after Waco philanthropist and lumber baron William Cameron, this park has miles of trails for hiking, running and biking. Some special features of the park include Jacob’s Ladder for the ultimate leg workout, a Frisbee golf course and a 52acre zoo.

BSR Cable Park

5347 Old Mexia Rd. The world’s longest lazy river, a 16-foot Royal Flush slide and a concert venue are just a taste of what Waco’s BSR Cable Park has to offer. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. the park has For Baylor students, all that’s affordable pricing that grants all necessary is to bring yourself day access with no reservations and your student ID. At the needed.


Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

A&L

‘milk and honey’ drips with rave reviews as summer must-read

B7

What to do in Waco this week: >>> Monday, Aug. 21 11:40 a.m.-2:39 p.m. — For your viewing pleasure, Waco will get a (partial) solar eclipse that won’t come back around until 2024. Grab safety eye wear! 7 p.m. — Waco Hippodrome will be showing “What the Health” for free as a part of their Independent Movie Mondays.

>>> Tuesday, Aug. 22 7 a.m.-2 p.m. — Heart of Texas Farmers Market brings fresh produce to 4601 Bosque Blvd. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. — John McClanahan: The Velasco Paintings opens at the Martin Museum of Art.

>>> Wednesday, Aug. 23

Liesje Powers | Multimedia Editor

HARSH SWEETNESS “milk and honey” by Rupi Kaur has been on the New York Times Bestseller List for 31 weeks. Kaur discusses survival and healing in poetic prose with each of the four sections in her book. The book has garnered much attention on social media, but it is up to readers to decide its true worth.

MEGAN RULE

REVIEW

Opinion Editor You’ve seen it all over Twitter and Instagram, the notorious couple of lines with line breaks that seem random with words that are never capitalized. The book ‘milk and honey’ by Rupi Kaur has garnered quite the social media rumble with people arguing seriously for or against its poetic impact. As a classic example of crowd psychology, the social media attention has led people who don’t normally pick up poetry books to give this one a whirl. The book is powerful, brutally honest and can be triggering for those who have gone through some of the same experiences as Kaur. Kaur speaks on topics ranging from toxic relationships to self-confidence issues. It can be graphic and is definitely intended for a more mature audience. In addition to the short, choppy sentences, there are drawings that sometimes don’t leave much to the imagination—don’t let your middle school child read it. However, putting aside my inner grammar-geek’s irritation that I felt while reading incomplete, un-capitalized sentences, I was very moved by this collection of poems. And yes, I would consider them poems, contrary to the arguments that others have made. The themes are way too relevant in today’s world and the stories that Kaur tells elicit extreme emotions I didn’t know I was capable of feeling. Kaur splits the book into four sections – the hurting, the loving, the breaking and the healing. My personal favorite was the healing because the self-empowerment and selflove that Kaur found was so moving. Each section captures the female empowerment movement that has spread wildly over the past few years, and balances the raw pain with beautiful compassionate feelings. The book seeks to relate to the struggles of many young women and their fight the survive. Although it is difficult to analyze the book as a whole, each poem is complex

RULE | MILK AND HONEY

Across 1 DEA agent 5 Traveller in London’s Tube 9 With 15-Across, Apple media player since 2005 13 Over the hill 14 Colorado-based brewery 15 See 9-Across 16 *Feature of gated community entrances 18 Sprouted 19 Like checks, when splitting the tab 20 Dungeness and Alaskan king 21 *GEICO product 24 “I got a great break!” 27 ID card picture 28 Adam’s grandson 29 “... disguised as Clark Kent, mild-__ reporter” 32 Hoopla 33 *Plaything for a backyard swimming spot 36 Fifth month 37 Warns of 39 Batman’s hideout 40 Donna Summer’s music 41 Spun, as a baton 44 *Source of showroom shock? 47 The Stones’ “__ Tonk Women” 48 Subscribers’ continuations 52 And others, in Lat. 53 Abundant farm yield ... and what the first words of the answers to starred clues comprise? 55 Past the deadline 56 Foreign relief org. created by JFK 57 Pac-12 sch. 58 Hotfooted it 59 Curve in a road 60 Easier said __ done

For today’s puzzle results, please go to BaylorLariat.com

5:30 p.m.- 7:30 p.m.— John McClanahan speaks about “The Velasco Paintings” during an artist talk and reception at the Martin Museum of Art. 6:30 p.m. — Mosaic Week continues with The Black Student Union at Baylor welcoming black freshman with “House Party” in the Barfield Drawing Room of the Bill Daniel Student Center. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. — Leg warmers and disco music will take over Cricket’s Drafthouse and Grill during its free Welcome Back 80s Party.

>>> Ongoing

It is complex, yet full of power to hit you where it really hurts.

Down 1 Badgers 2 Fever with chills 3 Garner from the fields 4 Music media holders 5 Infant foot warmer 6 City where Joan of Arc died 7 Tax form org. 8 “The Waste Land” poet’s monogram

8 p.m. — Common Grounds open mic night begins with featured artist Justin Philip Brooks.

>>> Thursday, Aug. 24

and touching in its own way. Kudos to Kaur for putting herself out there for the world to criticize and poke at; the stories and topics are a definite source of vulnerability. The book was best read when I put myself in the storyline and allowed myself to feel the pain and love that Kaur felt throughout the book. Although the choppiness is different and a little annoying compared to normally reading full sentences, readers should fully immerse themselves in the book to get the most out of it. It is complex, yet full of power to hit you where it really hurts. I wouldn’t say the book as a whole is something to rave about, but the honesty and emotion that the author poured into each page are what makes this book something exquisite to talk about.

Today’s Puzzles

6:30 p.m. — Mosaic Mixer begins Mosaic Week with free food, organization booths and a live showcase at the Bill Daniel Student Center courtyard.

Aug. 3- Aug. 31 — Waco 52 pop-up gallery will exhibit 52 art pieces 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays at 712 Austin Ave. Aug. 24- Sept. 24 — John McClanahan’s collection “The Velasco Paintings” will feature abstract landscape paintings and water color works from 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. at Martin Museum of Art.

9 Thankless sort 10 Like “X-Files” cases 11 Year before AD yrs. started 12 Wield a divining rod 14 Captivate 17 Low, sturdy cart 20 Close friend 22 Quarrel 23 “Sorry, that’s not happening” 24 Jump 25 “Go back” computer command 26 Match, as clothing colors 29 Chicago Fire’s org. 30 Roof projection 31 Colored like Easter eggs 33 Bothersome 34 Fairy tale start 35 Skunk’s defense

38 Got giggles out of 39 Close-cropped hair style 41 Apprehensive 42 __ and dined 43 Cake decorator 44 Bookcase unit 45 Sum 46 Image maker, briefly 49 Curved foot part 50 1970 Kinks hit 51 Stretch across 53 Fella 54 Employ


B8

Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

A&L

Deja brew! Change up your daily grind KAITLYN DEHAVEN Design Editor

Dichotomy

Common Grounds is Waco’s coffee shop staple, attracting college students and tourists alike to their morning and late-night study session brews. Although Common Grounds serves some of the more popular caffeinated concoctions in the city, there are a variety of other locations where consumers can get their daily cup of joe.

Coffee & Spirits 508 Austin Ave. Sunday — Thursday: 6 a.m. — midnight Friday & Saturday: 6 a.m. — 2 a.m.

Dichotomy | 508 Austin Ave.

Baylor students should definitely check out this hip coffee shop next time they are looking for a place to study. Both a coffee and spirits bar, Dichotomy offers an environment that is warm and inviting. The atmosphere can help you home in on your studies while remaining calm and relaxed. Much of Dichotomy’s décor celebrates their hometown pride, with historic pieces of art from Waco’s past, including outdoor tabletops from the downtown library and artwork by local artists and artisans. In addition, Dichotomy has a balcony where students can look out over Waco as they sip coffee out of a mason jar and study for upcoming tests.

Pinewood Coffee Bar

2223 Austin Ave. Monday — Friday: 7 a.m. — 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday: 8 a.m. — 7 p.m.

Brú

Pinewood Roasters | 2223 Austin Ave.

Something new is brewing at Pinewood Roasters, Waco’s newest addition to the caffeine scene. Baylor graduates Dylan Washington and JD Beard created specialty drinks with distinct and authentic tastes that you won’t find at your local Starbucks. Since Pinewood’s shop is new, it may be a quieter place to study than Common Grounds or Dichotomy, which is perfect for focusing without distractions.

Brú Artisan Coffee | 601 Franklin Ave.

If you’re particular about your coffee and like to taste the rich flavor of your drink, then Brú is the place for you. This shop’s drip coffee is extremely smooth and great for coffee lovers. The register is right in front of an old-fashioned elevator shaft, bringing a unique element to the atmosphere that will take you back in time. The coffee shop is connected to an interior décor store, so take a

Hours of Operation

Artisan Coffee 601 Franklin Ave.

Mike Chuang | Contributor

CONNOISSEUR CORNER A freshly pulled shot of Pinewood Coffee Bar espresso is poured into a mug of piping hot water, making a classic Americano. Pinewood’s menu is simple yet satisfying, offering espresso-based classics, plus a few specialty drinks of their own.

Monday — Thursday: 7 a.m. — 7 p.m. Friday & Saturday: 7 a.m. — 10 p.m. Sunday: 12 p.m. — 7 p.m.

Café

minute and look through the array of paintings, carpets, decorative pillows and table toppers while you’re stopping for your morning pick-me-up.

Café Cappuccino | 100 N. 6th St.

Even though this café is only open in the mornings and early afternoons, the coffee and food are worth leaving the comfort of your bed. This

restaurant is not only a good place to get your coffee fix, offering a variety of lattes and specialty drinks, but it is also a great place to get your morning meal. They offer an array of pancakes, omelets, waffles and even lunch foods for the late risers. Although this café might not be the best for studying, it’s a great place to catch up with friends or for a bite to eat.

Cappuccino 100 N. 6th St.

Monday — Saturday: 6 a.m. — 2 p.m. Sunday: 7:30 a.m. — 2 p.m.

Working warriors, where are they now?

Routh graduated in 2017 with a degree in elementary education. She is currently in Austin pursuing her dream to be a full-time wedding photographer.

Recent grads offer advice to arts, humanities students MEREDITH WAGNER Jenna Routh

Trampe graduated in 2017 with a degree in studio art. He now lives in Sheridan, Wyo., and works for Flood Marketing and PHLY.

Nathan Trampe Rutledge graduated in 2017 with a degree in marketing and studio art. She is pursing a Master of Arts in art business at Sotheby’s Institute in New York.

Social Media Editor The first day of school entails the chance to accomplish old and new goals alike. For some students, this looks like firing the next shot in a series of targets or checking off tasks on long-term to-do lists. For students committed to creative career paths, whether arts or humanities-based, the journey to a successful future can feel a little less defined, especially so with diploma in hand. The Lariat spoke with Baylor graduates on creative paths about helping current students sharpen their focus as they prepare for the school year and beyond. Recent graduates Jenna Routh, Victoria Rutledge and Nathan Trampe answer questions about their experiences so far and offer advice for right-brained aspirants.

Victoria Rutledge

Q&A

Q: What real-world obstacles did you encounter as you began to build your creative career? NT: The biggest obstacle I have encountered thus far in my creative career is finding a serious market for my artwork. So many people are quick to fall in love with your work but hesitant to pay what it is worth. VR: I think it can be easy to become discouraged when people try and change your mind about pursuing a creative career. You need to know what you want and go after it. JR: A big obstacle I face is not being able to turn it off. I feel like I am never really in “work mode,” but I feel like I am never really out of it, either. I don’t come home from work at 5 and wind down for the night. And if I do, I am constantly thinking, “Have I done all the work I can do today?” or “I should probably be editing right

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now.” But let me just say, I would take all of these obstacles and 100 more if it came with the freedom that stems from creating art for a living. Art that fills people up and serves them in a big way. That makes everything worth it. Q: What advice would you give to creative Baylor students who hope to make art for a living? NT: I would encourage current Baylor students to be actively marketing their artwork and entering as many shows/events as possible while they’re still in school. The more you put yourself out there, the more people know you and know about you, making it easier to display and sell your work post-graduation. VR: I knew what I wanted to be doing in five years, but I also knew that there were different paths I could take to get there. Talking to people who have already figured it

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JR: Just keep doing it. Keep going, keep creating. Find what kind of art really fills you up, and keep doing that. You can’t expect money to roll in right when you start, and maybe not for a while after that. For myself (and a lot of other artists), the hardest part was the initial phase of “I am not good, and I am not getting any better. My work is boring. It is not turning out how I want it to. How can I get it to look like her work? How can I get it to look like his? When will I start creating something that people will pay me for?” That’s the hump you have to get over. You have to cross over into being proud of what you are creating. The biggest key is to do it without thinking about money.

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out is really helpful. I asked several professors for advice, as well as emailed professionals who had jobs that I wanted to know about. I also think learning to get over a fear of failure is super important.

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B8

Monday, August 21, 2017 The Baylor Lariat

A&L

Deja brew! Change up your daily grind KAITLYN DEHAVEN Design Editor

Dichotomy

Common Grounds is Waco’s coffee shop staple, attracting college students and tourists alike to their morning and late-night study session brews. Although Common Grounds serves some of the more popular caffeinated concoctions in the city, there are a variety of other locations where consumers can get their daily cup of joe.

Coffee & Spirits 508 Austin Ave. Sunday — Thursday: 6 a.m. — midnight Friday & Saturday: 6 a.m. — 2 a.m.

Dichotomy | 508 Austin Ave.

Baylor students should definitely check out this hip coffee shop next time they are looking for a place to study. Both a coffee and spirits bar, Dichotomy offers an environment that is warm and inviting. The atmosphere can help you home in on your studies while remaining calm and relaxed. Much of Dichotomy’s décor celebrates their hometown pride, with historic pieces of art from Waco’s past, including outdoor tabletops from the downtown library and artwork by local artists and artisans. In addition, Dichotomy has a balcony where students can look out over Waco as they sip coffee out of a mason jar and study for upcoming tests.

Pinewood Coffee Bar

2223 Austin Ave. Monday — Friday: 7 a.m. — 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday: 8 a.m. — 7 p.m.

Brú

Pinewood Roasters | 2223 Austin Ave.

Something new is brewing at Pinewood Roasters, Waco’s newest addition to the caffeine scene. Baylor graduates Dylan Washington and JD Beard created specialty drinks with distinct and authentic tastes that you won’t find at your local Starbucks. Since Pinewood’s shop is new, it may be a quieter place to study than Common Grounds or Dichotomy, which is perfect for focusing without distractions.

Brú Artisan Coffee | 601 Franklin Ave.

If you’re particular about your coffee and like to taste the rich flavor of your drink, then Brú is the place for you. This shop’s drip coffee is extremely smooth and great for coffee lovers. The register is right in front of an old-fashioned elevator shaft, bringing a unique element to the atmosphere that will take you back in time. The coffee shop is connected to an interior décor store, so take a

Hours of Operation

Artisan Coffee 601 Franklin Ave.

Mike Chuang | Contributor

CONNOISSEUR CORNER A freshly pulled shot of Pinewood Coffee Bar espresso is poured into a mug of piping hot water, making a classic Americano. Pinewood’s menu is simple yet satisfying, offering espresso-based classics, plus a few specialty drinks of their own.

Monday — Thursday: 7 a.m. — 7 p.m. Friday & Saturday: 7 a.m. — 10 p.m. Sunday: 12 p.m. — 7 p.m.

Café

minute and look through the array of paintings, carpets, decorative pillows and table toppers while you’re stopping for your morning pick-me-up.

Café Cappuccino | 100 N. 6th St.

Even though this café is only open in the mornings and early afternoons, the coffee and food are worth leaving the comfort of your bed. This

restaurant is not only a good place to get your coffee fix, offering a variety of lattes and specialty drinks, but it is also a great place to get your morning meal. They offer an array of pancakes, omelets, waffles and even lunch foods for the late risers. Although this café might not be the best for studying, it’s a great place to catch up with friends or for a bite to eat.

Cappuccino 100 N. 6th St.

Monday — Saturday: 6 a.m. — 2 p.m. Sunday: 7:30 a.m. — 2 p.m.

Working warriors, where are they now?

Routh graduated in 2017 with a degree in elementary education. She is currently in Austin pursuing her dream to be a full-time wedding photographer.

Recent grads offer advice to arts, humanities students MEREDITH WAGNER Jenna Routh

Trampe graduated in 2017 with a degree in studio art. He now lives in Sheridan, Wyo., and works for Flood Marketing and PHLY.

Nathan Trampe Rutledge graduated in 2017 with a degree in marketing and studio art. She is pursing a Master of Arts in art business at Sotheby’s Institute in New York.

Social Media Editor The first day of school entails the chance to accomplish old and new goals alike. For some students, this looks like firing the next shot in a series of targets or checking off tasks on long-term to-do lists. For students committed to creative career paths, whether arts or humanities-based, the journey to a successful future can feel a little less defined, especially so with diploma in hand. The Lariat spoke with Baylor graduates on creative paths about helping current students sharpen their focus as they prepare for the school year and beyond. Recent graduates Jenna Routh, Victoria Rutledge and Nathan Trampe answer questions about their experiences so far and offer advice for right-brained aspirants.

Victoria Rutledge

Q&A

Q: What real-world obstacles did you encounter as you began to build your creative career? NT: The biggest obstacle I have encountered thus far in my creative career is finding a serious market for my artwork. So many people are quick to fall in love with your work but hesitant to pay what it is worth. VR: I think it can be easy to become discouraged when people try and change your mind about pursuing a creative career. You need to know what you want and go after it. JR: A big obstacle I face is not being able to turn it off. I feel like I am never really in “work mode,” but I feel like I am never really out of it, either. I don’t come home from work at 5 and wind down for the night. And if I do, I am constantly thinking, “Have I done all the work I can do today?” or “I should probably be editing right

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now.” But let me just say, I would take all of these obstacles and 100 more if it came with the freedom that stems from creating art for a living. Art that fills people up and serves them in a big way. That makes everything worth it. Q: What advice would you give to creative Baylor students who hope to make art for a living? NT: I would encourage current Baylor students to be actively marketing their artwork and entering as many shows/events as possible while they’re still in school. The more you put yourself out there, the more people know you and know about you, making it easier to display and sell your work post-graduation. VR: I knew what I wanted to be doing in five years, but I also knew that there were different paths I could take to get there. Talking to people who have already figured it

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JR: Just keep doing it. Keep going, keep creating. Find what kind of art really fills you up, and keep doing that. You can’t expect money to roll in right when you start, and maybe not for a while after that. For myself (and a lot of other artists), the hardest part was the initial phase of “I am not good, and I am not getting any better. My work is boring. It is not turning out how I want it to. How can I get it to look like her work? How can I get it to look like his? When will I start creating something that people will pay me for?” That’s the hump you have to get over. You have to cross over into being proud of what you are creating. The biggest key is to do it without thinking about money.

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out is really helpful. I asked several professors for advice, as well as emailed professionals who had jobs that I wanted to know about. I also think learning to get over a fear of failure is super important.

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