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Fall 2010

Volume XCVIV, No. 3

Clemens’ influence notable in our state

Networks benefit members, programs

will go first to its namesake, during an October celebration in Angels Camp. A second honor will be announced in December at the annual Cal Press Winter Meeting in San Francisco. And each year thereafter, the Twain Award will go posthumously to someone who has done great work that appeared in a California newspaper. Samuel Clemens, before he adopted the pen

By Thomas Emery Special to California Publisher Little was it known that the sandy-haired lad who liked to play practical jokes on his schoolmates in a small Hannibal, Mo., school would some day add a colorful chapter to early California journalism. The boy was Samuel Langhorne Clemens, who, even while he was still in his early school years in the mid 1800s, began to show the restlessness and optimism that became so prominent in his later years. Clemens was born Nov. 30, 1835, in Florida, Mo. Late in 1839 his family moved to the teeming Mississippi River port of Hannibal. There, not long after his father’s death, Clemens at the age of 13 launched his journalistic career. He began as a printer’s devil, newspaper carrier and unofficial sub-editor for the Missouri Courier, a local weekly. In the spring of 1851 he became a subprinter for the Weekly Dollar Journal, published by his brother, Orion, in Hannibal. He also worked on the Hannibal Western Union. Later he was employed by the Journal and Western Union, a paper which developed out of the merger of the two weeklies. In 1853, Orion started the Daily Journal, and Clemens also worked for it. Clemens combined the arts of printing and writing, and his experience on these newspapers obviously served as a stimulus for

See AWARD Page 9

See TWAIN Page 9

Securing new revenue continues to be a top priority for CNPA’s advertising departments. Member newspapers benefit from participation in one or more of CNPA’s networks, and a percentage of revenues supports the association’s work on behalf of California newspapers. Here is an update on the advertising programs, along with details on new initiatives. CNPA Advertising Services CNPA Advertising Services has expanded market research and mapping to meet the challenges of its clients. In the spring, Tiffany Chiang joined the Marketing Department as a marketing analyst for CNPA and the National Preprint Network. Chiang focuses on maintaining the accuracy and timeliness of the networks’ newspaper circulation information. Her background includes marketing analysis for the commercial real estate industry as well as working with the government of Taiwan in areas of banking and commercial development. Michael Schupp, a 20-year marketing analyst veteran, continues to head the marketing team. CNPA placed more than 50 accounts in calendar year 2009 and continues to see new accounts, agencies and other associations use CNPA services. These services range from marketing analysis and rate negotiation to one order, one bill and cash processing. For more information, visit www.cnpa.com. National Preprint Network NPN continues to grow with new member papers and clients. The service placed more than 22 million circulars in the first quarter and is on track to place more than 100 million this calendar year. This is all plus business to the newspaper industry in these markets. Major accounts continue to use NPN as their vehicle for total-market coverage and target marketing. What differentiates NPN is the quality of its audience. NPN gives clients access to paid subscribers in the top DMAs, leveraging the benefits of the higher readership and efficiencies of newspaper advertising. NPN provides the advertiser the ultimate convenience: With one phone call, advertisers are ensured one contact, one rate and one invoice for their buy. NPN’s second year of membership recruitment has expanded the network to 130 major newspapers with a national footprint of more than 56 million circulation. Member newspapers include Tribune, McClatchy, Gannett, Hearst, Journal Register, Media General, BANG, See NETWORKS Page 10

Before he set off to become the legendary Mark Twain, Samuel Clemens was a newspaper reporter in Nevada, San Francisco and Hawaii. PHOTOS COURTESY MARK TWAIN PROJECT, BANCROFT LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

Mark of Pride California Press Association award honors writers The California Press Association for decades has administered three distinct awards that honor newspaper executives for their service and impact on California and their local areas. Now comes a fourth, and it’s probably the very first to deal with jumping frogs. Just in time for this 100th anniversary of the death of Mark Twain, a new Cal Press award will honor great work by a journalist at a California newspaper. The Mark Twain Award

I N S I D E

Publisher Profile R.D. Tucker Mariposa Gazette

Pg. 3

Legal HelpLine ......................... 2 From the President ................... 2 Newspaper Design .................... 6 Technology ................................ 7 People ..................................... 13

California Newspaper Publishers Association

Newspaper headaches cured with call to CNPA’s Helpline Among the many services CNPA offers its members, the legal helpline often provides the most direct benefit to members and their staffs. Helpline calls are included with membership in CNPA. Members often say that the money the helpline has saved them in legal costs is alone worth the price of CNPA membership. To help members make the most of this benefit, here is a quick review of the Helpline basics: Q: Does a newspaper need continual legal advice? A: Are you kidding? We’re in California, remember, where almost no human endeavor goes unregulated and even normal businesses need to tread carefully to

708 10th St., Sacramento CA 95814 (916) 288-6000

avoid stepping in it. Add all the diverse activities of reporters, editors and photographers to the work of publishers, ad directors, circulators, human resources and production employees, and what do you have? Q: What? A: A lot going on, legally. Not just Chamber of Commerce stuff, but, thanks to our forefathers and the brilliance of the First Amendment, the rich and interesting law associated with the “non-regulation” of speech and the free press, or for short, media law. The real question is, how do you decide if the question is a legal matter or just a policy decision? Q: Okay, how do you? A: You ask a lawyer.

Fax (916) 288-6002

See LEGAL Page 12 www.cnpa.com


 California Publisher Fall 2010

T H E C N PA M I S S I O N To champion the ideals of a free press in our democratic society and to promote the quality and economic health of California newspapers

CNPA forges ahead on many fronts As I consider the many new and exciting directions CNPA is energetically pursuing in response to this digital age that is transforming our newspaper business, I’m reminded of an old Chinese proverb:

by CNPA Services sales director in order to accommodate digital newspaWolf Rosenberg. Here’s another per publishing membership because our great opportunity for members current bylaws don’t define or recognize to participate in new revenue just online-only newspapers, nor do they conby signing on to this network. I sider other types of online news publishers encourage all members, particuwho might qualify for membership. larly our board members, to show Another is to expand participation among support for the Quarter Page Ad our many vendors and suppliers by enhancBefore enlightenment – chop Network by signing up ASAP. ing or adding value to our Allied memberFROM THE wood, carry water. In addition to our revenue ships. After Enlightenment – chop initiatives, several ad hoc comOur Summit Committee, led by presiPRESIDENT wood, carry water. mittees have been formed to dent-elect Ralph Alldredge, is working to Ron Redfern pursue other new directions of deliver a re-tooled and more robust Summit I don’t want to minimize the opportunity. for 2011. importance of responding to the dynamic Two such committees, under the auspices Next April’s Summit will take place in and rapid pace of change that is impactof the Executive Committee, are tending to Los Angeles and will deliver strong sessions ing all of our newspapers here in the weak some of CNPA’s internal business needs. featuring industry thought leaders on curCalifornia economy. But it seems that the John Burns, Jerry Bean, Paul Nyberg and rent topics in advertising, circulation and more things change, the more some things Bill Brehm Jr. are reviewing investment digital media with an emphasis this year stay the same. strategies to improve returns on CNPA on the role of journalism and a free press. Even with all of the new technology, busi- funds with recommendations coming to the Included will be a full Governmental Affairs ness models and innovative adaptation to board soon. Day and CNPA’s this new digital economy, the journalistic And a refreshed onBetter Newspapers mission of our newspapers remains the boarding package for Contest awards. This CNPA is working hard same: to serve as a watchdog, protect the new CNPA board memwill be one affordable to develop new revenue public trust and provide news and informabers is being developed Summit that you canstreams and add new tion that enriches the lives of our readers by Amy Pack, Ralph not afford to miss. and the communities we serve. Alldredge and Cynthia CNPA is only as resources and services CNPA is working hard to develop new Schur. strong as the memfor its members. revenue streams and add new resources Another ad hoc bership that supports and services for its members. The executive committee, includit. So join these memcommittee, the board, Jack Bates and the ing John Burns and bers to help CNPA staff share a high sense of urgency to make Tony Allegretti under the auspices of our move in new directions of opportunity this that happen. In fact, given the initiatives Strategic Planning Committee, is exploring year and make CNPA a better organization underway, we might think of our theme this partnership opportunities for CNPA that because of your support. year as “pursuing new directions and precan deliver revenue participation, member As I stated at the start of this column: serving core ideals.” benefits or both. The more things change, and the more We have two immediate revenue initiaOne opportunity under review is a partenlightened one becomes, the more some tives underway. The first, the California nership to provide a directory of vendors things stay the same. Banner Ad Network, I’ve written about in a and suppliers for member newspapers that CNPA is pursuing new directions to previous column. would provide special enhancements for ensure that it thrives while also staying true Greg Harmon, who is leading the charge Allied members. to its core mission: to support, strengthen with our partners at ITZBelden, reports The work of these ad hoc committees is and sustain a financially sound publishthat the potential for political advertiscomplementing the work of CNPA’s standing business and free press in and for ing for the November elections continues ing committees. California. to remain high. So sign up now and stay Our Membership Committee, led by tuned. Dean Eckenroth, is pursuing two new direcRon Redfern is publisher of The PressThe second is a new Quarter Page Ad tions for growing membership. Enterprise in Riverside. Contact him at Network, which was announced recently One will require changes to our bylaws (951) 368-9515 or rredfern@pe.com.

CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER

Published quarterly by the California Newspaper Publishers Association 708 10th Street Sacramento, CA 95814 Fall, September 2010 Jack Bates Executive Director Joe Wirt Editor Diane Donohue Advertising California Publisher USPN 084720 ISSN 0008-1434 Subscriptions are $15 per year. California Publisher is printed by Paradise Post Printing. Periodicals postage paid at Sacramento, CA. Postmaster send address changes to: California Publisher 708 10th Street Sacramento, CA 95814-1803

Council email likely defied Brown Act

Q:

Our City Council took action at its meeting last month to appoint two new council members to sit on the council in lieu of conducting an election to fill the vacancies. The council justified the appointments because no one submitted nomination papers by the deadline for the election. One council member forgot the deadline to file even though she intended to run in the November election. Rather than allow the write-in process to occur, the council held a special meeting, HELPLINE voted to appoint rather Jim Ewert than elect replaceCNPA Legal ments (saving the city Counsel about $3,500) and appointed the sitting mayor to another four-year term and the husband of a sitting council member as a new member of the council. I spoke to a council member after the meeting and he informed me that nearly a week prior to the meeting there was a fair bit of email correspondence regarding this matter, which he agreed to forward to me. In the emails exchanged between three of the five council members as well as the city clerk, there was a discussion about whether it was appropriate for the council to appoint someone to fill the two council seats in a special meeting. Most of the emails were versions of previous emails exchanged between two council members that were forwarded to the third council member who then responded. There was also a discussion of whether the husband of the sitting council member See HELPLINE, Page 12

Who watches for the public? We papers do Santa Cruz Sentinel editorial An aftermath of the scandal in the Los Angeles-area city of Bell over salaries and pension benefits for top city employees has been a re-examination of who is watching local government. For a long time, that essential watchdog role has been fulfilled by local newspapers, daily and weekly, along with radio and television news departments. If a local town’s officials decided to hike taxes – which is what Bell did – and enrich a select number of public employees – which is also what the city fathers in Bell decided to do – they would do so only at risk of being exposed in the pages of the local newspaper and facing the wrath of angry taxpayers. But even the Los Angeles Times, which broke the story about the outrageous salaries Bell officials were paying themselves, conceded it doesn’t have the wherewithal any longer to cover all of the 88 cities and towns in its immediate circulation area. The downturn in advertising over the past few years and the rise of the Internet has led to a shrinking of news staffs and printed pages. Even though newspapers have their own robust websites, these sites bring in only a fraction of the money that mainstream newspapers get from their print editions.

ADVERTISERS THIS ISSUE CNPA Allied Members ........................... 13-15 CNPA Foundation .................................... 11, 14

While many veteran journalists have turned to the digital world, this often has proved a difficult way to make a living. The result is that a lot of what’s found on blogs and major online sites is more opinion and gossip than factual information reported and edited by vetted journalists. Big city “metro” newspapers have rarely drilled down to cover local communities in depth. That has been the function of “community newspapers,” such as the Santa Cruz Sentinel. Bell once had its own community paper – but it was gone by 1998, which, not coincidentally, was the time when the first wildly overpaid city administrator was hired. And even if reporters had been around to cover Bell, it’s unclear if they would have had access to the salary information for public employees. California’s Brown Act only requires that meetings, such as the open sessions where the salaries were approved, be posted. It doesn’t say where, which means the notices might be overlooked, nor does it require minutes of past meetings to be posted. The Brown Act also doesn’t require agenda information to be posted online. Moreover, when the highly paid employees were exposed and “resigned,” this came after a closed session of Bell’s city council, which itself included four highly paid mem-

Homeowners’ Association Advisor ............. Theme Crosswords ...................................... Kamen & Co. Group Services ..................... Knowles Media Brokerage Services .............

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bers; such closed sessions are off-limits to reporters and not covered by the Brown Act. Clearly public meeting laws need to be strengthened – and the public should be aware there is no substitute for trained and accountable journalists keeping a close eye on local government. Bell shows how dire the situation can get, which is why state Controller John Chiang announced he’ll require new reporting by cities and counties clearly identifying salaries of public employees and elected officials. The Sentinel also continues to publish extensive databases of public salaries in Santa Cruz County, even though this has made many public employees uncomfortable. The Sentinel, which has hardly been immune to shifts in the media world and the downturn in advertising, will keep comprehensively covering local government in Santa Cruz County. That’s what a newspaper should do and what readers should expect of us – watch over how the public’s business is conducted and how taxpayer money is being spent. We’ll continue to do just that. This piece appeared Aug. 4, 2010, in the Santa Cruz Sentinel, from which it is reprinted with permission.

National Newspaper Association .................. 8 Publishers Circulation Fulfilment Inc. ............ 5 TownNews.com ........................................... 5 The Ultimate Print Source .......................... 16


Fall 2010 California Publisher 

PUBLISHER PROFILE

R.D. Tucker Mariposa Gazette How’d you get to where you are now? By working at my profession every day, seven days a week. You never reach the top, you just get closer.

PERSONAL STATS

Tell us something about the reach of your print product, and the audience for your website. Our print product is the primary communication vehicle for this rural, Sierra county. Our web audience is fairly small because this is a retirement haven and there isn’t great acceptance of digital technology.

Name: R.D. (Dan) Tucker First job: Proofreader at a daily in Idaho Falls, Idaho, at age 13 Current job: Publisher of the Mariposa Gazette Family: Two grown, collegeeducated children; five grandchildren

How has your online venture measured up over the years? Our online venture was a necessary evil. It’s on a paying basis now, but doesn’t serve our primary audience. We receive around 10,000 unique visitors per month.

Education: Two years, Idaho State University

Contrast the news that the local audience craves with the information that tourists want. Our local audience craves exactly what we concentrate on: crime and the courts, education, local sports and community personalities. Tourists may read our dining guide, but I think readership by that audience is limited. How does the type of advertising change with the tourism seasons? Our advertising stays fairly stable, not a measurable effect in the tourist season.

Community involvement and diversions: Very involved in community although not a member of any civic organization because I would rather support them all equally. As a diversion, I am learning how to calf rope. R.D. Tucker helps out at Grizzly Stadium, a community project for which he is chairman. “We are converting a pathetic existing athletic facility into an upscale (at least for this area) stadium-type layout,” Tucker said. “We’ve raised well over $150,000, and the local contractors association is providing free labor, along with community members.” When this picture was taken, about 150 locals had just laid 25,000 square feet of sod in just over three hours to fill in bare ground.

Describe how you oversee your area. I oversee each and every aspect of this operation. My dedicated and loyal employees have often referred to me as the “dark overlord.”

What’s your recommendation for family-friendly, sit-down lunch food on the way to Yosemite? The best bet is the River Rock Deli. Great sandwiches and atmosphere. Name for us another must-see natural attraction, besides Yosemite. Merced River Canyon.

What’s one aspect of professional improvement that you’d like to make more time for in your career? I would like to learn better graphic design and page presentation. How often do you get to network with other publishers in your region? Very rarely. Tell us about a big story and how your paper covered it. There is no doubt that happened when I was waiting with my cell phone in the pressroom of the Merced Sun-Star (where we used to print).

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It was the day that Mariposa County would file first degree murder charges against Cary Stayner. We had two front and jump pages ready to go on the press with different leads as soon as the D.A. walked out of the courthouse after filing the charges. It put us about six hours behind our delivery schedule, but we were the first newspaper in the state to break the story. What do you like best about your position? Relevance. Our ability to bolster positive community change and raise awareness of issues that involve our readers.

What are you most proud of? How far we have improved our product since I bought it in 1997.

Any regrets? Very few. How has your membership in CNPA helped your business? The access to competent legal counsel at the drop of a hat has been the most beneficial. So, why do you push yourself as hard as your do? It’s my responsibility, and ink has been in my veins from a very early age.

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 California Publisher Fall 2010

New journalism motto: Less job, more action By Robert LaHue Special to California Publisher Might as well change my name to Benedict Arnold with that title, some in my field would say. But, it’s time to face the facts and acknowledge journalism as more an action than a job, for two reasons. First, to deal with reality. Second, to also realize, finally, that this isn’t a bad thing at all, even for professional journalists. This is, in fact, my answer to the everlasting “journalists vs. bloggers” debate, also commonly framed as “working in the century-old newsroom floor vs. working out of your parents’ basement” argument. (Quick sidetrack: Can we ditch the “parents’ basement” putdown? I’m sure there are a few bloggers making enough to afford their own basements to work in. And my college newspaper WAS in a basement.) For too long, we’ve considered “journalist” to be a very specific job. You have to work in a certain place, in a certain way, and have the intent to be a journalist in order to commit an act of journalism. I totally disagree. Flashback to journalism school. You’re taught the Five Ws and H: who, what, where, when, why and how. Five of these constitute reporting. But then there’s the sixth: Why. To me, answering the question of “why” is what separates journalism from reporting. Why is the red meat, or extra-firm tofu for you vegans out there. Defining Why is the response to the eternal question of “So what?” that permeates a society often too busy for its own good. Discovering Why takes skill and enterprise. So quite frankly, anybody who answers and passes along to another the question

of why, with details and evidence to back it up, is committing an act of journalism. And that can be done by anybody. People can answer Why without even intending to do so. Accidental journalism can exist. Does this dismiss those who have made committing acts of journalism their livelihood? Like, well, me? I don’t think so. Two reasons for that. First, just because it’s possible for anybody to commit an act of journalism doesn’t mean everybody wants to. I could go out and win the California Lottery. But I’m not necessarily interested in buying the ticket I would need to win the jackpot. Some people like playing the lottery; others just like to watch the drawing. Some people want to be journalists, other just want to read, hear and watch journalists’ work. The latter still need the former. Second, while accidental journalism is possible, the majority of journalism will still be done intentionally. Specific skills further increase the ability to commit an act of journalism. So those who best acquire those skills can still perform journalism as a living. So, for those pros still bristling at amateurs, even the ones blustering about how the pros are going to go down in flames: Quit sweating it. Yeah, things aren’t the same as they were 20 years ago. The market will be tougher. Some types of thinking that once existed won’t be able to survive anymore. But it won’t cease to exist. Robert LaHue, onetime staffer of The Orion at CSU Chico, is interactive content producer for the Appeal-Democrat in Marysville. This piece from his blog, robertlahue.com, is reprinted with permission.

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Fall 2010 California Publisher 

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Monica uses a special technique when she meets with prospective advertisers for the first time. “After we’ve chatted for a minute or two about the weather or a general topic, I say, ‘Although I could talk about my paper all day long, I know you’re busy. So how can we make the best use of your time today?’ “It works like magic,” she explained. “Most of the time, the prospect will identify the marketing problems that are of biggest concern. This allows me to structure questions and product information around what’s most important to them. It’s like AD-LIBS a road map for our appointment. John Foust “Recently, a prospect said, ‘I’d like to see what your paper can do to drive customers to our website.’ Because he had such a specific objective, we talked about advertising frequency, and that led us to a budget that was designed to produce a large number of impressions. If I hadn’t asked my magic question, we might not have arrived at that destination. Or maybe we wouldn’t have gotten there so quickly.” Monica’s technique can help you accomplish several things: 1. It shows respect. Saying that you want to make the best use of time sends a clear signal that you are committed to being efficient and productive. You are asking your prospects to set the agenda for your meeting, and the last thing you want is wasted time. If your prospects wander off the path and start talking about peripheral issues, you have a stated – and respectful – reason to bring them back to the subject at hand. 2. It puts relevance at the top of the list. If your prospects have talked to other media representatives lately, there is a good chance that there have been numerous sales monologues of meaningless factoids. Because most sales people take a one-presentation-fits-all approach, their spiels are unlikely to cover information which is relevant to your prospects’ specific marketing challenges. By asking prospects what they would like to accomplish in meetings, you put their concerns at the center of the discussion. 3. It establishes a pattern of openended questioning. Open-ended questions – as opposed to closed-ended questions – are those which can’t be answered in a few words. Obviously, you will get more information with open-ended questions. You’ll find it helpful to blend the two types. For example, “How long did your last campaign run?” (closed) can be followed by “How did it work?” (open). “What is your advertising budget for this year?” (closed) can be followed by “What are your thoughts on allocating those dollars?” (open). And “What zip codes would you like to target?” can be followed by “In your experience, what is so appealing about the people in those areas?” Contrary to the way many sales people behave, Monica knows that it’s better to listen than to talk. Simply establish priorities, ask relevant questions that uncover marketing problems, then show how your paper can solve those problems. That’s the best use of everyone’s time. (c) Copyright 2010 by John Foust. All rights reserved.

E-mail John Foust for information about his training videos for ad departments: jfoust@mindspring.com


 California Publisher Fall 2010

Plan ahead to avoid big cuts Unless it’s a special package, be longer ... or shorter. with photos, graphics, infoEditing: If your reporter boxes and sidebars, the most has to write longer, that doesn’t difficult item to design is a mean you have to allow the final long story. Actually, it can’t be piece to grow beyond a reasondesigned so much as just shoeable length. I don’t know of any horned into a page. experienced editor who can’t trim Overly long stories are not a story to the bone – and someonly difficult to design; they’re times to the marrow. But cutting also a turn-off to readers, who a story after it has been written NEWSPAPER feel they just don’t have the should be your last resort. It takes DESIGN time to spend on a long article. more time to edit a long story, Ed Henninger When confronted with a sea and you’re also tossing out the of gray text, readers often will time it took the writer to create bypass the story. the parts you’ve excised. So ... it’s critical for us to search for ways Segment: If a piece must be longer to keep our stories short. – let’s say it’s an investigative article or a Here are some suggestions: centerpiece – then talk with your writer Direction: Talk over the story with your about ways to break it apart. Rather than reporter before she goes out to cover it. one long piece on five mayoral candidates, Talk about the basics like the lead, getting for example, write five separate interviews, names, getting quotes, what her phone calls each with a photo and an infobox. A map tell her is going to happen at the meeting, could show readers where the five candietc. And during that quick chat (it need take dates reside. Another infobox could outline no more than two or three minutes), help the duties of the mayor. Another sidebar her to decide a target length for the report. (with chart) could give an election timeline, When she returns from the meeting or starting with the first day of filing for candievent she’s been covering, confirm that she dacy and ending with election day. Another can still write to the agreed-upon length. more commonplace example could be takIf she now thinks that’s not possible, talk ing a routine city council meeting story over with her the reasons for her change of and breaking it down to three pieces: 1) the heart. It could be that the story has taken council’s discussion on hiring a new police some new twists and turns and it needs to chief; 2) planning for city’s Fourth of July

This story is 2,000 words long

celebration (with map of parade route); 3) announcement by a council member that she will not seek re-election in the fall. Infoboxes: An easy way to shorten a story is to pull information that’s not critical (yet interesting) from the story and place it in an infobox. Example: An infobox on a fire story could include the square footage of the building that burned; time of the 911 call reporting the fire; response time of the firefighters and number of firefighters involved; how long it took for the fire to be brought under control; a list of other recent fires in the area, if any. Infoboxes not only serve to deliver information quickly; they also are a “hook” that will often get your readers into the main story. Length limits: This can be a lessthan-desirable method of controlling story length but it can work well if your writers are aware that no story is to run more than, say, 500 words. The length limit need not be applied in all cases. but writers will eventually learn that they need to let you know if they are exceeding the limit – or running way short. As the editor of your newspaper, you’re a busy person. Having a handle on the length of your major stories helps you plan your day – and your design. *** Free design evaluation: Ed Henninger

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms

with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story.

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, here are five more words and remember what peace there may be in silence.

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms

with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story.

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, here are five more words and remember what peace there may be in silence.

This story is only 1,000 words long

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and

disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms

with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of

youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story.

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for

in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, here are five more words and remember what peace there may be in silence.

This story here is only 500 words long Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your

achievements as well as your plans. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in

your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not

distress yourself with imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons; they are vexatious to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you

may become vain and bitter - for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however humble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with imaginings or other things.

offers design evaluations – at no charge and with no obligation – to readers of this column. For more information, check the FREEBIE page on Ed’s website: henningerconsulting.com.

Online corrections: Do the old rules still apply? More and more individuals numerous times. care about their online reputaAlmost every court to have tions and think website publishconsidered the issue, including ers have a duty to help them a California appellate court, has shape it. About three-fourths of found the single publication rule employers say they screen potenapplicable to Internet publicatial candidates by searching for tion. When, however, a publisher them on the Internet.1 changes the content of a previSeventy percent have decided ously published article, an open not to hire someone on the basis question emerges as to whether of the search results.2 Companies the statute of limitations restarts. ONLINE are emerging that monitor indiGenerally, in deciding whether LEGALITIES viduals’ online reputations for a something constitutes a republicafee – sending letters to remove tion, a court will consider whether Ambika K. objectionable content and postthe publisher “substantially Doran ing positive or neutral content.3 modified” the content, whether it Although young people may intended the publication to reach sometimes seem like they do not care, a new audience and whether the publisher about 90 percent of them think websites had control over the republication. should be required to delete all stored Under this test, the different options information about individuals.4 for responding to a retraction request may People request retractions for a variety have different results. At one end of the of reasons, some of them traditional (i.e., spectrum, retracting the story altogether they believed the story was unfair), and would not constitute republication. others less traditional (individuals who This option presents the logistical difwere charged with but acquitted on crimificulty of totally removing content form nal charges years ago).5 Despite this, half of the Internet, which may require numernewsrooms don’t have a policy about how ous steps that a publisher does not even they will respond to requests for online contemplate (e.g., removal from social story retractions.6 networking sites), and also does not correct My DWT colleague, Thomas R. Burke, any misinformation. has been watching this issue for the past Writing an update to a previously decade, and one of his previous articles on published article is also not particularly this issue can be found at http://www.cnpa. risky, to the extent the new story does not com/full_story.cfm?id=2234. republish information contained in the old As this audience knows well, responding article, but it does not always solve an indito a demand to correct under California law vidual’s concern, as a web search may pull raises important legal issues that should up the original story but not the update. always involve consultation with your Issuing a correction or addendum to the newspaper’s counsel – particularly now that story, which is logistically and sometimes publishers may be tempted to make changethically more desirable, may trigger a new es to previously published articles that statute of limitations, depending on an may in turn, create new legal risks. Several analysis of the republication factors. If a possible responses to a demand to correct publisher adds substantial amounts of new exist, and each brings with it some risks. information to an article previously pubDepending on the severity of the alleged lished, it may start the statute of limitations factual mistake, options include: retracting running again. specific portions of the article, publishing a Asking the offended party to post a comcorrection or addendum that is appended to ment raises an entirely different legal risk. the online version of the story (and contem- Generally speaking, Section 230 of the poraneously published in the newspaper in Communications Decency Act immunizes as prominent a place as the original offendpublishers from content posted by third ing statement), writing a follow-up story, parties because the publisher is not the proand/or asking the offended individual to vider of the content. post a comment online.7 A publisher should therefore be wary of The first four all require consideration making specific suggestions as to the conof the “single publication rule,” which tent of the posting, or offering to edit it. If treats an edition of a print source, such as a it does, it may expose itself to liability from magazine, as one publication giving rise to any actions arising from the content of the one claim for libel, even if it was reprinted posting because it may be considered the

content provider. Ambika K. Doran, an associate with Davis Wright Tremaine LLP in Seattle, regularly counsels news clients and litigates media and intellectual property cases. Columnist Tom Burke will return next issue. Notes 1. Jeffrey Rosen, “The Web Means the End of Forgetting,” N.Y. Times (July 21, 2010), available online at http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/25/

magazine/25privacy-t2.html?_r=3&emc=eta1&pagew. 2. Id. 3. Id. 4. Id. 5. See Mallary Jean Tenora,”5 Ways News Organizations Respond to ‘Unpublishing’ Requests,” available online at http://www.poynter.org/column. asp?id=101&aid=187067 6. Kathy English, “The Longtail of News: To Publish or Not To Unpublish,” APME Online Journalism Credibility Project, available online at http://www.journalismproject.ca/en/attachments/Long%20Tail%20report_Kathy_ English.pdf. 7. See Tenora, “5 Ways,” http://www.poynter.org/column.asp?id=101&aid=187067

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Mac users’ Snow Leopard glitches solved I get more emails about Snow (found under the apple Leopard issues than just about in the top corner of anything else these days, with your desktop). Then the exception of PDF problems. click on “Print & Fax.” I’ve been following my emails Step 4: Click on the lately and average about three + (plus) button at the cries for help each day related to bottom of the list of Snow Leopard. printers in the Print & For those unfamiliar with Fax window. Snow Leopard, it is the latest Step 5: Follow along NEWSPAPER with the screenshot Mac operating system. While consulting with newspapers TECHNOLOGY that appears with far and wide over the past few this column. Set your Kevin Slimp months, problems with printers, Protocol to “Line PDF files and fonts since installPrinter Daemon.” ing the new operating system are commonSelect any IP address that pops place. up in the Address line. Enter As I mentioned last month, I’ve found a a name for the driver. I used fix for the disappearing Adobe PDF driver “Adobe PDF.” You can leave the issue. Since that column was released, I’ve Location line blank. Finally, click on the been flooded with emails asking for my “Print Using” line and select “Other.” findings. It was tempting to keep this disStep 6: Find the printer driver that covery to myself, meaning newspapers and you previously copied to the Resources others would have to hire me to learn my folder earlier. If you receive the prompt, “A little secret. queue for this printer already exists,” click Conscience, however, got the best of me. “Continue.” So I’ll share my secret with you. Step 7: Click on the “Add” button. You have successfully fixed the problem. Adding an Adobe PDF printer driver The next time you select “Print” in in Snow Leopard InDesign (or other programs), you should While visiting with newspapers over the see a printer named “Adobe PDF” or whatpast couple of months, I’ve actually come ever you named the printer during the across a couple of ways to tackle this issue. install. This morning, I installed Snow Leopard (10.6.4) on my iMac. Let me explain the Type 1 fonts disappearing method I used to fix this problem on this in Snow Leopard computer. Lisa Griffin, my good friend whose Step 1: Find the Adobe PDF printer drivserves as the technical guru for the Boone er on a backup drive or another computer Group of newspapers based in Alabama, in your workplace. I was able to find mine called while I was working on the printer on several backup drives. If you had an driver issue and asked if I’d run into a lot Adobe PDF printer driver on your computer of papers losing fonts when upgrading to before installing Snow Leopard, you should Snow Leopard. The answer was “yes,” but I be able to find it on a backup. It is located hadn’t spent much time trying to figure out in the Mac HD>Library>Printers>PPDs>Co why this was happening. ntent>Resources>enlproj folder. Whew. It’s good to have friends. Lisa told me Step 2: Copy that file to the Mac HD>Li she’d been working on this for some time brary>Printers>PPDs>Content>Resources and had noticed that some Type 1 fonts folder on your new system. You can skip worked fine in OS 10.6, but many didn’t. the enlproj folder from the previous step. After much trial and error, she found that Simply put the file in the Resources folder. if you copy your Type 1 fonts to the folder Step 3: Go to your System Preferences associated with a particular application,

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Webinars now and for later Online Media Campus webinars are available to CNPA members for as little as $35 per connection. Previous webinars are archived at onlinemediacampus.com. And these webinars are coming up: Producing Video for the Web and Monetizing It l Editorial 101: Writing for the Web l Management in Tough Times l Photoshop Tips and Tricks l InDesign Tips and Tricks l Editorial 201 l How-to Podcasts l Writing a Blog l Search Engine Marketing and Optimization l Live Blogging as Stories Unfold l Improving Your Web Site to Increase Traffic l 10 Best NEW Revenue Ideas for Newspapers l

they usually work fine from then on. For instance, if a particular font that is installed in the Fonts folder inside your Library folder isn’t showing up in InDesign, copy that font to the Applications>InDesign >Fonts folder. That should do the trick. I wish I’d known this a week ago. I was pulling my hair out while at a small newspaper that had recently purchased a couple of new computers. They were unable to get their fonts to match because some of the fonts on the old computers wouldn’t show up on the new ones. Hopefully, I’ll remember to send them this column. You might wonder why Apple chose to make changes to its latest operating system that causes these quirks to exist. I have no idea. Officially, from what I’ve read, Apple does not support Type 1 fonts any longer. They seem to work fine if you follow the previous suggestion, but still they are not officially supported. And don’t even get me started on the PDF printer driver debate. I’m still a little hot from my experience last month. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, visit my website (kevinslimp.com) to see how that turned out. Thanks, Lisa, for your assistance. And PC users, I apologize. This month’s column probably didn’t interest you at all. However, it might have given you something to use when arguing with your Mac friends. Kevin Slimp is a newspaper trainer and industry speaker. To reach him, visit kevinslimp.com.

CNPA members can view Inland Press Association webinars at the Inland rate of $75. Learn more at inlandpress.org. Here’s a preview: Supervisory Skills Training: Your Responsibilities as a Supervisor in 2010 l Untangling Web 2.0: Understanding Social Media in the Workplace l What to Expect from OSHA in 2010/2011 l New Ideas to Grow Revenue in Your Fourth Quarter l How to Improve Your Recruitment Packaging and Positioning l Increase Your Advertising Sales Through Local Business Seminars l Hiring and Testing Issues — What Every Employer Needs to Know l

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 California Publisher Fall 2010

Step it up: Make it easier on customers With all this talk of newspapers disappearnotice and visit your booth. Have a drawing, give ing from the national landscape in a couple of away balloons and/or offer face painting for the weeks, it’s more and more important to remind kids. If you attract the kids, the parents will follow. your readers and the entire community that Another effective and relatively cost-free way to you’re here ... and you’re going to stay. get positive exposure is to identify a good cause A good newspaper is part of the fabric of a and lead the effort to help. It might be an effort community. That connection has always been already underway or it might be something that the important and has reached a critical stage. In newspaper identifies and spearheads. this economy, with ever tightening budgets, It seems basic that a newspaper’s content needs newspapers have to figure out a way to do that to truly connect with the reader. That is even without spending much money. more critical now but also more difficult thanks NEWSPAPER I’ll call my remarks “back-to-basics marketto cutbacks in people and resources in the editoMARKETING ing on a shoestring.” rial department and a shrinking news hole due to Scott Little Event sponsorships are a good and typically slumping advertising. But there are newspapers cost-free way to be visible in your marketplace. that still make that connection. You can’t do them all, so you’ll want to pick the One idea is to conduct a poll, not just of readers highest-profile events that attract the greatest number of but the entire community. It doesn’t have to be expensive people. or terribly scientific. When possible, be the title sponsor and not just one of Maybe you can work with a local college marketing class. a long list of companies. “The Daily Times 10k Run” has In that poll, find out what the top five local issues are in a lot more impact than being lost in a montage of logos. the minds of the residents. Then deal with each in a series And, a title sponsor typically gets exposure in the entire ad of articles. It’s a natural, since you know the topics are of campaign, whether it’s online, in other print publications, interest to the reader. posters, broadcast, etc. It might be a good assignment for freelancers or a local Get your hands on a list of upcoming events, pick the college journalism class. ones that look the best, contact the organizers and attend Finally – and this is important – be accessible to the the planning meetings. When possible, be sure to have a community. In the pages of your paper and on your webbooth at the event. Come up with a reason for people to site, make it easy for people to find the right department

Scott Little is president of Media Recruiters, an Allied member of CNPA. Contact him at slittle@mediarecruiters. com or (530) 342-6036.

CNPA adds seven new members

PUBLISHER’S BOOKSHELF

From novice to novelist, Clemens rode the long road “Lighting Out for the Territory: How Samuel Clemens Headed West and Became Mark Twain,” by Roy Morris Jr. (2010, Simon & Schuster, 283 pages) Our cover essay chronicles Samuel Clemens’ days writing in Nevada, California and Hawaii, but it takes a full volume to paint the full pre-Twain picture. “Lighting Out for the Territory” is that book. From Clemens’ Hannibal, Mo., youth through his work as boat captain on the Mississippi River, along the stagecoach trail and amid his adventures and restlessness once out West, then on into the “Jumping Frog” era and just beyond, author Morris doesn’t miss a worthy detail. Morris includes two glimpses of Clemens from his journalistic contemporaries: From Bret Harte, writing for the Golden Era magazine, with offices downstairs from the San Francisco Call: “His head was striking. He had the curly hair, the aquiline nose, and even the aquiline eye – an eye so eagle-like that a second lid would not have surprised me – of an unusual and dominant nature. His eyebrows were very thick and bushy, His dress was careless, and his general manner one of supreme indifference to surroundings and circumstances.” From Charles Henry Webb, in the New York Round Table: “The foremost of the merry men of the California press is one who signs himself Mark Twain. … If he will husband his resources and not kill with overwork the mental goose that has given us these golden eggs, he may one day take rank among the brightest of our wits.” The celebrated Hal Holbrook version of Mark Twain is the one we moderns know best: the white-haired orator in the white suit, pontificating on characters and issues of the day while chomping on an old stogie. (You younger kids might try to conjure a blend of linen-wearing Tom Wolfe, with a dose of modern Will Durst and a shake of early Hunter S. Thompson. What? You don’t know about those

and the names, numbers and email addresses of the management staff. I like to see a one-line description of what each does. On one website I visit, it describes the publisher’s job as something like, “ultimately responsible for everything” and the editor as “responsible for all content.” A reader or advertiser should not have to do more than three clicks on your website to connect with the right person or department. And please, please take a close look at your phone system. As someone who calls newspapers for a living, I can tell you that trying to get to the right person or department can be daunting and frustrating. Menus that are too long and offer no easy way to connect with a real live person are the biggest problems. Half the time, when told to hit zero for an operator, you end up in queue for the circulation call center. Or you finally find a way to connect with advertising and end up in that department’s voice mail with no way to escape to an operator. What does all this have to do with marketing? Anything we can do to make the newspaper and website relevant to our readers’ everyday existence has to add immeasurably to our financial success. It’s that basic.

guys? Get to readin’.) Anyway, this book ends where that Twain starts. And the way Morris spins the tale, it’s a breeze to travel with Clemens through his earlier days. “Edges of Bounty: Adventures in the Edible Valley,” by William Emery and Scott Squire (2008, Heyday Books, 200 pages) The correspondent-at-large is a rare sighting these days. Publishers of small, local and especially rural newspapers would probably say, “Good thing” in most cases. You know the type: the city reporter who parachutes in, gets the lay of the land, jets out with stereotypical notions and makes your town sound like it’s rife with hayseeds and yokels. Maybe a little like Mark Twain did? Start reading “Edges of Bounty” and you might warily turn the pages expecting essays about foodie stalls at the Ferry Building or quick-hit sketches by wide-eyed city writers about locally sourced fruits and the glories of swiss chard. But you’d be wrong. These essays by writer William Emery and photos by Scott Squire tell how it’s done at a butcher shop in Chico. They feature the strawberry seller on a rural corner. They celebrate at a Basque festival and eat their way to stuffed at a Los Banos Basque restaurant. Their visits cover a dozen counties in all, from Butte in the north down to Tulare. They try to fish the Delta, and they visit a river rat who lives on his floating compound year-round. They milk cows. They deliver eggs. They sample everyone’s wares. They visit many of the places you wonder about when you’re barreling down the 99 or rolling up I-5, and they hit all the byways in between. They portray nothing as quaint. You know your town’s going to get more visitors once Guy Fieri visits your diner or Huell Howser drops in with his PBS photo crew. But these guys would do your documentary at a slower, more thoughful pace. For that, you’d like it. –Joe Wirt

The CNPA Board of Directors approved the applications of these new members at its July 16 meeting: Active: l Desert Valley Star, Desert Hot Springs; Dean Gray, publisher Campus: l Bear River Current, Bear River High School, Grass Valley; Terrill Korell, adviser l The Windjammer, Mayfair High School, Lakewood; Kari Schneider, adviser l The Cardinal Voice, Laguna Creek High School, Elk Grove; Erik Olson, adviser

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The Falconer, Torrey Pines High School, San Diego; Mia Boardman Smith, adviser Allied: l Impact Engine Inc., San Diego; Neil Greer, CEO l Wormhole LLC, Cambria; Sammy Papert, president CNPA membership, across all categories, is now 826, said Membership Chairman Dean Eckenroth, Coronado Eagle & Journal. For information on CNPA membership, contact Bryan Clark, (916) 288-6001; bryan@cnpa.com. l

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2010 Annual Convention & Trade Show, Sept. 30–Oct. 3, 2010 Omaha Hilton and Qwest Center, Omaha, NE Educational Sessions Two Preconvention Workshops Great Idea Exchange Five Roundtables-repeated Opening Breakfast/Keynote Speaker Eight Educational Sessions Twelve Community Building Symposium papers

Networking and Social Events Opening Reception in Exhibit Hall Henry Doorly Zoo Trade Show with the latest and greatest Awards Luncheon Toast to the Winners

For more information or program updates visit www.nnaweb.org/acts/2010 or call 800-829-4662


Fall 2010 California Publisher 

AWARD From page 1 name of Mark Twain and went on to global fame as a shortstory writer, novelist and public speaker, practiced his craft as a mobile correspondent in Nevada and California. A biographical essay on Clemens has resided in the Cal Press Hall of Fame files since its completion in 1958, (see accompanying cover story) but he never was elevated to honorary status, even through decades of consideration by the Hall of Fame judges. Rules for admission to the Hall of Fame, which was begun in 1957 and now contains many well-known publishers and editors from California’s rich newspaper history – plus a few lesser-knowns – never quite accommodated someone like Clemens, who was not a publisher or newspaper executive, nor did he impact the development and furtherance of California or local life in the way the confirmed Hall of Famers did. So the timing was right, at the centennial of Twain’s death, to create a statewide honor for those from the writerly world: editors, writers, cartoonists “whose journalistic work, either regional or statewide in nature, challenged the status quo,” as the award specifications state. As with the Hall of Fame, a committee will consider nominations and will require documentation in the form of a biographical essay. Also as with the Hall, nominees not favored in one year will be reconsidered in succeeding years. After all, Mark Twain had been under consideration since 1958. Here is an excerpt from the rules: To be eligible, nominees must have been newspaper editors, writers or cartoonists whose journalistic work, either regional or statewide in nature, challenged the status quo. Nominees’ work may even have been significant enough to reach past statewide boundaries. Nominees may have rendered service anytime from the beginning of newspapering in California to the present time. The California Newspaper Mark Twain Award is only awarded posthumously. There is no requirement that the nominee shall have devoted

Before Twain

The new Mark Twain Award joins three longstanding newspaper honors administered by the California Press Association: California Newspaper Hall of Fame honors deceased newspaper men and women whose outstanding devotion to their responsibilities resulted in substantial contributions to their regions and to the development of California. Pictured at left is Sam Brannan, California Star, inducted in 1958. Justus F. Craemer Newspaper Executive of the Year Award recipients are publishers, editors-in-chief and equivalents who have involved themselves in the directions of the editorial and news side of their newspapers by showing exceptional editorial achievement. Their newspaper has made an impact on its community or influenced local, state or national concerns as a result of their journalistic effort. Named for Justus F. Craemer, right. Philip N. McCombs Achievement Award honors distinguished publishers who are no longer fully active in the industry but who have served their communities well for an extended period and have made lasting contributions to the newspaper industry. Named for Philip N. McCombs, left.

his or her entire life to newspaper journalism in this state, but obviously a good portion of their career should have been in this profession in California. Papers should outline the nominee’s entire career as fully as possible, but with emphasis on major accomplishments that will make them likely candidates for election to the Mark Twain Award. Biographers are urged to use due diligence in verifying all facts and claims. Authentication and reference sources should be included whenever possible. Papers should be prepared in narrative style, including some local color and occasional anecdotes that help to convey to the judges the nominee’s character and personality.

Recognizing that when more than two eligible candidates are submitted in any one year, rejection by the judges does not mean the individual is unworthy of election. It is Committee policy that all newly submitted papers will be referred to the judges for consideration at least three times. There are no length restrictions on nomination papers, although most run between 5 and 10, double-spaced, typewritten pages. Original copies should be forwarded to Becky Clark, Chair of the Mark Twain Award Committee, P.O. Box 1855, Idyllwild, CA 92549, or to clarkr120@gmail.com. The committee will arrange for additional copies and for their distribution.

TWAIN From page 1 his later literary work. Early journalistic work Most of Clemens’ early writings were printed in his brother’s papers between July 1, 1852, and May 1853. “The Dandy Frightening the Squatter,” a short sketch depicting a bit of Missouri folklore, was published when Clemens was 17. It appeared in the Boston Carpet Bag in May 1852 and was probably his first published piece. The sketch tells about the squelching of a “spruce young dandy with a killing mustache” by a “tall brawny woodsman.” Other pieces which appeared shortly after the “Dandy” were “A Family Muss,” “Historical Exhibition – A No. 1 Ruse,” “‘Local’ Resolves to Commit Suicide,” “Picture Department,” and “Connubial Bliss,” all comic anecdotes which were published in the Journal. In 1853, having gained a journeyman’s status as a printer, Clemens traveled to St. Louis, New York, Philadelphia and Cincinnati, serving as a printer and newspaper contributor. During this period Clemens wrote “The Snodgrass Letters,” a series of humorous letters written in the dialect of a country lout traveling through the city for the first time. Adding to his earlier background, he spent four years as an apprentice Mississippi steamship pilot, developing new ideas and new subjects to write about. Then came a brief two or three weeks’ stint in the Confederate Army with Marion’s Rangers in the summer of 1861. In an abrupt change of mind and sympathies, Clemens quit the Rangers and accompanied Orion to Nevada. Nevada days They arrived in Carson City Aug. 14, 1861. Orion became secretary of the Nevada Territory, but Samuel put in a year of disappointing speculation in mining. Again he returned to journalism, taking a position as reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. There Clemens had the job of reporting local news and later the proceedings of the Nevada State Legislature. Frequently he wrote feature material that consisted of satires, burlesques and sometimes outright fabrications. In “Roughing It,” Clemens recalls multiplying “one wretched old hay truck dragging in from the country” by 16, and “imagining an Indian

attack on an emigrant wagon train to this day has no parallel in history.” It was while working on the Enterprise that readers started chuckling over articles carrying the byline of Mark Twain. The use of a pen name was undoubtedly an attempt by Clemens to separate his serious reporting from his humor. Henry Nash Smith says, “Although Mark Twain was privileged to say anything … or almost anything … he pleased, Sam Clemens was expected to practice serious journalism and most of the time he accepted this professional responsibility.” San Francisco days Before Clemens left the Enterprise, he had already published some of his writings in California. The first San Francisco paper to publish his work was the Golden Era, a weekly literary magazine. When Clemens was in San Francisco on one of his many trips from the mining country, Colonel Joe Lawrence, editor of the Era, persuaded him to write his observations on fashions and politics while he was in the city. In the summer of 1864 Clemens left the Nevada Territory for good to join the staff of the San Francisco Morning Call as a city reporter. The journalism that Clemens found in San Francisco was far from modern journalistic standards. San Francisco was still a rough and tumble seaport bulging with people who came from all over the world. In those times a newspaper could be started on a borrowed $20 gold piece – the way Michael and Charles De Young did when they founded the Daily Dramatic Chronicle in January 1865. In those times of personal and sometimes highly critical journalism, an editor had to worry about life and limb, not to mention his print shop. In 1865 after the announcement of Lincoln’s assassination, angry mobs marched through seven of the smaller San Francisco papers accused of being sympathetic to the South and tore up the shops, scattering type as they went. Some of the popular San Francisco papers in this period were the Daily Dramatic Chronicle, the Alta California, the Evening Bulletin, the News Letter and the Daily Morning Call. Clemens, long accustomed to the freedom

and bylines he enjoyed at the Enterprise, was disappointed by the anonymity of his job and by the editorial restrictions of the Call. Despite his personal feelings, he made the rounds covering the police court, the theater and the town in general. The Call described itself as a “remarkably spirited and chatty little journal, published at a cheap rate, having a large circulation and being full of piquant paragraphs, bits of scandal, sensation ‘items’ and special scraps of news interesting to its numerous lady readers.” Clemens had his own description of writing for the Call. He said that he “spread this muck out in words and phrases and made it cover as much acreage as he could.” This expression was typical of the light manner in which he referred to his literary efforts – efforts that were widely read in the San Francisco of his day. While at the Call, Clemens contributed to the Californian, a magazine, and became associated with such literary figures as its editor, Bret Harte, and Charles Warren Stoddard, Prentice Mulford and Joaquin Miller. Clemens’ literary restlessness kept him on the move and he left the Call before the year was out. He journeyed to the gold diggings at Jackass Hill and Angels Camp. There, Clemens composed “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.” This humorous story, published Nov. 18, 1865, in the New York Saturday Press; brought the “Washoe Giant” instant national fame. The big scoop Capitalizing on his newfound fame, Clemens hired out to the Sacramento Union in 1866 for a series of travel letters on a trip to the Sandwich Islands. During this trip he did what was probably his best and most serious reporting job. He wrote 25 letters for the Union, three of them dealing with Hawaiian industry and trade and their relation to American economics. Edgar Marquess Branch says, “This writing was specialized reporting, at times semi-technical … The letters represent his ability to assemble the facts and present them with clarity and force.” During his four months’ stay on the Islands, Clemens got the Union a scoop on the burning of the clipper ship Hornet. Recognizing it as front-page material, he

wrote a three-column story complete with interviews of survivors. All this was done in a few hours and dispatched on the first ship leaving for California. It was a remarkable scoop, and, when he returned to Sacramento, he was granted a $300 bonus by the Union editors. It has often been said that the Hawaiian letters represent the “last fling” of the wild humorist of the Pacific slope, and that they mark the transition from “Sam Clemens the itinerant journalist” to “Mark Twain the writer.” The letters have been hailed as Clemens’ best work during his stay in California except for his “Jumping Frog.” Last days in California When Samuel Clemens sailed for New York Dec. 15, 1866, he said that he was “leaving more friends behind than any other newspaperman that ever sailed out of the Golden Gate …” Those words closed the door on an important venture in California journalism. But, as historian Rockwell D. Hunt puts it, these years laid the “firm foundations for his unmatched literary distinction.” An appraisal Samuel Clemens was one of the first of many American reporters who have achieved literary fame. One of the important journalistic distinctions in his life is the fact that some of his first and most popular writings, such as the “Jumping Frog” and his Hawaiian letters, found their journalistic cradle in California newspapers. Anyone appraising Mark Twain as a newspaperman must look at the time he lived in the Golden State. It was a gaudy era and Mark Twain fitted well into that period. His work in California bolstered the newspapers of the day and helped them in their journalistic development. Thomas Emery wrote this article in 1958 while a junior at (then) Fresno State College. He was editor of The Collegian his senior year and worked at the Merced Sun-Star and The Fresno Bee. He received the MA at San Francisco State College and the MFA from the University of Iowa Writers Workshop. Emery taught at DePauw University in Indiana for 33 years and retired as professor emeritus of


10 California Publisher Fall 2010

CNPA 2010-2011 Board of Directors Officers:

Ron Redfern

Ralph Alldredge

President-elect President The Press-Enterprise Calaveras Enterprise San Andreas Riverside

Amy Pack

Vice President Visalia Times-Delta

John Burns

Secretary-Treasurer Petaluma Argus-Courier

Tony Allegretti

Immediate Past President MainStreet Media Group, Gilroy

Know how to fend off attackers? You may be a reporter, editor It’s time to stop thinking or publisher reading this, but for conventionally in a world that’s a moment, let’s pretend you’re a been turned upside down. You secret agent cornered by the bad can’t be transfixed by the loud, guys, an electric fence three feet shiny threats, even if they seem from your back. nearby. Coming at you is an attacker Whether it’s trying to juggle with a chain saw. Another has a more things on a desk shift or flaming torch and another a deadly figuring out your future, you viper. The fourth has a bucket of have to figure out what can liquid, and the last has a knife. actually do you real, long-term COMMON Whom do you shoot first? damage. SENSE Sounds a lot like being a jourCopy editors, for instance, are JOURNALISM nalist these days, doesn’t it? Your learning they have to concenDoug Fisher back’s against a wall – make the trate on the big threats, things wrong moves and your job or your like libel, fact and whether a profits could vaporize. If you are a copy story truly makes sense, and give up some editor, with smaller – often consolidated of the language and style niggles they’ve – desks, it might seem like you’re under attended to. Journalists in general need to attack hourly. look more at the big picture, but it’s still too So which threat do you kill first? often a “that’s always the way we’ve done it” If you said the chain saw attacker, or world out there. even the one with the torch, you’re like Only it isn’t. Even the “Web” is so 2005. many journalists I talk to: The loud, shiny Mobile, location-aware (Facebook now threat gets their attention (just as it often allows users to “check in” at locations – you does when we decide what to cover each don’t think with more than 150 million day). But it’s what cuts down your options users that’s going to take off, do you?), augthat can really kill you. mented reality services are the world you’re Shoot the attacker with the liquid. selling into. If it’s flammable and he douses you, the Social networking is not just another disguy with the torch can more easily set you tribution channel, though that’s how many ablaze. If it’s water and he soaks you, one newsrooms still treat it. Instead of just brush against that electric fence could kill pushing it out, how many have thought of you. actually trying to create social networks (in As long as you stay dry, you have more other words communities of interest) cenmaneuvering room. tered on various aspects of what they do?

NETWORKS From page 1

Directors: Jeff Ackerman The Union, Grass Valley Gerald A. “Jerry” Bean Yucaipa News Mirror Bill Brehm Jr. Brehm Communications Inc., San Diego Cheryl Brown The Black Voice News, Riverside Cherie Bryant Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale George Cogswell Ventura County Star Dean Eckenroth Coronado Eagle & Journal Karlene Goller Los Angeles Times Fred Hamilton Los Angeles Newspaper Group David Herburger Galt Herald Debra Hershon Half Moon Bay Review Terry Horne The Orange County Register, Santa Ana Bill Johnson Palo Alto Weekly Eric Johnston The Modesto Bee Gene Lieb Los Banos Enterprise Ed Moss The San Diego Union-Tribune Paul Nyberg Los Altos Town Crier Gary Omernick The Monterey County Herald Scott Pompe Tribune Community Newspapers Cynthia Schur Santa Maria Times Brenda Speth The Napa Valley Register Mike Taborski Feather River Bulletin, Quincy Mac Tully Bay Area News Group Frank Vega San Francisco Chronicle Edward A. Verdugo The Event News-Press, Cypress Marty Weybret Lodi News-Sentinel John Wilcox The Examiner, San Francisco Arnold York The Malibu Times

LANG, MediaNews, Newhouse, Belo, Cox, Ottaway, Lee and other independently owned newspapers. For more information, visit nationalpreprintnetwork.com Banner Network CNPA has launched a new online ad network for 143 newspapers (53 dailies and 86 weeklies) in California with a combined estimate page views of 473 million. The audience reachout of a 26 million population in California is 12.5 million, and it reaches 29 percent of the loyalists who go to newspaper Marketing web sites 19-plus days analyst Tiffany per month. Chiang joined CNPA has offered the CNPA staff. two webinars to explain how newspapers can be sellers of the network and how newspapers and agencies can pick up 15 percent commission selling the network. Clients can access the network by run of network, Northern California, Southern California, Congressional districts and weeklies only. CNPA offers a “web-safe” environment for advertisers’ messaging. Newspaper sites are “family safe.” It’s also an ad-friendly environment: Clients can expect ads on news sites to be an exceptionally positive and appropriate environment for political messaging. Classified Daily Network CNPA’s new Classified Daily Network, utilizing the power of California’s daily newspapers, will allow advertisers to hit the state’s largest markets with repetition. The advertiser’s 25-word classified ad will run in the papers’ best days, providing a unique opportunity to market their products or recruit employees around the state. Bulletin advertising Vendors and suppliers to the newspaper trade are buying ads on the CNPA Bulletin. They are exposing their messages to CNPA’s members for a very low price. The weekly Bulletin reaches key executives in CNPA’s 800-newspaper membership.

Your business is now retail, and that’s a different way of thinking. It’s the red dressgreen dress problem. What, I ask journalists, would you do if red dresses were selling like hotcakes? The usual answer: order more red dresses. That’s what we’ve always done as a wholesale business, pump out more. But the retailer doesn’t reflexively do that. Maybe the red-dress market is getting saturated. Maybe it’s time to move the green dresses up front and the red dresses back. The retailer pays attention to her customers, trying to understand what they want and how it fits with what she can provide so that her business is the most efficient. She also understands impulse buying (how many of you still don’t have a “buy this photo” button under each caption online?). It’s not pandering. It’s survival. So, back to our attackers. Whom do you shoot second? The one with the snake. If he throws it at you and you’re bitten, you’re dead within minutes. You’ll never get to the anti-venom, even if one exists. Eliminate him and you still have a better chance to dodge the others. After that? Well, you’re on your own. Doug Fisher (dfisher@sc.edu), a former AP news editor, teaches journalism at the University of South Carolina. Read past issues of Common Sense Journalism at www.jour.sc.edu/news/csj/index.html.

Cal-SCAN members earn rebates for participation California newspapers in the California Statewide Classified Advertising Network received rebates in July for their participation in the program for the January-to-June period. The Cal-SCAN network consists of 240 newspapers across California with a classified readership of more than 6 million. Advertisers receive a cost-efficient rate of $550 for a 25-word classified ad placed in 240 newspapers and the convenience of one order and one payment. The average cost is $2.29 per newspaper. Advertisers can order online 24/7 at Cal-SCAN.com. Nationwide and regional options are also available. Only CNPA-member newspapers are eligible to participate in the Cal-SCAN program. Learn more about membership at cnpa.com/association_join.cfm Newspapers may choose to participate actively or passively in the Cal-SCAN network. Active participants run the ads as well as sell ads into the network. Active newspapers receive 15 percent in commission on the gross cost of the ads they sell as well as a rebate for publishing the Cal-SCAN ads for 26 weeks. Passive participants receive a rebate for publishing the ads. Ads are emailed to newspaper contacts on Wednesday afternoon each week to run the following week. Learn more at cal-scan.com

Display network participants rebated Participants in the California Statewide Display Network also received rebates in July. The Cal-SDAN network consists of 140 newspapers across California with a readership of over 3 million. Advertisers receive a rate of $1,550 for a 2x2 (3.75”x2” size) display ad in 140 newspapers and the convenience of one order and one payment. The average cost is $11.07 per newspaper. Advertisers may order online 24/7 at Cal-SDAN.com. Ads 2x4 (3.75”x4”) in size, nationwide and regional options are also available. Only CNPA member newspapers are eligible to participate in Cal-SDAN. Learn more about CNPA membership at cnpa. com/association_join.cfm Newspapers may choose to participate actively or passively in the network. Active participants run the ads as well as sell ads into the network. Active newspapers receive 15 percent in commission on the gross cost of the ads they sell as well as a rebate for publishing the Cal-SDAN ads for 26 weeks. Passive participants only receive a rebate for publishing the ads. Ads are emailed to newspaper contacts on Tuesday afternoon each week to run the following week. Learn more at cal-sdan.com


Fall 2010 California Publisher 11

AD REMAKE

Image is prime topic for busy shoppers By David Fowler Special to California Publisher How important is the adâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;imageâ&#x20AC;?? VERY. Based on its image, readers decide to read an ad or not in 1/20 of a second. In less than the blink of an eye, readers make a â&#x20AC;&#x153;readâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;no readâ&#x20AC;? judgment. So how do photographs, graphic elements, colors, typefaces, white space or clutter cause the life or death judgment of the ad? If the image in the ad matches the self-image held by the reader, they most likely will read the ad. Like attracts like. But if readers determine the adâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s image is â&#x20AC;&#x153;beneathâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;aboveâ&#x20AC;? the self-assessed social status, they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read the ad. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why sales reps must correctly identify the â&#x20AC;&#x153;self-imageâ&#x20AC;? of the advertiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prospects. Untrained reps can â&#x20AC;&#x153;churnâ&#x20AC;? advertisers. When the owner of a large flooring center came to my ad workshop, he wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happy with the leads generated by the paper. He showed me the ad. Yup. It was bright, busy and cartoonish. So I asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ad attracting?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aggressive bargain-hunters,â&#x20AC;? he said. The rep wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trained to ask who the ad should attract. And the artist (without information from the rep), couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t portray the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visual merchandising of products in the ad. Untrained reps cost newspapers advertisers ... and produce results like the

ad on the near right. So by asking the right questions, I learned the target was: l Wealthy women. l Sophisticated/classy. l Value conscious. In a walk-through, I saw the store was: l Well organized. l Modern. l Bright/well-lit. l Spacious between displays. With this information I worked with the rep and artist. Together we produced an ad that projected something like the ad on the far right. It was the right â&#x20AC;&#x153;imageâ&#x20AC;? that saved a ready-to-churn advertiser. Looking at both ads, you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think it was the same store. The new changes brought sophisticated women spending more money per transaction. In fact, this ad generated over $180,000 more than their best-ever sale ad from the past. The power of targeting by â&#x20AC;&#x153;image.â&#x20AC;? To increase ad revenues and stop churn, have David Fowler train your reps, artists and advertisers. Call (760) 822-2133 or email gofinddavid@gmail. Buy his latest book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultimate Moneymaking Newspaper Ads,â&#x20AC;? at davidfowlerads.com.

Before: This ad has problems: 1. The ad is colorful, bright, and cartoonish: perfect if their customer is a bargain-hunter; which they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. 2. The ad is choppy and cluttered, the opposite of the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s display strategy. 3. The pictures are too small and the blue background makes reading more difficult. 4. The logo is at the top ...wrong place.

After applying successful ad strategies: 1. When you use bigger photographs, readers can see more details about these beautiful floors. 2. A white background cleans up the ad and makes the store appear bigger, more spacious. 3. The headline, subheads and body copy are organized into three equalsize columns, making the copy easy to read quickly. 4. The logo is at the bottomâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;where it belongs.

With CNPA Foundation help, news is good Robin Epley, CSU Chico Intern at the Chico Enteprise-Record Without CNPAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s internship grant, I might not have been able to intern anywhere this summer. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tough market for everyone these days and when I was able to take money off the table, I was judged on

INTERN DIARIES my skills as a fledgling reporter, not by the amount of money in their budget. I was never once made to feel like â&#x20AC;&#x153;the intern,â&#x20AC;? and I admire their professionalism

If we want quality journalism in the future, we must help to pay for it now. This past year, support from Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newspaper publishers

N L I N E N O W!

enabled the CNPA Foundation to fund eight college internships,

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provide 15 campus newspapers with grants for editorial and production equipment and cover

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training for high school newspaper advisers. Fewer state funds are

being devoted to equipment, scholarships and training. We, the journalism leaders of today, must find the money to make it happen. Regardless of whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $25 that you include with your CNPA dues or $100,000 that you dedicate to an endowment, every penny helps and goes directly to scholarships, equipment or training. So please

donate today!

Foundation

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gene Lieb Publisher, Los Banos Enterprise Chairman, CNPA Foundation

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30

and dedication to the job. I think the most important thing I gained from my experience this summer was a taste of my future. Because of my CNPA Foundation grant, and because of their belief in me and my skills, I can go back to school this fall with the knowledge that this industry is exactly where I want to be. Kristine Guerra, CSU Sacramento Intern at The Orange County Register, Santa Ana When I was first sent out to cover an event and shoot photos, I walked out of the office armed with my digital camera and what little I remembered from a few photography lectures. The photos werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as good as they wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been if a real photographer had shot them, but my editors were nevertheless appreciative of my efforts. Overall, my 10 weeks at The Register were challenging, exciting, educational, frustrating, interesting and entertaining.

Epley

Guerra

North

I have learned how to write stories on short deadlines, and how to write a news brief from a press release. Working in the newsroom has exposed me to the atmosphere and dynamics of writing for a newspaper. I am very thankful for my internship, because it has provided me with a glimpse into my future and given me skills that will help get me there. Hillary Haenes, CSU Bakersfield Intern at The Bakersfield Californian My internship at The Bakersfield Californian went above and beyond my expectations. Learning the daily tasks expected of reporters was stressful at times, but always exciting. I enjoyed juggling multiple stories at once and working with three wonderful editors who let me look over their shoulders and provide input when my articles were being edited. Working with different editors and covering both local news and entertainment features has made me a stronger writer because I got to write both concisely and creatively.

Michael North, CSU Chico Intern at the Merced Sun-Star Since I started my internship, *** Albert Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve covered the nearby cities of The Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 interns Atwater and Livingston. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also also included James Sinclair, Santa covered some crime, fire and other Barbara City College (intern at The events in Merced. Independent, Santa Barbara); Mihiri Public Records Act requests Weerasinghe, El Camino College, have served as a valuable tool for Torrance (Gardena Valley News); me in my position. Since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been and Jeremy Zeller, UC Santa Barbara here, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve filed three. Two are still (Acorn Newspapers, Agoura Hills). pending, and one helped me shed Applicants for the CNPA Haenes light on the illicit funding of a Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 Internship Grants recall campaign in Livingston. program have until Nov. 5 to postMy internship ended recently, but I was mark their work samples, transcripts and given the privilege of a full-time position. references. Successful applicants receive a $1,000 Tara Albert, CSU Fresno Foundation stipend upon beginning the Intern at The Fresno Bee internship at a CNPA-member newspaper. I worked as a night reporter, mainly Foundation grants can cover newsroom, following the crime and medical issues in advertising or marketing internships. Fresno. Applications at cnpa.com.


12 California Publisher Fall 2010

No kidding: There’s no news here This summer, during walks in our neighborhood, I saw nothing newsworthy. Here are some of the non-news stories: There’s a guy building a knee wall around his front yard. He’s been at it for months. Over there’s the lady with the yard décor that changes with the seasons. A few doors down is the guy who built the custom speedboat AND the pro-street Camaro. There’s a guy around the corner who might be violating some ordinance fixing other people’s motorcycles in his garage. I always see the lady who’s endlessly digging in her muddy front yard with the talk radio blaring. Around the block are two dad-dudes who trade off on the nightly barbecuing while their kids play hoops in the street. A block over, one guy has three trailers in his driveway: boat, boat, utility. There are at least CNPA two ice-cream men OUTREACH in our neighborhood; Joe Wirt I wonder if they ever throw down over turf? This just in: The neighbor girl has a new puppy. Closer to home, our local correspondent reports quail in the backyard. From our roving correspondent: The blackberries are almost gone at the creek. Nah. None of that hyperlocal news here. *** By the time I’m forced to give up my print habit for a pocket-sized viewing appliance, I hope to see some of my favorite features with their own app. Meantime, I can still find many of them in my local newspaper – or online: Wee Pals. My early memories as a kid of meeting Morrie Turner stick with me even today. His Sunday melting-pot strip does, too. creators.com/comics/wee-pals.html Cheap Thrills Cuisine. A comic strip you can use. Even kitchen klutzes can cook this stuff. arcamax.com/cheapthrillscuisine Auto Album. I’ve been a fan of Tad Burness’ old-car feature ever since he drew a version of my Pop’s 1964 Barracuda back in ’77. kingfeatures.com/ features/columns/autoalbm/about.htm Joe Six Pack. Joe’s from Philly. Lots of beer there. And where you are, too. Joe knows his brew. Do you? joesixpack.net Straight Dope. The thinking-man’s Q&A column. All the important questions, Cecil Adams can answer (except car repair. For that, see Click & Clack.) straightdope.com/ *** In adding RSS and Twitter feeds to my daily routine, do I get a proper return on investment for my time spent? I dunno. Amid all the mayhem, I find enough local flavor to make it worthwhile most of the time. And I come across a few newsworthy bits worth sharing with others in the CNPA universe. New ways to find news; new ways to spread it. Never enough time to keep up. Oh. In case you missed it, we added an RSS feed to the CNPA website. You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter. Yell if you need anything. Joe Wirt is the editor of California Publisher. He is also secretary-treasurer of the CNPA Foundation. Contact him at joe@cnpa.com or (916) 288-6021. On Twitter: @joeCNPA

LEGAL From page 1 Q: Now, wait ... A: I know, I know. You can’t afford to be calling your lawyer every time one of these questions comes up, just to have him or her tell you whether it was necessary to consult in the first place. The real question is, do you have any choice? Q: Okay, do you have any choice? A: Are you a CNPA member? Q: Yes. A: You have a choice. CNPA operates a legal helpline, staffed by two attorneys. They do other things as well – you remember the old saw about no one’s person or property being secure while the Legislature is in session? – but part of their jobs is to answer any question asked by any CNPA publisher or publisher’s employee about law and legislation as they affect newspaper work. Nine times out of 10 they will be able to answer your question immediately and without qualification. But if you will need to consult your own attorney in addition, they’ll tell you that. And if your attorney needs further information on specialized newspaper legislation or case law (he or she is probably not a specialist in this area), they’ll be glad to consult. Q: What does this cost? A: It’s a member service – a benefit of belonging. Q: What if I’m a small newspaper publisher – there just aren’t that many legal questions that come up, are there? A: Do you publish legal notices? Do you mail your newspapers? Do you distribute using newsracks? Do you work with independent contractor carriers or freelance journalists? Do you cover city hall? Do you accept housing ads? Do you report on the courts? Do you get information from local police or sheriff’s departments? Do you ever get troublesome ad copy, letters to the editor or worry about your com-

ments section on the web? Do your employees work overtime? Do you ever have someone tell you that the law requires you to do something or not to do something – and you’d like a second opinion? Q: OK, OK. But suppose I’m one of the newspaper publishers with a corporate or in-house counsel to consult with? A: They call CNPA too, and they’re welcome to. Q: How soon can I get an answer to my question? A: Usually when you call. If not, usually within hours if the lawyers are in Sacramento. If you tell the staff you need an immediate answer, you’ll get one as soon as the lawyers are in touch with the office – wherever they are. Q: Are there limits to what CNPA lawyers will tell me? A: Yes. If your question is whether or not to print something that may be libelous, they will tell you what the basic rules are, but they will not advise you whether to print or not; they will advise you to consult with your own attorney. The same goes for retraction demands. And if your question is about the behavior of a competing newspaper that is a CNPA member, they will comment on your rights and obligations in a general way, and would, of course, give the competing member newspaper the same information. Q: Why these restrictions? A: As for libel, CNPA attorneys are not close enough to the situation in your community to weigh all the factors that should be considered in advising whether or not publication risks liability. Those factors have to do with the position of the various potential parties in the community, the issues in the story as perceived locally, and the impact of the story on various individuals and groups that may be involved. Every published opinion from an appellate court in the libel area represents a very particularized mix of these factual elements.

They can tell you what appear to be the relevant rules, but they can neither tell you with certainty that the rules apply in your case nor predict what may be an equally important outcome: whether the person you’re about to irritate is likely to sue. Q: What about competitors who are CNPA members? A: As a matter of fairness and to avoid conflicts of interest, CNPA’s lawyers will not advise one member against another. A CNPA lawyer will, on the other hand, provide legal information – what a statute says or what the cases have held – but would freely provide the same information to any other member. Q: What if the competitor is not a CNPA member? A: Ask away. Q: Does the publisher have to make the call to CNPA himself or herself, or authorize each call by his or her staff? A: Not as far as CNPA is concerned. Its attorneys take calls from reporters, editors, ad takers, production, circulation and human resources personnel. In fact, probably most of the calls come from someone other than the publisher – usually reporters, editors and department heads. Some publishers may not be aware of how much their staffs rely on the CNPA legal helpline. On the other hand, some of your employees probably aren’t aware a CNPA attorney will answer their questions directly. Q: Who are the CNPA attorneys? A: Legal Counsel Jim Ewert, (916) 288-6013 or jim@cnpa.com; and General Counsel Tom Newton, (916) 288-6015 or tom@cnpa.com. If neither is immediately available, contact Legislative Assistant Christine Caro, (916) 288-6014 or chris@ cnpa.com. Q: What’s the main disadvantage in calling them? A: They won’t always give you the answer you would prefer – or that they would prefer, for that matter. Q: What’s the main advantage? A: They answer more than a thousand calls like yours each year. And they’re on your side.

HELPLINE From page 2 would be interested in filling one of the seats. None of the council members shared their positions nor was any consensus reached on any of the issues the council members discussed in the emails. Does the exchange of emails constitute a violation of the serial meeting provision in the Brown Act?

A:

Probably. The serial meeting provision of the Brown Act, found in California Government Code Section 54952.2(b), was amended several years ago to prohibit a majority of the members of a legislative body, outside a meeting authorized by the Act, from using a series of communications of any kind, directly or through intermediaries, to discuss, deliberate or take action on any item of business that is within the subject-matter jurisdiction of the legislative body. That the council members reached no decision in the email communications is not relevant in analyzing whether the exchange constituted a serial meeting. A violation can occur if a majority discusses, deliberates OR takes action. In the emails three current council members discussed the relative merits of calling a special meeting to appoint new members to the council vs. conducting an election involving only write-in candidates. The council has the authority to make this decision because it is an item of business that falls within the subject matter jurisdiction of the council. Once the third member of the council responded to the emails that included the comments of the other two members, the serial meeting violation occurred.

Q:

I am trying to obtain from our local sheriff the booking photo of a man who was arrested and charged with 200 counts of

fraud and forgery. The sheriff’s department usually provides them to us, but in this case the district attorney’s office has opposed the release of the photo, and the sheriff is honoring the D.A.’s request. Do we have any way of getting the photo?

A:

There is little authority on whether law enforcement agencies have an obligation to make mug shots public. While the CPRA exempts investigatory records, it generally requires law enforcement agencies to disclose the basic details associated with an arrest or incident report, including an arrestee’s physical description: date of birth, color of eyes and hair, sex, height and weight. The California attorney general has issued an opinion asserting that “mug shots fall within the ‘records of investigations’ exemption of California Government Code Section 6254, subdivision (f).” This conclusion is based on the premise that “[a] mug shot is used by the police not only to identify the person arrested, but to determine if he or she is wanted on any other charge. Mug shots from earlier arrests may be used during subsequent investigations to identify individuals suspected of committing crimi-

nal offenses.” The requirement that a physical description of an arrestee shall be disclosed under section 6254(f) provides a strong legal argument for the routine disclosure of mug shots. A picture of a person who is arrested provides the most accurate and complete description of an individual’s physical characteristics. In most cases no purpose is served by depriving the public of mug shots. It is noteworthy that the attorney general also concluded that law enforcement agencies MAY disclose mug shots. As a matter of practice, many law enforcement agencies routinely make mug shots of arrestees available. It might be worth a phone call to the D.A. to learn why he asked the sheriff not to disclose the photo and, depending on the response, when you can expect the photo to be released. Moreover, even if there is a current investigative purpose justifying the withholding of the photo, eventual disclosure and publication could lead to more victims coming forward and further aid the investigation. For more about using the Helpline, see this issue’s cover story. Call Jim Ewert with your questions at (916) 288-6013.

More than 1,800 California newspaper executives and department heads from 120 dailies and 415 weeklies receive California Publisher.

One captive audience. California Publisher advertising: Call (916) 288-6017


Fall 2010 California Publisher 13

CONTAC T

Submit a story idea, letter or comment to California Publisher: Joe Wirt (916) 288-6021 joe@cnpa.com Advertise in California Publisher: Diane Donohue (916) 288-6017 diane@cnpa.com Order a CNPA book or directory: Debbie Gerber (916) 288-6012 dgerber@cnpa.com Get help with a legal issue: Jim Ewert (916) 288-6013 jim@cnpa.com Legislative issues: Tom Newton (916) 288-6015 tom@cnpa.com Place a recruitment ad: Debbie Foster (916) 288-6018 debbie@cnpa.com Better Newspapers Contest: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan@cnpa.com Membership Services: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan@cnpa.com Donations to the CNPA Foundation: Joe Wirt (916) 288-6021

PEOPLE

U S Top positions

Terry Horne, president and publisher of The Orange County Register in Santa Ana, in July added oversight of Freedom Communications’ Pacific Region. Horne succeeded Julie Moreno. His Pacific Region includes Freedom properties in Marysville, Porterville and Victorville and The Sun in Yuma, Ariz. Also at The Register, chief financial officer Michael Henry is now also general manager of Orange County Register Communications, and Tom Kelly, vice president of advertising, became interim senior vice president of sales. Monica Lozano, publisher and CEO of La Opinión in Los Angeles, was named CEO of impreMedia, parent company of La Opinión. She succeeded John Paton, who became CEO of Journal Register Co. Mitchell Stern became chief executive officer at Irvine-based Freedom Communications Inc. He had been in broadcasting with Fox and with DirectTV and succeeded Burl Osborne, who had been interim CEO since the departure of Scott Flanders in July 2009.

Advertising

Bob Brown became corporate director of advertising and marketing at Las Vegas-based Stephens Media LLC. He had been advertising director for the Las Vegas Review-Journal/Sun. Previously, he had been advertising manager at The Sacramento Bee and earlier was with Sparks Newspapers. JJ Jones became vice president of sales and marketing for Inland Newspapers. She had been retail advertising manager at the Reno Gazette-Journal. In addition to The Sun, Inland includes the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin in Ontario and the Redlands Daily Facts. Edward B. Lasak became senior vice president of finance and publishing opera-

tions at The Press-Enterprise in Riverside. He had been vice president of finance and publishing operations. Lasak previously was with The Tribune Company and The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Kenneth J. Nelson is now senior vice president of advertising and interactive development at The Press-Enterprise in Riverside. He had been vice president of advertising since 2007 and previously was with The Ventura County Star and The Orange County Register.

Circulation

Aaron J. Kotarek became vice president of circulation and distribution at The Press-Enterprise in Riverside. He had been senior director, distribution and customer care and previously was with The Record in Stockton, The Savannah (GA) Morning News and Thomson Newspapers. Joe Robidoux became vice president of circulation for Inland Newspapers. Robidoux was vice president of circulation for LANG’s Metro group. Robidoux, with LANG since 1991, also has worked for The Orange County Register, Oxnard PressCourier and Fullerton Daily News.

Interactive

Jeff Herr became vice president of interactive for the California Newspaper Partnership, which publishes more than 80 California newspapers. He had been corporate director of interactive media at Lee Enterprises for the past seven years.

Newsroom

John Arthur is serving as interim editor at The Bakersfield Californian. His arrival followed the departure of Mike Jenner, who joined the faculty at the University of Missouri. Jenner had been with The Californian since 1993. Arthur had been with the Los Angeles Times for 23

years before departing as executive editor in July 2009. Michael Donnelly became editor of the Napa Valley Register. He had been assistant managing editor for content management at the Quad-City Times of Davenport, Iowa. Previously, Donnelly was assistant managing editor for new media at the North County Times in Escondido. Donnelly succeeded Bill Kisliuk, who took a reporting position with Los Angeles Times Community News. Claudia Elliott became managing editor of the Tehachapi News in Kern County. She had been editor of the Porterville Recorder since December 2009 and previously had published the Southern Sierra Messenger. Joann Groff became editor of the Moorpark Acorn. She had been reporter and succeeded Kyle Jorrey, who continues as editor of the Simi Valley Acorn. Groff has been with the Acorn newspapers since August 2006. Deirdre Hussey became executive editor at The Examiner, San Francisco. Hussey, with The Examiner since 2002, had been managing editor. She succeeded Jim Pimentel, who became director of special projects at parent company Clarity Media Group. Jim Kelly became senior editor for dayside operations at The Desert Sun in Palm Springs. Kelly most recently was editorial page editor of The Honolulu Advertiser. Linda Renn became managing editor of the Dinuba Sentinel following The Sentinel’s acquisition by Mid Valley Publishing. Renn, most recently an assistant Metro editor at The Fresno Bee, previously was editor of the Hanford Sentinel. Kris Viesselman became managing editor and creative director at The San Diego Union-Tribune. She had been with National Geographic.

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14 California Publisher Fall 2010

OBITUARIES Paul Conrad, Los Angeles Paul Conrad, who won the Pulitzer Prize three times for his political cartoons while at the Los Angeles Times, died Sept. 4, 2010, of natural causes in Rancho Palos Verdes. He was 86. “Many journalists like to talk of the imperative of afflicting the comfortable and comforting the afflicted,” The Times’ obituary said. “Conrad embraced the credo with abandon. ‘Don’t ever accuse me,’ he liked to say, ‘of being objective.’” Conrad retired in 1993. Wayne Field, Lodi Wayne Field, a former Lodi journalism adviser and 1972 honoree as CNPA instructor of the year, died July 5, 2010. He was 84. Field taught eighth grade journalism before moving to Lodi High School, where he advised The Flame newspaper from 1961 to 1981 and also advised the yearbook. He worked with state officials to update the California Education Code regarding freedom of the press for high school publications. Barbara Greenspun, Las Vegas Barbara Greenspun, publisher of the Las Vegas Sun since husband Hank’s death in 1989, died June 1, 2010, in Las Vegas. She was 88. “As for enduring legacies, my mother would claim that her family is her legacy,” said oldest son Brian, editor of The Sun. “We know what she believed and have learned what she taught, and she will expect us to continue, just as she would if she were here.” Woody Laughnan, Fresno Woody Laughnan, who followed a career as a reporter, printer, editor, ad salesman and publisher with a 21-year stint as a columnist for The Fresno Bee, died July 12, 2010, in Fresno. He was 86. Laughnan worked at newspapers in Martinez and Montana, as general manager of the Gilroy Dispatch and publisher of the Paso Robles Press before joining The Bee in 1967.

Dave Leone, El Centro Dave Leone, former publisher of the Imperial Valley Press in El Centro, died May 27, 2010, in Palm Desert after a battle with cancer. He was 55. Leone, El Centro publisher from 2000 to 2007, most recently had been publisher of the Aberdeen (S.D.) American News. Betty Mead, Tehachapi Betty Mead, former owner and publisher with husband Bill of the Tehachapi News, died July 12, 2010, of a heart attack. She was 79. The Meads began publishing The News in 1977 and bought the paper from Dick and Warren Johnson in 1980. They sold it to The Bakersfield Californian in 1998. Bill Mead died in 2008 at age 80. Edward Neumeier, Marin Edward Neumeier, an award-winning Eureka reporter who went on to a journalism teaching career and in school administration, died Aug. 25, 2010, of lung complications. He was 86. During his administrative career in the Tamalpais Union High School District, Neumeier helped to develop student press bureaus in three of the district’s high schools. Franz Schurmann, San Francisco Franz Schurmann, the co-founder in 1970 of Pacific News Service, died Aug. 20, 2010, in San Francisco. He was 84. The cause was advanced Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Schurmann and partner Sandy Close ran the news service for more than 35 years. Darrow Tully, San Francisco Darrow “Duke” Tully, a former president of the San Francisco Newspaper Agency, Arizona Republic publisher and Wick Communications executive, died June 20, 2010, in Tampa, Fla., after a stroke. He was 78. Among his survivors is Michael “Mac” Tully, MediaNews Group vice president and publisher of the San Jose Mercury News.

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Profile for Joe Wirt

California Publisher Fall 2010  

News, trends and updates in California's newspaper industry.

California Publisher Fall 2010  

News, trends and updates in California's newspaper industry.

Profile for joewirt