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SPRING

2017

Success!

Kristin Coia ’94

Founder and CEO, Go Gently Inc.


Karoom Brown ’00

Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development, Leidos


CONTENTS

SPRING 2017 10

SUCCESS! From the first in his family to graduate from college to the 11th woman in the world to earn the Master Sommelier title, these 12 graduates are an inspiration to us all.

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THE DEL POSTO COOKBOOK Chef Mark Ladner ’90 teaches readers classic Italian cooking techniques with “The Del Posto Cookbook.”

the annual success issue

02 04 08 26 28 33 40

From the Chancellor Campus News Athletics Resource Development Alumni Firsts Class Notes JWU Global

front and back cover photos: Evan Hurd

www.jwu.edu

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JWU

FROM THE CHANCELLOR

Senior Vice President of Communications DOUG WHITING

Director of Design & Editorial Services BRIAN MURPHY

Editor

DENISE DOWLING

Designer

GAIL SOLOMON

Contributors

JENNIFER BROUILLARD MIKE COHEA

RYAN CROWLEY BONNIE DUNCAN SAM EIFLING JULIA S. EMLEN KARLI EVANS JORDAN FICKESS ANDREA FELDMAN ROBYN HANKERSON MELINDA HILL

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AMANDA HOUPT GREG HREN EVAN HURD HOLLI KEYSER BILL KOCH RACHEL LACAILLE MELINDA LAW JOE MAGENNIS LISA PELOSI ED PEREIRA

S WE CELEBRATE the accomplishments of a dozen alumni in this issue, I encourage

the community to take pride in our collective success. While the university continues to expand — with more programs at the intersection of food and medicine, for example — Johnson & Wales remains on the cutting edge of professional trends. Because our experiential approach to education allows students to delve into their chosen careers from the beginning, they have a head start in the job market upon graduation. In addition, countless internships have led to full-time positions upon graduation. “Experiencing their future now” gives students the opportunity to change course when they realize something isn’t the right fit. Karoom Brown ’00 intended to develop chip-level computer designs when he entered the university. However, an internship convinced Brown he’d rather work with customers than computers, so he shifted into sales management. Bonds formed between students and their professors — a number of whom are industry professionals — yield invaluable payoffs. For Matt Tortora ’15, the advice he received at our Larry Friedman International Center for Entrepreneurship helped him make critical pivots for an innovative cloud-based platform he launched while still a student. David Kinch ’81, ’14 Hon., chef and partner at Manresa and The Bywater restaurants, was drawn to “the profane pirates working with fire” behind the doors of the dining room where he worked before college. He knew that Johnson & Wales could teach him to cook, as well as deliver the financial foundation that a chef and restaurateur needs. A Johnson & Wales degree offers students an edge over the competition when they graduate: They’ve found their passion and their résumés are already impressive. I invite you to continue the conversation. How did the university help you discover your potential? Inform the community about your endeavors as well: Visit campus; address a class; mentor students and fellow alumni. Share your stories with us at jwumagazine@jwu.edu.

ANN-MARIE REDDY SHANNON ROBBINS CHRIS SAVAS STEVEN SHIPLEY STEPHEN SMITH SHELLEY STEPHENSON, PH.D. MARY SWARD DAMARIS R. TEIXEIRA LAUREN TKACS MIRIAM S. WEINSTEIN ’08 MBA KEVIN WESLEY

JWU Magazine is published four times a year including a special supplement for recent graduates. Photos (black and white or color prints), high-resolution digital images and news can be sent to JWU Magazine, 8 Abbott Park Place, Providence, RI, 02903 or emailed to jwumagazine@jwu.edu. Selection and publication of entries are at the editor’s discretion. JWU Magazine is produced by University Communications in cooperation with Resource Development and Alumni Relations. Chancellor JOHN J. BOWEN ’77

Providence Campus President and Chief Operating Officer MIM L. RUNEY, LP.D.

Regional Campus Presidents LARRY RICE, ED.D., ’90, NORTH MIAMI

Chancellor John J. Bowen ’77

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RICHARD WISCOTT, PH.D., DENVER ROBERT C. MOCK JR., ED.D., CHARLOTTE


JWU HONORARY CLASS OF 2017 AS JOHNSON & WALES UNIVERSITY CELEBRATES the graduation of its accomplished students during commencement, the university also inducts an august group of leaders as honorary members of the Class of 2017. These accomplished individuals are recognized for their notable careers and their positive influence on their industries, organizations and communities. Each has demonstrated support of the JWU mission in his or her own unique way, and serves as a role model for our students and graduates.

Providence Campus

Neil D. Steinberg

David L. Warren, Ph.D.

Charles M. Royce

Gary R. Comella ’76

President and CEO, The Rhode Island Foundation

President, National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

Chairman and Portfolio Manager, Royce & Associates LP

Executive Chef, University Club

Doctor of Humane Letters

Doctor of Business Administration

Doctor of Culinary Arts

Graduate Studies Commencement Speaker

College of Culinary Arts and School of Hospitality Commencement Speaker

College of Culinary Arts and School of Hospitality

North Miami Campus

Denver Campus

Charlotte Campus

Ira D. Hall

Richard C. Saunders

Kat Cole

Michael A. Kahn

Retired President and CEO, Utendahl Capital Management LP Former Treasurer, Texaco Inc.

Founder and Chairman, Saunders Construction Inc.

Group President, FOCUS Brands

President, Empire Distributors Inc.

Doctor of Business Administration

Doctor of Business Administration

Doctor of Business Administration

Doctor of Business Administration

Commencement Speaker

Doctor of Business Administration

Commencement Speaker

John Hazen White College of Arts & Sciences, School of Business, School of Engineering & Design and School of Hospitality Commencement Speaker

Commencement Speaker

www.jwu.edu

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CAMPUS NEWS The School of Hospitality honored Rick Blatstein, founder and CEO of OTG (On the Go), a company specializing in elevating the airport experience for travelers. Blatstein spent a day on campus with hospitality students and faculty where he shared his insight on delivering exceptional customer service in the hectic airport venue. 

NOW THAT’S COOKING WITH CLASS!

~ Miriam S. Weinstein ’08 MBA

In May, Chef Frank Terranova celebrated his 20th year of “Cooking with Class.” This popular cooking

VIRTUAL CULINARY ARTS MUSEUM

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n the late 1970s, a donation of historical cookbooks was the genesis for what would become the Culinary Arts Museum at Johnson & Wales University. This teaching museum’s holdings, now in excess of 250,000, has been a remarkable resource for culinary students to expand their knowledge of gastronomy. Though no longer open for general admission, the museum’s holdings are available to the public for online research and viewing at culinary.org/collections  ~ Ryan Crowley

HOSPITALITY PROFESSORS REACH NO TIPPING POINT THERE HAS BEEN SOME DEBATE within the restaurant industry about literally

taking tips off the table. Danny Meyer, CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group, has removed tips from the equation altogether. But according to research conducted by two JWU School of Hospitality faculty, Associate Professor Brian J. Warrener, CHE, and Professor Paul Bagdan, Ph.D., CHE, it’s not a one-size-fits-all option. Their findings indicate that the tradition of tipping servers is not going away soon. The debate has been closely tied to an increased minimum wage — a topic that has generated opinions from restaurant operators and patrons. Bagdan and Warrener recognized that the opinions of servers and their managers were neglected in the conversation. They surveyed food and beverage industry owners, managers and employees and found that the majority of respondents had a strongly negative impression of the elimination of the tipped wage. “We can sum up our research with three quick findings,” Bagdan notes. “Most of industry is against it, most of the employees are against it and legislation appears to be against it.” Warrener says, “Most signs indicate this will be slow to progress. Most notably, the fluctuating debate around minimum wage, resistance from those in the industry and hesitation among the general public are impacting the potential for change to happen in the near future.” ~ Miriam S. Weinstein ’08 MBA

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segment airs on NBC 10 in Providence at noon, Monday–Friday, and is the longest running culinary segment in Rhode Island. During the last 20 years, Terranova has demonstrated more than 4,000 recipes and worked with more than 100 JWU culinary students who have been part of the behind-the-scenes production.

~ Ryan Crowley

Research on Tipping Revealed: 77% of the respondents had a “strongly negative impression of the elimination of the tipped wage.” About 65% were “extremely unfavorable.”

89% of tipped employees surveyed “really hate” the idea of eliminating tips.

72% of the managers surveyed “hate” the idea. 1 in 4 respondents said they would remain at their current job if tips were eliminated in their establishment while 40% of respondents indicated they would leave and seek an establishment with tipping.

1 in 4 would leave the industry if tips were eliminated.

Nearly 1/2 of the respondents indicated the quality of service they would provide would diminish if they were not working for tips.

3% of the respondents said they would improve the

level of their service if they were not working for tips.


A “SWEET” DEAL: SHARKFEST WINNER TAKES ALL PITCHING YOUR business concept

WSJ RANKS NORTH MIAMI CAMPUS FIRST IN DIVERSITY IN THE SOUTH

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nown for its year-round tropical climate and unique cultural flare, the North Miami Campus now has a new distinction: It leads in diversity among colleges and universities in the south. According to The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) / Times Higher Education (THE) College Rankings, the campus was also recognized as third in diversity nationwide. “This is truly a testament to the rich culture of our campus and how we embrace those who are culturally and ethnically different,” says Larry Rice, Ed.D., ’90, president of the North Miami Campus. “Our focus has always been on creating an inclusive campus community and we are excited to know that our efforts have garnered this distinction.” According to WSJ and THE, a college’s environment comprises “several measures of diversity, including the racial and ethnic mix of students and faculty; the number of international students; and the number of students from less-fortunate backgrounds.” This is evidenced by the North Miami Campus’ diverse population of students representing nearly 40 countries, including the Bahamas, People’s Republic of China and Argentina. The campus also welcomes students from various socioeconomic backgrounds, with 95 percent of all students receiving financial aid. Diverse events, such as the Cultural Catwalk fashion show as well as Cinco de Mayo and Black History Month celebrations, offer cultural and educational experiences for students. According to President Rice, “We are proud that students have an opportunity to thrive in a diverse environment that provides them with rich experiences that will be helpful when they transition into the workplace.”  ~ Robyn Hankerson

to a panel of potential investors and successful entrepreneurs can seem intimidating, but it was no feat for James Shannon ’20, a baking & pastry major competing in the annual SharkFest. Shannon joined two other contestants to showcase his Breaking Bread Co. for the chance to win a $500 grand prize. “SharkFest was one of the scariest James Shannon ’20 yet thrilling things I have done,” said Shannon. “Preparing for it took a ton of hard work, determination, practice and going to the e-lab for assistance.” Shannon’s company promises a return to refined minimalism by harkening back to the basics: baking by using traditional flavors and decorations. Shannon beat out a couple of other great ideas, including Jasmine Williams’ app to enable students to apply for multiple scholarships via a centralized portal. He hopes to use the seed money from his win at SharkFest to promote his products at farmer’s markets and other events, and to complete the necessary legal verification for his business.  ~ Robyn Hankerson

MBA AND CULINARY NUTRITION AMONG NEW PROGRAMS TO LAUNCH FALL 2017 NORTH MIAMI CONTINUES to expand its portfolio, launching

four new programs this fall. Among them, the campus will introduce graduate programs and the School of Engineering & Design. “We are excited to welcome these new programs and offer more opportunities for new and returning students to matriculate at JWU,” says Michelle Garcia, Ed.D., North Miami dean of academics. New majors include a Master of Business Administration with optional concentrations in Hospitality, Finance, Human Resource Management, Nonprofit Management, and Operations and Supply Chain Management, in addition to a Bachelor of Science degree in Culinary Nutrition. In addition, students will be able to obtain a bachelor’s degree in Food & Beverage Entrepreneurship and Culinary Arts. The campus is preparing to launch a bachelor’s degree in Software Engineering, which will be available to students in fall 2018.  ~ Robyn Hankerson

www.jwu.edu

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CAMPUS NEWS MEDICAL AND DENTAL STUDENTS PIONEER CULINARY MEDICINE COURSE

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hat do doctors, dentists and chefs have in common? No, this isn’t your run-of-the mill cocktail party joke. The common denominator between the three disciplines is that healthy eating sustains healthy bodies and minds. Thanks to a program funded by Delta Dental of Colorado to support interprofessional education among health professionals, medical and dental students from the University of Colorado joined Johnson & Wales University’s Culinary Nutrition chefs and faculty for a revolutionary eight-week Culinary Medicine course. “Culinary Medicine provides the opportunity for substantive change in the way medicine, dental health and the culinary arts are practiced in the United States,” said Marleen Swanson, Denver Campus culinary nutrition chair. Held at JWU Denver’s Center for Culinary Nutrition, future physicians and dentists are presented with case studies to provide a stronger foundation to counsel patients on health. The real fun begins when students create meals to support their learning — from healthy breakfasts and lunches to smoothies. Culinary Nutrition students and faculty are integrated in the course to demonstrate proper knife skills and share their expertise of nutrition. “Their future patients will ask them a lot of questions about diet and they just don’t get a lot of training on it,” said Michele Doucette, Ph.D.,

Medical, dental and culinary nutrition students showcase healthful dishes created in the Culinary Medicine course.

assistant dean of curriculum for University of Colorado’s School of Medicine. “A class like this is invaluable.” The Culinary Medicine course is modeled after curriculum established in 2012 by Tulane University School of Medicine and JWU’s Providence Campus. The program in Denver, however, is the first in the country where dental students receive this level of culinary nutrition. “What you eat has such an impact on your oral health, and oral health impacts your overall health,” said second-year dental student Gabriela Andrade. With an affinity for cooking, Andrade said she is excited to help patients understand the connection between good oral hygiene and healthy eating.  ~ Holli Keyser

GROWING MBA PROGRAM WELCOMES NEW ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SINCE ITS INCEPTION in 2014, Denver’s

18-month MBA program has been on the accelerated track. Administrators recently brought on Assistant Professor David Hood ’07, ’08 MBA, from the Providence Campus to support the rapidly expanding program, which now has four concentrations: Human Resource Management, Operations and Supply Chain Management, Hospitality, Assistant Professor and Nonprofit Management. David Hood “As you grow into your future career, you will see that an MBA not only supports lifelong learning: It also gives you the confidence necessary to succeed in everything from interviewing to negotiating your next position,” said Hood. What does Hood like best about teaching in the program? “The students!” he says enthusiastically. Hood is finishing his Ph.D. program this year at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where his dissertation examines how the role of chief of staff affects an organization.  ~ Holli Keyser

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DENVER JOINS NCAA DIVISION III NCAA DIVISION III recently announced its

acceptance of JWU Denver as an exploratory member — a defining moment for the campus’ athletic program. Denver Wildcat Athletics will transition out of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and start working toward NCAA provisional membership for the 2018–19 academic year as a member of the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC). “Our student-athletes, coaches and staff have worked incredibly hard for the opportunity to compete at the NCAA level and we’re honored to be recognized as the newest member of the SCAC,” said Denver Campus President Richard Wiscott, Ph.D. Wildcat Athletics has been growing at the Denver Campus since its doors opened in 2000. The program currently has 13 teams and approximately 160 student-athletes. In 2018–19, JWU Denver will add men’s and women’s golf teams. ~ Holli Keyser


THE MUTUAL BENEFITS OF SEEM MENTORSHIPS NATHAN GRUBIN is a first year Sports,

From “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice” by Peter Reinhart*

ON THE RISE “ON THE RISE: THE FUTURE OF BREAD,”

JWU’s first International Bread Symposium, occurred at the Charlotte Campus May 22–23. The forum united influential scholars, authors, agriculturists, historians, media, millers and bakers from across the U.S. and Europe. The symposium was moderated by Johnson & Wales faculty member and noted author Peter Reinhart, who wrote “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice” and 10 other books on bread. “My goal was to provide a collegial environment in which to explore a very controversial (due to the increase in gluten sensitivity and purported wheat allergies) yet beloved subject,” Reinhart said. “We heard about consumer trends, advances in technology and technique, as well as socioeconomic factors that are shaping the business of bread, both now and in the future.” Speakers comprised a who’s-who of the bread world, including Chad Robertson of Tartine Bakery; Francisco Migoya from Food Lab and co-author of “Modernist Bread”; Glenn Roberts, founder of Anson Mills; and William Rubel, noted author and bread historian, along with many other distinguished professionals.   ~ Melinda Law

Entertainment, Event — Management (SEEM) student nearly 2,400 miles from his California home, so he didn’t think twice about applying for a new mentorship program that would get him out of the classroom and, in his case, on the diamond. “It’s a way to get to know the city and meet people,” Grubin says. “My first meeting was a tour of the BB&T Ballpark and I saw L-R: Matt Millward with Nathan Grubin ’20 the press box with its incredible view. Not many people can say they were right on the field!” School of Hospitality Assistant Professor Pat Stack and Associate Professor and SEEM Program Director Jeff Longo created AdviSEE. AdviSEE matches students with mentors who represent businesses including the Carolina Panthers, Charlotte Hornets, NASCAR and The Coca-Cola Company. Matt Millward, Grubin’s mentor and the director of ticket sales and operations for the Charlotte Knights, says he is getting a unique perspective. “This is good for both of us. I’m interested in seeing Nathan’s viewpoint and gathering ideas from a millennial while he’s learning ticket sales and promotions. It’s great to get perspective from someone who wants to be in the industry versus information from a fan survey.” “I am learning from someone in the business as opposed to doing concessions or working in the fan shop,” says Grubin. “I can do this for all four years and learn every aspect of the industry.” ~ ML

LABELS ARE FOR SOUP CANS JEREMIAH MOTTA ’20 says he has been labeled for most of his

life. “I’m mixed. I’ve been told I’m not black enough or that I’m not really Spanish because I don’t speak the language. Writing it down is like releasing it.” Motta and others were encouraged to write about their experiences — whether their label was positive or negative — during the “Labels Are for Soup Cans” event. The labels were then placed on bulletin boards throughout campus during February, which is Black History Month. Students were also invited to a seminar called “Woke: Bringing Awareness to Black History and Culture.” Guest panelists, including College of Culinary Arts Instructor Quientina Stewart and Queens University Graduate Assistant for Diversity, Inclusion, & Community Engagement Hillman Evans IV, discussed topics such as “What is Black: The American Dream — Injustice and Africans in the Diaspora.” “Dialogue such as this will bring a huge impact to the JWU community along with the Charlotte community,” said Evans. “These events are the starting points to creating change.” Kayla Greene

’18, Student Government Association Senator, said, “During the Woke event I learned that students want to have those difficult conversations; however, there isn’t a proper setting for this to happen. The theme “Woke” (rather than “Broken”) was chosen to wake up our community into seeing what’s going on around us. Many times on campus we get distracted from the outside world. It’s amazing the amount of conversations that have been created here; I can’t wait to see what’s in store.” ~ ML

*Reprinted with permission from “The Bread Baker’s Apprentice”, 15th Anniversary Edition, © 2016 by Peter Reinhart. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. Photography © 2001 Ron Manville

www.jwu.edu

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ATHLETICS

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Most Valuable Coach BY BILL KOCH

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Wrestling Coach Lonnie Morris has gone the distance for two decades. The result? He’s a four-time NCAA Regional Coach of the Year, his team finished fourth at the NCAA Championships and he’s a father figure to many student-athletes.

ONNIE MORRIS remembers the days when his Johnson & Wales wrestling team would barely make it to lunchtime at major tournaments. The Wildcats’ coach celebrated 20 years at the helm this past winter, having served as the program’s founder and primary driver since 1997. His first team had just four wrestlers on its roster, and matching up with the likes of New York powers Ithaca College and Cortland State was nothing but some farfetched proposition. “You have to imagine it in order to put all of yourself into something like this,” Morris said. “You’ve got to have a vision. You’ve got to believe it can happen. If not, it’s very hard.” Fast-forward a generation to a winter afternoon at in-state rival Roger Williams University. Morris is cradling the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Northeast Regional Coach of the Year plaque, his fourth in what has developed into a Hall of Fame career. His seniors have a tight grip on the program’s second team title trophy, and five wrestlers are bound for the NCAA Championships (where they will finish in fourth place) after reaching the finals in their respective weight classes. Four of them wear gold medals — two, Bobby Jordan ’18 and Stephen Jarrell ’16, ’17 MBA, have reached the pinnacle for the second time. How does something like this happen? How can one person make a difference in the lives of so many? How is one coach able to help change the face of an institution famous for its culinary programs to a genuine athletic force across so many sports? The answers lie somewhere in Coventry, Rhode Island, a town caught between urban sprawl and suburban solitude, where Morris grew up in the 1980s. The high school’s wrestling program won or shared a state record 17 Rhode Island Interscholastic League titles from 1982 to 1998, and Morris was an integral part of the dynasty during his career with the

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Oakers. The lessons he learned under legendary coach Dick Magarian still help shape his philosophy today, from the techniques Morris teaches to the crisp suits he wears every time the Wildcats compete. “When you’re competing it’s a celebration of all your hard work during the week,” Morris said. “You dress up for it. It’s not jeans and a hat or sweats. You’ll never see a basketball coach in sweats.” Morris was a two-time New England champion and an All-American at Rhode Island College in the early 1990s, extending his dominance to the college mat. Without intending to, he’d also started mentoring younger wrestlers. Kevin Hennessey — another former Coventry star and five-time Rhode Island championship coach with private-school powerhouse Bishop Hendricken High School — remembers Morris giving him a ride home from a wrestling banquet while he was just an impressionable teenager. “That whole summer we trained together,” Hennessey said. “He coached me my senior year at Coventry and since then we’ve been best friends.” That’s the common refrain heard from current members of the JWU squad. Jarrell developed from freshman afterthought to regional champion at 174 pounds as a junior and 165 pounds as a senior. He credits Morris with keeping his interest during those initial practice sessions where Jarrell knew he had no chance of cracking the Wildcats’ starting lineup. “One of the best things about Coach Morris is how much he cares about every individual on the team,” Jarrell said. “Whether you’re the starter or the third-string guy, he’s not showing any favoritism. He pours his heart out for the sport. He’ll do anything for any kid.” The depth of those connections is evident on the JWU staff. Associate Head Coach Brian Allen came on board in 1999, a former college teammate with the Rhode Island College Anchormen. Assistant Coach James


Gilbert was the Wildcats’ first All-American in any sport, a New Hampshire native recruited by Morris who took the short journey south for college and never left after graduating in 2002. “I knew at an early age that I couldn’t micromanage,” Morris said. “The recruiting was paramount; I had to get on the road. I also had to get someone in here I could trust. I could leave the guys with them and there was no issue.” What Morris finds while traveling is an ever-growing welcoming party he dubbed “JWU Nation.” The many graduates of the school’s trademark culinary and hospitality programs are often the folks feeding and hosting Morris and the Wildcats while attending dual meets and tournaments. He’s certain to keep some school-issued gear at the ready when such instances occur. “We truly have become JWU Nation,” Morris said. “Everywhere we go, to a restaurant or a hotel, they’ll say, ‘You guys are the wrestling team? I’m an alum.’ And we’ll give them a T-shirt.” A longtime teacher and administrator in the same Coventry school system that educated him, Morris has been a full-time coach for the past two seasons. He’s better able to dictate a schedule that includes quality time with his family — his wife, Katherine, daughters Cortney and Taylor, and son Jack are a steady presence in the bleachers. They’re also included in the frequent photographs Morris likes to pose for after meets, group shots that include wrestlers, coaches and parents alike. “That’s coach’s No. 1 thing — to be together,” said junior Jonah Aurelio, JWU’s starting 285-pounder. “He always says, ‘This is the one moment. You’ll never forget it.’ He always wants to take pictures. After a match he wants to go out to eat or do something fun. He just wants to build the team relationship.” Those team dinners come much later in the day than lunch, the time where Morris and his wrestlers used to make the drive back to campus with little to show for hard weeks and months of training. The current Wildcats tend to stay longer than most of their opponents, with the spoils of victory and podium pictures taking up a few extra minutes. Such was the case on that winter afternoon at Roger Williams, the latest in an ever-growing list of triumphs. “Some things are priceless,” Morris said. “Days like today make it priceless.” PHOTOS: [1] L–R: Bobby Jordan ’18, Head Coach Lonnie Morris, Associate Head Coach Brian Allen [2] L–R: Associate Head Coach Brian Allen, Head Coach Lonnie Morris with their National Coach of the Year awards [3] L–R: The team with the fourth-place trophy from the NCAA Championships [4] Jay Albis ’19 (in blue)

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contributors Denise Dowling Sam Eifling Andrea Feldman Melinda Hill Amanda Houpt Rachel Lacaille Damaris R. Teixeira photography Mike Cohea Karli Evans Greg Hren Evan Hurd Chris Savas


S U C C E S

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“You can’t get complacent. You have to be daring and willing to do something that people don’t expect.”

Kristin Coia ’94

B.S. Hospitality Management Founder and CEO, Go Gently Inc. Manhattan Beach, California

Kristin Coia ’94 is that rare sort who studies hospitality, grows up working in her family’s heating oil business, and goes on to launch a clothing brand using her own designs. “Fashion was always my thing,” she says. “My parents pull out the yearbook, I was voted ‘Best Dressed’ every year in high school.” Only since last summer, though, could a high schooler actually get those designs. After a decade operating as Go Gently Baby, which sells kids’ clothing in some 200 mostly boutique retailers, Coia rebranded the business as Go Gently Nation and began offering clothing for adult women. It was a huge leap for a small company, but Coia saw it as a necessary risk. “Fashion is a very, very hard business,” she says. “You can’t get complacent. You have to be daring and willing to do something that people don’t expect.”

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Years ago, Coia’s boldest move was to edge out of event planning into night school and design studios to formally train as a designer. Entrepreneurship and business always fascinated her — while at Johnson & Wales, she’d commute to punch in at the oil business her grandfather founded — and when she saw a niche for sustainably sourced, highquality baby clothes, she sprang. Coia launched Go Gently Baby when her firstborn was all of three months old. (On starting a company the same year you have a kid, she advises, simply, “Don’t do it.”) A decade in, the second jump was daunting, but made with the confidence of having loyal customers who recognize the durability of her Los Angeles-made garments. Baby clothes are a highly intense sector of fashion, Coia says: Designs must account for a huge range of sizes, including whether the wearer is still rocking diapers. But hook a parent who buys clothes for their infant and they’ll return throughout a kid’s childhood. Years later, as they see the clothes endure, parents will associate the brand with quality and longevity. That’s the plan, anyway. So far the gradual, sustainable approach is working for the vegan mother of two. “In the last 20 years, fast fashion has become the culture of cheap fashion,” Coia says. “That has become more of the American way, but it never used to be.” The return to buying fewer, better-quality garments, she adds, “has been a slow movement, but people want less. They want minimalism.” Count one advantage, at least, to remaining steady and predictable in an industry predicated on change.


“I’d go through the doors and there was this group of profane pirates working with fire.”

David Kinch ’81, ’14 Hon.


A.S. Culinary Arts Chef and Partner, Manresa, Manresa Bread, The Bywater
 Los Gatos, California

David Kinch’s restaurant Manresa has often been described as the epitome of California cuisine — but that’s not the whole story. Manresa is indeed a temple of sun-kissed produce, fresh seafood and the kind of hyper-locality that East Coast restaurants can only dream of. But Kinch’s culinary influences defy borders. Perhaps no single influence is as strong as that of New Orleans, where Kinch ’81, ’14 Hon. grew up. Transfixed by the city’s deep food culture, he naturally gravitated to restaurant work: “I started out in the dining room, but found myself fascinated by what was going on in the kitchen — I’d go through the doors and there was this group of profane pirates working with fire.” From there, JWU was a natural progression: “To be a well-rounded chef, I’d need an understanding of the financial realities and JWU had a good foundation in place.” After graduating, Kinch spent 15 years cooking all over the world, with stints in New York City (including five years at Barry Wine’s iconic Quilted Giraffe), France, Japan, San Francisco, Germany and Spain. As he puts it, “I regarded staging as finishing school. My goal was to work in the best kitchens I could find.” In 1993, he settled in San Francisco and worked on opening his own restaurant. Debuting in 1995, Sent Sovi had 30 seats and “a kitchen the size of a broom closet.” While the food that emerged from that tiny kitchen put Kinch on the culinary map, he and his staff quickly outgrew the space. In 2002, he opened Manresa to unanimous accolades. In 2014, a two-alarm fire ripped through Manresa. While the restaurant was being rebuilt, Kinch and his team subverted what could have been a devastating blow by rethinking the menu, beverage program and overall customer experience from the ground up. The San Francisco

Chronicle called the revamped restaurant “even better than before”; Kinch showcased this creative rebirth in the PBS series “Mind of a Chef.” In 2016, Kinch opened The Bywater, an elegant tribute to his New Orleans roots, and Manresa earned a coveted third Michelin star. As the restaurant turns 15, Kinch is juggling multiple projects, including expanding Manresa Bread and conceptualizing a new endeavor. Through it all, he maintains a surfer’s belief in balance: “I understand going full speed and being passionate. But at a certain point you realize it’s not about working longer, it’s about working smarter.”

www.jwu.edu

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“I knew I could save the restaurant $15,000 a year with a platform like this.”

Matt Tortora ’15

A.S. Culinary Arts ’13 B.S. in Food Service Management with a concentration in Entrepreneurship ’15 CEO and Cofounder, Crave Food Services North Kingstown, Rhode Island

Oprah would call it an “Aha!” moment. While working as kitchen manager at an Ocean State restaurant, Matt Tortora ’15 opened a box of locally-caught squid with a “processed in China” label. A veteran naval nuclear missile technician who has seen combat, Tortora relishes a challenge. After investigating, he discovered that it is cheaper for the distributer to have the squid processed in Asia than somewhere closer. Tortora knew the time it took searching for ingredients added significantly to a restaurant’s cost and thought technology could whittle both time and expense, as well as help producers market their goods. “I knew I could save the restaurant $15,000 a year with a platform like this so I ran with it,” he says. After incorporating Crave Food Services as a technology and consulting company, Tortora brought his idea to Johnson & Wales University’s Larry Friedman International Center for Entrepreneurship, where he sought the advice of Executive-in-Residence John Robitaille. “He encouraged me to move forward with the initial idea and later helped me to understand which pivots I was making were the right ones. He confirmed that where I was wanting to take things made sense to him.” At JWU’s SharkFest competition in spring 2015, Tortora and his team launched WhatsGood, their free online platform that brings local ingredients to restaurants, schools, hospitals and businesses by connecting food service workers and chefs directly to local producers. With more than $1 million in seed financing, the app now connects 600 chefs and

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other buyers (including nearly 3,000 public schools and 50 hospitals) with about 500 local producers in 27 states. The company has also started writing grants for public schools to win funding for federal USDA grants or private grants for farm-to-school endeavors that would improve the quality of school food. “Before this venture, my life had taken unexpected 90-degree turns following where I saw opportunity or danger, so that became what I was used to,” says Tortora. “When I was looking at whether I should move forward on this concept, I thought ‘Why not?’ ”


“I try to create trends rather than keep up with them.”

Brad Kilgore ’06

B.S. Culinary Arts Chef and Owner, Alter Culinary Director, the Adrienne Arsht Center (Brava by Brad Kilgore) Miami, Florida

“I try to create trends rather than keep up with them,” says Brad Kilgore ’06. “One thing that has helped me accelerate my career is my creative outlook on cuisine and restaurants — ingenuity is what drives me. But it has to taste good; I always say, ‘delicious first, everything else second.’ ” This sensitivity and ability to stay ahead of the game has allowed Kilgore to live outside the lines where he’s able to create what he calls “food with no boundaries.” His hard work at Alter and Brava, his two

Miami restaurants, is certainly pushing him to the top. He recently received a semifinalist nod for the Rising Star Chef of the Year award from the James Beard Foundation. Last year he was named Best New Chef in America by Food & Wine magazine. At 30 years old, Kilgore is a veteran in the kitchen — he got his start as a dishwasher at a diner when he was only 11 years old. From there he was hooked, taking on jobs at many different kitchens, including fast-food restaurants. But it wasn’t until high school — at the Broadmoor Technical Center in Kansas City under chef and mentor Bob Brassard — that he fell in love with the industry. “It was an accelerated culinary program that was recognized as one of the best in the country,” he recalls. “I learned a lot and it’s where I got the itch for fine dining and becoming a chef.” Over the years, Kilgore has carved a place in the world of progressive American cuisine. “I want the food to stand out on its own and be something new and creative, fair-priced and purchased from quality local sources,” he adds. Looking forward, Kilgore envisions expansion. “I definitely want to be a restaurateur,” he says. “There are a lot of different types of cuisine that I’d like to cook. As a chef, you never stop learning. The sky’s the limit and there’s certainly room to grow.”

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“It’s kind of hard to hold bias once you meet people and break bread with them.”

Kristin Lamoureux ’97

B.S. Travel Tourism Management Associate Dean and Clinical Associate Professor Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism New York University New York, New York

Kristin Lamoureux ’97 was bitten by the travel bug during a high school exchange program in Ecuador, where she discovered her love of travel, cultures and communities beyond the U.S. The Ecuadorian adventure also steered her future education and career in the direction of sustainable tourism and international economic development. After graduating from Johnson & Wales, Lamoureux earned her master’s degree and Ph.D. from George Washington University (GW), where she also launched her academic career as an assistant research professor of tourism and business management. She later became the executive director of GW’s International Institute of Tourism Studies. The role propelled her into global travel with her students, teaching them in communities around the world. “I’ve never had the traditional academic career where I’m in the classroom,” says Lamoureux. “I’ve worked in or been involved with any number of 50-plus countries. A lot of it has been at the very local level — working in communities, helping them identify what they have to offer with regard to tourism and how can they do this sustainably. I think that traveling, especially now-a-days, is so important as we learn about other cultures and people. It’s kind of hard to hold bias once you meet people and break bread with them.”

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After 14 years at GW, in early 2016, Lamoureux became associate dean at New York University’s Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism. NYU has campuses and academic centers on seven continents, offering a choice platform for Lamoureux’s talents. “I’m working on developing activities at our campuses in Shanghai, Tokyo and other places, so that’s really interesting right now — bringing the NYU-applied education model to our other places around the world.” Back when she was a student at JWU, Lamoureux worked as a teaching assistant to help fund her education. That experience ended up being ideal training for her academic career. “Having the responsibility of overseeing other students was challenging,” she recalls. “It was my first experience managing people. Looking back, I made a lot of mistakes but I also learned a lot, and what better environment to do that?”


Bob Benson ’97

B.S. Culinary Arts and Foodservice Management Business Development and Brand Management Consultant, Moceri Produce Owner, BioSystemic Consulting San Diego, California

In any industry there are big-picture people. In food, Bob Benson ’97 goes a step further — he’s what you’d call a whole-picture guy. As a consultant for companies in the hospitality industry, he drills into the interconnectedness of supply chains and their effects on the planet to help companies operate sustainably, as well as profitably. And in his work in business development and brand management for a San Diego produce company, he makes sure he knows the local farms he works with down to the grittiest detail. “I know the dirt that our produce is coming from,” he says. “I know what it smells like when it’s wet, when it’s dry. I’m a little OCD about it. When our kids at home open the fridge they can tell you where all that food came from.”

Food was always his way into exploring the natural world. His parents owned French restaurants in Manhattan, and the romance of eating followed practicality. He grew up hunting and fishing in upstate New York; one summer, a visit to an uncle in France brought a lesson in butchering that began by them shooting a cow with a .38. Later, after graduating from Johnson & Wales, he did a two-month stint on the killing floor of a slaughterhouse. Today he has vaulted from his chef’s training to take the long view of health, both of humans and the planet. Now he helps businesses — and the U.S. military — examine the wider scope of their effects on natural systems and bolster the overall health of food systems. In his spare time, as a judge for the Biomimicry Global Design Challenge, he’s trying to identify sustainability innovations for a world that’s striving to feed 7.4 billion people. “There is a giant responsibility in food service to find solutions to many problems,” he says. “It’s about water, it’s about resources. I’m not a doom-and-gloom guy, but I’m no-nonsense.” Yet this deep immersion into the practical hasn’t dulled his romance for food. He says with a hint of pride that he has been turning dishwashers into cooks for 20 years, and when he lets himself get carried away with his love of restaurant work, it’s easy to see why. “What other profession allows you to take a raw product through the back door — something that’s still alive! — that you handle, assemble and build in the same day?” he says. “What other profession lets you create something from nothing that sustains people, that gives them life?

Location courtesy of Go Green Agriculture, Encinas, California

“There is a giant responsibility in food service to find solutions to many problems.”

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Like most college students, Brown didn’t start out seeking to close billion-dollar contracts.

Karoom Brown ’00

B.S. Electronics Engineering Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development, Leidos Washington, D.C. Metro Area

Karoom Brown ’00 talks about billion-dollar contracts without batting an eye. As the senior vice president of strategy and business development at Leidos Health, he handles marketing, strategy, sales and business development for the health division of the largest federal IT service provider in the world. Like most college students, Brown didn’t start out seeking to close billion-dollar contracts with government agencies and Fortune 500 companies: “When I entered college, I thought I wanted to develop chip-level computer designs and things of that nature.” After doing an internship, Brown realized he’d rather focus on customers than computers. After graduating, he became a sales engineer before working his way up through sales management. His “passion to always excel and exceed objectives” led him to the world of large contracts.

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Despite his success, Brown initially struggled to maintain a strong GPA. The first of his 10 brothers and sisters to graduate from college, he held a job with Lucent Technologies while an undergraduate. “In order for me to be able to work full time at Lucent and finish my degree on time, the professors and the school had to offer extra tutoring and flexible classes,” he says. By leaning into the support of his professors and determinedly studying, he turned his GPA around. After graduating, he pursued a Master of Science in Information Systems Management from New York University’s Tandem School of Engineering, where he graduated valedictorian. He attributes much of his success to the practical experiences gained while at Johnson & Wales: “Part of my success was that I graduated with experience and a degree, which was not normal.” But it was alluring to employers; upon graduating, Brown accepted a position at Verizon that launched his career. Now, having worked his way to the top of his field, Brown values giving back. He volunteers with the National Institutes of Health Children’s Inn, which houses and supports families participating in research studies. In addition, he serves on the board of directors of the Paralyzed Veterans of America and frequently returns to JWU as a motivational speaker.


“I enjoy broadening people’s horizons beyond what they thought was possible.”

Rob Erskine ’12

Graphic Design & Digital Media Senior Creative Technologist, Hill Holliday Boston, Massachusetts

People often find inspiration in unlikely places — for Rob Erskine ’12, it was the consequence of a childhood injury. “I broke my arm when I was a kid,” he says. “That meant I couldn’t take gym class, so I spent that time in the library. I ended up falling in love with computers.” The 25-year-old Somers Point, New Jersey, native parlayed that passion into what has already become a storied career: He’s a senior creative technologist at Hill Holliday, the 18th largest ad agency in the United States, in their Boston office. Ask him about his job description and he will tell you that it’s “intentionally ambiguous”: “I’m a developer, and work on websites, APIs [application programming interfaces] and chatbots [think Amazon Echo’s Alexa]. But I’m also a liaison between the creative teams. A lot of my job involves bridging gaps.” Unlike other ad-agency creatives, he doesn’t handle a set list of clients; instead, he goes where his skills are needed. “That’s one of my favorite parts of the job — interacting with different clients. I enjoy broadening people’s horizons beyond what they thought was possible.” A key internship during his sophomore summer helped solidify his career trajectory. “I applied to Hill Holliday for an internship, but didn’t get it. Instead, I ended up at 38 Studios,” Erskine says. The now-defunct video game developer in Providence was so impressed with Erskine that they offered him a full-time temp job as a front-end developer after he

completed his internship — and while he was still a full-time student. But everything came full circle: “A week before 38 Studios closed, I interviewed at Hill Holliday again, this time for a job. They called me with an offer on my drive home. Four years later, here I am.” Erskine acknowledges his education as a driving force in helping him attain success so early in his career — specifically, his time on JWU’s award-winning student Ad Team. “The first year I was involved, I was a designer; the second year, I was art director,” he says. Being art director meant he was in charge of the all-important plans book for that year’s client, Nissan. The result? “We won best plans book in the country. That’s when I really started to understand what it takes to make the best work possible.”

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Virginia Philip ’89

A.S. Hospitality Management ’87 B.S. Hotel and Restaurant Management ’89, Hon. ’15 Wine Director and Master Sommelier, the Breakers Palm Beach Owner and CEO, the Virginia Philip Wine Shop and Academy Palm Beach, Florida

The road to becoming a Master Sommelier is paved with grueling exams that few pass. However, Virginia Philip ’89 is a game changer. The 11th woman in the world to earn the title of Master Sommelier, she’s broken ground in a male-dominated industry. “A lot of us were pioneers in our industry at the time,” she recalls. “It could be very intimidating and a little bit overwhelming at times.” She persevered: “I always tell people, ‘They were looking for the best possible person for the job and I was it.’ ” One can find proof of this in her many accolades: being crowned Best Sommelier in the United States by the renowned American

Sommelier group a mere three weeks after her final exam; getting a James Beard Foundation nomination for Outstanding Wine & Spirits Professional in 2012; and receiving an honorary doctorate in Oenology from Johnson & Wales in 2015. She had a taste for grapes from childhood memories of sipping her father’s wine mixed with water, and a wine class at JWU furthered her interest. After graduating, she worked in restaurants and set her eyes on the Master Sommelier certification. For the past 15 years, she has been the wine director and master Sommelier at the Breakers Palm Beach. There, she creates a dozen wine lists for the Breakers’ eight restaurants and draws from a selection of more than 2,000 wines. However, her most exciting venture yet is opening the Virginia Philip Wine Shop and Academy in 2011. A dream 20 years in the making, her shop features a selection of more than 650 wines arrayed around a large classroom space. “I believe in giving back,” she notes. “So having a classroom where sommeliers can meet and taste wine is a great benefit to those trying to succeed in the program, even if they don’t want to go all the way to MS level.” Between the Breakers and her wine shop, she stays busy. If you manage to find her home at the end of a summer day, she’ll likely be sitting outside sipping a glass of dry rosé, though she’ll settle for whatever is in the fridge. One thing is certain: If Philip picked it, it’s bound to be delicious.

Philip is the 11th woman in the world to earn the title of Master Sommelier.


“It feels very good to be doing things for ourselves on our own terms.”

José Mendín ’01

B.S. Culinary Arts Founding Partner and Chef, The Pubbelly Group Miami, Florida

José Mendín’s world is fast-paced. And that’s just how he likes it. “This business is always changing — it’s incredible,” he says. As founding partner and chef for The Pubbelly Group in Miami, Florida, Mendín ’01 oversees concept and menu development for 10 restaurants (the newest just launched this spring in his native Puerto Rico) and a bar/lounge concept. “When I think about where we started and where we are today, wow — a lot has changed! But one thing that never changes is flavor — that’s something that people are always going to look for,” he says. Mendín’s flavor, powered by his earnest work ethic, has earned him national recognition from Food & Wine, Travel + Leisure, Departures and The Cooking Channel, among other outlets. He’s also been a semifinalist

for the James Beard Foundation’s “Best Chef South” for five consecutive years, from 2011–2016. While Mendín and The Pubbelly Group have turned Miami into a haven for lovers of cuisine celebrating his Latin American and Asian influences, the team hasn’t stopped there. In 2015, Mendín’s cooking brought him to Germany, where he set out to curate a new restaurant concept, Food Republic, aboard Norwegian Cruise Line’s Escape. He’s even published a digital cookbook, “Food Republic by José Mendín,” in collaboration with the cruise line. But it’s his latest concept, PB Ysla, that has brought him full-circle — he gets to cook in Puerto Rico. “We’re very excited to open a restaurant in Puerto Rico,” Mendín says, adding that he left the island in 1998 to enroll at JWU and never looked back. “The concept for PB Ysla is similar to the original Pubbelly, but in a very casual setting. It’ll be a place where I’ll be able to prepare what I want to cook, with influences from the island and local ingredients.” The secret to Mendín’s success? “You have to lead. You have to be part of a team that’s working together toward a goal. My aim is to lead my staff toward consistency by providing a high-quality product and great service. And it feels very good to be doing things for ourselves on our own terms.”

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“What I have learned in marketing is that we are all one person with many personas.”

Bill Linehan ’87

A.S. Hotel and Restaurant Management ’85 B.S. Hospitality Management ’87 Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer Red Lion Hotels Corporation Greater Atlanta Area

“The highlights of my career have all been around applying innovation with relevance,” says Bill Linehan ’87. This is evident in the latest concept he has created, Hotel RL. Gone are front desks with staff standing behind intimidating counters. Instead, they greet guests promptly and personally while checking them in on iPads. The lobby is a communal space where people can work while sipping craft coffee or gather to watch live performances on a stage. “What I have learned in marketing over the years is that we are all one person with many personas,” Linehan says. “And based on our reason for travel, we will evoke that particular persona.” He strives to create

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satisfying experiences for each traveler and harness the proximity of hotels to cities and nature. “We’re selling real estate one night at a time.” Linehan realized his passion for hospitality and marketing in high school, when he joined the Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA), an organization that prepares students for careers in marketing, finance, hospitality and management. While attending meetings, he stayed in many hotels, which cemented his interest in the industry. His involvement drew attention from Johnson & Wales, which offered him a scholarship to study hospitality management. However, when asked about the best thing he gained from JWU, he’ll tell you it was the relationships: “I met my wife!” They’ve been married for 27 years. Will, the oldest of their three kids, currently attends the Charlotte Campus. After graduating, he joined a manager training program with Hyatt. Over the course of his prestigious career, he has worked in senior leadership positions at Starwood Hotels and Resorts, InterContinental Hotel Group and Richfield Hospitality, among others. Linehan draws inspiration from the long runs he takes during business travel. He once rose early to run along the Great Wall of China. While jogging, he has also explored Lake Geneva, the River Thames, Paris, and the Bund in Shanghai. Feet to pavement, breathing in the local air, it’s easy to imagine him admiring the scenery and forming his next big idea.


“Smile, breathe, listen.”

Sharon Eliatamby ’91 B.S. Hospitality Management Senior Project Manager The World Bank Group Washington, D.C.

Sharon Eliatamby ’91 speaks five languages and samples dishes few besides Anthony Bourdain would dare (such as a Chinese specialty called cobra bite chicken). As a child traveling the world with her parents, she was awed by the friendly hospitality staff they’d encounter and liked to imagine herself as a restaurant manager tending to everyone’s needs. The hospitality niche was confirmed when Eliatamby worked as a banquet server at Shangri-La Hotel in her native Malaysia at age 16. “I loved the opportunity to meet and work with people from all walks of life,” she says. “If you can solve a problem or make a person really happy that day, you know you’ve accomplished something.” Now senior project manager at The World Bank Group, Eliatamby oversees the management of food, conference and hoteling services contracts. The scope of the food service operation is approximately $15 million a year in facilities consisting of five cafeterias, four coffee bars, one retail store, one executive dining room plus 11 private dining rooms and a conference facility in Paris. After a decade at The World Bank, she is proudest of implementing a composting program early in her tenure. Food and containers were composted, then dehydrated into dirt and shipped to a farm where it was transformed into mulch. “Now the whole idea of being green is more common, but back then it was less so,” she notes. “Given the volume of food here it was a big undertaking.” Another proud moment was winning the “best menu concept” category from Food Management magazine. “We serve more than 180 countries so it really encouraged what we do,” Eliatamby notes. “We have a robust children’s menu with curries and such — it’s not pizza and tater tots.” Eliatamby’s mantra is “smile, breathe, listen.” She strives to surround herself with positive people: “If I have the Debbie Downers, I am not going to get things done. I have an open door where anyone can enter;

I keep a huge martini glass filled with candy for everyone but me. It’s how I can get the ins and outs of what is going on!” Although she calls herself a true people person, moving to the U.S. by herself to study at Johnson & Wales was a challenge. “I knew that things were not going to fall into my lap here and I couldn’t rely on other people,” she recalls. But she never doubted her choice and even remains in touch with now-retired Professor Jann Douglas Bell. “She instructed us on the importance of being flexible, thinking on your feet and being a go-getter,” says Eliatamby. “She also taught us to own up to our mistakes and fix them. She really inspired me to be where I am today.”

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The

D

PO L E

STO COOKBO

By Mark Ladner ’90

WHEN DEL POSTO OPENED MORE THAN A DECADE AGO, I had no idea that we might be able to create a new style of sophisticated Italian-American cuisine. This was never the goal, nor did I think we were capable of such a feat. We have created our own regional Italian cuisine, based on what has been available here, as well as New Yorkers’ expectations. Del Posto had no precedent — an Italian restaurant of its size, level of ambition, and price point had never existed in New York City before. In 2009, I committed us to a very ambitious tasting menu that I referred to as Le Collezione. I invested nine months into planning and plotting the content of this tasting menu. It would prove that we could push ourselves very hard and that we could produce and present an elaborate, nine course menu that involved 126 service implements per diner. We discovered that by really focusing on age-old Italian cooking techniques, we could push boundaries even further. We harnessed a forgotten, traditional technique for vitello tonnato from Lombardy. Rather than relying on mayonnaise in the tuna sauce for the roasted veal, we gently cook veal and tuna together, making a rich sauce from the rendered juices. Then we introduce unusual garnishes — croutons stained black from olives, lime cells and lemon basil together

OK

to simulate an effervescence similar to Sprite soda, and an unknown preserved caper shoot from the small island of Pantelleria. We spiced Long Island duck in the style of a recipe made popular by the school of gourmands, Apicius (documented in the book De re coquinaria from the fifth century), that celebrated the ancient Roman spice trade. The duck is paired with charred celery and Savor, a condiment that was created by our friend and figurehead of contemporary Italian cooking, Massimo Bottura. His distinctive accompaniment, made of quince paste, chestnuts, apples, and pumpkin seeds, is a lovely combination of sweet and savory elements, and a modern foil for ancient duck. Needless to say, it takes a village. Del Posto is a 400-seat restaurant with 200 employees. This book represents our passion for Italian cooking and fine dining. The recipes here are the work of a large team of talented people, all of whom have contributed something to each of these dishes. There is no better way for me to share the true spirit of our recipes than to have you make them at home and learn how to use the techniques we have refined over the years. While the recipes may seem long and intimidating, we have worked tirelessly to cover every detail of their process so that you can successfully make our food in your kitchen.


Opposite page: Photo of Mark Ladner by G. Girlado. Photos and book cover printed with permission of Grand Central Publishing Š2016.

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RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT MICHELLE RUSSO, FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT OF hotelAVE, ESTABLISHES JWU SCHOLARSHIP JUST A FEW BLOCKS from Gaebe Commons, on

Culinary students welcome McCormick & Co. representatives Nicole Bertelli, manager, content & communications, and Bjoern Leyser, vice president, connected consumer & eCommerce.

SPICING UP CULINARY EDUCATION FOR MORE THAN THREE DECADES

I

n the process of developing the Johnson & Wales culinary arts program, forward-thinking faculty members Rene Dionne and Robert Nograd collaborated with then-dean of culinary arts and current Chancellor John J. Bowen ’77, to develop a relationship with McCormick & Co. Dionne, who managed the culinary storeroom when the deal was struck, notes “the program was well designed to be of value to both the company and the university. I’m not surprised that it has prevailed.” Today JWU students continue to benefit from one of the longest lasting partnerships on campus. Each year McCormick & Co. donates all of the spices needed for culinary education across all four campuses — and their commitment doesn’t end there. McCormick & Co. visited the Providence Campus last year to share their flavor forecast with students and faculty, providing direct access to industry leaders. In fact, they sent their senior research chef for culinary nutrition — alumnus and former chef instructor Andreas Pias ’11, CRC. He appreciated the opportunity to return to his alma mater: “Returning to Johnson & Wales means that I get to express my gratitude to the university that opened up the many paths my career could take. Today, with McCormick, I can give back to that university with a relationship of continued student interaction and the best quality spices to equip the future restaurateurs, manufacturers and Research & Development chefs — the future of flavor, really.” “We are grateful that the quality and integrity of their products enable our students to learn about flavors in their truest representation,” added Erik Goellner, MBA, director of culinary purchasing.  ~ Bonnie Duncan and Steven Shipley

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Westminster Street in Providence, Michelle Russo oversees the offices of Hotel Asset Value EnhanceMichelle Russo ment, or hotelAVE, a fast-growing and influential hotel asset management company that she founded in 2013. Russo’s company grew out of her early career on Wall Street, her love of numbers and analytics, and her education in the hospitality industry (Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration). Given her proximity to JWU and her experience in finance and hotel management, it was natural that Karen Silva, Ed.D., chair of the International Hotel School, invite Russo to deliver a Distinguished Visiting Professor presentation, which she did in April 2015. Recently, Russo established the Hotel Asset Value Enhancement Scholarship with a gift of $25,000. Somewhere in between the lecture and the gift, she also became a JWU parent. Silva notes that the DVP presentation connected students to Russo — and she to them. “Michelle Russo is a powerful presence in the hospitality industry and an inspiration to our students,” says Silva. “Her strong background in asset management opened students’ eyes to new opportunities on the business rather than the operations side of hospitality, working with analytics and investment portfolios to improve hotel returns.” Russo welcomes JWU students to intern at hotelAVE and several alumni already work for the company. She’s a great mentor to students, and a great boss because she believes in maximizing client value as well as promoting a positive work environment. She readily admits that staff are her most important asset and uses teamwork to achieve her corporate goals. It’s good that Russo is just a 10-minute walk from campus — she’ll be back.  ~ Randy Rosenthal

Karoom Brown ’00 Establishes Innovation Fund for Engineering and Design NOT ONLY is Karoom Brown ’00 a successful businessman (see his

success profile on Page 18), he also supports the university: He recently pledged $25,000 to launch an innovation fund in the School of Engineering & Design. Dean Frank Tweedie sees the fund as an opportunity to advance new and innovative ideas from students and faculty. “Karoom was an excellent student here during his undergraduate days and has come back to help our faculty and students accomplish their goals and dreams,” he says. “It’s great to have his involvement in our programs.” ~ Bonnie Duncan 


THE JWU FUND: Making a Difference for the Sixth Consecutive Year THE JWU FUND anticipates another successful year

in attracting current-use contributions to the university. Investments in the university through the fund make a difference in meeting a range of priorities across the four campuses, including scholarships, internships and study-abroad support. JWU Fund Director Ann-Marie Reddy explains how giving to the JWU Fund helps accomplish important goals that build a strong university: “Support through the JWU Fund helps us keep our students in school through graduation. We know that students who return for a second year are more likely to complete their degrees. Current-use dollars also encourage growth in athletics on all four campuses. Our athletes and coaches are bringing home conference awards and national accolades. Perhaps most important, these programs unite our whole community whether as athletes or fans.” Alumni have responded to the call to support their alma mater through the JWU Fund. Tracy Keller ’91, CEO of Girl Scouts of Eastern Virginia, has been a continuous donor and is a regular at alumni events in Virginia Beach/Norfolk. Justine Sacks ’09, assistant director of dining services at Columbia University, also contributes to the JWU Fund regularly and is an active participant in the Ad Hoc Alumni Professional Programming Committee. Also giving consistently over the past few years is John Serock ’95, owner and executive chef of Serock Catering, Inc., who donates

because he is passionate about supporting students. Debra Hill ’77, vice president of information technology at Gatehouse Media, regularly attends alumni events and has supported the JWU Fund for many years as well. While all giving to the university is vital, annual alumni participation in giving to the JWU Fund has an additional benefit of enhancing the value of the degree all Johnson & Wales alumni have earned. This is because outside organizations like U.S. News & World Report use the alumni participation rate in their ranking formula. Participating in the JWU Fund can elevate the ranking of Johnson & Wales University among its peer institutions. For a fifth year, the fund launched its “Investing in Our Future: The Faculty & Staff Campaign,” which began July 1, 2016 and ends June 30. Faculty and staff are invited to contribute to a number of JWU Fund initiatives, including athletics, but the majority of faculty and staff donors choose to support scholarships and greatest needs. This year, the campaign seeks to increase participation to 750 faculty and staff donors through direct giving or payroll deductions. “Giving to the JWU Fund really does matter,” notes Samantha HerardBarrette, JWU Fund officer and manager of the Phonathon program. “It’s not too late to join those who have already given or to increase your gift at giving.jwu.edu or by phone at 401-598-2185. The students and faculty who benefit from donations to the JWU Fund are grateful to all those who help sustain this great educational enterprise.” ~ Julia S. Emlen

Why do faculty and staff give back to the university for which they work?

Marketing Coordinator Damaris Teixeira gives because she believes “it’s important for the university community to support students in their time of need.”

College of Arts and Sciences Associate Professor Keith Bowers agrees, noting that giving “is my way of supporting students to make sure they have the best opportunity to succeed.”

Director of Student Involvement & Leadership Kiona Bolton supports the JWU Fund because she “once walked in our students’ shoes and knows the benefits of having someone in my corner.”

Students are aware of the importance of the JWU Fund to their academic success.

“I have been able to do so many things that I would have never thought possible if it weren’t for the contributions of alumni and staff,” says Luis Cervantes ’17, whose major is Culinary Arts and Food Service Management.

“Support for the JWU Fund is important to me because without it, I wouldn’t be able to attend Johnson & Wales,” says Courtney Bynum ’18, who is studying Finance.

Phonathon caller Angelo Lonardo ’17, majoring in Baking & Pastry Arts and Food Service Management, knows that “every donation makes a difference in the lives of students like me.”

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Alumni Reflect on What it Felt Like to be First

19 95

DISTINGUISHED VISITING PROFESSOR

In the mid-90s, there were a tremendous amount of women getting involved in the hospitality industry, both on the restaurant and the hotel side. Smart people in the university’s administration realized that they needed to have more women leaders speak to the students. A third of the student body was women, and Johnson & Wales intelligently saw that female Melinda (Johnson) students were an audience that needed to be addressed. Bush ’93 Hon. in a 1995 photo I was representing the largest publishing company devoted to hotels and the travel industry, and was honored to be a Distinguished Visiting Professor. Johnson & Wales was so progressive, and this was so important for the industry. ~ Melinda (Johnson) Bush ’93 Hon. President and CEO, HRW Holdings/Hospitality Resources Worldwide LLC West Palm Beach, Florida, and New York, New York

19 92

NORTH MIAMI CAMPUS

I chose JWU North Miami because I met three key people when they stayed at the hotel where I bartended and cooked. We got to talking and they mentioned that they were opening a culinary school in the area. Though I had never even thought about attending culinary school, I was very interested and over the next few months, we became great friends. I visited the campus while it was under construction, and when it was done, I was the first in line to attend the new school. My favorite thing about being a student at the new JWU North Miami Campus was the intimate atmosphere. Everyone I went to school with was more mature than most typical college freshmen, as we had been in the food business for some time. All of the faculty were new; the ovens and the pots and the pans were new. I continued my friendship with the senior administrators I met at the hotel and also became good friends with some of the professors. I remember Dean Robert Nograd ’99 Hon. teaching one of my classes and the stories he would tell. He was such an

1960s 28

Spring 2017

1964 first associate degrees 1965 first scholarship recipient 1966 first residence hall

inspiration and had so much knowledge … I am forever grateful that I got to be there when he was alive. I felt like more than just a student; I felt like I had a special part in the beginning of the campus. ~ Tracy (Weston) Pizura ’94 Private Chef and Chef Instructor The Real Food Academy North Miami Beach, Florida

NCAA ATHLETIC CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIP In many ways, my JWU soccer career was less than glamorous: We played on glass-strewn fields and spent countless hours shuttling from site to site for practices and games; we had no home field but we were willing to play anyone, anywhere, anytime. And that attitude paid off because my senior year ended in incredible victory, with us winning the championship — the first Todd Hart ’96 in a yearbook in university history. photo It was our first year in the NCAA-recognized Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC), and most of my teammates were freshmen and sophomores. But on our team, there was no such thing as ‘freshman’ or ‘senior.’ We were 24 guys focused on the same goal. It was a true team … we counted on everyone to play a role. As the goalkeeper and co-captain, I was a bit of a mentor to the younger players and worked hard to build a cohesive unit. Now when I look back, I’m very, very proud that we were able to compete. My pride didn’t stop when I stopped playing; I helped coach the keepers after graduation and I still return regularly to cheer on the team and play a little. I’ve never let this program go; it’s become a part of who I am.

19 95

~ Todd “The Godfather” Hart ’96 Senior Vice President of Sales Account Management LifeCare Inc. Shelton, Connecticut

1970s

1970 first bachelor’s degrees 1972 first practicum 1973 first culinary arts class


Clockwise from left: An early photo from the North Miami Campus with then-Vice President of Administration and Planning and Executive Director Donald McGregor, J.D.,’09 Hon., at far right The first JWU GNAC championship soccer team in a photo from the Winter/Spring 1996 issue of “Visions” Lisa (Benkoski) Lynn ’83 with Radiant Sky in a 1983 yearbook photo

19 83

EQUINE STUDIES

Looking back, the thing that hits me the most about the equine program is the professionals whom I had the opportunity to work with. I was in clinics with Sally Swift, who wrote “Centered Riding”; Susan Harris, who wrote “Grooming to Win”; Nancy Bliss, who was a national bronze medal winner … and they really influenced me. Teachers of that quality, that caliber: These were legends in the field who wanted to help you. They were true professionals who wanted to share their knowledge so that we could all be good equine people. I’m still working with horses, so in a nutshell my education enabled me to do what I like to do. I spent the summers as a working student and got a taste of the real world, learned a good work ethic. I worked in the stable as a work-study job, then did some teaching. If I hadn’t gone to Johnson & Wales, I wouldn’t have the basic knowledge and experience to do all these other things that I’ve done in the equine world since, like working in the fox hunt and running a private stable. It gave me a good foundation; we had good instructors, a good barn manager. We got a basis in training and exposure to medical treatments, and got to ride all types of horses. It was an experience, to say the least.  ~ Lisa (Benkoski) Lynn ’83  Stable Manager, Mountain Meadow Stable  Ligonier, Pennsylvania

1980s

1984 first Charleston graduation 1985 first graduate degrees 1987 first technology degrees

1990s

1993 first Vail graduation 1994 first North Miami graduation 1995 first GNAC conference titles

www.jwu.edu

29


19 78

HONORARY DEGREE RECIPIENT

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM

One of the highlights of my career was receiving an honorary doctorate from Johnson & Wales University. Officiating that day was my good friend and mentor John Yena, then-vice president of the college. Through the years I have been privileged to visit each of the Johnson & Wales campuses, where I witnessed the dedication and zeal the talented faculty exhibited Stephen B. in every classroom. Graduates of the university are Friedheim ’78 Hon. a reflection of this interaction, which propels them through their successful careers. I still look forward to visiting the campuses whenever the opportunity presents itself, and I am delighted to be associated with the university in a personal and professional way.

On a service trip to Peru, I worked with many people who were without healthcare and did not have access to doctors. It was an eye-opening experience, and I decided right then that I wanted to go into the healthcare profession to try to alleviate people’s medical burdens. A career as a physician assistant (PA) seemed like the right fit for me because it allows you to make a difference while having a reasonable work-life balance. I could not be happier with my choice to enroll in the JWU PA program. When I interviewed as an applicant, the faculty — who are so experienced and turned out to be amazing mentors and educators — were so friendly. It felt more like a conversation than an interview, and they were genuinely interested in my background. The idea of a new building and program was also promising. Having a building devoted solely to the PA program was unique, and it was evident that Director Dr. George Bottomley knew exactly how to set up a successful program. As a student, my favorite thing was the people. Everybody — faculty, staff and classmates — supported one another while working very hard, making it an environment that I truly enjoyed each day. Now, as a practicing physician assistant in Rhode Island, it’s exciting to see the impact that the program has had on many clinical settings. A number of my classmates are now practicing PAs at Rhode Island locations that previously did not have PAs.

~ Stephen Friedheim ’78 Hon. Strategic Coach, Education Systems & Solutions Dallas, Texas

Jeanne Gilbert ’66 on the cover of “Visions” Fall 1995 issue

20 16

~ Brittany Fraser ’16 Physician Assistant, Rhode Island Hospital Providence, Rhode Island

19 66

DRAMA CLUB

I attended Johnson & Wales Junior College for the one-year Secretarial Science Program. I completed the course in 1966. What I remember about the Drama Club, under the direction of Department of English Chairman Emilio L. Capomacchio, was being asked to put together the program for one of the productions. I was so careful about spelling and punctuation, but when the program was being run off on the mimeograph machine we realized that I hadn’t set the pages up correctly. I was so disappointed with myself, but I revised the program in time for the show to go on! ~ Jeanne (Cardin) Gilbert ’66 Owner and Manager, Gilbert’s Bed & Breakfast Rehoboth, Massachusetts

2000s 30

Spring 2017

2000 first Denver graduation 2001 first LEED-certified building 2005 first Charlotte degrees

2010s

2011 first SharkFest 2012 first online courses 2016 first PA degrees awarded


Below, top: Opening day of the Center for Physician Assistant Studies Below: Center for Physician Assistant Studies Director (now Dean of the College of Health & Wellness) Dr. George S. Bottomley reveals plans for the new building.

Dear Alumni, Each academic year brings with it several “firsts” at Johnson & Wales University, and recent years have been no different. From new academic programs to being the first university in Rhode Island to go tobaccofree, Johnson & Wales continues to pioneer. This innovative spirit has long been a part of the JWU mentality. Over more than 100 years, there have been many firsts at our institution. In each instance — whether a new educational offering, campus or student activity — our students and faculty have been brave enough to take those first bold steps. Going first requires the courage to chart a new course, paving the way that others later follow. While this may not always be easy, courage has always been part of the Wildcat Way. The stories of those who ventured forth first are heartwarming and compelling, brimming with fond memories and inspirational reflections of how their trailblazing experiences shaped them as individuals and shaped Johnson & Wales as a university. I had the pleasure of talking with Todd Hart ’96 about the year he was on the first JWU team to win a Great Northeast Athletic Conference championship (only an hour before the men’s cross country secured our second!). Hart was a senior leader on a very young Griffins soccer team in the fall of 1995, and although they played on a field that was often strewn with debris, they triumphantly shut out the competition and captured JWU’s first taste of athletic success. Hart is still an involved member of the JWU community and a regular fixture at games. He is impressed with the new facilities the university has built for today’s student-athletes, and the pride in his voice is unmistakable when he talks about the role he played in starting JWU Athletics on a path of winning. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about a few of these “firsts” and will share your own with us. We are proud of the university’s past and excited for our future and the new firsts we will celebrate as we continue to evolve. Best regards,

Kevin Wesley Executive Director of Alumni Relations

www.jwu.edu

31


YOUR REUNION

IS COMING UP, AND YOU WON’T WANT TO MISS A MINUTE! MARK THESE DATES: PROVIDENCE HOMECOMING OCTOBER 14, 2017 CHARLOTTE REUNION OCTOBER 20–22, 2017 DENVER HOMECOMING OCTOBER 20–22, 2017 CHARLESTON REUNION FEBRUARY 24, 2018 AND STAY TUNED — DATES FOR NORTH MIAMI HOMECOMING AND PROVIDENCE REUNION WILL BE ANNOUNCED SOON!


CLASS NOTES 1

1983

JOSEPH CHIOVERA PVD

GREGORY DELIBERIS ’90 M.S. PVD

Joe is president of emerging markets and innovation and design at Buddy’s Kitchen in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

LEWISVILLE, TEXAS

COVENTRY, RHODE ISLAND

Greg is senior general manager of food and nutrition service for Sodexo Health Care at the Southcoast Hospitals Group in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

1984

TERRENCE WILLIAMS PVD

CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY

Paul is a chef instructor for the public schools of Elizabeth. KIMBERLY PISCO PVD OLD SAYBROOK, CONNECTICUT

and Todd Daigneault ’83 at the Smithfield Chef’s Table event in Brooklyn March 6

1977

1980

DEBRA HILL PVD

KENNETH TROUT PVD

LINCOLN, RHODE ISLAND

SOUTHAMPTON, NEW JERSEY

Debra is vice president of information technology for Gatehouse Media, which publishes the Providence Journal.

Kenneth runs the Souper Chefs of Atlantic City, a community outreach program that makes and distributes soup to the hungry (at least 65,000 bowls as of press time). He is spearheading the American Culinary Federation’s (ACF) National Convention at Disney Orlando/Coronado Springs for National Community Outreach. He is president of the South Jersey Chapter, which won the ACF’s Chapter Achievement Award. He has also received the ACF 2017 Northeast Region Cutting Edge Award. Kenneth is a corporate executive chef with Icon Hospitality in Galloway.

1979 KEN DESMARAIS PVD MANVILLE, RHODE ISLAND

Ken is director of culinary business development for Snapchef in Cranston. CAROL ANN FRANKLIN PVD NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Carol Ann is principal office stenographer with the New York Supreme Court Appellate Division. DENISE WASHINGTONBURGESS PVD BRONX, NEW YORK

Denise is the owner of Denise the Hair Doctor, which is located in the Bronx.

Katy is the owner of Katy Sparks Culinary Consulting in Brooklyn.

1989

PAUL CONTE PVD

[1] L– R: Camillia Burke ’10, Diego Feliciano ’11

KATHARINE SPARKS PVD BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

Kimberly is human resources director at The Red Door by Elizabeth Arden in Stamford.

SOMERSET, NEW JERSEY

Terrence is director of human resources at OTG Management in New York.

1990 FRANK CAPASA PVD NEW MILFORD, CONNECTICUT

1985

Frank is vice president of sales at Ecolab.

STEVEN CUMBY PVD

[2] MICHELLE DUBE PVD

SYKESVILLE, MARYLAND

Steven is a corporate account manager with Roland Foods in New York.

1986 JUDITH BECK PVD

SOUTH WELLFLEET, MASSACHUSETTS

Michelle recently published a children’s book titled “Kyppa and the Duckling.” The book gently encourages teamwork and promotes diversity.

NORFOLK, MASSACHUSETTS

Judy is the owner of Beck’s Bistro Catering in Norfolk.

1982 ROBERT LEONARD PVD NARRAGANSETT, RHODE ISLAND

Robert owns the Coast Guard House restaurant in Narragansett.

2 www.jwu.edu

33


CLASS NOTES 1990

1997

JENNIFER JORDAN PVD

JASON SCHWARTZENBERG

HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS

PVD

Jennifer is general manager at SD Visual Images in Marlborough.

NORWALK, CONNECTICUT

1993 VINCENT MESSINA PVD CRANSTON, RHODE ISLAND

Vincent is executive director of Wingate Residences on the East Side of Providence. VIJAYAKUMAR RAJ M.S.

PVD

SINGAPORE

Vijayakumar is assistant general manager at The American Club in Singapore.

Jason is executive vice president, tenant representation, at Jones Lang LaSalle in New York.

1999 FRANCIS WELCH NMI MELBOURNE, FLORIDA

Francis is an executive sous chef at the Boston Harbor Hotel.

2000 ANDREW BERNIER PVD Andrew is executive chef at Todd English’s bluezoo restaurant in the Walt Disney World Dolphin Hotel.

2002

[4] ALINA DANIELLE

Yem is a personal stylist with J. Hilburn in Westborough.

LANCE MCCORMACK PVD

COREY ANDERSON PVD

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

1995

Lance recently published “Lust: Living Under Severe Torment (the Guide to Beating Addiction).”

YEM REITSMA PVD WESTBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS

BRIAN OGRODNICK PVD JACKSON, NEW JERSEY

Brian is an area director for Doherty Enterprises. PAUL SOTTILE PVD APEX, NORTH CAROLINA

Paul has earned the following certifications with the American Culinary Federation: Certified Executive Chef (CEC), Certified Culinary Educator (CCE) and Certified Culinary Administrator (CCA). He works for Chartwells K12 as regional executive chef for the South Central region.

1996

EAST GREENWICH, RHODE ISLAND

2001 KEVIN KNAUSS PVD BUDD LAKE, NEW JERSEY

Kevin is director of food, beverage and conference services at the Dolce Hotel in Basking Ridge. THOMAS MORAN PVD ELIZABETHTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

Tom is executive sous chef at The Hershey Lodge in Hershey. TANNER SEIPP CHS LUTHERVILLE TIMONIUM, MARYLAND

Tanner is executive banquet chef at the Baltimore Country Club.

ANDREA LINKEVICH PVD Andrea is a human resources manager at Nordstrom in the Providence Place Mall.

Spring 2017

ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS

Corey is store manager at Kohl’s in Northborough. JOHN MUSZKEWYCZ PVD SMITHFIELD, VIRGINIA

John is director of group sales for the Norfolk Tides baseball team.

PVD Providence NMI North Miami DEN Denver CLT Charlotte CHS Charleston NOR Norfolk VAIL Vail International ONL Online

MURNIEKS PVD

Danielle is an account executive with PRX Exposition Services in Charleston.

4

[3] LAURA NEWMAN MBA PVD

GOLDEN, COLORADO

Laura recently became business development manager of Carla’s Pasta Inc. and gave a presentation on Italian foods to JWU Denver students. NORMA PINEAULT DEN WESTPORT, MASSACHUSETTS

Norma is a pouring agent with Trendsetters Marketing in Wakefield.

2003

NORTH SCITUATE, RHODE ISLAND

34

3

KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA

CINDY ERAZO NMI ORLANDO, FLORIDA

Cindy is the human resources recruitment supervisor at Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Hotel.

MICHAEL SALOMON PVD WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS

Michael is an operations manager at Snapchef in Dorchester.

2004 AARON MESSINA PVD WEST WARWICK, RHODE ISLAND

Aaron is the area group sales manager for the Renaissance Providence Downtown Hotel and Hilton Providence Hotel.


NICOLE PARMENTER PVD CRANSTON, RHODE ISLAND

Nicole is resident chef and appliance expert at Yale Appliance + Lighting in Dorchester, Massachusetts. TRISTAN WHISENANT CHS CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA

Tristan is director of private dining for Holy City Hospitality in Charleston.

2005 GARY ELLIS PVD ASHFORD, CONNECTICUT

Gary is a meadsmith and owner of Mad Moose Meadery in South Windsor.

2006 SARA AUGUSTUS PVD NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS

Sara is a chef manager with AVI Foodsystems Inc. at Siena College in Loudonville, New York.

[5] CHACARA HARVIN NMI CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA

Chacara is the destination services manager at the Cabarrus County Convention & Visitors Bureau in Concord.

5

6

MARRIAGE

2011 [6] COURTNEY (MILLER) FERRELL

CLT

and Chris Ferrell November 2, 2016

SHAYLA HALL PVD OAK PARK, MICHIGAN

Shayla was promoted to executive coordinator at Kraemer Design Group in Detroit. She manages Kraemer’s executivelevel communications and organizational tasks. MARLENE LUCIANO ’06 MBA PVD CRANSTON, RHODE ISLAND

Marlene is the global payroll lead at Alex & Ani. THOMAS LYON PVD SOMERSET, MASSACHUSETTS

Tom is executive chef at 22 Bowen’s Wine Bar & Grille in Newport, Rhode Island. JULIE NICHOLS PVD CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

Julie has been promoted to senior market manager for Expedia Lodging Partner Services. AMY TORMEY CHS DURANGO, COLORADO

Amy is a senior culinary recruiter with Delaware North Companies Inc.

BIRTHS

7

KHADIJAT IBRAHIM PVD MILFORD, MASSACHUSETTS

Khadijat is an account manager at Upserve in Providence, Rhode Island. KAITLIN ARMSTRONGLANGE PVD ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

In 2014 Kaitlin and her husband opened Kasey’s, where they serve locally grown food. Their menu is almost entirely made from scratch, including freshly baked bread and homemade desserts; many ingredients come from their garden.

2002 [7] JOHN MUSZKEWYCZ

PVD

and Sharon Josie Anna

2007 [8] JESSICA ROSS DEN MIKE ROSS DEN Ethan Michael

8

IAN MAGIROS PVD NORTH PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

Ian is an on-premise key account specialist with M.S. Walker Inc. WILLIAM SCHLISSEL PVD ROSELLE PARK, NEW JERSEY

Bill is regional sales manager for the Metro New York and New Jersey estates division of Jackson Family Fine Wines.

www.jwu.edu

35


CLASS NOTES 2007 JOSEPH ERHARD PVD FOXBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS

Joseph has been promoted to quality assurance manager at Steward Health Care System in Westwood. DAVID LAURENT PVD MILFORD, MASSACHUSETTS

David is a general manager with Colwen Hotels. ANGELA PANDOLFI PVD CUMBERLAND, RHODE ISLAND

Angela is director of sales for Chase Canopy in Mattapoisett, Massachusetts.

9

10

JAMES PORTER CLT WAXHAW, NORTH CAROLINA

James is the regional ordering captain at Total Wine & More in Charlotte.

2008 [9] DARIAN BLACKWELL

DEN

DENVER, COLORADO

Darian is executive chef at New Image Brewing in Arvada.

[10] DAVID LIEBERMAN CLT ORLANDO, FLORIDA

David is the food and beverage supervisor at the Marriott World Center in Orlando. LASHEEDA PERRY PVD ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Lasheeda is a pastry chef at The Four Seasons Hotel in Atlanta. MICHAEL SHKRELI PVD CRANSTON, RHODE ISLAND

Michael is executive chef at the Boat House Restaurant in Tiverton.

2009

2010

NICHOLE SAPONARE PVD

CHRISTOPHER ALEXIS PVD

[11] LEI CRISTINE GARCIA

Nichole is a reservations manager with the Newport Hotel Group.

MOUNT KISCO, NEW YORK

Christopher is director of front office operations at Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York.

NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND

CLT

FORT MILL, SOUTH CAROLINA

Lei Christine owns The Wow Factor Cakes In Charlotte, North Carolina.

GREGORY BRUNO ’15 MBA

11

PVD

LINCOLN, RHODE ISLAND

WESTFORD, MASSACHUSETTS

Nick is operations manager with Snapchef in Dorchester. JUSTINE SACKS PVD BRIDGEWATER, NEW JERSEY

HACKETTSTOWN, NEW JERSEY

Stacy is the private dining and events manager at Eataly in New York.

ROBERT GROTHA CLT SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI

2011 BLAIR CANNON CLT

JIM OSCEOLA NMI

Blair is executive sous chef at The Forsyth Country Club in Winston-Salem.

HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA

Jim is director of hospitality with Seminole Gaming in Hollywood.

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

Eduardo is a sous chef at the Weekapaug Inn in Westerly.

Spring 2017

ADAM WOLFSON PVD

Robert is a sous chef with Aramark in Florissant.

EDUARDO PERDOMO ’13 M.A.T. PVD

36

Tania is a human resources project manager with Alex & Ani.

Adam is the cofounder, chief technology officer and chief marketing officer at startup Warnable Solutions. The company provides emergency communication services to K–12 schools, hospitals and businesses.

NICHOLAS PROBOLUS PVD

STACY STOUT PVD

JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND

NORWALK, CONNECTICUT

Gregory is an account manager at Upserve in Providence.

Justine is assistant director of dining services at Columbia University.

TANIA TURCHETTA PVD

WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA

JENNIFER DANAUX ’13 M.A.T. PVD FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS

Jennifer is an operations manager with Snapchef in Cranston, Rhode Island.


13

PEARL FARQUHARSON PVD

CONNOR LANGTON ’16 MBA

NORTH PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

PVD

Pearl has rebranded her company, formerly known as Delsie Catering & Events, to Designed by Delsie.

MANASQUAN, NEW JERSEY

Connor is part of the management team of The Asbury, in Asbury Park, which was awarded Best Hotel 2016 by USA Today.

QIAN HAO MBA PVD NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Qian is a banker with Wells Fargo in New York. MICHAEL LEVINE PVD Silver Sparrow Photography

COMMACK, NEW YORK

BENJAMIN GREENE PVD NORTH KINGSTOWN, RHODE ISLAND

Ben is street sales development manager for the Rhode Island district at Ecolab. REBECCA HAND CLT ROEBLING, NEW JERSEY

Rebecca is the business process manager, GOE enterprise mobilization, at Aramark in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. LOGAN MCCOY ’13 MBA CLT CLEVELAND, OHIO

Logan is a corporate chef at Nestlé Professional in Solon. BENJAMIN SHAPIRO DEN

Michael is CEO of Global Food Solutions Inc. BRITTANY MUGGLE PVD CUMBERLAND, RHODE ISLAND

ALAN ZHU MBA PVD PEMBROKE, MASSACHUSETTS

Alan is an analyst with the Linchris Hotel Corporation in Hanover.

2012 DILLON BURKE PVD NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Dillon owns Front of House Inc. in New York, which provides branding and marketing for the hospitality industry.

[12] LEO CARELLE GARCIA

CLT

CLARKSVILLE, MARYLAND

Leo is finance director at ABW Appliances in Silver Spring.

DENVER, COLORADO

Ben is sous chef at Steuben’s Food Service in Arvada.

12

Brittany is executive sous chef at McCormick & Schmick’s in Providence. ZACHARY RANES PVD CHERRY HILL, NEW JERSEY

Zachary is an account manager with the MediaPlace/In-Store Sports Network in Long Island City, New York.

DREW PONTILLO PVD NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Drew is an executive meeting manager with Highgate Hotels in New York.

[13] CAMILLE SHOEMAKER

DEN

DENVER, COLORADO

Camille is a brewer at Vine Street Pub, which is in the Mountain Sun Pub and Brewery family. The long-standing brewery is known for its stouts.

[14] SHANNA STEWART CLT

CHINA GROVE, NORTH CAROLINA

Shanna is an event coordinator at TCG Events in Charlotte.

14

2013 CANDICE HOLMES PVD ALBANY, NEW YORK

Candice is the vice president of development at The Mallozzi Family Restaurant in Schenectady. RICHARD KOSSOWER ’15 MBA PVD CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Richie is a manager with Aramark in Chicago.

STELLA SHORTS ’16 MBA

CLT

NORWOOD, NORTH CAROLINA

Stella and her family purchased the 54-year-old Norwood Campground in North Carolina with the intent to preserve it as a family-friendly space to relax and enjoy the outdoors. The space has access to a large lake, as well as a private stocked fishing pond, pool and game room. They will provide activities and outdoor games in the summer months.

SUBMISSIONS To share your news with fellow alumni, please send us photos and announcements about recent weddings, unions and additions to your family. Images: To submit images from your event, please provide high resolution digital files (minimum one megabyte [1 MB] in size, in jpeg format), or actual photographs. Entries may be emailed to jwumagazine@jwu.edu or mailed to: JWU Magazine c/o Johnson & Wales University, 8 Abbott Park Place, Providence, RI 02903.

www.jwu.edu

37


CLASS NOTES

[15] Daniel Garcia ’14, center [16] Brandon Tucker ’14, right [17] L– R: Alex Brady, Denver Campus manager of alumni relations, with Louis Colburn ’15

15

2014

NATE KEENEY PVD

CHRISTIAN CANTUA DEN Chris is the in-room dining manager at the Four Seasons Denver.

Nate is territory associate director of online marketing and engagement for the East Territory with The American Diabetes Association.

KEIKO CARBERRY PVD

TONY LE PVD

KINGWOOD, TEXAS

WARWICK, RHODE ISLAND

Keiko is assistant store manager at Kohl’s in Warwick.

[15] DANIEL GARCIA PVD NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Daniel helped Team USA take home the gold medal at this year’s Bocuse d’Or — widely acknowledged as the foremost culinary competition in the world — in Lyon, France. This was the first American victory in the competition’s 30-year history. JACY HAEKLER PVD NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND

Jacy is assistant general manager at the Wyndham Inn on Long Wharf in Newport. MEGAN JOHNSON PVD MIDDLETOWN, RHODE ISLAND

Megan is assistant venue manager at Longwood Venues and Destinations in Newport.

38

Spring 2017

NORTHAMPTON, PENNSYLVANIA

BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS

Tony is restaurant chef at The Country Club in Brookline. ELIJAH OCHOA CLT

16

[16] BRANDON TUCKER PVD

BENJAMIN CLARK PVD

Brandon, a chef at Denver’s restaurant Mizuna, won the 2017 Southwest Region Jeunes Chefs Rotisseurs & Pastry Provincial Competition in March and will compete in the Jeunes Chefs Rotisseurs National Competition in May.

Benjamin is the human resources coordinator with the Newport Hotel Group in Middletown, Rhode Island.

DENVER, COLORADO

2015

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA

ANDREW BARNINGER DEN

Elijah is the event coordinator at Project 658 in Charlotte.

MANCHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA

JORDAN PILARSKI PVD GARNET VALLEY, PENNSYLVANIA

Jordan won the Food Network’s Spring Baking Championship. TOMMY SETO PVD BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

Tom is the manager at DelFrisco’s Double Eagle Steak House at Liberty Wharf in Boston seaport. He is pursuing his Master Sommelier certification.

Andy is the director of research and development for the Applied Science and Performance Institute (ASPI) in Tampa, Florida. Andy says, “I attribute my new position (and career) solely to the fact that Johnson & Wales was able to provide me with diverse qualities that are unmatched. Most people know what to eat, to an extent, but not many know how to make it and make it sustainable. I was able to bring an innovative skill set to the table.” BRYAN CHAVEZ PVD MAHOPAC, NEW YORK

Bryan is a financial advisor with Dipaola Financial in Briarcliff Manor.

NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE

[17] LOUIS COLBURN DEN DENVER, COLORADO

Louie, a native Hawaiian, has opened Ohana Island Kitchen in the LoHi neighborhood of Denver. It has already been written up in the Denver Post, Westword and Eater Denver as the go-to place for Hawaiian fare. KILEY FRALEY DEN DENVER, COLORADO

Kiley is a wok cook at Departure Restaurant & Lounge, which was recently featured in Denver’s regional magazine, 5280. JASMINE GRENIER PVD CRANSTON, RHODE ISLAND

Jasmine is operations manager and event activation with the PSE Agency in Providence. LARA HICKS CLT MORGANTON, NORTH CAROLINA

Lara is feeding program director at Project 658 in Charlotte.


LIANNE GOSSELIN PVD

NOAH SARNO PVD

BROOKLYN, CONNECTICUT

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

Lianne is a patient services manager for Sodexo at Umass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Noah is a management trainee with Enterprise Rent-A-Car in Woonsocket.

TAYLOR MELCHIONO PVD

MANSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS

COTUIT, MASSACHUSETTS

Taylor is a registration coordinator with Convention Data Services in Bourne. SUZETTE RAMSEY CLT LIBERTY TOWNSHIP, OHIO

Suzette is the assistant restaurant manager at Heirloom in Charlotte, North Carolina.

17

TONY SAN PVD PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

NATHANIEL KELLIEHAN

NMI

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

Nathaniel is a legal assistant with Brooklyn Defender Services. MATILDA MIGLIO PVD PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

Matilda is the sales development representative for Upserve in Providence. BRIELLE MINUTILLO PVD HASBROUCK HEIGHTS, NEW JERSEY

Brielle is the food and beverage manager at the Hilton DoubleTree Suites Hotel New York City in Times Square. ANTHONY OH DEN AURORA, COLORADO

Anthony is sales manager at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis. JEFFREY SILVERSTEIN

PVD

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Jeff is a food service director with Aramark in New York. MICHAEL TABERSKI PVD BERKLEY, MASSACHUSETTS

Michael is the marketing operations analyst for Upserve in Providence, Rhode Island.

NICOLE THEOHARY PVD PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

Tony is a management trainee with Enterprise Rent-A-Car in Providence.

Nicole works for Upserve in Providence as an account manager.

TABETHA TAYLOR PVD Tabetha is a travel consultant with Liberty Travel in Boston. ELIZABETH TESTA M.S. PVD COVENTRY, RHODE ISLAND

Elizabeth is a medical cannabis speaker. JOY TURNER CLT HEATH SPRINGS, SOUTH CAROLINA

Joy is catering director and chef at Project 658 in Charlotte.

2017 RICHARD BLINKHORN PVD WARWICK, RHODE ISLAND

Richard owns Narragansett Bay Entertainment in Warwick.

2016 SCOTT COX PVD PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

Scott is a houskeeping leader in development with Omni Hotels in Providence. CHRISTINE DAUGHERTY

CLT

IN MEMORIAM ALUMNI

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

Christine is food and beverage manager at The Baltimore Country Club in Maryland.

MARGARET A. HEIST ’75 March 7, 2017

SEAN C. HAIRE ’95 February 27, 2017

JULIANA ENGLER PVD Warren, New Jersey Juliana is an events intern with the NoHo Hospitality Group in New York.

JOSEPH F. PYTEL ’79 February 5, 2017

MATTHEW C. WEBSTER ’96 March 1, 2017

EVERETT W. HEATH ’80 February 23, 2017

ANTHONY B. CAVEDON ’97 February 7, 2017

DEREK A. KEARNEY ’81 March 6, 2017

LAWRENCE C. MCKINLEY III ’00 January 19, 2017

JOSEPH F. RANONE ’82 February 16, 2017

BRADLEY J. LEWIS ’05 January 23, 2017

MICHAEL J. CARR ’83 January 26, 2016

JOHN S. HIGGINS ’07 January 24, 2017

JEAN C. ROBEY ’85 March 2, 2017

ASHLEY M. BRIGGS ’09 March 5, 2017

GEORGE VASSARAS ’89 February 7, 2017

JILLIAN J. SPRENGER ’11 January 24, 2017

ASHLY GAULIN PVD WARWICK, RHODE ISLAND

Ashly is member services manager at the Kirkbrae Country Club in Lincoln.

www.jwu.edu

39


Expanding the JWU Global Landscape

E

BY SHELLEY STEPHENSON, PH.D.

The university integrates services across four campuses to best serve its diverse student population

XCITING THINGS are happening at JWU Global. A new entity, JWU

Global is comprised of the three departments formerly known in Providence as the International Center: International Student Services Office (ISSO), Study Abroad and the BRIDGE. As a new name, JWU Global signals the integration of programs across all four campuses around the university’s goals to foster global and community citizenship. It also more closely reflects the ethos that unites the university’s efforts to serve its diverse community. ISSO is happy to have hosted 1,340 students across the four campuses during the 2016–17 academic year. Our strong international student population consistently puts JWU on the Institute of International Education (IIE)’s Open Doors Top 40 lists: Providence this year placed 14th on the Master’s Colleges list, and North Miami placed 33rd on the Baccalaureate Colleges list. Among many cultural/social opportunities for international students is Providence’s Cultural Companion Program, which pairs students with individuals and families in the community; and Denver’s Global Connections living-learning community. JWU’s study abroad landscape is transforming. Founded on a strong and growing set of faculty-led programs out of JWU’s academic colleges, Study Abroad recently added affiliate programming in such locations as China, Japan, India, Brazil and the UAE — approximately 75 programs worldwide. For the first time, students had a spring break option in the Azores’ Volcanic Island Wines and Tourism program. Meanwhile, the number of student and faculty exchange opportunities also doubled. This expansion supports JWU’s partnership in IIE’s Generation Study Abroad campaign, which aims to double study abroad participation by 2020. JWU has been successful in winning new scholarships for study abroad, and also made the Open Doors Top 40 list in this area. New global alumni programming, which will bring similar opportunities for our alumni community, is in the planning stages.

40

Spring 2017

Finally, the BRIDGE, which was created on the Providence Campus in 2013, continues to grow. With its acronym standing for Building Relationships, Intercultural Dialogue and Global Engagement, the BRIDGE is a locus for transformative and civic learning for JWU’s diverse community of students, faculty and staff. Collaborating with virtually every department across the Providence Campus, where the physical space is located, the BRIDGE as a framework refers to the collaborative interests of the entire JWU community through educational programs, cultural events and social activities designed to explore cultural differences and diverse perspectives. The work of the BRIDGE on the Providence Campus reflects sustained signature programming while remaining responsive to stakeholder interests. For example, weekly Not Just Coffee Hour sessions are open to all and offer a range of topics around which participants are able to build and nurture relationships. As a dedicated means for responding to the various interests of JWU community members, BRIDGE Flash Seminars support JWU community member interests beyond the classroom, grounded in the broader framework of global citizenship. Since 2013, participation in BRIDGE-connected programming has reached almost 21,000 JWU students, faculty and staff. ~ Shelley Stephenson is dean of international programs and development


Aim for greatness. Learn how you can get closer to the inner circle. 401-598-2185 or giving.jwu.edu

The JWU Fund Leadership Circle


NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

8 Abbott Park Place, Providence, RI 02903

PAID JOHNSON & WALES UNIVERSITY

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Bob Benson ’97

Location courtesy of Go Green Agriculture, Encinas, California

Business Development and Brand Management Consultant, Moceri Produce; Owner, BioSystemic Consulting

JWU Magazine Spring 2017  

Success

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