Page 1

JL945_GH4_0 Covers_BEpc:GH4

31/7/13

11:15

Page 1

10 ers er st ov ma th py Wi toco ho 0p

The Grammar 4 Handbook A Handbook for Teaching Grammar and Spelling

Sara Wernham and Sue Lloyd


Grammar 2 – Identifying Verb Tenses Aim: Reinforce the children’s knowledge of the simple and continuous tenses and develop their ability to identify them in sentences. (See Verbs, pages 9 and 10).

Prepare...

Grammar S heet 2 Red pencils

Builds on..

Grammar S . heets GH1: 14-18 , 26 GH2: 16, 1 7, 21, 32 GH3: 3, 5, 7 -9, 17, 36 GH4: 1

Introduction: Write ‘to help’ on the board and ask what sort of word ‘help’ is [a verb]. Remind the class that when it has ‘to’ in front of it, it is called the infinitive. Ask the children which tenses they know [simple past, simple present, simple future, past continuous, present continuous, future continuous] and discuss how they are formed. Draw a simple grid of six boxes on the board and write in the tenses as you talk about them. simple past

past continuous

simple present

present continuous

simple future

future continuous

Remind the children of the spelling rules for adding the suffixes ‹-ed› and ‹-ing› and how the continuous tenses are formed by using the auxiliary verb ‘to be’ with the present participle. Conjugate the irregular verb ‘to be’ with the class in the simple present, past and future, doing the pronoun actions. Main point: Write ‘I help my dad’ on the board and ask which tense the sentence is in [the simple present]. Circle the tense in the grid and call out the same sentence in another tense for the children to identify. Continue in the same way, using all six tenses: Past: Present: Future:

Simple I helped my dad. I help my dad. I shall/will help my dad.

Continuous I was helping my dad. I am helping my dad. I shall/will be helping my dad.

Remind the class that the simple present describes an action that is repeated or usual: I help my dad every day; while the present continuous describes something that has started and is still happening: I am helping my dad paint the fence. The simple past describes an action which started and finished within a specific time: I helped my dad today; while the continuous past describes an action that had started and was still happening in the past: I was helping my dad when the phone rang. Similarly, the simple future describes an action which will start and finish within a specific time: I shall help my dad tonight; while the continuous future describes an action that will start and still be happening in the future: I shall be helping my dad when the race begins.

Grammar Sheet 2: The children write inside the outlined word Ve rbs, using a red pencil. They then read each sentence, underline all parts of the verb in red, and decide which tense is being used, circling the correct tense in the Tense Tent [1. run: simple present, 2. will be painting: future continuous, 3. are moving: present continuous, 4. walked: simple past, 5. will send: simple future, 6. announced: simple past, 7. will brush: simple future, 8. collect: simple present, 9. was ignoring: past continuous, 10. were humming: past continuous, 11. is knocking: present continuous, 12. shall be listening: future continuous]. Extension activity: The children choose one of the sentences from Grammar Sheet 2 and write it in the other tenses. Rounding off: Go over the sheet with the children, checking their answers. If they have done the extension activity, ask some of the children to read out their sentences.

38

3


8

Red

Identifying Verb Tenses

Verbs

Underline each verb in red and identify the correct tense.

simple past

simple present

present past continuous continuous

1.

simple past

present past continuous continuous

simple future future continuous

7.

simple present

past present continuous continuous

simple future future continuous

8.

simple future future continuous

I collect comic books.

You will be painting the fence. simple past

simple present

past present continuous continuous

simple present

present past continuous continuous

simple future future continuous

9.

simple future future continuous

My sister was ignoring me.

They are moving to a new town. simple past

simple past

simple present

past present continuous continuous

4.

future continuous

10.

simple future future continuous

You were humming a tune.

I walked to school. simple past

simple present

present past continuous continuous

5.

simple present

past present continuous continuous

simple future

simple past

simple future future continuous

simple present

past present continuous continuous

11.

simple future future continuous

Ben is knocking at the door.

He will send you a letter. simple past

simple past

simple present

present past continuous continuous

39

simple present

past present continuous continuous

simple past

6.

future continuous

We run in the park every day. simple past

3.

simple future

She will brush her hair. simple past

2.

simple present

past present continuous continuous

simple future future continuous

simple present

12.

simple future future continuous

We shall be listening carefully.

They announced their engagement. Grammar Sheet 2

(GH4)


Spelling 6 – Irregular plurals: ‹ves› Revision: Revise the consonant digraphs: ng, ch, sh, th, qu; the vowel digraphs: or, oo, ou, oi, er, ar; the five vowel letters and the spelling of their short sounds, /a, e, i, o, u/; and the different spellings of the long vowel sounds: /ai/ ai, ay, a_e; /ee/ ee, ea, e_e; /ie/ ie, y, igh, i_e; /oa/ oa, ow, o_e; /ue/ ue, ew, u_e. Flash cards can be used for reading and sound dictation for spelling.

Prepare...

Spelling/Ext . Sheet 6 Revision fla sh cards Coloured pe ncils

Builds on...

GH2: G10, G24 GH3: G24; GH4: S5

Main point: Revise the ‹ve› spelling of the /v/ sound and remind the children how it usually comes at the end of a word. Now write ‘scarves’ and ‘wives’ on the board and ask the children what they notice about these two words. They should be able to point out that the /v/ sound is written ‹ve› but they may also notice that ‹ve› does not come right at the end of either word, but in both cases it is followed by ‹s›. Ask the children why this is [they are plural nouns] and then ask them to call out the singular for each word [scarf, wife]. Explain that some singular words ending in ‹f› have an irregular plural made by removing the ‹f› and adding the suffix ‹-ves›, as in ‘scarves’. If the word ends in a ‘hop-over ‹e›’ digraph, as in ‘wife’, the plural is made by replacing the ‹fe› with ‹ves›. Not all singular nouns ending in ‹f› or ‹fe› make their plurals in this way, so the spellings have to be learnt. Spelling list: Read the spelling words with the children, go over the meaning of any words they may not know, and ask them to find and highlight the ‹ves› in each word. Point out that ‘lives’, the plural of ‘life’ is said with an /ie/, unlike the verb ‘lives’, which has the /i/ sound. Also point out the ‹ea› spelling of /ee/ in ‘leaves’, the silent ‹k› and ‹h› in ‘knives’ and ‘wharves’, the /o/ saying /oo/ in ‘wolves’, the ‹al› in ‘halves’ and ‘calves’, the ‹ie› saying /ee/ in ‘thieves’ and the ‹ar› saying /or/ in ‘wharves’ and ‘dwarves’. Also make sure the children know the difference in meaning and spelling between the plural ‘calves’ and the verb ‘carves’ from Spelling List 5. It can also help to remember certain spellings to ‘say it as it sounds’. It is a good idea to blend and sound out the spelling words quickly every day with the children.

Spelling Sheet 6: The children write the singular for each of the plural spelling words [self, scarf, wife, elf, life, loaf, hoof, leaf, knife, wolf, shelf, half, calf, thief, wharf, dwarf]. They then write the correct plural for each noun [cherries, bushes, radios, tomatoes]. Finally, they parse the sentence, underlining each part of speech in the correct colour, identify the subject [thieves] and choose the correct tense, which is the present continuous so all parts of the verb should be underlined in red. ‘Bakery’ is a noun acting as an adjective and should be underlined in blue. The greedyAdj thievesN (are stealing)V the warmAdj loavesN fromPre the bakeryAdj shelvesN.

NounN (black), VerbV (red), PronounP (pink), AdjectiveAdj (blue), AdverbAdv (orange), ConjunctionC (purple), PrepositionPre (green)

Dictation: Call out the sentences for the children to write down. Remind them to use speech marks with the correct punctuation in Sentence 3. 1. The baker put the loaves on the shelves. 2. The cows and their calves grazed in the field. 3. “Are the knives sharp?” asked the butcher.

Extension activity (page 190): The children write the plural for each singular noun [bats, brushes, daisies, boxes, monkeys, feet, flies, cars, pencils, potatoes, geese, men] and then draw a picture, showing more than one of each item to match the plural.

52

5


2

Spelling List 6 Plurals: ‚ves› 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

scarves selves wives lives elves loaves hooves leaves knives wolves shelves halves calves thieves wharves dwarves ourselves themselves

Make these plural words from the Spelling List into singular nouns.

selves

knives

scarves

wolves

wives

shelves

elves

halves

lives

calves

loaves

thieves

hooves

wharves

leaves

dwarves

Write the plural of each noun, and draw some more examples so the pictures match the words.

cherry

bush

radio

tomato

Parse this sentence, identify the subject and choose the correct tense.

The greedy thieves are stealing the warm loaves from the bakery shelves. 53

simple past

simple present

simple future

past continuous

present continuous

future continuous

Spelling Sheet 6

(GH4)


Dictation: Schwa ‹er› 1. 2. 3.

Write a different sentence each time, using the punctuation mark(s) shown.

1.

apostrophe ‹s› for possession

2.

speech marks.

3.

exclamation mark

4.

question mark

5.

commas in a list

Extension Activity: Spelling 12

(GH4)

196


Dictation: ‹gh› ‹ough› ‹augh› 1. 2. 3.

Complete these sentences, using a different possessive noun as an adjective in each one.

archer’s

pirate’s

loaf’s

researcher’s doctor’s

mirror’s crocodile’s

bird’s

caterpillar’s

thief’s

1.

The

crust was dark and crispy.

2.

The

fingerprints were found at the crime scene.

3.

An

4.

Lots of juicy leaves make a

5.

They found woodworm in the

6.

The

7.

He looked aghast at the

sharp, pointed teeth.

8.

Did they find any of the

treasure?

9.

The results of the

10.

The male

wooden bow is made of yew. body fat. frame.

stethoscope could not be found.

findings were unexpected. plumage was superb.

’s ’s ’s ’s ’s ’s ’s ’s ’s Extension Activity: Spelling 16

(GH4)

200

Grammar 4 handbook be  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you