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Pedal toward a better you!

START CYCLING TODAY.

5 TASTY FOODS TO HELP YOU CUT CHOLESTEROL THE #1 SPOT FOR A HEALTHY RETIREMENT TIPS TO STICK TO A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE! INSIDE: THE YOGA STUDIO


be a master of the green Augusta National Golf Club


On the Cover 40 14

Cycling for Your Health Cycling is a cardiovascular activity that’s fun, low impact and helps your brain stay sharp as you age.

Five Foods That Will Lower Your Cholesterol High cholesterol can pose a major health risk for older men. Check out these five easy-to-find, yummy-to-eat foods that are proven to bring your bad cholesterol levels down in no time.

26

Sticking to It Get started today with new healthy habits! Our three experts in nutrition and exercise give you the tips you need to get started and commit to a healthy lifestyle.

66

49

Find It in Durham Thinking about making a move? Durham, N.C. not only provides the resources for a healthy retirement—it was named CNN and Money Magazine’s No. 1 retirement city.

Yoga for Men Demystifying what goes on in the yoga studio and why you should try it out.

Check out Men’s Retirement online! Read our stories anywhere, share your thoughts, and give us feedback. MENSRETIREMENT.TECHYPELL.COM


Featured

People 22

With Father’s Day on June 19, we asked nine dads to describe an ideal Father’s Day only to discover that for these fathers, family comes first.

30 I Overcame

Prostate Cancer Learn from one man who shares his struggles and triumphs with prostate cancer, and find out what you should know about screening and risk factors.

36 Dealing with Loss When Max Sills’ wife died of breast cancer, he was devastated. Now, with the help of his family, Max is learning to accept loss while holding on to love.

Exercise 17

56

Retired Male Seeking Best Friend Thinking about adopting a furry friend? Follow this advice to make the best choice for you and your new pal.

Food 62

Sips of Summer Break out the tumblers and your favorite lawn chair and take a break from the summer heat with these five tasty (and easy!) sweet tea recipes.

Gear + Gadgets Nine Stretches to Loosen You up for the Links These stretches will have you loose and ready to bring your A-game the next time you hit the greens.

68

Celebrating the Joys of Being a Father

Brain Games Riddles and puzzles that will both entertain you and exercise your mind to improve cognitive function.

8

Apps for Your Health Try using your smart phone to help improve your health. We list five of the best health apps for Android devices and iPhones.

11

Heart Rate Monitors We found four of the best heart rate monitors that can help you stay healthy, whatever your goals are.

12 What to Look for in a Dress Shoe Follow these guidelines to find a dress shoe that is both stylish and good for your feet.


Editors KELSIE ALLEN MARY AVANT REBECCA COLLINS ALEXIS DEEGAN RACHEL SCALL Art Director NICOLE YANG Assistant Art Director KELLY ASKEW Designers ALI AMOROSO ANNIE ARNTZ MEGAN FINKE MARY PELL LEA CARA RICHARDS AMANDA SOBNOSKY Multimedia MEGAN FINKE MARY PELL LEA Contributors KATHERINE DRYE ERIK ANDERSEN

SPECIAL THANKS TO BILL CLOUD AND TERENCE OLIVER

6 March 2011

A Letter from the Editors

Staff

As daughters and granddaughters who have seen our fathers and grandfathers move from a structured work life to a life without a 9 to 5, we’ve witnessed how easy it is to slip into unhealthy habits. The women in our lives can take advantage of the plethora of magazines on the market that focus on their health and well-being, but when we looked through the newsstands, there was nothing to fill this role for retired men. That’s where Men’s Retirement comes in. Our goal is to help you lead a healthy and active lifestyle, with topics ranging from nutrition and exercise to relationships and emotional health. Men’s Retirement will help you make the most of your retirement. This issue will help you get on your feet and on the path to a healthy way of living. We will help you overcome roadblocks to changing your lifestyle (pg 26) and introduce you to new forms of exercise, such as cycling (pg 40) and yoga (pg 66). We’ll also tackle some of the tougher issues, like overcoming prostate cancer (pg 30) and coping with loss (pg 36), that may arise during the course of your retirement. We promise that reading our magazine will give you the resources you need to enjoy a long, healthy and happy retirement—for yourself and your family. Enjoy our premiere issue!

Kelsie Allen, Mary Avant, Rebecca Collins, Alexis Deegan and Rachel Scall


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Gear + Gadgets

APPS

for your

BY ALEXIS DEEGAN

Calorie Counter by MyFitnessPal

Blood Pressure Log

It can be used for running, cycling or walking. It tracks your time, distance, speed, altitude and history of workouts. You can also challenge your friends and go against their personal bests. A good choice for self-motivators.

You can select your goals for diet: maintain, lose or gain weight (per week); and goals for exercise: number of workouts and minutes per workout. It now has a barcode scanner so you can easily scan a food to find it in the database.

This app tracks your blood pressure, heart rate, weight, site and position taken in. You input your statistics into the database. The data can be exported to Google Docs, allowing you to print it and take it to your doctor’s office.

To figure out your heart rate, just put your finger on the camera lens and hold it steady for 10 seconds. With every heartbeat, the surface of your skin changes color. The camera tracks the changes and calculates your heart rate.

It includes GPS tracking, a pedometer, voice notification­— feedback about your workout— and autopause, which stops your statistics when you stop moving. You can also connect to your favorite music mix and control playback.

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

Instant Heart Rate

Cardio Trainer

Others to keep in mind:

MiMeals ($1.99): a way to plan out meals for the week; Wellness Tip of the Day (free); Couch to 5K ($2.99) Source: Apple App Store

8 June 2011

ILLUSTRATION BY KELLY ASKEW

android

1 2 3 45 Endomondo Sports Tracker


M

any people use their smartphones for things like e-mail and games. But now there’s another reason to pull out your cell phone, and it’s one that will benefit your health. There’s been an explosion of apps geared toward fitness—everything from workouts and meal planning to ones that help you monitor your blood pressure. Check out these charts of five apps you should download today on your Android device or iPhone to help jump-start a healthy lifestyle.

Fitness Pro

iTreadmill

Blood Pressure

This app has a daily calorie budget that updates as you record your food and exercise. It can remind you when you forget to log your meals, and you’re also able to set up daily or weekly e-mail reports. Great for diligent record keepers.

It includes more than 450 exercises with photos so you can see the exercise. You can pick exercises by individual muscle groups and choose from preprogrammed routines or pick your own. It’s a good way to get started and pairs well with Lose It.

Tracks steps, distance and average speed while in your hand, on your arm or in your pocket. It has a sensor and stride calibrator, calorie counter and a pacer. Great for those with a step-aday goal and for those starting to exercise.

This app lets you track your blood pressure measurements. Plug in your readings: systolic, diastolic and heart rate, and then look at your statistics, using a time scale of one day to six months. You can also export your data to Excel.

An app that is is made up of several sections helpful in monitoring your health. Sections include: symptom checker, first aid essentials, conditions, drugs and treatments, a pill identification tool and local health listings.

FREE

FREE

$0.99

$1.99

FREE

iphone

ILLUSTRATION BY KELLY ASKEW

1 23 45

WebMD Mobile

Lose It!

Others to keep in mind:

Restaurant Nutrition, Mind Mender (puzzles), Health Tips, NutriFacts (all free except Mind Mender, which costs 99 cents) Source: market.android.com

June 2011 9


VIAGRA

(sildenafil)


Heart Rate Monitors

In the market for a heart rate monitor? Check out the chart below to find your perfect match

Basic interest?

Check out the Polar FS3 Basic HRM One-button option to switch functions Monitors performance and fitness levels Ability to set target heart rate based on age.

Est. price: $85-95

4

.5

Average Consumer Rating

5 Average Consumer Rating

Athletic?

Try the Garmin Forerunner 305 Versatile Can be used with variety of sports Advanced features include: workout feedback, GPS, downloadable data.

Est. price: $128-200

Technology-phobe?

How about the Omron HR-100C Simple and user-friendly Doesn’t require techno-saavy. Basic features of a HRM include: digital watch, chest strap transmitter, out-of target HR alarm, stopwatch

Est. price: $35-60

4

Average Consumer Rating

4 Average Consumer Rating

Weight loss? Test the Polar F6

Tracks heart rate Tracks workout intensity Tracks time spent in each rate zone Calculates calories burned

Est. price: $100-120 June 2011 11


Gear + Gadgets

What to look for in a dress shoe BY REBECCA COLLINS

People have taken for granted that the fancier the occasion, the more painful the footwear. But it doesn’t have to be that way. It is possible to find a dress shoe that’s stylish, comfortable, durable and affordable. You just have to know what to look for. Let these guidelines from the American Podiatric Medical Association help you find the best shoe for you.

ORTHOTIC INSERTS Orthotic inserts are materials prescribed by podiatrists to improve foot function and most often to reduce leg, thigh and lower back pain. Orthotic inserts can be prescribed to correct a large number of ailments. For dress shoes, podiatrists usually prescribe rigid orthotics, which are made with hard plastic or carbon fiber and are custom-made with a mold of your foot. They slip into your shoes and won’t alter your shoe size much. Talk to a podiatrist to learn more.

COMFORTABLE FIT The most important part of finding a comfortable dress shoe is making sure that it fits properly. Always have both feet measured when you go shoe shopping. Feet get larger over time, and if you haven’t measured your feet since you bought your shoes for college graduation, don’t be surprised if you’ve gone up a size. Also, it’s common for one foot to be larger than the other. Always buy shoes that fit the larger foot. 10 9 8

11 1 2 1

7 6 5

2

3 4

Go shoe shopping later in the day. Feet swell as the day goes on and it’s best to measure feet when they’re at their largest. Wear the kind of socks you expect to normally wear with the shoe. If you have any orthotics, make sure you bring them with you.

12 June 2011

Make sure every part of the shoe fits— the front, back and sides. The widest part of the shoe should correspond to the widest part of your foot. This helps distribute weight more evenly. Always try on both shoes and walk around the store.


Insole

Upper

There should be enough cushioning that the shoe is immediately comfortable. There shouldn’t have to be a “breaking-in” period.

The upper, or the part that covers your foot, should be made of leather. Leather contours to your foot and creates a comfortable fit.

Counter

The counter, or the piece of material at the heel of the shoe, should be stiff to ensure that the shoe keeps its shape.

Outsole

Outsole

There should be flexibility at the ball of the foot to make walking more comfortable.

Shoe Suggestions

The soles of dress shoes come in rubber or leather. Rubber soles are usually cheaper and more durable. Leather soles, however, contour to your feet and are more comfortable. But water ruins leather soles, so you have to be careful on rainy days.

Dr. Comfort dress shoes ($175-$180): www.drcomfort.com

Men’s dress shoes endorsed by the American Podiatric Medical Association

Florsheim Footwear ($100-$180): Garfield, Garrick, Gibson, Grant, Jamie, Jason, John and Jordan styles www.florsheim.com/shop/index.html

Dockers proStyle line (about $60): www.dockersshoes.com

Nunn Bush ($70-$75): Eagan, Eathan, Emory, Macallister, Marcel, Maury, Maxwell and Mead styles www.nunnbush.com/shop

June 2011 13


5

Food

Foods that

LOWER YOUR CHOLESTEROL

BY MARY AVANT No matter how bad its reputation, cholesterol—which makes up the membrane of every cell in our bodies—is essential. It’s only when low-density lipoprotein (LDL)—also known as “bad cholesterol”—levels get out of whack that cholesterol can start causing your body problems. High LDL levels have been found to correlate with cardiovascular disease, hardening of the arteries, heart attack and stroke.

*

Try adding these five foods to your diet every day to see improvements in your LDL levels in as little as three weeks.

Oatmeal

1½ cups of this breakfast * Eating staple every day can provide you with 6 grams of soluble fiber, which helps reduce the stomach’s absorption of LDL. Top it off with fruits like bananas or strawberries to get added fiber. 8 a.m.

Walnuts

eating a lot of these healthy * Although nuts can pack on the calories, just a handful a day can help keep blood vessels in shape and reduce the amount of cholesterol your stomach soaks up. 10 a.m.

14 June 2011


Broccoli

vitamin C-rich veggie, * This which is a great side dish

when served steamed, helps stop the buildup of cholesterol in your veins. 6 p.m.

Salmon

fish has high levels of * This omega-3 fatty acids­—which are

great for reducing blood pressure— and is rich in niacin, an important B vitamin that raises good cholesterol levels. Try it grilled or baked to avoid adding on unhealthy fats that can come from frying the salmon. 6 p.m.

Hummus

with chickpeas and olive oil, this Middle Eastern * Made dip also helps lower your body’s cholesterol intake.

Plus, the olive oil is full of heart-healthy antioxidants. Try spreading some hummus on a whole-wheat pita or crackers for a good afternoon snack. 1 p.m. June 2011 15


Your Move.


Nine STRETCHES TO

LOOSEN YOU UP for the LINKS

BY RACHEL SCALL

I

t is always a good idea to stretch before you hit the golf course—loosening your muscles helps prevent injury. Before a round of golf, stretching has the added benefit of helping to improve your swing. These nine stretches, recommended by The Mayo Clinic, will loosen the muscle groups you use each time you tee off or sink that final putt. To get the most out of your swing—and provide the most protection for your body—hold each stretch for 10 to 20 seconds before hitting the course.

June 2011 17


Exercise Torso Stretches

Back Stretch

1

Stand with your feet shoulder width apart, facing the back of the chair. Hold the top of the chair’s back with both hands.

2

As you hold the chair, slowly bend your knees and lean away from the chair, keeping your back straight and the majority of your weight on your legs. You should feel a stretch near your armpits.

Seated Hip Stretch

1

While seated on a bench, chair or low table, place your left ankle on top of your right knee.

2

Push down on your left knee using your forearm. Slowly lean forward over your lap, keeping your back straight, until you feel a stretch in your left hip. Repeat on the opposite side.

Kneeling Hip Stretch

1

18 June 2011

Kneel on your left knee with your right knee at a 90-degree angle in front of you. Hold your golf club in your right hand for balance.

2

Keeping your back straight, slowly lean forward and transfer your weight to your right leg. As you lean forward you should feel a stretch in your left hip and thigh. Repeat on the opposite side.


Core Stretch

1

Fold your arms across your chest and stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Bend your knees and lean forward slightly.

2

Rotate your torso as if performing your backswing. Continue rotating from your backswing position to your followthrough position.

Leg Stretches Hamstring Stretch

1

Hold your golf club behind your shoulders.  Place your right foot in front of you on a low table or bench, bending your left knee slightly.

2

Lean forward, keeping your back straight, until you feel a stretch in the back of your right thigh. Maintain this position while slowly rotating your torso and shoulders left and right. Repeat on the opposite side.

Quadriceps Stretch

1

Stand directly in front of a chair, table or bench with your back to the chair, table or bench. Place your right foot on the table behind you, keeping your right knee in line with your left knee. Tighten your buttock muscles to feel a stretch in the front of your right thigh.

2

With your arms crossed over your chest, rotate your shoulders and torso to the left. Slightly bend your right shoulder and torso to mimic your backswing. Repeat on the opposite side.

June 2011 19


Exercise Arm Stretches Shoulder Stretch

1

Stand with your feet apart as if you are about to tee off. Using your right hand, hold your left elbow across your chest.

2

Keeping your left thumb pointed up, rotate your torso to the right. Using your right hand, put pressure on your left elbow until you feel a stretch in your back. Repeat for the opposite side.

Upward and Downward Wrist Stretch Hold your right arm straight in front of you, palm facing down. Using your left hand, slowly pull your right fingers up, bending at the wrist. Repeat on the opposite wrist.

Hold your left arm straight in front of you, palm facing down. Using your right hand, slowly pull your fingers downward, bending at the wrist. Repeat on the opposite wrist.

20 June 2011


C H O O S E AC T I V I A , YO U R S TO M AC H W I L L T H A N K YO U

Help regulate your digestive system March 2011 21


Celebrating theJoys of being a

Father


e Jun

19 ay d n Su

BY KELSIE ALLEN

Father’s Day is Sunday, June 19, which made us wonder: how do dads want to spend their special day? We asked nine fathers about their ideal Father’s Day and some common themes emerged. Dads don’t expect gifts or recognition—they just look forward to enjoying a nice day with their families.

“A day spent with my family in the most beautiful place in the world­— Chapel Hill, N.C. Go Tar Heels!” -William Lackey, 74, Statesville, N.C. “My perfect Father’s Day would combine my two favorite things: baseball and my five grandchildren. I would love to take them to see a Braves game in Atlanta.” -Allen Andrews, 68, Gastonia, N.C. “A pretty day for a cookout in the backyard with all the family … hamburgers, hot dogs, laughter, conversation, pitchin’ horseshoes and quality time together. I have had lots of them, and I feel truly blessed.” -Bill Arnold, 75, Charlotte, N.C. “My boys are all in their 30s and live in different states now. My ideal Father’s Day would be to have all of them visit and go to Mohonk [a preserve in New York’s Hudson Valley] for the day to hike.” -John Costa, 70, Bedford, N.Y.

ILLUSTRATION BY MEGAN FINKE

“I’d spend the day grilling out at home with the whole family there. We might go fishing in the pond out back or just relax and enjoy the sunshine and warm weather.” -Dewey Tyndall, 71, Erwin, N.C. “My ideal Father’s Day would have to be going to the beach with my wife and my three sons and their wives. It’s great when everyone is together because the laughter never stops.” -Mike Ridge, 62, Gastonia, N.C.

“Eating a special meal with family and spending time with my son and granddaughter, because I don’t see them often.” -Tan Huynh, 81, Washington, D.C.

“On Father’s Day, I want to be surrounded by my family and friends. I couldn’t ask for anything more than that.” -Cleland White, 74, Frankfort, Ky.

“I’d have a few beers, cook out with the family and eat a nice dinner all together.” -Donald Barney, 61, Mooresville, N.C.

June 2011 23


Sticking to it.

26 June 2011


What to expect when starting a healthy lifestyle and how to avoid hazardous health roadblocks BY REBECCA COLLINS

T

he most rewarding things in life don’t come without a challenge, and being healthy is no exception. For many people it’s hard to adopt healthier habits. Why else do you think that 34 percent of American adults are overweight or obese? When it comes down to it, it’s just easier to be unhealthy. But there is no better time than retirement to make a commitment to get in shape and eat healthier. You’re already going through a lifestyle change; might as well make it one for the better. Becoming healthier will not only help prevent health problems associated with older age, but will also help you make the most of your retirement. Before you commit to a new healthy lifestyle, it’s good to understand the challenges that may lie ahead and how to avoid or overcome them. Learn from the advice of our three experts to make healthy living a lifestyle and not just a two-week diet and a wasted gym membership.

KEEP POSITIVE AND MAKE HEALTH A PRIORITY The strongest roadblock to sticking with a healthy lifestyle is mindset. You’ll never be able to change if you don’t believe you can. Many people give in to low selfesteem and faulty logic as a way to avoid change. These are people who tell themselves things like “I can’t change the way I eat” or “I’m not athletic enough to keep up with an exercise routine.” All these people are really saying is, “I don’t think I’m good enough to stick to change.” Another bad mindset is telling yourself, “I don’t like healthy food,” or “I don’t like to exercise.” These attitudes and preferences are mostly the product of habit and stubbornness. Dr. Suzanne Hobbs, an associate professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, says that a real challenge for older people is that many

June 2011 27


MyPyramid.gov One size doesn’t fit all. Try out this website’s interactive tools to get a personalized eating plan or to plan and assess your food and physical activity choices based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. DIETARY GUIDELINES The Dietary Guidelines describe a healthy diet as one that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products; includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts; and is low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt and added sugars. INTERACTIVE TOOLS • Daily Food Plan: Get a plan just for you. • MyFoodapedia: Quick access to food info: food groups, calories and comparisons. • Food Tracker: Feedback on your food intake and physical activity. • Food Planner: Plan what to eat to help reach your personal goals. STEPS TOWARD A HEALTHIER WEIGHT Reaching and maintaining a healthier weight is important for your overall health and wellbeing. If you are significantly overweight, you have a greater risk of developing many diseases including high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, stroke and some forms of cancer. Reaching a healthier weight is a balancing act. The secret is learning how to balance your “energy in” and “energy out” over the long run. “Energy in” is the calories from the foods and beverages you have each day. “Energy out” is the calories you burn for basic body functions and physical activity. EXERCISE RECOMMENDATIONS Walking, gardening, briskly pushing a baby stroller, climbing the stairs, playing soccer or dancing the night away are all good examples of being active. For health benefits, physical activity should be moderate or vigorous and add up to at least 30 minutes a day.

28 June 2011

aspects of their lifestyle, such as the kind of food they eat, have been long established and are hard to change. Another psychological factor is fear of the gym. “Older guys, or older people in general, a lot of them have never been to the gym before. They don’t know how any of it works,” says Mary Petters, a licensed personal trainer. “They don’t know how to operate in the atmosphere and they have no idea how to use the equipment. And I think it’s intimidating.” To overcome this roadblock, you first and foremost have to believe that you deserve to be healthy. You can’t just try to be healthy because your

choices, you should let your friend know that you would prefer to go somewhere else. Don’t use it as an excuse to stray from a healthy diet. You’ll find that once you decide that you really want to be healthy, you’ll be more willing to make the effort necessary to make the change, including trying new things that you didn’t think you liked. Try healthy foods again and cooked different ways. Sure, you didn’t like brussels sprouts when you were 7, but a lot has changed about you since then— your tastes might have changed as well. The more open you are to trying new things, the easier it will be to change your lifestyle and stick with it.

You need a support group to keep you on track and to help you reach your goals.

DO YOUR RESEARCH Most people don’t know much about nutrition beyond what they hear on commercials. It’s important to learn about proper health and nutrition in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. You can buy health-food cookbooks to learn about nutrition and how to cook balanced meals. Start reading labels in the grocery store and learn what they mean. Mypyramid.gov is a great website for learning about American dietary guidelines and for finding healthy eating tips. Overall, just take an interest in being healthy. It’s also important to find the gym that’s right for you. It should be a place where you’re comfortable exercising. A gym where most of the members are body builders and marathon runners can be intimidating for a person who is just trying to be healthy. You should also ask about the classes and programs geared toward older people and make sure the programs interest you. Petters says that most gyms gear their programs toward women, so even if they say they offer 30 classes a week, you may not find any of them appealing. Petters also suggests finding “a facility where you can exercise with no excuses. So if the weather’s bad it doesn’t matter because you can come

wife or your children want you to be. You have to want to be healthy for yourself. Beyond just wanting to be healthy, you should know why. For most people it takes being on the edge of danger­—or even death—to wake them up and get them to adopt a healthy lifestyle. But most of those near-death experiences are avoidable if you decide to be healthier sooner. Make a list of concrete reasons why you want to get in shape and what you hope to gain from a healthier lifestyle. It will help keep you focused and on track. Gary Miller, an associate professor of health and exercise science at Wake Forest University in WinstonSalem, N.C., says the most important thing is to make it known that your healthy lifestyle is a priority. He says that means if a friend asks you to go to a restaurant without many healthy


The best way to overcome unrealistic goals is to know yourself. a new lifestyle. But you should view rediscovering yourself as an added bonus to a healthy lifestyle. Hobbs says that the key is to take things slowly. “Making wholesale lifestyle changes, especially later in life, is a real challenge and something most people are not going to be able to do successfully overnight,” she says. “They are going to be more successful in the long run if they make the changes more gradually.” She suggests making a timeline of your goals in order to break them up into manageable chunks.

Junk food won’t seem like such a looming obstacle if you allow yourself to have it in moderation instead of giving it up completely.

inside and walk on the track.” If you’d rather exercise at home, read reviews of exercise DVDs to find which are the best for you. Go online to find walking and biking trails in your area. There is usually a list on the website for a city’s parks and recreation department. Some even include the length of the trails or rate them by difficulty. KNOW YOURSELF AND TAKE IT SLOW Another common roadblock is making goals that are out of your reach. By making unrealistic goals, you set yourself up for failure. And once you fail to achieve a goal, you become discouraged and believe that change is impossible. The best way to overcome unrealistic goals is to know yourself. What are your limits? What kinds

of exercise do you like? What kinds don’t you like? How long can you comfortably exercise? You should tailor your goals and your exercise plan to your preferences. For example, if you know you hate walking on a treadmill, plan to walk outdoors instead. Or, if you don’t like working out in a gym, find some other way to exercise, like swimming or golf. And it’s important to know yourself as you are now. “Some of the guys I see in the middle-aged group or older were athletes at some point. So they played football in high school or college and they think they know how to exercise,” Petters says. “But that was 40-some-odd years ago.” Getting to know yourself takes time, and you have to be patient with yourself when you are first starting

FORM YOUR SUPPORT GROUP Major life changes are hard enough as it is. They are even harder if you go after them alone. You need a support group to keep you on track and to help you reach your goals. “It’s amazing when people join a gym and have to pay a monthly membership. You’d be surprised how many don’t show up,” Petters says. “The best way we’ve found to get people to continue with exercise or take part in creating a lifestyle change is to develop some sort of support system or some sort of accountability.” It’s easy to cheat on your diet or exercise plan if no one is holding you accountable. Even though in the end you need to hold yourself accountable for sticking with your new lifestyle, it’s a lot easier if someone else is watching you too. If you’re married, you should encourage your wife to adopt a healthier lifestyle with you. You can both act as positive influences on each other and enjoy your healthy Story Continued on Page 71

June 2011 29


Icancer OVER CAME

prostate

Dennis Walden had surgery to remove his prostate in 2006.

30 June 2011


gery

since biggest

different

now remember wife

advises

point

talk

spent prostate doctor

men levels positive problems

One in six men in the U.S. will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, and doctors say this number may go up in the future. Here, one man shares his story about battling back. BY MARY AVANT

cancer. Few words elicit such fear in people of all ages, races, genders and nationalities. Unfortunately, many men will be forced to hear this diagnosis at some point in their lives, whether it be lung cancer, colon cancer or prostate cancer. In fact, prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the U.S. (lung cancer is the leading cause), and the National Cancer Institute estimates that more than 215,000 men were diagnosed in 2010 alone. “When they tell you you have cancer, you get scared,” says Dennis Walden, who was diagnosed in 2005 at the age of 60. “The word cancer just—and it rightfully should—it just scares the heck out of you.” The Chicago native, who grew up in Wisconsin and is now 65, had a clean health record—his biggest injury was a broken wrist from playing catch with his son, Matt—and had no indications that anything was amiss. “I had no symptoms whatsoever. I had no pain in that part of my body,” Walden says. But when he went in for his annual checkup in 2005, something wasn’t quite right. Walden’s PSA blood test, which shows the level of the protein PSA produced by the prostate, showed his levels were up to a 3.5. It wasn’t an alarming number, since anything below 4.0 is categorized as “normal,” but his levels had gone up three years in a row. His doctor referred him to a urologist.

June 2011 31


32,000 The estimated number of men who died of prostate cancer in 2010.

“Looking back on it now after five years, intellectually, I realize that different forms of cancer have different prognoses and that prostate cancer is one that they’ve got a lot of really good treatment options for, especially if caught early as it was with Dennis,” says Ruth Walden, Dennis’ wife. “But there’s nothing that can take away the shock of getting a cancer diagnosis.” His urologist laid out treatment options to both Walden and his wife: surgery, in which his prostate would be removed; radiation therapy; or to simply do nothing and continue to monitor his PSA levels. “Well, I didn’t think the latter was an option,” Walden says. “I do remember trying to get every piece of information we could and all the options,” Ruth says. “The doctor was great about that—laying out, ‘Here are all the alternatives. Here are the things you can do. Here are the plus, here are the minus of each and every option.’” After doing some research, in which he found out that radiation consisted of treatments five days a week for seven weeks, he and his wife came to a solid conclusion. “It just seemed to me that surgery was the best way to go in my case,” he says. Now that the treatment option had been chosen, it was time to face the difficult task of breaking the news to their son, Matt, and

32 June 2011

daughter, Becky (ages 30 and 27 at the time). “The timing was really awkward, really difficult, because it was right before Christmas, and our children were both coming home,” Ruth says. “The big thing I remember us talking about was, ‘When do we say something to them?’ Like every other family, we have our Christmas traditions and the things we always do, and so we didn’t want that to be ruined or marred in any way. “But always, of course, in the back of your mind, you’re thinking about two days later when you’re going to sit them down and talk to them and tell them.” Walden says that the Christmas season of 2005 was the toughest his family has ever been through. Thankfully, they had the support of their friends and neighbors, and Ruth says that having the children around helped the pair avoid getting “wholly wrapped up in ourselves.” Two months later, on the morning of Feb. 3, 2006, Walden underwent surgery to remove his prostate. “The doctor came in smiling, and he said, ‘Good morning, Mr. Walden! How are you doing?’ ” Walden says. “And I said, ‘How do you think I’m doing? I’m nervous as heck!’” This was Walden’s first surgery and his first experience being hospitalized. After a successful surgery and a few days spent recuperating in the hospital, Walden was able to return to the comfort of his home—on one of the biggest game days of the year. “The doctor said, ‘I’m sure you’d rather watch the Super Bowl from the couch than you would from this bed here,’ ” Walden says with a chuckle.

23 .

+

million men alive who had a history of prostate cancer, as of 2008.

After enjoying the game (the Pittsburgh Steelers took home the title), Walden spent almost four weeks at home, resting and trying to get back on his feet again. “I remember thinking all the time, ‘No matter what, I’m not going to be angry with him,’ ” Ruth says, laughing. “ ‘I’m not going to get crabby; I’m not going to pick a fight.’ So it was sort of like going back on dating behavior after 35 years of marriage, where you were trying to be very, very careful to always keep everything as pleasant as possible.”

99.4% is the 5-year survival rate for men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer.

And although things were going well on the home front and the health front, the surgery wasn’t without its consequences. “One of the problems that almost every man experiences—and this is almost embarrassing—is urinary incontinence. That was a problem for a year, or maybe even two,” Walden admits, “but it’s much better now.” This is one reason why another prostate cancer survivor, Kenneth Davis, chose a different route for treatment. Incontinence, which can range from slight leakage to a total loss of bladder control, was something Davis, who was only 53 when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in August 2010, refused to deal with. “The chances of being incontinent and impotent are very, very high when you have a prostate removed,”

SOURCE: NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

In November of that year, Walden had a biopsy of his prostate. He didn’t receive positive results. Walden had prostate cancer. “I was not surprised,” he says matter-of-factly.


SOURCE: NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

1in 6

men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lives.

Davis says. “And I was more concerned with being incontinent.” Davis, who was at one time an assistant coach for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets men’s basketball team alongside Bobby Cremins, is now a financial planner in Charlotte, N.C. After his PSA blood test showed levels as high as 6.4 and a biopsy diagnosed him with prostate can-

cer, Davis consulted three different urologists in his search for the best treatment option. And for Davis, researching and getting second opinions were essential. He advises men he knows with prostate cancer to do their homework. “You’ve got to do your own personal research on it,” Davis says. “Personal research is not only just digging in books or medical journals and all that, but talking to people.” While doing his research, Davis talked with five other men who had prostate cancer to learn about their experiences with different treatments. In the end, Davis opted for an operation—called a high-intensity focused ultrasound—that is not yet approved in the U.S., but is approved in Canada, Mexico, India, South America and the Caribbean.

The procedure is still under investigation by the Food and Drug Administration, and it’s important to note that there always comes great risk with procedures not yet approved. On Nov. 20, 2010, Davis underwent the procedure in Nassau, Bahamas. Since his treatment, Davis’ blood tests have shown PSA levels of zero, which he calls “spectacular.”

66

67

68

The median age of men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer.

PSA Tests: What You Should Know According to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, “Finding and treating prostate cancer early offers men more treatment options with potentially fewer side effects.” So how do you make sure you’re being screened for prostate cancer? One widely accepted screening test for prostate cancer is the PSA test. “It’s the best available tool we have for screening problems with the prostate, and that’s what you need to distinguish,” says Dan Zenka, senior vice president of communications for the Prostate Cancer Foundation. “It’s not a cancer-specific test,” he says. “It’s a test that can tell you that there may be something wrong in the prostate.” PSA stands for prostate-specific antigen, a protein that is naturally produced by the prostate in males. Whenever problems with the prostate begin to develop, the prostate secretes more and more of this protein into the blood. During a PSA test, a small amount of blood is taken to measure the level of PSA. These PSA blood levels can alert doctors to potential problems. Levels under 4.0 are often classified as “normal”; levels of between 4.0 and 10.0 are “intermediate”; and levels of above 10.0 are considered “high risk.” Typically, when doctors see measures of above 4.0, they encourage their patients to be on guard and often refer them to a urologist for a biopsy. Zenka says that the myth of prostate cancer being a slowly progressing type of cancer isn’t true in all cases and that PSA testing is very important. “Last year, some researchers from the University of Michigan identified 24 sub-types of prostate cancer,” Zenka says. “Some of

these are indolent or non-life threatening; some of them are very aggressive. Many of them sit in the middle. “That’s when you need to interpret the results, given the best tools we have available,” he says, “and then make a decision based upon that.” Like any other test, the PSA test isn’t flawless. Other prostate problems, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or prostatitis can increase PSA levels, even in men who don’t develop prostate cancer. There are even cases in which men who have prostate cancer show low PSA levels. Zenka says that while he recommends the PSA test to men over the age of 40, patients need to be careful about how they interpret their PSA levels. He says that, on occasion, PSA tests can lead to overtreatment, such as the unnecessary removal of the prostate. “That’s why patients need to understand how to read the numbers, how to look at biopsies, and have a physician they trust to guide them through the solution process,” Zenka says. Some men and their physicians choose to use the PSA test as a sort of “watchful waiting” mechanism. “Watchful waiting is watching PSA levels to make sure that it does not rise rapidly or increase in a short amount of time,” Zenka says. Whether you choose to have a PSA test done at your annual checkup or not, make sure you’re taking some kind of precautionary step to detect prostate cancer in its earliest stages. Talk to your doctor to determine the best screening mechanism for you. Source: Prostate Cancer Foundation

June 2011 33


34 June 2011

Doctor Says While prostate cancer is a disease that affects men across all races and several age groups, some men face a higher risk. Read the factors below to determine your level of risk.

Family History: If a man in your family, especially your father or brother, had prostate cancer, your chances of developing the disease are doubled. If someone in your family was diagnosed before the age of 55, or if three or more members of your family had prostate cancer, your risk for getting the disease is even greater.

Race: African American males are 60 percent more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than their Caucasian counterparts. African Americans are also 2.5 times as likely to die from the cancer.

Age: The older you are, the higher your risk of developing prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is rare for men under the age of 40 (only one in 10,000 men are diagnosed at this age), but the likelihood of being diagnosed drastically increases when you hit age 40. One in 38 men will be diagnosed between the ages of 40 and 59, and one in 15 will develop prostate cancer between ages 60 and 69. Sixtyfive percent of prostate cancer diagnoses come from men over the age of 65. However, Dan Zenka, senior vice president of communications for the Prostate Cancer Foundation, says age can have an effect on the treatment a patient requires or chooses. “Is a 75- or 80-year-old going to need surgery when his numbers are in the middle? Probably not,” he says. “A 50-year-old man? Probably yes.”

Where You Live: While men who live in China are the least likely to get prostate cancer (only 2 percent will develop the disease), the risk of developing the disease for men in the U.S. is 17 percent. Also, men who live in U.S. cities north of 40 degrees latitude (Columbus, Ohio, or Philadelphia, Penn., for example) receive less sunlight and vitamin D, increasing the risk of death from prostate cancer.

SOURCE: PROSTATE CANCER FOUNDATION

Walden, too, has seen these kind of PSA levels on his “progress reports” since his procedure. “It’s funny, because [my doctor] writes ‘Excellent!’ with an exclamation point, as if I had anything to do with it!” he says. Now that Walden has emerged triumphantly from his battle with cancer, he’s serving as a sort of “peer adviser” to friends and neighbors who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer over the last few years. “We’ve both been much more cognizant of wanting to help or talk to … friends who have been diagnosed,” Ruth says. “Since Dennis had surgery, three friends have been diagnosed as having prostate cancer, and in each of those instances, we reached out.” “We’re all kind of in this together,” Walden says. “We talk about it every now and then, but we don’t dwell on it.” Another person Walden has reached out to is his own son. Prostate cancer tends to be hereditary, so Walden continually reminds Matt to start getting prostate cancer screenings at age 40—even though this is another five years away. Both Walden and Davis encourage other men to be proactive about prostate cancer and spread the word about getting a PSA test at the appropriate time, which is age 50 for men who don’t have a family history of prostate cancer or any prior prostate problems. “I’m telling every male that I come in contact with today that they need to have those tests done,” Davis says. “Make sure you’re being checked once a year.” While both Davis and Walden were unfortunate enough to be diagnosed with cancer, both show a courageously positive outlook on the situation. “The way I look at it: God gives you roadblocks,” Davis says. “You just have to figure out how to get around them.”


Working for your heart.

Cheerios


Dealing with 36 June 2011


When his wife died in 2009, Max Sills could have been angry, or simply given up — but instead, he is working on getting stronger every day BY KELSIE ALLEN Max Sills, 70, has always been one to think of others before he thinks of himself. “You can relax,” he says with a sweet smile as we sit down to talk. He can tell that I’m a bit uncomfortable. The subject we’re about to discuss isn’t a comfortable one. We’re joined a few minutes later by Max’s daughter, Diana Smith, 48; his granddaughter, Ashton, 18; and his 4-month-old great-grandson, Bentley, who all live in Charlotte, N.C. Four generations of the Sills family are now gathered at this table. The only person missing is Max’s beloved wife, Linda, who died after an 11-year battle with breast cancer in November 2009. Now just over a year after her death, it’s clear that he misses her terribly. It would be easy for his outlook on life to change; life for a widower can seem empty, gloomy. “Depression for a widower is worse than it is for a widow,” says Duncan Puckett, associate pastor at Pineville Church of the Nazarene in Pineville, N.C., where the Sills have attended for years. Puckett offers marriage counseling at the church and has taught numerous classes on building a lasting marriage and coping with loss and divorce. “Many times, widowers tend to feel the loss of their mates more than a widow.” Widowers often equate the death of their wives with being lost without a compass, due to their dependence on their wives for managing the household, taking care of children and being their only true confidant. Many widowers

cling to old routines and stay huddled inside their homes rather than reach out to their family members for support, Puckett adds. But “widower” isn’t a word that defines Max Sills. His optimistic nature, warm heart and unwavering faith have allowed him to deal with the loss of his wife while holding onto the many happy memories of his 46-year marriage. “I’m not over it,” Max says. “But I’m taking it one day at a time.” STARTING A FAMILY Max met Linda Ruby through his cousin in 1962, while he was on a short leave from the Army after being stationed in Fort Riley, Kan. “She started out being someone I could be with for a while, and I guess we ended up doing quite a few things together,” he says. “It got to the point where I had to go back to the service, and she decided she wanted to stay involved with me, and it mushroomed from there.” When Max was finally discharged from the Army, he went to work for Linda’s father managing a gas station, which brought Max and Linda even closer. “One thing led to another…she was ready to get out, away from home, so I thought I would accommodate her a little,” Max says with a chuckle. They were married June 21, 1963, his parents’ wedding anniversary. It was only a matter of time before their four children came along: first Darnell, then David, followed by Diana and finally Dana. When the Sills kids

June 2011 37


UNWELCOME NEWS In 1998, Max first heard the awful news: Linda had been diagnosed with breast cancer. The cancer appeared first in her right breast, and in an unusual way; it didn’t present itself in a lump but rather, a rash, which the medical field didn’t know much about at the time. Linda’s doctor, however, saw this inflammatory breakout and suspected it was breast cancer. Before long, she was undergoing radiation and chemotherapy. After six months, Linda’s doctor found that the cancer had spread to her left breast, and she was forced to endure the entire process all over again. Max was devastated. His own health had begun to decline, having suffered two heart attacks and being diagnosed with lymphoma in the late 1990s. But he could come to terms with his own health issues. Linda’s issues left him feeling very helpless. For weeks, he could not sleep and was not eating properly. Every Tuesday for seven years, Linda went to the doctor for an injection of Herceptin, which was intended to stop the production of more cancer cells. These doctor visits usually would consume an entire day. The drug was so new that the doctors didn’t know the long-term effects, but they hoped for the best. The rash continued to reappear, but Linda stayed positive. “A lot of times it was hard for me to remember or realize that she was go-

38 June 2011

ing through what she was going through,” Smith says. It was difficult for Max, a very spiritual man, to process Linda’s illness. He did not understand why this was happening to Linda and he hated to see her suffer. He prayed daily that she would be cured, and

“Many times, widowers tend to feel the loss of their mates more than a widow.” Duncan Puckett

he tried to do everything possible to make her comfortable. “I was concerned about her and was doing anything and everything in my power to make it easier for her. I told her several different times that if it was possible, I’d take her pain. I said, ‘I’d take it on myself so you can relax a little bit and not have to be so concerned.’ I tried to be uplifting for her.”

Amazingly, when Max was sick, Linda was strong. And when Linda was sick, Max was strong. “She was closest to being in remission the times I was sick than she ever got,” Max says. GETTING THROUGH THE DAY For respite during these difficult years, Max turned to his love of woodworking. Meanwhile, Linda was skilled in making crafts. These activities were their escapes. In their house, Max converted one room to a craft room for Linda, filled with all the supplies a person could ever need. Smith describes the room as “any crafter’s dream.” Every Saturday, while Max was working in his shop, Linda could be found in her craft room. “We didn’t really feel like we had to keep up a continual chatter, talking all the time,” Max says. Linda got the idea to start a Christmas craft fair at their church, Pineville Church of the Nazarene. She began by making wooden angels of all shapes and sizes and became known among the other craft vendors as

LEFT: Linda’s yearbook photo from her senior year of high school RIGHT: Max in his Army uniform in 1957, five years before he met Linda. The couple

met while Max was stationed in Fort Riley, Kan. They were married by 1963.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MAX SILLS

were growing up, their father’s work kept him from being around a lot, although he was at home whenever possible. Max worked as a truck driver and was frequently on the road, except during the summers. Linda took care of the children, maintained the house and kept things running smoothly while Max was away. “She wore a lot of different hats,” says Smith, who is wearing a silver bracelet with light pink breast cancer awareness ribbon charms dangling from the links.


“But even though she’s not here physically, she is still very present inside me.” Max Sills

al Pineville Church craft fair. Losing Linda left Max with an aching emptiness, but he had the support of a loving family and church to help him get through it. AFTER LOSS Smith, who had been living in Kansas, moved back to Charlotte, N.C., the week Linda passed away, and now lives next door to Max. Right after her mom’s death, Smith tried to keep her dad busy and prevent him from isolating himself in his house by thinking up little projects he could work on, such as rebuilding her family’s kitchen and one of the closets in their home. “Retired men who lose their spouses may find the loss of social contact overwhelming,” Puckett says. “So having family, especially children around, is a way to fill that void of losing a spouse and provide comfort and companionship.” But even with children, grandchildren and a brand new great grandchild around, the reality of

stopped and then found himself smoking a new pack the next day. But when he finally worked up the courage to tell her, Linda just smiled and said, “I knew.” In early 2009, the cancer had progressed into Linda’s bones, including her spine, causing the bones Max and Linda at their home in to fuse together and forcing her to Charlotte, N.C., about six months stoop when she walked. “I was so before Linda’s death. moved by the fact that everybody else, when they came up to her, “the angel lady.” Max would build would bend down to talk to her the frame of the angel out of wood so they could look her in the eye,” and Linda would decorate it with Smith says. “That was so touching fabric and paint. to me.” Despite his own health issues, Linda died in early November when he was feeling really down 2009, just a few days after the annuStory Continued on Page 71 about Linda’s failing health, Max would smoke cigarettes. He’d leave 15 or 20 minutes early for work every day so he could stop and buy a pack. It didn’t make a difference how long he worked—eight hours, The grieving process may last from 3 months to 3 years. Those experiencing 12 hours—he needed that pack of cigloss often work through the following stages, although the sequence may differ arettes to get him through each day. for different people. It is healthy to work through each stage in order to return Max prayed about his tobacco to full emotional health. dependency but could not find the strength to quit. Linda could smell 1. Denial: This cannot be happening. 2. Bargaining: I will do anything to make the pain stop. the smoke on him and didn’t like 3: Anger: This is not fair. it, and her disapproval was all that 4: Despair: I cannot take this anymore. Max needed to stop. The company 5: Acceptance: I cannot repair the loss and need to move on with my life. he worked for was smoke-free and offered classes sponsored by the Red It is important to seek outside support when processing feelings of loss. If family or close friends are not available, a support group may help avoid isolaCross, so he began attending. At tion and provide a safe forum for sharing painful feelings. Support groups may one of the classes, a nurse brought be in-person groups, where members discuss their feelings and offer support in a piece of freeze-dried lung tissue in community buildings or in homes, or online groups where members interact that had belonged to a smoker and in chat rooms. was speckled and black. That was The website “Living Again After Widowhood” (www.livingagainafterwidowenough for Max to quit. hood.com) helps its visitors prepare their posts on the blog by providing a list of questions that aim to trigger feelings and emotions that the widower It was about a month before Max or widow may be experiencing. The key is to interact regularly as a means of told Linda he had given up smoking. sharing deep-seated feelings. He was afraid to tell her because he wanted it to mean something, not Source: Livestrong.com like all the other times he had said he

The Grieving Process

June 2011 39


40 June 2011


YOUR WAY to Better Physical and Mental Health BY ALEXIS DEEGAN

T

here’s still a bit of coolness in the spring air. Calm, with only a slight breeze. The sun peeks out between the trees. Among the cars on the road, there’s a cyclist. He’s pedaling on the shoulder, grimacing as his legs churn. June 2011 41


He heads away from the traffic into the countryside. Greg Atchison is working hard, his heart rate up, his tongue dangling down almost to the spokes he’s breathing so hard. But he looks up, realizes the beautiful panorama of rolling fields and vivid colors. And he forgets how hard he’s working—the view is something he would never see constrained in a car. And for the retired Navy pilot, it’s something he can compare to his former job. “This is the closest thing to flying I can do right now. Just out there, free and easy, on your own,” says Atchison, who lives in Chapel Hill, N.C. Atchison is one of many retirement-age men who cycle. USA Cycling, a competitive cycling organization, has 9 percent of its members between the ages of 55 and 74. This sounds like a small number, but is almost 4,000 riders. Cycling doesn’t have to be a competitive thing, though. All you need is a bike, a helmet and a desire to ride. Cycling is a cardiovascular sport, but one that the individual rider can control—deciding on the speed, terrain, route and distance. Going up a

Wheel size varies based on the kind of bike you’re riding.

hill, huffing and puffing, feeling the intense burn through the quads, the rider can choose to stop and walk the rest of the way. Then he can decide to jump back on the bike and coast down the other side at breakneck speed, feeling the wind at his back. The rider can set his own goals and

how he wants to accomplish them. Riding a bike is an especially good form of exercise as a person ages. It offers a way to maintain a sense of balance and is non weight-bearing, so it can be done for a long time with less stress on the body. Cycling is very forgiving compared to run-

Making Sure Your Bike Fits Saddle

Seat height

Handlebar

Moving the handlebar forward, you have high-speed control, better aerodynamics and more power while standing and accelerating. When the handlebar is closer to you and/or higher, you can sit more upright and take in views. A good starting point is to have a slight bend in your elbows as you grip the handlebar and to have the handlebar level with your seat. PHOTOS BY KATHERINE DRYE

Place heels on the pedals. Pedal, and when you’re at the bottom of the stroke, your knee should have a slight bend, about 80 to 90 percent of full extension. Your hips shouldn’t be rocking from side to side.

Your pelvis needs to be level. A downward tilt can cause you to slide forward, while an upward tilt can result in pressure points. For most riders, a level pelvis results in the nose of the saddle being a little higher than the rear.

42 June 2011


ning, which has a lot more impact on the bones and can be hard on the body. Cycling isn’t going to damage joints or cause muscle sprains or tears. And while cycling is good for your health, it’s a social thing as well. Dan Shugars, a cyclist from Chapel Hill, N.C., enjoys it because it’s something he and his wife can do together. His most positive memory of the sport was the cycling portion of an Ironman Triathlon in Germany, which he completed with his wife. There were more than 100,000 spectators out on the roads and during one steep climb, the crowd lined the course about 10 people deep so that the riders could only go up single file. Shugars felt like he was in a race like the Tour de France and has wonderful memories of climbing the hill, high-fiving kids the whole way up. As people age, staying sharp is something they worry about. Cycling can help with that concern. The main reason is that the rider has to be alert at all times. If he is riding in the road, he needs to be aware of the cars and obey the rules of the road. Riding on paths or different terrains requires being able to pay attention to what’s ahead and if there are any ditches or other obstacles in the way. And if a rider wants to ride in a group, it’s even more essential to pay attention and constantly adjust to the other riders in the pack. Another one of cycling’s selling points for the older generation is flexibility. Even to just get on the bike, the rider has to be flexible enough to swing one leg up and over the seat, which can be hard, since flexibility diminishes as you age. Something Atchison and Shugars agree on is that cycling is a good choice for older men. Their first reason: it’s fun. It gets you outside and is also the gentlest activity of exercise choices—as you are only moving your legs—compared to running, which is moving everything, or swimming where the water can be rough. Jack Bianchi, from Santa

Greg Atchison, from Chapel Hill, N.C., says one of the best things about cycling is the constantly changing scenery.

Barbara, Calif., says cycling gives you a chance to see the sights, smell the smells and learn about the roads around you. It can be a social thing as well as an opportunity to tour the world. Bianchi’s favorite memories are from all the places he’s ridden, especially the roads he’d never drive on in a car and his bicycle tours through Europe. Cycling can also be a way to continue exercising after running becomes too hard on the body. Joe Carr, now living in Blowing Rock, N.C., started off as a runner, but began spending more and more time on his bike during the summer. Soon, cycling became the sport he loved in and of itself, not as a complement to running. He cycles year-

round, even when it’s in the mid-20s with the wind howling. He has tires with metal studs on them for snow, which helps the bike gain traction. He’s participated in 18 duathlon World Championships, which combine cycling and running, and has won, as well as placed in the top four, several times. “I have a spiritual dimension with respect with what I do. The natural landscape of the mountains adds to it,” Carr says. And with cycling, you are able to see that landscape year-round. Atchison recalls one race in Chapel Hill, N.C., during the winter. The thermometer read 19 degrees. The wind was howling, making it feel like single digits. The ground was June 2011 43


Because cycling is an outside sport, there are going to be those days when the weather is terrible. The hot summer ones where you sweat so much your body turns into a tropical rainforest. Or, conversely, days so cold that the wind bites in your face and your fingertips and toes are numb. You may not want to get out and ride. But getting out of the door is the hardest part. Once you start riding, that displeasure starts to melt away. “It’s not all rainbows, gumdrops and teddy bears. There are days when I’m thinking about how soon can I get some coffee,” Atchison says. “But I’m practicing now to hurt, practicing to bleed. That’s what you tell yourself.” Cycling may seem like a repetitive motion. And the act in and of itself is. But while on the bike, it’s anyHaving the right cycling gear can make riding more enjoyable. thing but boring. You’re not thinkfrozen. Yet Atchison was ready to go. it was that sense of exhilaration that ing about the motion your legs are He lined up with his bike and once cycling brought. During the race, it making; you’re looking at the views, he got going, the cold wasn’t a fac- didn’t matter what the weather was. whether it’s the color of the leaves in tor. After the race, it was a different It was just him and his bike, taking the fall or the early morning splash story. But for him, in the moment, on the terrain. of light as the sun rises. And this

Dress like a cyclist

Waterproof cycling jacket, cut for a forward-leaning position 44 June 2011

Look for a bike jersey made of a light material like Lycra and a collar to protect your neck from the sun


“I have a spiritual dimension with respect with what I do. The natural landscape of the mountains adds to it.” Joe Carr scenery is constantly changing— you’re not riding in place—and there’s also the need to be on the lookout for obstacles in the road, cars and stoplights. It’s easy to listen to stories of Atchison, Shugars, Bianchi and Carr and be inspired. But getting started takes more than just announcing, “I’m going to go out and ride today.” The biggest mistake most experienced riders agree on is spending a whole lot of money on a first bike. The most important thing is the fit of the bike, not the price or the brand name. If it doesn’t fit right, you’re not going to want to ride it,

Mountain bike-style shorts have a looser outer short on top of the spandex

at the very least; at the worst, it will cause injuries, like knee problems. So look for a bike shop or an experienced rider to help you out. But whether you’re a beginner to bicycling or a veteran, wearing a helmet is essential. And no one knows this better than Shugars. A helmet saved his life. He was bike riding near the beach when he was run off the road, crashed and broke his back. He had to be airlifted to a hospital. But he says he was fortunate, as it only took six months to complete rehab. He still has his helmet, which split in half, as a reminder. “Anybody who doesn’t wear a helmet on a bike, I think, is stupid,” Shugars says. “I don’t get on a bike even to test a seat without putting it on. Spend the money and get a good-fitting helmet.” Carr agrees. He’s hit the pavement head-first several times, splitting helmets and breaking collarbones and ribs. The most difficult injury for him was when he fell off the bike but wasn’t knocked unconscious. He

Want to ride?

30

number of minutes you should ride

2-3

times per week you should ride

10%

amount to increase your mileage per week Varying these components of a ride keeps it from getting repetitive and prevents you from putting too much stress on your body at once.

Story Continued on Page 73

Look for synthetic or merino wool socks that will wick perspiration away

Make sure to find a helmet that fits snugly and securely June 2011 45


Which bike is r

Before hitting the road, you need to decide what kind of bike riding you’re going to be doing: Are you going to be staying mostly on the roads or are you going to venture off onto trails? Once that’s decided, you’re ready to head to a shop to pick out a bike.

road bike

These bikes first became popular in the 1970s and are used for, as the name indicates, riding on roads. They have lightweight frames, curved handlebars, a narrow seat and thin tires. The handlebars and seat are designed to allow you to pedal efficiently while keeping your back parallel to the ground, making for less air resistance. The narrow tires and wheels make the bike lighter and have less friction, so you can go farther with less effort. You will feel every bump in the road, though.

hybrid bike

People began buying mountain bikes because they were more comfortable than road bikes, but were beginning to find that mountain bikes were too slow and heavy on the pavement. Enter the hybrid—which combines features of the road and mountain bikes. It takes its handlebar—high and flat—and wide saddle from the mountain bike, making the rider more upright and comfortable. But it has rims and narrow tires, similar to a road bike, to help it roll more easily. The hybrid also has a wide range of gears. It’s not as fast as a road bike but better on the road than a mountain bike, and it’s more comfortable than a road bike. For the average rider who wants to go on local streets and trails, the hybrid is usually the best choice.

bike safety rules

1

Ride on the right side of the road, going with the flow of traffic.

46 June 2011

2 3 4 Obey all traffic controls, like stop signs and traffic lights.

Signal when you intend to turn, merge or stop.

Yield the rightof-way when you enter the road or change lanes.


right for you? mountain bike

Hardtrail mountain bikes have suspension only in the front, making it lighter.

This bike originated in California in the 1980s and is designed to be ridden on gravel as well as on crosscountry terrain—areas a road bike can’t navigate. The 2-inch-wide tires have lots of cushion to absorb bumps and grab onto the terrain. There are usually 15 or more gears to help you pedal up steep hills. The handlebar is wide and flat and is positioned above the saddle so that you are more upright. Most riders find these more comfortable than road bikes.

INFO

GRA

PHI

C BY

ANN

IE A

RNT

Z

Comfort mountain bikes have a wide and cushy saddle—usually with springs under it—and the handlebars are several inches higher than the saddle, making for more upright sitting. The tires are smoother and designed to ride on the roads or easy-to-walk trails.

Full-suspension mountain bikes have suspension in both front and back wheels for the fastest downhill speeds and the greatest control over rough trails.

5

Use a good set of lights and reflectors whenever you ride after dark.

6

Treat pedestrians with respect, and don’t ride on sidewalks.

7 8 Watch for motorist errors.

Use good equipment and check that it is working properly.

Source: North Carolina Department of June Transportation 2011

47


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Application Deadline – January 1

d rl o w e th h it w te a ic un m com


Find it in This North Carolina city is an ideal place to enjoy a healthy retirement.

A Quick Guide to the City 501

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Our favorite Durham spots are on the next few pages! Look for the red cross to read a quick description of the spot and to see where they are located in the city.

June 2011 49


BY RACHEL SCALL During the late 19th century, Washington Duke brought big business to Durham, N.C.—the cigarette business. But what was once a city of tobacco plantations and factories is now a city of activity and art. Not to mention Durham currently sits atop CNN and Money Magazine’s list of top places to retire. Durham, a city of more than 225,000 residents, is home to parks, museums, festivals and concerts. The city also boasts winning sports teams, a prestigious continuing education program and some of the best medical facilities the nation has to offer.

on a winning team, Durham offers many options. With its temperate climate, most days in Durham are good for going for a walk or a jog. And with more than 24 miles of trails and greenways, there is no excuse to stay indoors. The Al Buehler Cross Country Trail, to take one example, winds its way for almost 3 miles through the shady patches of trees surrounding the Washington Duke Golf Course. The golf course, located adjacent to Duke University’s West Campus, is one of 10 golf courses within city limits. Each public and private course boasts more than 5,000 yards of golf. JOCKS WELCOME Four of the courses top 7,000 yards. If you are looking for a good For those not interested in a workout or you just want to cheer round of 18 holes, Durham also

offers tennis—ranging from private tennis clubs to public courts at local schools. On a rainy day, head to the YMCA of Greater Durham, or one of Durham’s private gyms, and play a game of racquetball. If you’re more of an outdoor adventurer, Durham’s parks and nature areas offer residents—and visitors—a set of exciting activities. The Duke Forest, spanning 7,060 acres in Durham and its surrounding counties, is home to a variety of ecosystems and more than 100 species of trees. It is also a site for hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding and fishing. If you prefer to exercise in a group, the Forest hosts events including group hikes and races. Eno River State Park preserves another 3,900 acres of Durham wilderness and allows hiking, fishing, canoeing and rafting. It is also a popular site for bird watching. “I’m not a hiker,” says Durham resident Kenneth Lundstrom, 78. But Eno Park is good for “semihiking,” or taking nature walks, Lundstrom says.

Washington Duke Golf Course 3001 Cameron Blvd. The Washington Duke Golf Course is one of 10 courses in the city. After a round of 18 holes, you can dine at the nationally acclaimed Fairview Restaurant at the Washington Duke Inn.

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50 June 2011

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PHOTO CREDITS: WADU & DURHAM CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU (LEFT); CHIP HENDERSON AND DCVB (RIGHT

D

urham, N.C., once revolved around the tobacco and cigarette industries. Today, it is a small city with a lot to offer its healthy and active residents.


Durham

Quick Facts CITY POPULATION (AS OF 2010)

228,330

501

people

85

POPULATION OVER AGE 55

85

70

Durham Bulls Athletic Park 409 Blackwell St.

147 40

17.6 percent

54

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The Durham Bulls Athletic Park seats 10,000 and includes picnic areas and skybox rentals. It is one of the premier ballparks in the nation.

AVERAGE AGE OF RESIDENTS

33.1 years old

Little River Regional Park and Nature Area offers similar outdoor activities, with the added bonus of picnic shelters housed in historic barns, houses and sheds. Go for a morning hike and then meet the family for a picnic lunch and an afternoon of playing with the grandchildren on Little River’s playground. To enjoy sports without breaking a sweat, purchase a ticket to see one of Durham’s many winning sports teams. In the fall, Duke and North Carolina Central University’s football teams take on teams from across the country and their respective conferences, the Atlantic Coast Conference and the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. Although neither team finished the 2010 season with a winning record, each team hosted entertaining opponents, including then No. 1 Alabama at Duke and one-time Michigan upsetter Appalachian State at North Carolina Central. In late spring and summer, Durham residents rally behind the city’s Triple-A minor league baseball team, the Durham Bulls, affiliated with the Tampa Bay Rays. The team, which last won the International League Championship in 2009, plays its home games at Durham

Bulls Athletic Park in downtown Durham, a stadium designed by the same people who built Baltimore’s historic Camden Yards. Perhaps the most exciting time to be a Durham sports fan is in the winter and early spring when Duke’s men’s basketball team, the 2010 NCAA National Champion, is in season. Although tickets aren’t easy to come by—Duke’s Cameron Indoor Stadium only holds 9,314 “Cameron Crazies”—the game-day atmosphere stretches far beyond Cameron’s confines. Lundstrom has only been inside Cameron twice throughout the 20 years he has lived in Durham, but he still says Durham is a great city for college and professional athletics. ACTIVE MINDS Durham is more than an athletic haven. The city offers a number of cultural and academic resources to keep the mind active. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Duke University offers a broad range of continuing education courses to students of all ages and education levels. Classes are filled almost entirely by retirees. And although historically the program attracted more women than men,

CITY SIZE

95

square miles SIZE OF DOWNTOWN

14 12 blocks x blocks AVERAGE HIGH IN JULY

89

degrees Fahrenheit AVERAGE LOW IN JANUARY

28

degrees Fahrenheit SALES TAX

7.75 percent

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME (AS OF 2008)

67,370 dollars

June 2011 51


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Durham Performing Arts Center 123 Vivian St.

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The Durham Performing Arts Center is recognized as one of the best theaters worldwide.

the gender gap is beginning to even out, OLLI Director Garry Crites says. OLLI offers programs ranging from lifestyle courses, such as a course on relationships, to history courses focused on the military. OLLI membership, which is required to enroll in classes, also includes access to extracurricular activities. Recently, OLLI member and retired Durham resident Jim Cunningham started a men’s group. “It wasn’t billed as … spill your guts out,” Cunningham says. But members of the group have been very willing to discuss a variety of topics with one another, such as time

spent in the armed forces, he says. OLLI also helps the university connect with Durham’s retirees. “These centers are, I believe, one of the most important bridges between the university and the community,” Crites says. Durham also offers learning opportunities outside of a classroom setting. The city is home to a number of historic sites. At Bennett Place, a farmhouse where the Southern armies for Georgia, Florida and the Carolinas signed surrender papers in the final year of the Civil War, visitors can learn about the war between the North and South. Duke

Durham’s Accolades In 2009, Transportation for America named Durham the second safest place for pedestrians in North Carolina.

52 June 2011

In 2010, Portfolio.com named Durham the fourth “brainiest bastion” in America.

In 2010, U.S. News & World Report ranked Duke University Hospital 10th on its list of America’s Best Hospitals.

PHOTO CREDITS: SZOSTAK DESIGNS, DPAC AND DCVB (LEFT); BRAD FEINKNOPF AND DCVB (RIGHT)

501

Homestead, Washington Duke’s former home, educates visitors about the early tobacco industry, while Stagville Plantation provides insights into Durham’s plantation history. The Durham Performing Arts Center (DPAC), located in the downtown area, encompasses Durham’s cultural diversity with the wide array of performances it hosts. In the past year, DPAC patrons have had the chance to see Diana Ross, Blue Man Group, Steve Martin and a number of Broadway shows. The city’s museums offer a similar diversity of mental stimulation. The Nasher Museum of Art, run by Duke University, will host “The Jazz Loft Project: W. Eugene Smith in New York City, 1957-1965,” a photographic exhibition, through July 10 in addition to the museum’s permanent collection of classical European, African and American art. For a more family-friendly museum experience, Shelly Green of the Durham Convention and Visitor’s Bureau recommends taking the grandchildren to the Durham Museum of Life and Science. There, you and the grandkids will learn about everything from dinosaurs to butterflies. Durham is also home to a number of cultural festivals. The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, which takes place each spring, brings international documentary films and filmmakers to Durham for four days of screenings, discussions and panels. Indiewire, a news website dedicated


Nasher Museum of Art 2001 Campus Drive Designed by renowned architect Rafael Viñoly, the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University houses the school’s permanent collections along with galleries for special exhibits.

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to international independent film, named the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival one of the top 50 film festivals in the world. In the fall, Durham hosts the North Carolina PrideFest, which celebrates gay rights. The event includes a 5-kilometer run and walk, health awareness events and a parade. Other Durham festivals focus on dance, music, food and cultural diversity.

and medical interns. The 1,824 licensed physicians dealing directly with patients gives Durham a ratio of one physician per 109 patients—a ratio far above the national average of one physician per 420 patients. Durham’s ratio of 43 patients per registered nurse also far exceeds the national average of 141 patients per registered nurse. Durham’s six hospitals provide more than 100 types of medical services. Duke University Hospital, WORLD-CLASS HEALTH CARE Durham’s largest hospital, ranks Durham is nicknamed the City of above the North Carolina average in Medicine, and for good reason. The heart attack care and pneumonia care. city boasts 2,300 licensed physicians The hospital ranks eight percentage

In 2010, Durham County was ranked the 11th healthiest county in North Carolina.*

In 2010, The League of American Bicyclists named Durham a Bicycle Friendly Community at the Bronze level.

40

points higher than the national average in overall patient satisfaction. The Durham VA Medical Center offers veterans a number of services, including primary care, cancer screening, prostate disease prevention and treatment, emergency room care and mental care. With its learning opportunities, exercise facilities, sports teams and award-winning hospitals, retiring to Durham isn’t only a healthy option— it’s an exciting option. “There’s a lot to pick and choose from,” Lundstrom says. “It’s just a matter of what interests you.”

In 2010, Pollstar Magazine named the Durham Performing Arts Center the No. 12 venue on its list of the top 100 theaters, worldwide.

*Ranked by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

June 2011 53


Keep Reading: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

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People

Retired Male Seeking Best

Friend W

hether you’re searching for a new running buddy or someone to play with in the yard this summer, maybe it’s time to look for a new friend—a dog. And there’s no better place to start your search than your local animal shelter. When adopting from a shelter, you pay a one-time fee that covers many of the dog’s basic needs, says Stephanie Kirby, director of volunteering and fostering at the Animal Protection Society of Durham in Durham, N.C. “Any animal you adopt from here is going to have its basic vaccines already. It’s already going to be spayed or neutered, and it has been examined by a veterinarian. It’s also going to have a microchip,” Kirby says. “So these are things you won’t have to worry about when you come.” Adopting from a shelter means you’re not only saving money, but you’re helping save a dog’s life. Another advantage of picking your pet from the shelter is the variety the shelter offers. “We’ve got young dogs, we’ve got adults, we’ve got puppies,” Kirby says. “All different sizes, all different breeds. With such a wide selection, you’re bound to find a dog … that you would truly get along with and enjoy sharing your home with.” To find the shelter nearest you, try checking a website like www.animalshelter.org.

56 June 2011


To prepare for your upcoming adoption, follow these steps before you visit the shelter:

Before getting started, ask yourself: “Do I really have the time, money and energy to devote to a new dog?” Unless you can answer this question in the positive—and without any doubts—you may want to put off the decision until you’re definitely ready to commit. Once you’re certain that a dog is the right choice for you, begin making a list of characteristics that your ideal dog would have. Do you want a dog with a high energy level or one that’s more low-key? Do you prefer a bigger breed or something a little smaller? Do you want a dog that is good around children and other pets? Do you want a dog that doesn’t shed or a dog that doesn’t bark a lot? Make sure you take thoughts like these—and a whole list of others—into consideration. Next, make a list of factors that could affect your new pet. Do you live in a small apartment or a big city where there is little room for a dog to stretch its legs? Do you have a large backyard and lots of room to run? Keep all of these things in mind when

you’re making your list and you’ll have an easier time when it comes to picking your new friend. For men who are looking for a new dog, Kirby says they should “look for the pet that best fits their lifestyle. “They need to keep in mind what they like to do and how they like to spend their time and try to find a dog that’s going to match that as best as possible,” she says. Kirby suggests that retired men look for adult dogs “because they’re a little bit more low maintenance and there’s not as much training involved.” But Kirby says your age really isn’t a factor. Choosing a dog depends on what kind of person you are, not how old you are. “If you want to go jogging in the morning, you can find a dog that would love to go jogging with you,” she says. “If you’re a couch potato and you want to read your newspaper or watch television, you can definitely find a dog that would love to just lay with his head in your lap.”

Once you know what you’re looking for, follow these steps at the shelter to help you pick the perfect pooch:

When you come to the shelter, bring your list along and speak with a shelter volunteer. This person can help match you with a dog that best fits your wants and needs. Be sure to check whether the dog you’re considering has had a behavior assessment (many shelters conduct these once a dog enters the shelter). This will clue you in on important factors, like what kind of energy level the dog has, if it’s shy or playful and whether it’s good with children and other dogs. After making your way through the shelter and finding a few dogs

that pique your interest, spend some time with them. Most shelters have an outside area that allows potential owners to play with dogs in the fresh air. Use these few minutes wisely and gauge your gut reaction toward the dog. Do you think it fits all of your criteria? Will it get along with your wife, your grandchildren and your neighbors? Once you’ve finally found a dog that you think is a good match, take the leap! Getting a new dog takes a lot of commitment, but the rewards you’ll get from your new furry friend will be worth it.

June 2011 57


People Take this quiz before going to the shelter to help you look for breeds that best match your preferences. 1. What size dog would you prefer? Small (up to 20 pounds) Medium (21 to 45 pounds) Large (more than 46 pounds) 2. What kind of energy level do you want your dog to have? High (needs a lot of exercise every day) Moderate (needs some exercise every day or a few days a week) Low (needs very little exercise) 3. When it comes to grooming, would you prefer a dog that is high maintenance or low maintenance? High maintenance (needs bathing and brushing every week) Low maintenance (needs bathing and brushing only when necessary) 4. How important is it that your dog is friendly to children, strangers and other pets? Very important Somewhat important Not very important Now that you know what you’re looking for, take a look at some of our suggested breeds, to the right.

58 June 2011

Medium size, high energy, high maintenance, not very friendly

BORDER COLLIE: This high-energy and intelligent breed, which can weigh between 30 and 40 pounds, needs lots of exercise every day. It’s very playful, easy to train and enjoys being assigned tasks (like fetching the morning paper!). Border collies tend to chase other animals and can be unfriendly to strangers, so this breed may be ideal if you don’t have neighbors. Its long coat needs brushing twice weekly. Large size, moderate energy, low maintenance, friendly

GOLDEN RETRIEVER: Although they can weigh up to 75 pounds, golden retrievers can make great family-friendly, indoor pets. This moderate-energy dog enjoys a big yard to play in and needs at least a little exercise every day. Its enthusiastic, playful and obedient attitude makes it a great match for grandkids, friends and other pets. Small size, high energy, low maintenance, somewhat friendly

JACK RUSSELL TERRIER: Jack russells are energypacked, spirited dogs that need lots of exercise each day. Although this is a relatively small breed, they can be aggressive with other dogs if they’re not socialized and shouldn’t be trusted around other small animals, like cats or rabbits. However, they are friendly and devoted to their owners and generally behave well around children. Their short coats make them easy to groom, and you only need to bathe them when necessary. Medium size, moderate energy, low maintenance, friendly

BEAGLE: This affectionate, fun-loving breed can weigh up to 30 pounds. Although it has a moderate energy level and can live in an apartment, it needs exercise every day and prefers to have a yard to play in and explore. Beagles are great with children and are very friendly to other dogs, but because of their hunting instincts, you have to be careful leaving them around other animals. While they do shed a little, beagles don’t need to be brushed, and they need a bath only when necessary. Small size, low energy, high maintenance, moderately friendly

PEKINGESE: This little lap dog usually weighs less than 14 pounds and has a low energy level, which means it will be content to sit around while you’re watching the evening news. While they’re not known to be very affectionate and often ignore strangers, they are devoted to their owners and get along well with other pets. Grooming is important for this breed because its coat can mat, so be sure to brush it at least once a week. Of course, this list isn’t exhaustive—there may be other breeds that match your wants and needs. Make sure to talk to a shelter volunteer to help you narrow your search.

LAST PHOTO COURTESY OF LUDOVIC

Which Breed is Best For You?


Expect Wonders.

Two pills a day could lower your chance of a heart attack or stroke.*

*Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. March 2011 59


People

Summer Fun Use this key to find age-appropriate games

3-4+

5-8+

9+

Good for younger kids

Good for kids who have started school

Only good for older kids

kid tyle s

BY RACHEL SCALL Nice summer weather only lasts so long. Take advantage of the warm weather and venture out to your backyard or a nearby park with your grandchildren this summer and try out one of these fun activities.

icipant art

3-4+

s

1. Scavenger Hunt

A ges

P

What age are your grandchildren?

4+

Create an outdoor scavenger hunt for the grandkids. Make a list of common—and not so common—items you can find in your backyard or local park. Your list can include things such as pine cones, a certain color rock, a certain shape of leaf or anything else you can think of. Divide your grandchildren into teams of two (you can join a team or judge the competition). You and the kids will run around finding the items on the list and either collecting them or photographing them. First team to find all the items on the list wins.

3-4+

P

icipant art Any number

s

2. Activity Course

A ges

Set up an activity course for the kids. Activities can include hula hoops, jump ropes, small puzzles and hopscotch, just to name a few ideas. If you don’t have enough materials to let the kids run the course head-to-head, let each child run the course one at a time and time him or her. Then let the kids time you as you show them how the activity course is really done.

60 June 2011


A ges

P

s

5. Sardines

icipant art

4+

5-8+

Sardines is a new spin on hide and seek. One person hides while everyone else counts to 50. When it’s time to search for the hider, the group splits up to look for him or her. When you find the hider, squeeze into the hiding spot with him or her. The last person to find the group that is hiding becomes the first hider in the next round.

icipant art Any number

P

s

3. Build a tent

A ges

3-4+

Use outdoor furniture and sheets or a tarp to build a backyard tent or fort. If you supply the building materials, the grandkids will surely supply the imagination. Before you know it you’ll be an Indian defending the backyard from cowboys or a knight protecting the king’s castle.

ILLUSTRATION BY MEGAN FINKE

P

9+

P

5-8+

This game is good for a hot summer day when you need to cool off. Split your group into teams of two, with team members standing about 6 feet apart. One teammate holds a cup with a Ping-Pong ball in it. The other teammate has a water gun or spray bottle. When you say go, the teammates with water guns or spray bottles shoot water into their partners’ cups. The first team to fill the cup, and cause the PingPong ball to fall to the ground, wins.

icipant art

s

4. Cornhole

A ges

icipant art Any even number

s

6. Fill ’Er Up

A ges

4

Cornhole, also known as Corn Toss, Bean Toss or Indian Horseshoes, is a popular game at Southern tailgates— and it will be just as popular in your backyard. This game requires that you have a Cornhole set—two wooden platforms and eight corn bags or beanbags. Sets normally cost between $75 and $125, or you can make your own (www. cornholehowto.com has detailed instructions on how to build your own set). Set up your wooden platforms approximately 30 feet from each other, or closer if you are playing with smaller children. One member of each team stands next to each platform. Players take turns trying to toss a corn bag into the hole of the opposite side’s platform. If the corn bag goes through the hole, the team receives three points. If the corn bag lands on the board, without any part of it touching the ground, the team receives one point. Play until a team reaches 11 or 21, depending on how much time you have.

Cornhole Scoring A corn bag through the hole = 3 points

A corn bag remaining on the board = 1 point A corn bag landing on the ground = 0 points

Sources: The Savvy Source, Disney FamilyFun, American Cornhole Association

June 2011 61


Summer ips of

Celebrating June as National Iced Tea Month BY KELSIE ALLEN

62 June 2011


T

o celebrate the refreshing beverage, here are five easy recipes for your sipping pleasure. Whether you’re in the mood to try your tea with a fruity twist or to just brew a pitcher of classic sweet tea after an intense round of golf, these thirst-quenching recipes will keep you cool as the temperature rises.

Editor’s Pick Watermelon & Basil Iced Tea Estimated time of preparation: 25 minutes (active time: 5 minutes) Servings: 8 8 cups water 8 individual-size tea bags Sugar or low-calorie sweetener, to taste 1/8 medium-size watermelon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces 1 small bunch fresh basil sprigs In a large pot, bring 8 cups water to a boil then add tea bags. Boil 1 minute; remove from heat. Cover and let steep for 10 minutes. Remove and discard tea bags. Add desired amount of sugar or low-calorie sweetener; using a large spoon, stir until dissolved. Allow the tea to cool to room temperature. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Before serving, add the watermelon and basil to the tea and serve over ice.

PHOTOS BY ERIK ANDERSEN

The Health Benefits of Tea For an even healthier option when making iced tea, try using green or white tea. Green tea has been proven to help with weight loss, while white tea is loaded with anti-cancer antioxidant polyphenols, which detoxify cell-damaging free radicals in the body. Some studies have suggested that tea’s polyphenols may reduce the risk of gastric, esophageal and skin cancers and has about 8 to 10 times the polyphenols

found in fruits and vegetables. Either option is healthier than using plain tea bags, and a great way to add additional flavor. Or consider adding a sugar substitute, such as a low-calorie sweetener, so you can still get the sweet flavor you love without all the extra calories. Also, make sure you always prepare your tea with pure or filtered water to avoid contaminants that may alter the flavor of your tea. June 2011 63


More Favorites

Peach & Mint Iced Tea Estimated time of preparation: 25 minutes (active time: 5 minutes) Servings: 8 8 cups water 8 individual-size tea bags Sugar or low-calorie sweetener, to taste 4 ripe peaches, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces 1 small bunch fresh mint sprigs In a large pot, bring 8 cups water to a boil, then add tea bags. Boil 1 minute; remove from heat. Cover and let steep for 10 minutes. Remove and discard tea bags. Add desired amount of sugar or lowcalorie sweetener; using a large spoon, stir until dissolved. Allow the tea to cool to room temperature. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Before serving, add the peaches and mint sprigs to the tea and serve over ice.

64 June 2011

Lemonade Iced Tea Estimated time of preparation: 35 minutes (active time: 10 minutes) Servings: 12 3 quarts water 9 individual-size tea bags 1 can (12 ounces) frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed ž to 1Ÿ cups sugar or equivalent measure of low-calorie sweetener In a large pot, bring 3 quarts water to a boil then add tea bags. Boil 1 minute; remove from heat. Cover and let steep for 5 minutes. Remove and discard tea bags. Add lemonade concentrate and desired amount of sugar or lowcalorie sweetener; using a large spoon, stir until dissolved. Pour into a 1-gallon pitcher. Cover and refrigerate until chilled. Serve over ice.


Raspberry Sweet Tea Southern Sweet Tea Estimated time of preparation: 25 minutes (active time: 5 minutes) Servings: 10 3 cups water 2 family-size tea bags ½ to 1 cup sugar or equivalent measure of low-calorie sweetener 7 cups cold tap or filtered water In a saucepan, bring 3 cups water to a boil, then add tea bags. Boil 1 minute; remove from heat. Cover and let steep for 10 minutes. Remove and discard tea bags. Add desired amount of sugar or low-calorie sweetener; using a large spoon, stir until dissolved. Pour into a 1-gallon pitcher and add 7 cups cold water. Stir again and serve over ice.

Estimated time of preparation: 40 minutes (active time: 15 minutes) Servings: 15 4 quarts water 1 cup sugar or equivalent measure of lowcalorie sweetener 10 individual-size tea bags 1 package (12 ounces) frozen unsweetened raspberries, thawed and undrained 3 tablespoons lime juice In a large pot, bring 2 quarts water to a boil. Add sugar or low-calorie sweetener; using a large spoon, stir until dissolved. Add tea bags. Boil 1 minute; remove from heat. Cover and let steep for 8 minutes. Remove and discard tea bags. In another large pot, bring raspberries and remaining 2 quarts water to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 3 minutes. Using a mesh strainer, strain raspberry juice and discard pulp. Add raspberry and lime juices to the tea. Pour into a 1-gallon pitcher. Cover and refrigerate until chilled. Serve over ice.

June 2011 65


Exercise

Yoga

Not just for women anymore

BY ALEXIS DEEGAN The lights dim as soft, soothing music fills the room. Deep inhales and exhales are heard above the music as limbs stretch in all directions. It’s a place to which most men have no interest in going. After all, yoga classes are usually filled with women contorting their bodies in ways most men don’t think theirs can. But a yoga studio shouldn’t be your enemy. In fact, yoga is something you should think about incorporating into your weekly schedule. Yoga helps you with strength, flexibility and balance. The poses also help build core strength, which is good for your back. The breathing exercises practiced in yoga can help

66 June 2011

with releasing stress, which is something everybody can use. There’s also the meditation and mind-body connection that yoga brings, allowing you to feel comfortable with and at one with your body. But wait. You’re thinking there’s no way you’re flexible enough to even try a class. But that’s not so, says Sage Rountree, co-owner of Carrboro Yoga Co. in Carrboro, N.C. “Saying you’re not flexible enough to do it is like saying you’re too dirty to take a bath or your teeth are too bad to go to the dentist. But that’s why you’re going.” And while there is a small learning curve, it’s just like any other activity

you’re trying to pick up. Similar to cycling, you start off at the beginning – nice and slow – with just the basics. Rountree says to look for a gentle class or one designed for beginners. Another excuse many men use to avoid the yoga studio is that they’re worried about being the only guy in class. While the majority of yoga practitioners are women, men are an emerging demographic in yoga, Rountree says. Look for classes aimed specifically at men. Another option is yoga for athletes, which involves a lot of stretching and core strength. This is Rountree’s niche, and in the seven years she’s been in the field, it has grown exponen-


tially. Many of her classes now are “Saying you’re not close to being half men, half women; one night, she even had eight men to flexible enough to just one woman. Rountree says it’s a good entry point for men, since they do it is like saying can come in and feel like, “I’m an you’re too dirty to athlete; this isn’t yoga for ballerinas.” You don’t even have to be a hardcore take a bath or your athlete; if you classify yourself as an athlete, you can attend. However, the teeth are too bad to thing to be careful for when looking go to the dentist.” for a yoga for athletes class is to make sure that it’s not athletic yoga, which Sage Rountree involves more challenging poses. Rountree suggests going to one class per week and practicing one tween 1 hour and 1½ hours, and are or two days on your own for 20 to good for making sure you do poses 30 minutes. Classes usually last be- that challenge you, since most peo-

ple, when left to their own devices, do the things they’re already good at. Rountree usually gives her yoga students routines to do at home, and suggests doing poses that are both difficult and feel-good. Yoga can be a great activity to do with your wife and friends. It’s also a gentle way to start getting into an exercise routine. “It’s good on levels you don’t even appreciate until you start doing it – stress reduction, mood management, comfort in your body as you age and well, just for everything,” Rountree says. And she stresses that it’s not just for women. Yoga is becoming more mainstream for everyone.

Yoga poses for beginners Try these three poses to get a feel for yoga and how it can help your body. Standing Forward Bend

Stand with your feet hip-width apart, parallel to each other. Start with a slight bend in your knees and fold your torso over your legs, starting with your stomach, then your middle ribs. Let your hands hang straight down. Bend your knees as much as needed so that your torso rests on your legs. This will take pressure off your back and prevent overstretching. With practice, you won’t need to bend your knees as much. Let your legs and back release with each inhale and exhale. Hold for 30 seconds to 1 minute, and then roll up.

Back Bends: Cat and Cow

Come down onto all fours. Make sure your hands are under your shoulders and your knees are under your hips. Spread your fingers wide. When you inhale, tuck your tailbone, round your back and look in toward your stomach. To bend the other way: exhale, drop your stomach, arch your lower back and look up. Hold for 30 seconds to 1 minute each way.

Balance Poses: Tree

Stand up straight and using your right hand, grab your right ankle. Guide the sole of your right foot onto the inside of your upper left thigh. Your toes should be pointing toward the floor. When you feel steady, extend your arms up over your head, palms facing inward. If needed, hold onto a chair or wall for balance. Hold for 30 seconds to 1 minute.

June 2011 67


Ga s me

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Exercise

BY REBECCA COLLINS

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o fully enjoy your retirement, it’s not only important to keep a healthy body. You have to keep a healthy mind, as well. Memory loss is one of the most common struggles people face as they get older, and scientists believe this mental decline is caused by losing connections between brain cells. At its most extreme, mental decline can manifest itself as Alzheimer’s disease. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 5.3 million Americans had Alzheimer’s disease in 2010. While death rates from other major diseases such as cancer and heart disease have dropped in recent years, the

68 June 2011

number of deaths from Alzheimer’s has risen. There have been no definitively proven ways to prevent Alzheimer’s, but studies have shown that mentally active people are less likely to be diagnosed with the disease. “Really any kind of game is going to help keep an older person sharp by engaging them cognitively,” says Dr. Anne McLaughlin, an associate professor of psychology at North Carolina State University. She says that research is being done about how different puzzles affect the brain differently but acknowledges, “the brain is still a very mysterious thing. We don’t know exactly how activities such as

puzzles improve cognitive function. … But there have been correlations between engaging mentally and improved cognition.” She says that many different types of puzzles, including brain teasers, jigsaw puzzles and sudoku puzzles, all help stimulate brain activity. Studies have shown that exercising your mind can help rebuild connections and possibly even build new brain cells. That means you can slow or even reverse memory loss if you challenge your brain regularly. Here, we’ve given you some puzzles to challenge your mind and help you start rebuilding those lost connections today.


Riddles

Level 3 Sudoku Instructions: Fill every column, row and box with the numbers 1-9 without repeating any numbers.

What kind of coat can only be put on when wet? (Hint: It’s not a raincoat.)

Difficulty: MEDIUM

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Cryptogram Hint: English proverb Instructions: Every number corresponds to a letter of the alphabet. Crack the code to reveal the phrase.

Brothers and sisters I have none, but that man’s father is my father’s son. Who is he?

What is put on a table and cut, but never eaten?

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Answers on Page 75 June 2011 69


Exercise

There is a path.

Your friendly neighborhood one-stop shop.


continued. Sticking to it. (Continued from pg. 29)

lifestyle together. No matter who does the cooking in the house, it’s easier if you two can enjoy the same meal together instead of cooking two separate meals. And sharing your challenges and supporting each other will bring you closer to one another. But you also need a support group for those times when you need a little space from your wife. You’ll enjoy your workouts more and be more productive if you have a friend there to encourage you. You could join a walking group or play tennis to find men with similar interests to be your workout buddies. A personal trainer could also be a great part of your support group. He or she can teach you the right exercises to meet your goals and tailor them to your strengths and weaknesses. Your trainer can also show you proper form and encourage you so that you get the most out of your workout. A personal trainer will also help you get over gym phobia by teaching you how to use the equipment properly so you don’t have to worry about figuring it all out on your own. But, above all, you have to keep yourself accountable. Keep a journal that details what you eat and how you exercise. “Keeping a lifestyle diary can help you become more aware of the patterns that are causing challenges for you and areas in which you need help,” says Hobbs. MAKE HEALTH A HABIT It’s very common for people to decide they’re going to be healthy but then give up on it two weeks later. Miller says that many people give up because “they don’t learn

how to incorporate things into their everyday life. They can just do it when things are just on a normal schedule.” In order to be truly successful you have to make health a habit. Even more so, you have to make health a lifestyle. That means committing to being healthy all the time. That doesn’t mean you can never have a cheeseburger again or that you can’t have the occasional lazy Sunday spent reading or watching movies. It means that you make those the exception to the rule. When you’re starting out you should plan everything—and stick to the plan. That means planning your daily meals, snacks and exercise routine. That way you won’t be standing in front of an open refrigerator trying to put together a healthy lunch on the fly. By sticking to your schedule you’ll start forming habits that will make it easier for you to eventually start making healthy choices without a plan. You should also start weaning yourself from temptation. You don’t have to throw out all of your junk food right away. But you should decide that when you finish that quart of ice cream in the freezer you’re not going to buy any more, or that you’re going to start buying a healthier alternative like frozen yogurt instead. You’ll be better able to stick to healthy eating if you allow yourself to have unhealthy food in moderation. You just have to learn restraint. Miller says that being active has to be a habit as well. He says that even if you’re out of town and can’t do your normal exercise routine, you can still stay active by doing small things like walking. A healthy lifestyle means making healthy choices all of the

time, not just when it’s convenient. There’s no better time than now to start the next chapter of your life, and you’ve just read how to adopt a healthy lifestyle successfully. Now all that’s left is for you to overcome that first roadblock and decide to make a change for the better.

Dealing with Loss (Continued from pg. 39)

the loss still sets in sometimes for Max. “It’s hard to believe it’s been 15 months. It doesn’t really seem possible that she’s been gone that long,” he says. “But even though she’s not here physically, she is still very present inside me.” In 2010, Pineville Church renamed their Christmas craft fair “The Linda Sills Memorial Christmas Craft Fair” in her honor, and it was the most successful year the fair has had t o date. Smith was determined to keep her mom’s passion for the craft fair alive and took on the responsibility of planning the event. Max did not revert to smoking and has continued to direct his energy toward projects. His most recent project has been converting Linda’s craft room into an office. “I’ve got a TV in there, a computer and a desk. The other day, Diana and I went out and bought a futon,” he says. “I think my biggest push to get that done was so I could spend more time in that room, because I know she spent so much time in that room. There’s just a closeness about it.” He pauses and then adds, “But you know what? I’m going to have to get a DVD player in there for when the grandkids come down and want to play their movies and games in there. That would be nice.” June 2011 71


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continued.

Cycle Your Way to Better Physical and Mental Health (Continued from pg. 45)

hit the ground, bounced up. Hit the ground again, bounced up. All he was thinking was, “This has got to stop sometime.” Crashing is a fact of the sport. According to Carr, there are two kinds of bikers: those who have crashed, and those who haven’t yet. It’s in-

evitable. If you’re wearing the right gear, impact is minimized. Carr remembers one time at a world competition when he fell off the bike and, as he lay on the ground, hoped he hadn’t broken anything. He got up, walked around. He realized if he could walk, he could ride. So he hopped back on and was so elated he could finish, he forgot about the pain. Carr does say that after a bad crash, there is fear the next time out. But for each day you don’t get out there, it gets more and more difficult to do so. Luckily when cycling,

Brain Games

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(Continued from pg. 71)

What kind of coat can only be put on when wet? (Hint: It’s not a raincoat.) Answer: A coat of paint The more of these you take, the more you leave behind. What are they? Answer: Footsteps I’m taken from a mine and shut up in a wooden case, from which I am never released. Yet

I am used by almost everybody. What am I? Answer: Pencil lead Brothers and sisters I have none, but that man’s father is my father’s son. Who is he? Answer: His son

you’re not going to think about getting injured every time you go out. It’s only a small part of a sport that has many positive aspects to it. Bianchi compares cycling to baking. You need all the ingredients to be successful. Gather your bike, your helmet and the right clothing and pack a positive attitude. You’ll be out of the door and ready to go. Whether it’s training for a race, just getting some exercise, catching up with friends or admiring the views, you’ll be constructing a recipe that’s good for your health. And the best part is you’re in control of it.

What is put on a table and cut, but never eaten? Answer: A pack of cards

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June 2011 73



Men's Retirement