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Š 2019 by the author of this book Jon Anderson Architecture. The book author retains sole copyright to his contributions to this book. 3rd Printing, March. 2019 ISBN: 978-1-61850-144-8 Printed in Korea by Four Colour Print Group, Louisville, Kentucky

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JON ANDERSON ARCHITECTURE


Arc de Triomphe Travel Sketch, Paris 1984

Notre Dame Cathedral Travel Sketch, Paris 1984

Colosseum Travel Sketch, Rome 1984


INTRODUCTION

Jon Anderson Architecture (JAA) is an Albuquerque, New Mexico based design practice whose work focuses on regionally sensitive modern architecture. Established in 1991, JAA has won over 50 local and regional American Institute of Architects design awards and has been featured in architectural books and periodicals internationally. The firm was founded by owner and principal architect Jon Anderson FAIA when he opened his own studio after 18 years with other firms including 12 years as a Senior Associate with renowned architect Antoine Predock. Jon’s early works received high acclaim amongst his clients and peers which generated the momentum to expand the office to perform large scale work including major commercial, educational and institutional projects. The office size has grown modestly to currently 6 architects and designers including 2 long-time associates, James Lucero and Dean Cowdrey, with 24 years with the firm combined. JAA has made the conscious decision to remain a small firm to promote the philosophy that a core team involved throughout the entire design process, from conceptual design through construction, is critical in realizing highly-crafted, thoughtful architecture. The work of Jon Anderson Architecture is a response to the natural forces and phenomena of each site in a form that is both minimal and elegant. The architecture is a derivative primarily from its interaction with the sun, borrowing queues for solar benefit and for the interplay of light and shadow. Cultural context and regional building traditions are considered and critically analyzed in order to create an appropriate architectural response. The work is expressed as a balance of systems where program, site, economy, energy efficiency, and the human sense of well-being come together to celebrate a respect for the landscape and promote rational and meaningful design. Jon Anderson was elected to the American Institute of Architects - College of Fellows in 2012.

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Projects: Residential


Patton Residence Albuquerque, New Mexico

The dynamic and powerful presence of the Sandia Mountains inspired a young family of four to purchase a prime lot in the foothills of the High Desert Subdivision in Albuquerque. An Open Space Reserve bridges the lot and mountain allowing unobstructed views for the foreseeable future. The goals for the design were to celebrate the intimacy/grandeur of the mountain and views in all directions, to nestle quietly into the high desert landscape, to harmonize with the family’s lifestyle, and to support entertaining of friends and family all while meeting the strict design guidelines of the development. The house is oriented to align with Sandia Peak with the parti described as high volume public spaces flanked by semi-public spaces to the west and private spaces to the east. The slope of the butterfly roof over the main space axis tilts gently to the main entry and more drastically toward the mountains so that the viewer inside can see the mountain ridge touch the sky. The material palette is meant to borrow from the texture and colors of the landscape including traditional cement stucco, stained polished concrete floors to match the site soils, the warm pine ceiling, and the interior earth clay plaster. The design strives to blend and to serve as a window to appreciate the New Mexican landscape.

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SITE PLAN

FLOOR PLAN


Bosque House Albuquerque, New Mexico

This house for a family of five is located in Albuquerque’s north valley. The one acre lot is part of a residential development on the banks of the Rio Grande River. The lot on the perimeter of the development was partially irrigated field and river bosque. The bosque portion is rich with vegetation and contains 35 year-old cottonwood trees which give it a very special quality. The irregular shape of the lot and the preservation of the existing trees dictated a tight buildable area. The house straddles the line between the irrigated field and the bosque. It plugs into the existing cottonwood trees and captures views under the tree canopies. The glass corner of the living/dining area points to a distant view of Sandia Peak framed by the existing cottonwoods. The house radiates from around a large entry foyer that connects winter and summer outdoor patios, and leads to the children’s wing and formal family living areas. The master bedroom suite is accessed via a wood stair with a steel rail that steps up the west wall of the living room to a cylindrical study. The kitchen has views up the river corridor and across to a children’s play area. The cylinder that rises up from the center of the living room becomes a circular dining booth on the kitchen side and forms the study above. The 3,300 square foot house ties the trees and fields together. Long masonry walls define vehicular and visitor circulation and anchor the forms of the house to the ground. The house opens to views and to outdoor living areas and integrates the inside with the outside. The stepping forms of the house are defined with four different, but traditional stucco colors that compliment the surrounding vegetation and recall elements of traditional New Mexican architecture.

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High Desert House Albuquerque, New Mexico

The chameleonic and powerful presence of the Sandia Mountains inspired a retired couple to purchase a lot and settle in the foothills of the High Desert Subdivision. The goals for the design of the house were to exploit the intimacy and views of the mountain, display the couple’s extensive and varied collections, harmonize with their lifestyle, and support entertaining their friends and family while meeting the strict design guidelines of the development. The outcome as viewed from the street is a modest and discreet stucco/masonry house extruded gently from the native landscape. A low canopy announces the entry and compresses space in anticipation of the dramatic celebration of the majestic mountain caused by the living room’s high sloping ceiling with floor to ceiling glass oriented directly toward Sandia Peak. Galleries throughout the house and niches in the masonry display the collections in various modes. The house is bright and open with the butterfly roof clerestory providing dynamic light, changing with the passing of each day and each season.

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Kerr + Hauswald Residence Albuquerque, New Mexico

This project is located in Albuquerque’s close-in north valley area just east of the Rio Grande River. The 1-1/2 acre lot was formerly an alfalfa field which was later subdivided and borders an active ‘acequia’ or irrigation ditch. A husband and wife doctor couple with a 10 year-old son wanted a house that blended with the rural character of the site while taking advantage of the views and sun orientation. Their interest in traditional Japanese architecture and culture influenced the design as well as the integration of their vast collection of recreational equipment. The house stretches out on the site and includes a 31 foot tall stair tower, a traditional Japanese Tea House, garage space for 5 vehicles, and room for a future lap swimming pool and Koi pond. The 3400 square foot house has a second floor Master Suite and a third floor observation level at the top of the tower. The house turns on the site to capture mountain views from the living room and kitchen and to get a direct solar exposure for the bedroom wing and future lap pool. Guests enter the house through a “genken” with a window looking out into the garden and a bench and storage area for removing shoes as one enters. The entry leads to a two-story living area with an open kitchen at the south end. A large area of glass looks east to capture morning sun and distant views of the Sandia mountains. A corridor leads to the son’s bedroom and a guest room. A stair tower made from sandblasted concrete block leads to the master bedroom and up to the observation level. A traditional Japanese tea house sits by itself to the east of the main house. The layout is based on a 4 1/2 “tatami” mat room and also has a small entry and bathroom area. The “shoji” screen on the south side is a double-glazed Kawneer sliding glass door with horizontal divisions to mimic traditional Japanese design. The Tea House is a private meditative space and doubles as a guest house.

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UPPER FLOOR PLAN

SITE PLAN

LOWER FLOOR PLAN


Griego + Ruth Residence Albuquerque, New Mexico

This house in Albuquerque’s north valley is for a couple who own a prominent custom-home building business. The owners commissioned Jon Anderson to design their own house after building three other Jon Anderson designed custom houses. They wanted a house that explored the indigenous tradition of simple masonry forms and utilized bold color to define and differentiate these forms. The 4,000 square foot house sits in a flood-irrigated pasture with several existing apple trees and a huge cottonwood tree. The house faces east capturing the morning light and views of the Sandia mountains. An intense pink wall, ten feet high, greets visitors and directs them along a linear fountain lined with cobalt blue tile to the glass entry. The front door is flanked on the opposite side by a purple masonry grid that supports a steel trellis that is reminiscent of viga and latilla construction in the historic pueblo style. The entry is continuous with a large dining area which features a cast-in-place concrete table that seats fourteen. The pink entry wall continues through the house, defining the south side of the dining area. The north side is a masonry fireplace mass rendered in a brilliant yellow. Floor-to-ceiling glass defines both ends of this space, framing views to the east and sheltered views to the west. The living room shares the pink wall on one side and a masonry fireplace on the other side. The fireplace has a cast-in-place concrete hearth with a glass block grid on either side. An intimate courtyard sits at the west end of the house dominated by the tiled fountain which marks the entry and continues through the house as a vibrant blue tile stripe. The simple stucco shapes and brilliant colors of the house evoke the power and mystery of de Chirico’s paintings. The massive entry wall guides one into the house, an atmospheric interior suffused with rich saturated color that captures and transforms the brilliant natural light of New Mexico.

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Komesu Ketai Residence Albuquerque, New Mexico

The house located in the High Desert Subdivision, was designed for husband and wife doctors with two teenage sons and a mother who spends half the year in New Mexico. The 2700 square foot house stretches out on a long narrow lot that runs east and west. The house sits at the west end of the site and steps up to the east with room for future expansion. The entry is on the north side with spectacular panorama views of the Sandia Mountains. Outdoor living spaces wrap the east and south faces of the house absorbing the warmth of the sun during the cooler months and protected by shade structures during the heat of the summer. Views from the outdoor living spaces wrap around from the Sandias to distant views of Downtown Albuquerque and the West Mesa beyond. A long corridor runs through the house with south facing clerestory windows that take advantage of the direct light and solar gain during the cooler months. The living / kitchen / dining area is one large room with the kitchen cabinets acting as a wood divider between the dining and kitchen areas. The sons share a bathroom and a small living area. These spaces are located behind an interior masonry wall that not only absorbs heat from the sun, but is also a sound barrier to the main living area. The long, low stepping forms of the house with earth-tone stucco and masonry blend into the naturalistic landscape and mountain backdrop. This project’s conservative budget lead to its compact and efficient design even though it has four bedrooms and a mother-in-law quarters. The finishes are high quality but not extravagant and the construction cost including all site development and utility costs was just over $100 per square foot at the time it was built.

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Flyway View House Albuquerque, New Mexico

This house rests on a site located in Albuquerque, New Mexico bordering the 160 acre Rio Grande Nature Center to the south and the Rio Grande River corridor to the West. The wildfowl habitat is on a major migratory flyway hosting snow geese, sand hill cranes and the occasional endangered whooping crane. Designed to maximize views of the bird habitat and to take advantage of solar exposure and passive ventilation, the house hosts simple sustainable materials and the thoughtful use of glass to blend the indoor and outdoor living spaces. The major living areas align the Southern exposure and view windows. Overhangs protect these areas from the high summer sun but exploit the low winter sun for passive heat gain. The house sits below the ancient cottonwoods with distant views of the Sandia mountain range to the East, the Rio Grande Bosque to the West and abundant migratory wildfowl to the South.

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Archibeck Residence Albuquerque, New Mexico

This project is a remodel of house built in the close-in Northeast Heights of Albuquerque in 1961. The clients, an Orthopedic Surgeon and Architecture Graduate with four daughters, purchased this house because of its distinct modern aesthetic. To minimize the cost impacts, the work was divided into 5 phases. Phases 1 and 2 were comprised of major renovations to the existing roof structure, flooring, kitchen, windows, casework, and fireplace. Phase 3 addressed all of the exterior work and included landscaping, a new pool and pool house. Phase 4 consisted of remodeling four bedrooms and four bathrooms on the east end of the project. The family’s need to expand beyond the existing limitation created an opportunity to extrude a space from the existing house that was both inspiring and functional (Phase V). With the girls growing up into young women this space had to provide a sense of limitless boundaries by providing connections beyond the space both virtually and physically and adapting to the family’s changing needs. The space functions as a media room, a music practice space, a place to do homework, and simply a gathering space.

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Byrn-Wesley Residence Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, New Mexico

Albuquerque’s north valley has a rich heritage. The once meandering course of the Rio Grande River is now channeled to the western edge of the valley. The remaining fertile crop lands are gradually being displaced by real estate development. This site which lies in a Los Ranchos de Albuquerque development was once irrigated alfalfa with a few apple trees from a turn-of-the-century orchard. Excavation on-site revealed pot shards from Anasazi visitors. It was important for this house to relate in every way possible to the physical and historical characteristics of the site. The one acre lot is long and low and backs up to an active irrigation channel on the west with spectacular views of the Sandia mountains to the east. The house is also long and low and steps back to the north and south to maximize the mountain views. One approaches the house through an opening in a large masonry wall that leads to an auto court with access to the protected entry with its brick paving and fountain. A 160 foot long brick walk leads past a future lap pool to a small patio adjacent to the irrigation ditch. This patio is inside a naturalistic preserve are with native trees, shrubs, and grasses. The house has an open plan that stacks spaces along a central east/west linear circulation path. This path is intersected at the entry by a high foyer with glass at both ends that frame close-in views. The east wall of the entry is the long masonry wall of the entry court. The stucco finish of this wall continues into the house and becomes the finished surface of the entry, kitchen/family room, and master bedroom. The entire first floor is red brick which is continuous under the perimeter glass openings to visually tie the inside to the outdoor living spaces. The linear open plan of the house is flooded with natural light and the stepping masses of the house along with the subtle earth tone colors recall elements of traditional New Mexico Architecture.

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SITE PLAN

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

UPPER FLOOR PLAN


Placita House

Albuquerque, New Mexico This house is the result of the reinterpretation of the traditional New Mexican south-facing u-shaped house or “placita� within a contemporary semi-rural context, shaped by the needs of a family with three young competitive swimmer daughters. The property is at the end of a cul-desac nestled amongst the cottonwood trees that flank the Riverside Drain. A private gate provides direct access to the bike path that runs north/south along the Rio Grande River. The massing, materials, and colors are meant to speak to, but not mimic the heritage of agrarian adobe construction in an honest way where corners are squared and un-tapered. Walls and semi-opaque masonry scrims are arranged to orchestrate layers of privacy, play of light, and moments of allure. The courtyard remains the heart of the house providing light to the living spaces that embrace the pool and a private and safe refuge for the girls as they grow. The plan wraps a courtyard with a direct southern exposure. The courtyard houses a 75 foot lap pool with perimeter deck and landscaping. The covered entry is on the north side with views into the courtyard area. The garage is also on the north side with the doors facing west to form a sheltered auto court. The master suite and four bedrooms line the west side of the courtyard. The living areas which are one large continuous space line the east side of the courtyard. A fireplace mass, open on both sides, divides the Family Room from the Kitchen. The Kitchen is wrapped on the other side with an olive green partial height wall that separates it from the formal dining area and living room. The kitchen is flanked on the east by a butler’s pantry and an outdoor barbecue and dining area. The family room terminates at the south end with a large covered area with a fireplace which is really an outdoor extension of the family room. This house including the finished garage, pool and site work was built for $134 per square foot.

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Bolton Residence Albuquerque, New Mexico

A family of four wanted to build a new house on a vacant lot in an established Albuquerque neighborhood that had been developed in the 1960’s. The lot was small, 65 feet by 135 feet with a northeast orientation and a grade that sloped 8 feet from back to front. To secure financing, the construction cost had to be compatible with the current resale values of adjacent properties. This meant that the total square foot construction cost, including all site development, had to be less than $60 per square foot. The compact 4,000 square foot plan revolves around a tall linear entry foyer that bisects the formal and casual living areas. The house has a basement and two upper levels which are set back from the street to diminish the vertical impact of their height. A large area of glass occurs at the end of the living room to capture views of the adjacent Sandia Mountains. The garage door is also glass which continues the pattern of the living room window and opens up the typical elevation on a narrow subdivision lot. The main level consists of living, dining, kitchen and family rooms along with kid’s bedrooms and playroom. The upper level has a master bedroom suite with a large bathroom and separate study. A small deck off of the bedroom faces the Sandia and Manzano mountains and a ladder-accessed look-out tower peeks over an adjacent hill with views of the West Mesa volcanoes and sunsets. The house steps up from the front to the back following the natural slope of the site. It opens up on the north and east sides to capture views and morning light. The stepping forms of the house subtly recall elements of traditional New Mexico architecture.

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SITE PLAN

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

UPPER FLOOR PLAN


Schwartz Residence El Paso, Texas

Our client wanted to build a contemporary house on an infill lot in the established Country Club neighborhood of northwest El Paso Texas. Together we developed the goals of the project: maximize the site, provide a sense of openness while maintaining privacy, and incorporate the latest in home-automation technology. Through the orchestration of perimeter spaces, landscape elements and the site, outdoor living areas were created that feel private and protected, but also “open� despite the house filling the majority of the lot. Though very different than its neighbors, this cast-in-place concrete house responds to its environment by embracing the desert light and climate, but also by addressing the notions of scale and solid vs. void inherent within the neighborhood. The exposed concrete is complimented by large glass areas and stainless steel details while the interior offers the owner a rich environment with dark stained concrete floors, warm wood and plaster finishes, and sounds of flowing water echoing through the spaces. The house is equipped with all of the conveniences and comfort available through modern technology.

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White Residence Albuquerque, New Mexico

This project is a remodel of a 7th floor condominium unit in a building built in 1960 in Albuquerque’s Southwest quadrant. The owner, an orthopedic surgeon and his wife, planned to spend only a portion of the week in this unit and the rest of the week in another residence they own in Santa Fe. They wanted the remodel to make this small space efficient and comfortable and to display a portion of their contemporary art collection. To maintain transparency and a feeling of openness, the bathroom was enclosed with slabs of ½” thick translucent glass. Other than a linear closet and mechanical enclosures, there are no walls. The positioning of art work and new furniture was studied to maximize the use of space. Classic furniture pieces by Mies, Corbusier, Perriand, Nogucci, Eames, Pensi and Starck were selected based on their appearance and compatibility with the layout. This apartment has been transformed from a tight, dark, worn-out space to a new level of bright modern simplicity.

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Blue Grama House

Mariposa Development - Rio Rancho, New Mexico This home was designed for a young couple that had purchased an estate lot in the new Mariposa Subdivision on the far West side of Rio Rancho. The owners Zach & Susan Bryan had a limited budget, but were interested in a house that was site specific, explored a modern aesthetic, and displayed the couple’s extensive mineral collection. Susan is a writer for the Associated Press and Zach is Albuquerque firefighter who also has a degree in Geology. The house sits at the base of a hill that is part of the Mariposa “Open Space” and stretches out and wraps the hill parallel with the topography. The site sloped more than 20 feet from the back corner to the street and had a pre-determined building envelope meant to preserve open space. The house forms a bench with a concrete retaining wall that follows the building envelope on the front and back side. The main living areas face southeast with panoramic views of the Sandia mountains and Rio Grande River valley. The Master suite and two bedrooms line the northwest side and the rest of the house is a large open space. The view windows are protected from the summer sun with overhangs based on the solstice angles. Outside, the retaining walls form the terraces and preserve the natural grade and pre-existing vegetation. The perimeter of the house includes a series of lighted “nichos” to display the mineral collection. The house was designed to be built by the owners who did the work themselves under a homeowner’s permit with help from their families and key sub-contractors. This project including the finished garage, utilities and all site work was built for a total of $91 per square foot.

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Downtown Residence Albuquerque, New Mexico

The Historic Downtown Neighborhood of Albuquerque was developed after the arrival of the Railroad in 1878. The Owner/Architect had lived in this neighborhood for 40 years. He owned an adjacent property that was designated “non-contributing” and it was he and his wife’s intention to tear down this structure and build a new house for them to live in. An initial design of the house was rejected by the Historic Landmarks Commission who oversees all construction in this area for being “too modern” to fit-in. A second design was developed and approved that was based on the pre-dominant bungalow style of the neighborhood. The house sits on a narrow 50’ wide lot and wraps a 100 year old Austrian pine tree on the West side. The North elevation is composed of a linear porch with large French doors opening to the Living Room and the South facing roof slope supports a 30 panel solar array. The interior is open to the 27’ high ridge and an open steel stair extends from the basement to the upper level Master. The steel stair transitions to a steel catwalk that wraps the upper level to access book shelves and art walls. The super-energy efficient house is in the process to seek LEED Platinum certification. The brand new construction, with its modern interior, blends nicely into this 100 plus year old neighborhood just blocks from Albuquerque’s Downtown Core.

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SITE PLAN


GROUND FLOOR PLAN

UPPER FLOOR PLAN

BASEMENT PLAN

A. LIVING ROOM B. DINING ROOM C. KITCHEN D. PANTRY E. LAUNDRY ROOM F. MUSIC ROOM G. BATHROOM H. GUEST BEDROOM I. MEDIA ROOM J. CLOSET K. MATER BATHROOM L. MASTER BEDROOM M. BALCONY N. CATWALK O. SERVICES P. EGRESS LADDER Q. OFFICE R. WINE CELLAR S. GAME ROOM


Projects: Commercial


Scott & Kienzle Law Office Albuquerque, New Mexico

A principal partner and owner of a law practice desired to move his firm from a leased office suite in a downtown Albuquerque high-rise to an office of his own. Tucked between the Plaza Inn Hotel and the neighboring Medical Arts Complex, the site sloped to the southwest. The unassuming location for a former full-service gas station, the property seemed at first to be an unlikely site. The location’s true potential revealed great opportunities to experience dramatic urban views of downtown Albuquerque to the southwest and views of the Sandia Mountains to the northeast. An existing retaining wall along the western edge of the property provided a parallel datum to which the building and required parking layout aligned with street and view orientations. Master-planning for the site accommodated room for a future expansion that will match the existing building’s footprint in size with utilities and site infrastructure sized to accommodate the future expansion. The design is realized in one overreaching gesture pivoting the building slightly west of south focusing the metal clad tube-like structure toward the downtown and distant mountain vistas. The building projects over a concrete plinth emphasizing the tube as it sits above the sloping topography. The southern exposure allows controlled solar gain in winter and abundant day-lighting throughout the year.

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FLOOR PLAN

SITE PLAN

ELEVATIONS


Santa Fe MINI Dealership Santa Fe, New Mexico

The owner of Sandia Motor Group decided to open a satellite MINI Cooper and a BMW Motorcycle dealership in Santa Fe to complement his Albuquerque location which would house both in the same building. He purchased a lot with an existing pre-engineered building that previously housed a sporting goods business which had been adorned on the exterior to resemble a Bass Pro Shop. The design for the remodel and expansion strives to incorporate two different dealerships, each with their own corporate identity and style into a cohesive whole. The black surfaces with whimsical splashes of color for the MINI identity and the refined white surfaces with muted grays for the BMW identity creates a Yin and Yang quality. These opposite/contrary forces are interconnected by a deep projecting exterior canopy that doubles as shading for the glazing as well as creates a light shelf as it extends to the interior.

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SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


Sarabande Bed and Breakfast Albuquerque, New Mexico

Our client purchased a run-down 5,000 square foot Bed & Breakfast in Albuquerque’s North Valley area with the goal of revitalizing the property by juxtaposing its existing rustic garden character against a clean and modern backdrop. By stripping away the applied ornamentation of articulated parapet caps and faux pueblo detailing, surfaces and facades are visually de-cluttered to move away from kitsch to a more ambient sophistication while maintaining a comfortable charm. Interiors have been opened up and brightened with large windows, white plaster walls, traditional exposed viga wood ceilings. Cabinetry, flooring, fixtures, and lighting has been replaced with clean modern lines set against the texture of existing saltillo tile and flagstone. The entry sequence has been enhanced by layering spaces along an axis beginning at an entry portico through a wall with punched openings via reclaimed wood gates, a covered patio open to a light filled brick courtyard, and finally, a covered outdoor hallway or Zaguản leading to the swimming pool beyond. The cost of renovations were $360k or $69 per square foot.

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SITE PLAN

FLOOR PLAN


Sandia MINI Dealership Albuquerque, New Mexico

There is a reinvigorated enthusiasm worldwide for the colorful, trendy, classic MINI Cooper that brought the need for a new dealership to Albuquerque. Jon Anderson Architect determined that the new Sandia Mini dealership should act as a backdrop or jewel case for the maniaworthy little car rather than an icon in itself. This is the design concept that ultimately became the force that lead to the clean and sophisticatedly simple award-winning facility. The site sits several feet below the pavement of Interstate 25, strengthening the concept of displaying a MINI in a manner that would be visible from the freeway; in essence, a billboard for itself. This concept was realized by cantilevering a car from the second floor of the dealership in a frameless glass box; a very different idea than MINI dealerships built in other parts of the country. The initial photo-realistic renderings of the design reviewed by MINI national corporate administrators were controversial, but well received and met the vision of the progressive design intent which is the image that MINI Corporate wanted to project to the public. Although there were much larger population bases that wanted a MINI dealership, the Albuquerque facility was approved based on the image established by the renderings and the quality of the BMW dealership on the same site also designed by Jon Anderson Architect.

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SITE PLAN


Bolton Animal Hospital Albuquerque, New Mexico

The original Bolton Animal Hospital was established on this same site in 1948 . The current owner and son of the founder wanted to up-grade the facility which was in bad shape and didn’t meet some of the basic requirements of an Animal Hospital. An existing kennel structure and a storage building were torn down to make way for a new building directly behind the existing facility. When the new building was completed, the practice moved in over the course of a weekend. The old hospital was then torn down and a landscaped parking lot was constructed. This whole process took place without losing a single day of operation. The new building is set back from the street. Clients and their pets enter through an east facing entry vestibule. The reception area which opens all the way to the roof structure looks out over the parking lot and has great views of the Sandia Mountains. The three exam rooms are free standing soundproofed enclosures that allow natural light to move through the public spaces. The treatment and surgery areas are on the south side of the building.The surgery area takes advantage of south light through a fire rated glass block opening. The kennels which have 45 dog runs are designed for future expansion and incorporate a state of the art flushing floor drain system. The grooming area with views to the east, has two custom built dog baths and a separate cage area. The building also contains an apartment for a live-in employee so that they can offer 24 hour care as required for hospitalized animals. The building had a limited budget and the approach to design and finishes was very utilitarian. The plan is straight forward, based on an efficient “race track” layout around the three exam rooms. The interiors are very light and bright and present a comfortable but professional environment for the clients and their animals. (The building not including site work was built for $65 per square foot.)

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Santa Fe BMW Dealership Santa Fe, New Mexico

The 16,368 square foot auto dealership is located in the Valdes Industrial Park at the south end of Santa Fe just off Cerrillos Road. The site is visible from Cerrillos Rd. and is adjacent to a Land Rover dealership and a Mercedes Benz dealership. The building is a satellite facility to the main BMW dealership in Albuquerque. This remodel was done to the existing dealership building, originally designed by this office in 1999. The purpose of the remodel was to enlarge the existing facility and to upgrade finishes, fixtures, and furniture to meet current BMW Corporate standards. It was important to us to not only meet the required standards, but to design a building that was site specific and addressed the climatic issues of this high-desert environment. Miesien planes lightly meeting one another create the form of the lobby. The curtain wall windows and skylights allow light to pass though while overhangs control heat gain and help frame distant views of the New Mexican landscape.

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FLOOR PLAN

SECTION FACING SOUTHWEST


Projects: Educational


Georgia O’Keeffe Elementary Albuquerque, New Mexico

The magnificent landscape of New Mexico profoundly affected Georgia O’Keeffe and transformed her work into an appreciation of what she believed “belonged” to her. It is this overwhelming notion of belonging that allowed her to evolve as an artist and it is the backbone for the design of this school which bears her name. The school is meant, not as a monument, but as a vehicle to extract and distill the principles and phenomena of this place, New Mexico, for which O’Keeffe became intensely aware and subsequently exposed to the world. It is meant to instill within every student a spirit of limitless growth potential by providing a richly pedagogical, nurturing, and protected environment from which to thrive. The school is arranged in a U-shape on an east-west axis with arms that reach out toward the existing playground/park and embrace the Courtyard. Views reconnect the seemingly introverted plan with the Sandia Mountains to the east and the volcanoes and Rio Grande River valley to the west. The materials are muted neutral colors allowing the building to reflect the seasonal qualities of the sky and are juxtaposed against dark metal skin bringing physical form to the notion of shadow. Color is dynamic being both bold and subtle with brightly colored ceiling planes refracting diffuse light onto adjacent surfaces.

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Centro Cívico Civic Center Ciudad Juárez, Mexico

The Civic Center for the Arts and Culture (CCAC) in Cuidad Juarez is envisioned as a multi-dimensional community center and school for the arts. It is meant to be the home for music and cultural programs to be used by the families of SMart employees and as a community outreach hub. It is to allow for many uses (and user diversity) to overlap blending fine and performing arts, traditional classrooms, and indoor and outdoor play areas into a cohesive communal asset. The design challenge is to develop a Center that welcomes the community providing a sense of ownership and belonging while recognizing the sensitive security issues of a city in a state of rebuilding. The design responds to these goals by first providing an entry monument tower as an enclosure for the water cistern. The tower becomes a landmark demarcating the Center and acting as a gateway to the property and a cue that one has entered something special. The Center is secured with a “fence” that resembles sculpture with vertical flat steel posts spaced apart to allow visibility, but close enough deter undesirable entry. The building vocabulary borrows from regional masonry and stucco tradition and injects moments of vibrancy and rhythm echoing the colorful passion and resilience of the people. The building wraps a light-filled central space in a protective gesture with secure high windows and rhythmic narrow vertical openings for natural light. The bulk of the gymnasium mass rises up with its south-facing facade used as an armature for a photovoltaic solar panel array that acts also as a shade canopy for a Portal that faces the outdoor play area. Translucent insulated panels run the length of the north side of the multi-use gym to provide soft diffuse north light. The building separates two distinct outdoor areas, one plaza-like which has a formal presence useful for events and the other, less defined, ideal for sport and play. Within a compact footprint, the design works to balance the opposing notions between protection and freedom by softened barriers treated more as landscape architecture allowing the community to feel a sense of security to foster inspired worry-free creativity within.

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UNM SA+P FabLab Metal Shop Albuquerque, New Mexico

The School of Architecture and Planning’s FabLab at the University of New Mexico built in 2007 quickly outgrew its original space and doubled its footprint within a few years. What began as a woodshop evolved into a technologically sophisticated fabrications lab boasting an inventory of 3d printers, laser cutters, and CNC machines. FabLab needed a permanent Metal Shop structure to replace a temporary outdoor structure they had constructed to house a new plasma cutter and welding equipment. FabLab’s new Metal Shop was to enclose a small outdoor court directly adjacent to the FabLab with an open-air non-conditioned space that integrated visually with the existing architecture. This new space was to provide security for the state of the art equipment, allow for positive air flow to remove gaseous fumes, and to quietly exude a progressive ubiquity representing what occurs within. With a modest budget of $120,000, the School embraced a proposal to perforate steel panels in-house both to achieve a specific gradient pattern and to reduce costs.

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George I. Sanchez Community School Albuquerque, New Mexico

This new Pre-K thru 8 school prototype blends elementary and middle school to celebrate the differences and commonalities between age groups and fosters an environment of mentorship and community. The design embodies a collaborative pedagogical model to support crosscurricular and cross-disciplinary instruction. Technology and collaborative space are omnipresent instructionally and manifested physically in the campus design. The design parti borrows from the notion of a grapevine: the stem nourishing a series of grape leaves which in themselves are microcommunities of cells. The school is laid out along a two-story central circulation concourse running north/south with a full-length mechanical penthouse above. The spine acts as the armature for all building systems including rooftop solar panels. Each ‘grape leaf’ is then designed with flexible classrooms outlining shared workspaces of varying degrees of intimacy dispersed within to provide opportunities for learning in many modes whether small intimate groups, individual study, or large group team-teaching.

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


Albuquerque High School Renovation Albuquerque, New Mexico

Albuquerque High School, being the oldest high school in the city and located in the heart of the city, serves not only Albuquerque Public Schools but the city at large. The main component of the renovations was to create a new school commons for the campus within a severely restricted footprint. Originally, an exterior courtyard and a skylight provided some daylight to the existing student commons, but the space was dismal and shut off from the campus. The daylighting was insufficient and masonry walls and multiple levels distanced the existing commons from being an integrated space for the school. The exterior courtyard, while providing a much needed secure outdoor space, physically is an obstacle for the circulation of the school. The renovation for the commons was seen as an extraction of space within the restricted footprint.

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SCOPE OF WORK

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

1 2 3 4 5

COMMONS CAFETERIA KITCHEN ADMIN SUITE MUSIC DEPT.


Tres Volcanes Community School Albuquerque, New Mexico

Tres Volcanes Community Collaborative School is the second iteration of a new K through 8 model based on the prototype design of George I. Sanchez school to support Albuquerque’s growing northwest community. The School District requested a collaborative pedagogical model to support cross-curricular and cross-disciplinary instruction with a philosophy regarding technology and common collaborative space as omnipresent through the school both instructionally and manifested physically in the campus design. The school is meant to blend elementary and middle school to celebrate the differences and commonalities between age groups to foster an environment of mentorship and community. The design parti is based on a grapevine with the stem nourishing a series of grape leaves which in themselves are micro-communities of cells. The school is laid out along a two-story central circulation concourse running north/south with a full-length mechanical penthouse above. The spine acts as the armature for all building systems including rooftop solar panels. Each ‘grape leaf’ is then designed with flexible classrooms outlining shared workspaces of varying degrees of intimacy dispersed within to provide opportunities for learning in many modes whether small intimate groups, individual study, or large group team-teaching. The design sought to echo the mystique of the neighboring three inactive volcanoes and surrounding landscape of dark basalt and white mineral deposits in its exterior materials. Color is then injected into interior corridors and hallways as an abstraction of active student energy and lava flow. The colors act as wayfinding devices to color code each wing. This manifestation of the play on the site’s geology led to the name of the school as well as its “Magma” mascot.

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Projects: Unbuilt


Downtown Residence 1.0 Albuquerque, NM

The Historic Downtown Neighborhood of Albuquerque was developed after the arrival of the Railroad in 1878. The Owner/Architect had lived in this neighborhood for 40 years. He owned an adjacent property that was designated “non-contributing” and it was he and his wife’s intention to tear down this structure and build a new house for them to live in. An initial design of the house was rejected by the Historic Landmarks Commission who oversees all construction in this area for being “too modern” to fit-in. A second design was developed and approved that was based on the predominant bungalow style of the neighborhood.

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Bighorn Ridge House Albuquerque, NM

A young family of 5 purchased a premier lot in Albuquerque’s Sandia Heights subdivision nestled in the foothills of the Sandia Mountains. Our client’s goals were to balance the notion of modern with warmth and New Mexican tradition in a manner expressive of a reverence for the landscape. The dramatic slope of the site inspired a partially submerged 2-story design with half of the lower level embedded within the hillside. Natural and traditional materials such as wood, brick, and stucco were arranged with deliberate geometric clarity and juxtaposed with black aluminum storefront and large windows. The close proximity to the mountain caused the sides of the house to take on distinct personalities - the west public side faces the vast vistas toward the city, river valley, and distant volcanoes beyond, while the east side is intimate and private as the space between house and mountain create a quiet peaceful entry courtyard from which to enjoy the dynamic surroundings. The family’s energetic connected nature is reflected in the design by layering public and private spaces in such a way to allow the kid’s autonomy while maximizing opportunity for family interaction and bonding.

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Splay House

Albuquerque, NM The challenge was to design a home for an active young couple with a 4-year-old son which preserved the natural mountainous character of the site while celebrating the grandeur of the mountain and the limitless western views toward Albuquerque’s Rio Grande River Valley. The lot sits at the foot of the Sandia Mountains, a fault-block range on the eastern edge of the Rio Grande Rift Valley, and extends dramatically down a steep slope spotted with massive granite boulders and native vegetation. The house is conceived in a “v-shape” with one arm in alignment with a trajectory connecting Sandia Peak and Downtown Albuquerque and the other set at the azimuth of the setting sun on the summer solstice. The house is arranged around a massive 10’ tall rock formation to create an intimate courtyard and entry sequence. The private and utilitarian spaces constructed of concrete sit partially buried in the rocky terrain and anchor the house to the land mirroring the qualities of an outcropping.

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Native American Community Academy Charter School Albuquerque, NM

The Native American Community Academy (NACA) is a relatively new public charter school representing over 60 tribes and indigenous peoples. This project seeks to work in tandem with the curriculum of the school to foster a reconnection to the land, to community, and to the traditions of reverence for nature. It is meant to be a place of local discovery; an ecological learning community. The proposed site for the new school is an irregularly shaped lot (originally a gravel & sand mine) with drastic sloping topography near University Arena. The mission of the design is to reclaim the disturbed landscape and to heal the land in the spirit of the Native American way. Native Americans believe that people merely “borrow� the earth and it is our responsibility to nurture and give energy so that the earth can in turn give back. It is this symbiotic philosophy that the design strives to epitomize with clear acknowledgement towards the notion of earth and sky, the path of the sun, the natural cycles of the earth (relative to this specific place), and the strengthening of community. The strategy to heal the site is to use terraced gardens to provide areas for students to reconnect to their farming heritage as well as stabilize and mediate the existing drastic topographical change.

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Collaborations: Executive Architect Design Architect: Antoine Predock Architect PC


The University of New Mexico: George Pearl Hall

School of Architecture & Planning and Fine Arts & Design Library Albuquerque, NM


Photographs: Tim Hursley

The University of New Mexico

Cornell Parking Structure Albuquerque, NM


Mesa Del Sol

Aperture Center + UNM Interdisciplinary Film & Digital Media Albuquerque, NM


Sage House Taos, NM


Logjam House Blanco Basin, Colorado

Photographs: Jon Anderson


Principal in Charge for all projects : Jon Anderson, FAIA Photography by Kirk Gittings unless otherwise noted

Bolton Residence | 1991 Project Team: Jeff Wren Contractor: Robert Slatterly Construction Bosque Residence | 1992 Project Team: Peter Karsten Contractor: Sunbelt Properties New Mexico Heart Clinic Business Office | 1992 Electrical: Telcon Engineering Mechanical: Four Seasons Engineering Contractor: Ashcraft Construction Ridgecrest Residence | 1993 Project Team: Jeff Wren Contractor: Ron Romero Highland Senior Center Improvements | 1993 Project Team: Pankaj Vir Gupta Civil/Structural: Chavez Grieves Electrical: Telcon Engineering Mechanical: Four Seasons Engineering Contractor: Sims General Building & Construction Byrn-Wesley Residence | 1994 Project Team: Brett Oaks Contractor: Sunbelt Properties Bolton Animal Hospital | 1995 Project Team: Carl Kruger Contractor: Duncan Building Contractors Griego-Ruth Residence | 1996 Project Team: Brett Oaks, Sam Sterling Contractor: Sunbelt Properties Purcell-Will Residence | 1996 Project Team: Pankaj Vir Gupta, David Nelson, Brett Oaks Contractor: Sunbelt Properties Kerr-Hauswald Residence | 1997 Project Team: Tim Christ Contractor: Paul W Kenderdine Inc.

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UNM Health Science Center Remodel | 1997 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM Electrical: Telcon Engineering Mechanical: Four Seasons Engineering Contractor: ESA Construction Inc. Structural: McCormack Engineering Albuquerque Land Rover | 1997 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM Contractor: Flintco Civil: Jeff Martinson Structural: McCormack Engineering Mechanical: Four Seasons Engineering Electrical: Telcon Engineering Santa Fe BMW | 1998 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM Civil: Red Mountain Engineering Electrical: Telcon Engineering Mechanical: 4 Seasons Engineering Specifications: KG Associates Structural: Golden Lane and Associates Contractor: MEKA Inc., Peter Chalimides Contract Associates | 1999 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM, Malia Parikh Civil: Jeff Mortenson & Associates Electrical: Telcon Engineering Interiors: Barbara Blewett Studio B Interiors Mechanical: Four Seasons Engineering Structural: Golden Lane Structural Engineering Contractor: Sunbelt Properties Komesu-Ketai Residence | 2000 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM Contractor: Paul W Kenderdine Inc. Santa Fe Land Rover | 2000 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Civil: RME Engineers Structural: Golden Lane Engineering Mechanical: Four Seasons Engineering Electrical: Telcon Engineering Solecito Ranch | 2001 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM Radiant Heat: Radiant Heating Systems Inc. Contractor: Owner Permit


PROJECT CREDITS MuĂąoz Ibarra Residence | 2002 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM Civil: Atcon Engineering & Surveying Mechanical: Four Seasons Engineering Contractor: Cullers & Caldwell Levy Residence | 2002 Project Team: Devin Cannady PM Contractor: Sunbelt Properties Archibeck Residence - Phase I-V | 2002-2009 Project Team: Jarrod Arellano, Devin Cannady, Brian Hagood, James Lucero, Arturo NuĂąez, Kevin Sweet Contractor: Sunbelt Properties (Phases I & II), Paul W Kenderdine Inc. (Phases III - V) Schwartz Residence | 2003 Project Team: Angel Cantu PM, James Lucero Electrical/Low Voltage: Tech 2 Systems & Design Inc. Fountain Consultant: Roman Fountains Interior Designer: Martina Lorey Architect Inc. Landscape Architect: Design With Nature Mechanical: Robinet & Associates Structural: Crossno Engineering Contractor: Joe Nowell UNM Cornell Parking Structure | 2004 (In Association with Antoine Predock Architect) Project Team: Angel Cantu PM, Devin Cannady Civil/Structural/Mechanical/Electrical: Sonalysts Parking Structure Consultant: Walker Parking Consultants Contractor: Gerald Martin Sandia BMW | 2004 Project Team: Devin Cannady PM, Angel Cantu Civil/Electrical/Mechanical/Structural: Sonalysts Specifications: KG Associates Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Sage House | 2007 (In Association with Antoine Predock Architect) Project Team: Jarrod Arellano PM, Mark Harvold Structural: QPEC Contractor: Ian Forsberg

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Sandia MINI | 2005 Project Team: Kevin Sweet PM Civil: Sonalysts Electrical: The Group Plumbing/Mechanical: 4 Seasons Engineering Structural: RME ABQ Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. White Residence | 2005 Project Team: Brian Hagood PM, James Lucero, Kevin Sweet Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Placita House | 2006 Project Team: Mark Harvold PM, Jarrod Arellano, James Lucero, Kevin Sweet Contractor: Sunbelt Properties Logjam House | 2006 (In Association with Antoine Predock Architect) Project Team: Devin Cannady Structural: Walla Engineering Contractor: Glenn Murray AIA Blue Grama House | 2006 Project Team: James Lucero PM Contractor: Zach and Susan Bryan Hope Christian Middle School | 2006 Project Team: Mark Harvold PM, Jarrod Arellano, Kevin Sweet Civil: D. Mark Goodwin & Associates P.A. Electrical: Stone Electrical Design Mechanical/Plumbing: Terry L. Walker Consulting Engineers Structural: QPEC Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Medicine @ Downtown | 2006 Project Team: Mark Harvold PM, Kevin Sweet Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc.


UNM School of Architecture & Planning + Fine Arts Library | 2007 (In Association with Antoine Predock Architect) Project Team: James Lucero PM, Jarrod Arellano, Angel Cantu, Brian Hagood, Mark Harvold, Kevin Sweet Acoustical: Dohn & Associates Inc. Civil: Jeff Mortenson & Associates Cladding: Corte Cladding Consultants Code: Code Consultants Inc. Cost: Accurate Estimating Services Energy Design: The Weidt Group Lighting: Emphasis Lighting Group MEP: Bridgers & Paxton Consulting Engineers Specifications: KG Associates Structural: Chavez Grieves Consulting Engineers Contractor: Jaynes Corporation Flyway View House | 2007 Project Team: Jarrod Arellano PM, Mark Harvold, James Lucero Contractor: Blueher Abodes Ltd. Aperture Center @ Mesa Del Sol | 2008 (In Association with Antoine Predock Architect) Project Team: Jarrod Arellano PM, Dean Cowdrey, James Lucero Civil: URS Corporation Electrical: Allied Engineering and Design Inc. Mechanical/Plumbing: 4 Seasons Engineering Specifications: KG Associates Structural: KL&A Inc. Contractor: Klinger Construction Houx Residence Renovation | 2008 Project Team: Veree Parker PM, James Lucero Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Scott & Kienzle Law Office | 2009 Project Team: Mark Harvold PM Civil: TGC Engineering Electrical: Stone Electrical Design Mechanical: Mechanical Concepts Plumbing: Paul M. Romero P.E Structural: Quiroga Pfieiffer Engineering Corp. Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc.

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UNM Interdisciplinary Film & Digital Media | 2009 Project Team: Jarrod Arellano PM, Dean Cowdrey, Alisa Giron Electrical: Allied Engineering and Design Inc. Mechanical/Plumbing: The Response Group Inc. Specifications: KG Associates Structural: KL&A Inc. Contractor: Klinger Construction Albuquerque Microgrid | 2010 Project Team: Jarrod Arellano PM Civil: Brasher and Lorenz Inc. Electrical: Allied Engineering & Design Mechanical: Beaudin Ganze Consulting Engineers Specifications: KG Associates Structural: KL&A Inc. Contractor: Shimitzu Georgia O’Keeffe Elementary | 2010 Project Team: Mark Harvold PM, James Lucero - Designer, Jarrod Arellano, Dean Cowdrey, Alisa Giron, Arturo Nuñez Acoustical: Southwest Noise Control Civil: High Mesa Consulting Group Cost Estimating: Accurate Estimating Services Kitchen: Leonar Steeves Company Landscape: Westwind Landscape Construction Inc. LEED: Environmental Dynamics Inc. MEP: The Response Group Inc. Specifications: KG Associates Structural: KL&A Inc. Contractor: Shumate Constructors Inc. High Desert House | 2010 Project Team: Arturo Nuñez PM, Dean Cowdrey, Veree Parker Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Gooch Residence | 2010 Project Team: Mark Harvold PM Civil: Bordenave Designs Contractor: Chris Forsythe Native American Community Academy (Design) | 2010 Project Team: James Lucero PM, Jarrod Arellano, Dean Cowdrey, Mark Harvold Gutow Residence | 2013 Project Team: James Lucero PM Mechanical: Higham Consulting Contractor: Sunbelt Properties


PROJECT CREDITS Des Moines Municipal Schools School Based Health Center | 2013 Project Team: James Lucero PM, Dean Cowdrey Electrical: Stone Electrical Design Mechanical: Terry Walker Consulting Engineers Structural: Structural Design Associates Contractor: Stoven Construction Inc. UNM SA+P FabLab Enclosure | 2014 Project Team: James Lucero PM Electrical: Velarde Engineering Inc. Contractor: Klinger Construction Splay House | 2015 Project Team: James Lucero, Dean Cowdrey, Mark Harvold Gutow Residence | 2015 Project Team: Contractor: Sunbelt Properties Inc. Sarabande Bed and Breakfast| 2015 Project Team: James Lucero PM Contractor: Sunbelt Properties George I Sanchez Community School | 2015 Project Team: Mark Harvold PM, James Lucero, Jarrod Arellano, Dean Cowdrey Acoustical: Southwest Noise Control Code: Integrity Code Consulting Cost Estimating: Accurate Estimating Services Civil: High Mesa Consulting Group Energy Modeling: Bridgers & Paxton Kitchen: Leonard Steeves Company LEED: Environmental Dynamics Inc. MEP: BG Buildingworks Specifications: KG Associates Structural: Chavez Grieves Consulting Engineers Contractor: Bradbury Stamm Bighorn Ridge House | 2015 Project Team: James Lucero PM, Mark Harvold Civil: High Mesa Consulting Group Geotechnical: Earthworks Engineering Group Mechanical: Walker Energy Services Structural: Chavez Grieves Consulting Engineers

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Santa Fe MINI | 2016 Project Team: Dean Cowdrey PM, Mark Harvold Mechanical: Arsed Engineering Group Structural: Heatly Engineering Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Centro CĂ­vico | S-Mart | 2016 Project Team: James Lucero PM Executive Architect: ALA+S Architects Santa Fe BMW | 2016 Project Team: Dean Cowdrey PM Mechanical/Electrical: BG Buildingworks Structural: Chavez Grieves Consulting Engineers Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Patton Residence | 2017 Project Team: James Lucero PM Geotechnical: Earthworks Engineering Group Mechanical: Walker Engineering Services Structural: Heatly Engineering Contractor: Supple Homes Inc. Downtown Residence | 2017 Project Team: Dean Cowdrey Structural: Chavez Grieves Engineers Contractor: Paul W. Kenderdine Inc. Albuquerque High School | 2017 Project Team: Jarrod Arellano PM, Dean Cowdrey PM Code: Integrity Code Consulting Cost Estimating: Accurate Estimating Services Kitchen: Leonard Steeves Company MEP: BG Buildingworks Specifications: KG Associates Structural: Chavez Grieves Consulting Engineers Contractor: Bradbury Stamm Tres Volcanes Community Collaborative School | 2018 Project Team: James Lucero PM, Dean Cowdrey Acoustical: Wave Engineering Code: Integrity Code Consulting Cost Estimating: Accurate Estimating Services Civil: High Mesa Consulting Group Energy Modeling: Vibrantcy Kitchen: Leonard Steeves Company LEED: Environmental Dynamics Inc. MEP: BG Buildingworks Specifications: KG Associates Structural: Chavez Grieves Consulting Engineers Contractor: Bradbury Stamm


PUBLICATIONS

2019 “The Workaround”, Residential Design, September 2018 Downtown Residence 2018 Kirk Gittings, “Building Culture”, Santa Fe TREND, Summer 2018 Bosque Residence Jessa Cast, “One for the Architect”, Su Casa Magazine, Spring 2018 Downtown Residence 2017 Tony Hillerman, “Birthday for a College”, New Mexico Magazine, Feb 2017 UNM School of Architecture and Planning 2016 Charles C. Poling, “A Man With a Plan”, New Mexico Magazine, April 2017 Jon Anderson Feature 2015 Bill Dunn, “Jon and Dawn”, Land Rover ONELIFE, 2015 Jon Anderson Feature 2012 Kristin Lamprecht, “High Desert House”, Design Bureau, 2012 Driss Fatih, “Schwartz Residence”, Pure Luxury - World’s Best Houses, 2012 UNM Foundation, “School of Architecture + Planning”, Changing Worlds - The Campaign for UNM, 2012 Jon Anderson Feature 2011 Jon Anderson Architecture, Jon Anderson Architecture, Self-published 2010 “Flyway View House”, Sources + Design Magazine, Jan/Feb 2010 Joseph Giovannini, “Natural Wonder”, Architectural Digest, July 2010 Sage House 2009 Charles C. Poling, “Inspiration Out Back”, Su Casa Magazine, Spring 2009 Flyway View House Richard Metcalf , “Awarding Excellence”, Albuquerque Journal, Dec. 14, 2009 Aperture Center

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2009 Cont’d Alejandro Bahamon, Ana Cañizares, Antonio Corcuera ed., Corporate Architecture. Barcelona: Parramon Ediciones. 2009. 486-493. Sandia MINI 2008 Associated General Contractors, “Grand Prize of Show”, 2008 New Mexico’s Best Buildings Award Magazine, UNM School of Architecture Stanley Collyer, “A New Front Door for a University Campus”, Competitions Magazine, 2008 UNM School of Architecture Bruce D. Snider, “Intelligent Design”, Custom Home Magazine, Jul/Aug 2008 Flyway View House Alejandro Bahamon, Antonio Corcuera ed., Automotriz. Barcelona: Parramon Ediciones. 2008. 136-143. Sandia MINI Tony Illia, “Record News - On the Boards”, Architectural Record, May 2008 Mesa Del Sol James Saywell, “School of Architecture & Planning and Fine Arts & Design Library”, Hinge, June 2008 UNM SAAP and Fine Arts & Design Library 2007 Subhra Mazumdar, “Light View”, Design Today Magazine, October 2007 Griego-Ruth Residence Laura Sanchez, “Style Pioneers”, Su Casa Magazine, Autumn 2007 Blue Grama House 2006 “Winners in the AIA Albuquerque Su Casa Awards”, Su Casa Magazine, Spring 2006 Archibeck Residence and White Residence Stephen Gandel et.al., “Can you still Get Rich in Real Estate?”, Money Magazine, June 2006 Archibeck Residence Brad Collins ed. Antoine Predock Architect 4. New York: Rizzoli Intl. 2006. Nora Burba Trulsson, “Project Walk-thru”, Sources + Design Magazine, Jan/Feb 2006 Sandia MINI

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2006 Cont’d “Dress Grays”, Residential Concrete Magazine, Mar/Apr 2006 Schwartz Residence “Square is Cool”, Around 505 Magazine, Spring/Summer 2006 Schwartz Residence, Kerr-Hauswald Residence, Bolton Residence, Komesu-Ketai Residence, 2005 Cemex, Concrete Ideas for Living. Monterrey: Cemex, S.A. de C.V., 2005. 22-31. Schwartz Residence Ed Soltero, “East Meets Southwest”, Texas Architect, May/June 2005 Schwartz Residence Hanley Wood, “Mineral Spirits”, Custom Home Magazine, March 2005 Schwartz Residence Peter Haldeman, “Daryl Hannah Thinks Green”, Architectural Digest, January 2005 Sandia MINI Gussie Fauntleroy, Shelter From the Storm, New Mexico Magazine. 2005. 11, 71. Bosque Residence, Griego-Ruth Residence 2004 Elmo Baca, “Modern Elegance, Timeless Heart”, Su Casa Magazine. Summer 2004 Bosque Residence, Komesu-Ketai Residence, Griego-Ruth Residence, KerrHauswald Residence, Archibeck Residence, Bolton Residence, Schwartz Residence Nora Burba Trulsson, “New Mexico’s Design Awards”, Sources + Design Magazine, July/Aug 2004 Archibeck Residence Hanley Wood, “Family Plan”, Custom Home Magazine. Jul/Aug 2004 Komesu-Ketai Residence Kay Lockridge, “MINI Invasion”, The Santa Fe New Mexican, November 27, 2004 Sandia MINI 2003 Nigel F. Maynard, “Store Turn”, Residential Architect Magazine. May 2003 Griego-Ruth Residence 2002 Jodie Davis ed., Through the Lens. Australia: Images Publishing Group. 2002 Griego-Ruth Residence 2001 Nigel F. Maynard, “Industrial Revolution”, Residential Architect Magazine. May 2001 Bolton Residence, Anderson-Daby Residence, Bosque Residence

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2001 Cont’d “Jon Anderson Architects”, Residential Architect Magazine. April 2001 Kerr-Hauswald Residence, Griego-Ruth Residence 2000 Jim Tolpin, “Full Bloom in the Desert”. The New Family Home. Taunton Press. 2000 Griego-Ruth Residence Nick Markovich, “Cutting Edge Design”, New Mexico Magazine. April 2000 Kerr-Hauswald Residence, Griego-Ruth Residence Cheryl Weber, “Green Lagoon”, Custom Home Magazine. April 2000 Ridgecrest Residence 1998 Charles Miller. “Big Color in the High Desert”, Fine Homebuilding Magazine. 1998 Griego-Ruth Residence “The Great Designs, The Great Designers”, Santa Fean Magazine. October 1998 Griego-Ruth Residence, Kerr-Hauswald Residence 1997 Jon Anderson. “Creating a Master Suite”, Fine Homebuilding Magazine. 1997 Ridgecrest Residence 1996 Scott Gullett. “First Place Architect Designed Home”, Albuquerque Monthly Magazine. June 1996 Purcell-Will Residence 1995 Candice Miles. “Auto Magic”, Phoenix Home and Garden Magazine. November 1995 Bolton Residence M.J. Van Deventer. Western Design. Lincolnwood: Publications International Ltd., 1995 Bolton Residence, Bosque Residence 1994 Reed Kroloff. “Pane Geometry”. Phoenix Home and Garden Magazine. September 1994 Ridgecrest Residence 1993 Elle Faber. “Great Homes of Albuquerque”. Albuquerque Monthly Magazine. June 1993 Bosque Residence

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1991 Catherine Martines. “Great Homes of Albuquerque”. Albuquerque Monthly Magazine. June 1991 Bolton Residence, Anderson-Daby Residence


AWARDS 2018 AIA New Mexico George I. Sanchez - Honor Award Albuquerque High School - Citation Award Patton Residence - Citation Award AIA Albuquerque Albuquerque High School - Honor Award George I. Sanchez - Citation Award 2017 AIA New Mexico Santa Fe Mini - Citation Award AIA Albuquerque Patton Residence - Citation Award Anderson-Daby Residence - Citation Award 2016 AIA Albuquerque Sarabande Bed and Breakfast - Merit Award 2015 AIA Albuquerque Santa Fe Mini - Citation Award UNM SA+P FabLab Metal Shop - Citation Award Jeff Harnar Award for Contemporary Architecture Georgia O’Keeffe - Citation Award 2012 AIA Albuquerque Scott + Kienzle Law Offices - Merit Award Bryan Residence - Citation Award Jeff Harnar Award for Contemporary Architecture UNM School of Architecture - Winner Georgia O’Keeffe Elementary - Honorable Mention 2011 AIA New Mexico George Pearl Hall - Honor Award Aperture Center - Merit Award Georgia O’Keeffe Elementary - Merit Award AIA Albuquerque Georgia O’Keeffe Elementary - Merit Award 2010 AIA Western Mountain Region Native American Community Academy - Unbuilt AIA Albuquerque Placita House - Citation Award Aperture Center - Citation Award Sage House - Citation Award AIA Albuquerque - Unbuilt Native American Community Academy - Citation Award

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2009 AIA New Mexico Flyway View House - Honor Award AIA Albuquerque Schwartz Residence - Honor Award Georgia O’Keeffe Elementary - Merit Award NAIOP Award of Excellence Aperture Center Southwest Contractor Aperture Center - Honorable Mention 2008 AIA Albuquerque/Su Casa Magazine Flyway View House - Honor Award American Concrete Institute UNM School of Architecture & Planning Associated General Contractors UNM School of Architecture & Planning - Grand Prize Southwest Contractor UNM School of Architecture & Planning - Best of Award 2007 AIA Albuquerque/Su Casa Magazine Blue Grama House (Bryan Residence) - Honor Award AIA Albuquerque Flyway View House - Honor Award 2006 AIA Western Mountain Region Sandia Mini - Citation Award AIA New Mexico Sandia Mini - Merit Award AIA Albuquerque White Residence - Merit Award 2005 AIA Albuquerque/Su Casa Magazine Archibeck Residence - Honor Award White Residence - Merit Award AIA Albuquerque Sandia Mini - Honor Award Archibeck Residence - Honor Award Cornell Parking Structure - Honor Award 2004 AIA Western Mountain Region Cornell Parking Structure - Citation Award AIA New Mexico Cornell Parking Structure - Honor Award Schwartz Residence - Honor Award 2002 AIA New Mexico Kerr-Hauswald Residence - Citation Award


STAFF 2000 NAIOP Award of Excellence Contract Associates 1998 AIA New Mexico Home Tour Kerr-Hauswald Residence 1997 AIA Western Mountain Region Griego-Ruth Residence - Honor Award 1996 AIA New Mexico Griego-Ruth Residence - Merit Award Purcell-Will Residence - Merit Award AIA New Mexico Home Tour Griego-Ruth Residence Purcell-Will Residence Great Homes of Albuquerque Purcell-Will Residence 1995 New Mexico Business Journal Best Building Bolton Animal Hospital 1994 AIA New Mexico Byrn-Wesley Residence - Honorable Mention AIA New Mexico Home Tour Byrn-Wesley Residence UNM Friends of Art Home Tour Ridgecrest Residence 1993 AIA Western Mountain Region Bosque Residence - Merit Award AIA New Mexico Bosque Residence - Merit Award AIA New Mexico Home Tour Ridgecrest Residence Great Homes of Albuquerque Bosque Residence - Single Family Home Winner Ridgecrest Residence - Remodeled Home Winner 1992 AIA New Mexico Home Tour Bosque Residence Bolton Residence AIA New Mexico Award of Excellence Bolton Residence 1991 Great Homes of Albuquerque Bolton Residence - Single Family Home Winner Albuquerque Conservation Association Award Bolton Residence

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Principal Jon Anderson, FAIA Current Staff: James Lucero, AIA Dean Cowdrey Nick Garcia Nate Bia Elliot Hield Staff from 1991 to 2017: Mark Harvold AIA Jarrod Arellano AIA Kevin Sweet Angel Cantu Alisa Giron Arturo NuĂąez Brian Hagood Veree Parker Devin Cannady Tim Christ Mala Parikh Alberto Frias Sam Sterling Pankaj Vir Gupta Brett Oaks David Nelson Carl Kruger Peter Karsten Jeff Wren


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