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Summer 2011

Volume CI, No. 2

Helping your business is our Job One By Thomas W. Newton CNPA Executive Director In the early days of his leadership of CNPA, Jack Bates decided to attend a quarterly meeting of the Newspaper Association Managers (NAM). He came home from the meeting of this nationwide group of newspaper trade association executives and told his staff how wide his eyes had been opened. At our Monday morning management meeting, Jack said he was shocked at the number of things we were not doing on behalf of our members. Jack was amazed, enlightened and totally fired up at the

wealth of information these press association experts were so willing to share with a newbie. Jack returned to NAM again and again, and soon his small staff was engaged in all sorts of new activities to provide more value to CNPA members. Jack quickly stole the best of his colleagues’ ideas, souped them up and put them into motion at CNPA. In the next decade, CNPA grew from a small but effective lobbying operation into a thriving newspaper association with two new wholly owned subsidiary corporations. One of them, the for-profit CNPA Services, Inc., grew

CNPA Executive Director Tom Newton joins in the tribute to Jack Bates, his predecessor, at the Press Summit in April.

See NEWTON Page 2

Former presidents Craemer, Person

New conventioneers

Two former CNPA presidents, both tremendous leaders and supporters in their communities and statewide, have died. Jack Craemer, former publisher of the Marin Independent Journal and 1965 president of CNPA, died March  in San Rafael from a stroke. He was 94. Evert Person, former publisher of The Press Democrat in Santa Rosa and CNPA president in 1981, died March 8 in Rancho Mirage of complications of pneumonia. He was 96.

STEVE O’DONOGHUE / CALIFORNIA SCHOLASTIC JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

Student journalists and advisers from several Southern California high schools pause for a photo during the national JEA/NSPA Spring Convention in Anaheim. Their attendance was part of a yearlong outreach effort funded by the McCormick Foundation and administered by the CNPA Foundation. Support for the 10 schools’ programs has

included training for the teacher-advisers, regular mentoring visits from veteran journalism advisers, and connections with several college and university journalism departments. The McCormick Foundation has renewed its support of the program through Fall 2011. For more on the Anaheim event, see Page 7.

Be bold! Hybrid presses can give print product a new life By Ted Markle Special to California Publisher Print newspapers are on death watch, some say. Consider these ominous statistics from a 2010 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development report. Since 2007, U.S. circulations declined by 0 percent, U.K. by 25 percent and Canada by 17 percent. Even growth in developing countries couldn’t offset global newspaper declines. Subscribers are migrating to free online content. Advertisers are following them, though with much tighter wallets. Who can blame newspaper publishers for wanting to bury their heads in the sand? Yet as many people inside and outside the news-

I N S I D E

Publisher Profile Richard Esposito

Mountain Democrat, Placerville

paper industry minimize print’s future, new hybrid press technology is enabling a significant rebirth. Visionary publishers are using this innovative technology to reinvent their print versions. They’re leveraging the unique capabilities of hybrid presses to deliver newspapers that not only look different, but also attract new, non-traditional and high-end advertisers from Tiffany to Chanel: advertisers that previously considered newsprint reproduction inappropriate for their premium-level merchandise. So, what’s the benefit of getting outside the tired old print newspaper model? Attracting advertisers that now will find

From the President ........ 2

Online Legalities ....... 4

People ......... 13

See HYBRID Page 6

Advertising ..... 5

Obituaries .... 14

California Newspaper Publishers Association

Pg. 3

Legal Helpline ........ 2

Outreach ........ 7 Writing .......... 10 Calendar ..... 12

2000 O St., Suite 120, Sacramento CA 95811 (916) 288-6000

Jack Craemer, 1917-2011 Craemer was with the newspaper from 1947 until he and co-publisher Wishard Brown sold it to The Gannett Co. in 1980. The newspaper had been in their families since the 190s. Craemer was born Feb. 8, 1917, in Santa Ana. His father was coowner of the Orange Daily News and, as a boy, Craemer ran errands and worked Jack Craemer as a messenger at the paper. He graduated from Stanford University in 199 with a degree in economics. He began his career in journalism in 1940, working for the Holtville Tribune in Imperial County. During World War II he served in field artillery in the Aleutians, New Caledonia and Saipan. He was awarded a Bronze Star. He also served on the staff of Yank magazine, a military publication, and as a member of the Army’s public information staff. After the war he worked as a reporter for the Turlock Daily Journal before joining the San Rafael Daily Independent. “He shined the light on public proceedings,” said Gary Giacomini, a former Marin County supervisor who worked as the IJ’s lawyer before he entered politics. “He really loved to have the paper’s coverage everywhere.”

Fax (916) 288-6002

See PRESIDENTS Page 4

www.cnpa.com


2 California Publisher Summer 2011

T H E C N PA M I S S I O N To champion the ideals of a free press in our democratic society and to promote the quality and economic health of California newspapers

A value-added proposition steep and inevitable decline toward Most people in this country irrelevance and extinction. believe the newspaper indusOur association can help contry is in trouble. Our financial vey a more accurate and positive statements in recent years message of what is happening in have provided some evidence our industry. As the largest state to support that view. But those newspaper association in the counstatements and other measures try, representing both dailies and of our business also reveal an weeklies, chains and independents, industry that has embraced we are in a unique position to help innovation while remaining the FROM THE our members and our industry find most trusted source for news a successful path through a rapidly in a world where the rapidly PRESIDENT increasing volume of data avail- Ralph Alldredge changing environment. California is also home to some of the leadable to everyone places an evering technology companies whose increasing value upon brevity, Internet search engines, mobile computer accuracy and reliability. products and software applications are cruEven if they accept that reality, pescial to our ability to attract Internet users simists insist that the newspaper industry who will pay for newspaper content. will never be able to charge a reasonable I am pleased to announce that in May, price for access to news that has been given the CNPA Executive Committee approved away free for many years, particularly so the formation of six new ad hoc commitlong as it can be obtained from any source tees. One of those committees will focus without charge. Surely they said the same upon means to improve the public image of thing in the early days of the bottled water our industry, our association and its memindustry, when water ran freely from every bers. Another will explore the possibilities tap, but today American consumers pay of finding mutual benefits in new alliances billions of dollars for bottled water. And with technology companies whose products the only reason people are willing to pay and services have already had a significant even more per gallon for bottled water than impact upon our business. gasoline is a perception that it is more reliI will be sending a letter to the board and able than free tap water. our membership with more details about I’m old enough to remember the days these new committees. when people laughed at the idea that anyWhile the value of a trade association one would ever pay for television programs, should be greatest when its members face which were broadcast free to every comthe most difficult problems, that is when munity. But today nearly everyone pays members may be least inclined to particisomething for television programming, pate. The only hope for avoiding that paradespite the fact that free broadcasts remain dox lies in developing a plan for association available throughout the country. And they action that members can see as likely to are willing to pay because they can gain make a real difference, and which they access to a greater diversity of professionunderstand will depend upon their support ally produced programming than broadcast for success. television provided. I believe we have developed that plan So there are good reasons to believe and look forward to everyone’s input and that newspapers can develop a successful participation. business model where reduced advertising CNPA President Ralph Alldredge is pubrevenues can be replaced with increased lisher of the Calaveras Enterprise in San revenues for diverse and reliable content. Andreas. Contact him at alldredgelaw@ But that story needs to be told to combat gmail.com or (510) 375-7200. the mistaken view that newspapers are in a

CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER

NEWTON From page 1 tector of the First Amendment, freedom of information and the public’s right to know; and work to keep in check the myriad proposed laws and regulations that limit productivity and increase the costs of doing business. With the leadership of Wolf Rosenberg, who steps into the newly created position of vice president of advertising for CNPA Services, Inc., CNPA will take the oneorder, one-bill idea to the next level with new efficiencies for advertisers to get their message to their customers using newspapers’ print and digital platforms. This newspaper, the CNPA Bulletin, Legislative Bulletin and FOI Watch will keep you current on industry news. We will continue to educate and train your staff – in person at events like the CNPA Summit, or on the Internet – and recognize your achievements with a top-notch Better Newspapers Contest. General Counsel Jim Ewert will provide quick and accurate answers to your legal questions, usually the same day you call. CNPA will support members who occasionally must go to court to protect the right to gather, publish and read the news. This year look for President Ralph Alldredge and the Board of Directors to implement a new strategic plan for CNPA that will improve its governance, increase the number and quality of member services and create new opportunities for you to help CNPA keep the industry strong. After 20 years, Jack counts his friends at NAM in the dozens and he will, no doubt, continue to benefit from these relations long into his so-called retirement. His years at NAM were not without conflict, not without expense, not without effort, and not without, yes, untimely distractions. That is the price one pays to reap the benefits of memberJack and Lou Bates laugh at satirist Will Durst at the ship. Press Summit in April. The CNPA Board of Directors, Reach me anytime at (916) and others, took up a collection to present the Bateses 288-6015 or tom@cnpa.com. with a two-week trip to China.

quickly as a provider of essential backshop services to advertisers and newspapers. Starting as a statewide operation, the one-order, one-bill advertising placement service, and all its related networks, quickly grew to serve advertisers and newspapers across the country. The other, the CNPA Foundation, continues to raise and spend money in support of journalism education and the training of your future workforce. The point is that Jack tapped into something good: the power of a group of individuals engaged as competitors yet willing to share their best ideas and admit their worst failures, to the benefit of their own businesses and the greater good of their industry. Jack made his own contributions to NAM, eventually serving as its president. His NAM membership helped his business thrive, and his business was all about helping your business. As your new executive director, it’s my job to build on Jack’s legacy and make sure CNPA provides each of its members the opportunity to work together to improve his or her own business and the industry as a whole. This, of course, means CNPA will continue its leadership role as the state’s pro-

‘Granny flat’ might be trouble

Q:

Published quarterly by the California Newspaper Publishers Association 2000 O St., Suite 120 Sacramento, CA 95811 Summer, June 2011 Thomas W. Newton Executive Director Joe Wirt Editor Diane Donohue Advertising Sales California Publisher USPN 084720 ISSN 0008-144 Subscriptions are $15 per year. California Publisher is printed by Paradise Post Printing. Periodicals postage paid at Sacramento, CA. Postmaster send address changes to: California Publisher 2000 O St., Suite 120 Sacramento, CA 95811-5299

We have a person who is selling his home by owner and wants to place an ad that describes the property to potential buyers. In his description he states one of the features of the house is a room that has a private entrance. He describes it as a “granny flat, perfect for in-laws and man cave.” Would the wording of this ad violate fair housing law?

A:

HELPLINE Jim Ewert CNPA General Counsel

Probably. State and federal fair housing laws make it unlawful to publish an ad that “prefers, limits or discriminates against” someone on the basis of a protected class characteristic. Two of the protected class categories are marital status and gender. Since the ad uses the words “in-laws” and “man cave,” this is considered a limitation or discrimination against unmarried individuals and women. Because of the strict liability standard in fair housing law, the newspaper could be automatically liable even though it does not intend to publish anything that is unlawful.

Potential liability most often occurs when an advertisement attempts to describe the type of individuals the advertiser is targeting in the housing ad. Generally, when you are unsure about the legality of a housing advertisement, use terms that physically describe the property itself. The use of the term “granny flat” has been approved by California’s Department of Fair Employment and Housing as an acceptable term because it is commonly used as a physical descriptor much like the term “single-family home.”

Q:

Our paper has sent a California Public Records Act (CPRA) demand to the city for the salary amounts and compensation paid to each city employee. The city has offered to provide us with the name of each employee; however, the city referred us to the employees’ “bargaining unit” and told us to obtain the salary and other compensation information from the bargaining unit. The city never claimed it did not have the salary or other compensation information. Can the city defer

its responsibility to provide this information to a bargaining unit?

A:

No. If the employees’ salary and compensation information is prepared, owned, used or retained by the city, the CPRA requires the city to disclose the information unless an exemption allows the city to withhold it. The issue of whether public agencies must provide this information was conclusively decided by the state Supreme Court in International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers v. Superior Court, 42 Cal. 4th 19 (2007). The Supreme Court ruled, with one narrow exception, that public employees do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy in their compensation information and that no exemption allows the withholding of individually identifiable salary and compensation information. The court ordered the city of Oakland to publicly disclose this information to the Contra Costa Times. Since the information you are seeking is in the city’s possession and in light of the ruling in the IFPTE case, the city is required to provide you with names, titles, exact salaries, See HELPLINE, Page 10

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Summer 2011 California Publisher 

PUBLISHER PROFILE

Richard Esposito Mountain Democrat, Placerville What sparked your interest in newspapers as a career? My uncle was the classified sales manager at the Syracuse (N.Y.) Herald American. “The real money is in advertising,” he told me. When a retail sales position became available at my hometown newspaper in Herkimer, N.Y., I applied and was offered the job. How did your career take you to Placerville? While I was publishing The Oak Ridger, in Oak Ridge, Tenn., a newspaper recruiter contacted me. He was seeking a prospective replacement for Mountain Democrat Publisher Jim Webb, who was planning to retire. My wife and I had a yearning to return to California. Prior to relocating to Tennessee we spent five years in Nevada City where I was the associate publisher at The Union in Grass Valley. So with one daughter attending the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and another getting ready to start her first year at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, we decided the time was right. You could say that instead of sending our kids off to school, we left. What’s the most important thing you learned along the way that prepared you to be a publisher? I’ve been at this for over 30 years. In 1985 I was named Thomson Newspapers’ youngest newspaper publisher at Sikeston, Mo., at age 27. For five years before that I was a regional marketing consultant working in Thomson’s corporate headquarters in Des Plaines, Ill. During that time I had an opportunity to work closely with more than 24 different newspaper properties and their respective publishers. My territory ranged from the upper Midwest to California. This job exposed me to a broad range of management styles and experiences. Most importantly I learned how to value our greatest resource: the talented people working for us. Building solid teams with the proper chemistry to achieve a newspaper’s objectives is one of the keys for success. What advice would you give someone interested in a similar career path? This industry is challenging and everevolving. For those considering this career path I suggest a wider scope of study. New technology and shifting demographics are altering our business model, so it’s important to understand the impact of that technology and how it affects readers of tomorrow. Keep an open mind and don’t be afraid to foster change. Let’s face it, we’re a mature industry and audience demands are changing. We need to continually reinvent ourselves. My advice: Be adaptable. What excites you about this business? Everyone in this business knows just how truly unique it is. Each day brings new challenges to overcome. It’s exciting to know newspapers still make a difference in the communities they serve. And small town newspapers like The Mountain Democrat have an impact. One day we’re covering a national story like the Jaycee Lee Dugard trial; the next day we’re launching a new special section. What other industry offers so much variety? You oversee more than The Mountain Democrat. Tell us about your other newspapers and your affiliated companies. Besides The Mountain Democrat, I’m responsible for Village Life, a free weekly community newspaper with a distribution of 10,000 serving El Dorado Hills on the west end of our county. We also publish Cameron Park Life, an 8,000 cir-

Placerville Publisher Richard Esposito, right, with staff members Dean Royal, left, Joe Boydston and, seated, David Martinelli: “Our newsroom experienced a radical paradigm shift as we changed our focus from ‘fiber’ to ‘cyber’ and embraced the future of our industry.” culation free monthly newspaper serving the communities of Cameron Park and Shingle Springs. Additionally I publish the Georgetown Gazette, an 1,800-circulation paid weekly newspaper serving Georgetown and the communities on the “Divide.” In addition to these news publications, we print and direct mail a totalmarket publication called the “Extra” to 30,000 homes in El Dorado County. Besides our newspaper products we publish a biannual tourism publication with plans under way to launch a new regional Sierra foothills magazine. Our website, mtdemocrat.com, was revised last October and we restructured our news department to reverse publish. We’re proud to say we were the first newspaper in California to accomplish this. This change in strategy allows our paid newspaper subscribers’ free access to all online content before we publish the print edition. We’re currently rolling out a new paywall to better capitalize on this. How do you serve your varied demographics? The Mountain Democrat reader demographic is older, similar to other newspapers. However, we enjoy tremendous brand loyalty. As California’s oldest newspaper (celebrating 160 years this June) we are part of the original fabric in our state’s history. Our online edition complements the print edition very well. Like our print edition, all content is local. We don’t subscribe to any wire services, so all our news resources are targeted to local coverage. Tourists and locals alike read our publications for all things local, including the many entertaining and recreational activities our area offers. Tell us a little more about your digital innovations. Inland Press Association recently awarded us Second Place in the category of General Excellence in Online News Service for newspapers with a circulation of less than 200,000. We were honored and thrilled to receive this recognition given the number of newspapers in this category across the country. When we revamped our website last October, our goal was to make it more reader friendly and functional. Our newsroom experienced a radical paradigm shift as we changed our focus from “fiber” to “cyber” and embraced the future of our industry. Joe Boydston, vice president of Digital; and Dean Royal, director of Online Strategies, were instrumental in the

development and launch. We’re using WordPress blogging technology that Joe refined. I like to refer to it as “Wordpress on steroids.” Everything we cover appears on our website first. We then reverse publish back to the print edition. Our paywall was temporarily removed during the project and we of course experienced a huge leap in traffic. Today we’re reinstalling the wall and testing a new pay model. Our online pay strategy includes charging a fee for content within our market area but allowing readers outside our DMA free access. We’re also developing a new advertising model we believe advertisers will really appreciate. How has your changed workflow made it easier on staff? How has it helped revenue-wise? Reverse publishing has accomplished a number of positive outcomes. First, we increased newsroom productivity. Sports reporters, for example, now upload stories and photos directly online immediately following an event. Staff and editors can write and publish content from home or anywhere with Internet access. Photos can be uploaded directly to the site using nearly any Internet-connected device. We’re generating more local content online than ever. The inclusion of a user-friendly reader submission form also helps drive more people and local content

PERSONAL STATS Name: Richard B. Esposito Born: New York, N.Y., 1958 First job: Advertising sales representative, The Evening Telegram, Herkimer, N.Y. Current job: Publisher of The Mountain Democrat in Placerville. Family: Wife Janie (married 23 years) and daughters Madelyn and Chelsea Education: B.S. in Business Management Community involvement: El Dorado County Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, El Dorado County Snowline Hospice Board of Directors, Placerville Rotary Club

to our site. It gives our readers immediate access (with editors’ approval). Second, we reduced the bottleneck of page production because content is readily attainable on deadline. Updates and edits to stories are already made to the published stories on our website, so by the print deadline articles are ready to move over into our print edition. This allows us more time to get ahead of building pages. Third, we no longer rely on an editorial database system. No more repairs, expensive software upgrades or reliance on others to manage content storage. Lastly, when we roll out our new advertising product, clients will see their ads online immediately, thus getting advance exposure of their advertising message before it appears in the print edition.

What should smaller newspapers do: innovate or wait for a product they can buy out of the box? Smaller newspapers are in an ideal situation. Although we may lack deep pockets, we don’t have the constraints larger newspapers face. Our news coverage is all local all the time so our mission is easy to understand. We’re nimble enough to innovate and experiment. Innovation is the key, though. We must try new ideas to see what works and what doesn’t. Fortunately we’ve been blessed with outstanding talent to lead the charge and owners who understand and support innovation. If you have the resources to innovate then go for it. Our Wordpress model is open source, so everyone has access to it. But innovation doesn’t necessarily mean spending tons of money on technology. For example, we realigned our organizational chart and named our Production manager, David Martinelli, online editor. David coordinates website content and works tirelessly to improve its functionality while acting as the conduit between the news and production departments. Your companies are part of McNaughton Newspapers. How have your innovations benefited the group? The Mountain Democrat was the beta site for our recently developed Wordpress technology. Our tri-weekly print cycle was ideal for the transition. Our sister newspaper, The Davis Enterprise, started reverse publishing in February, and the staff at The Daily Republic at Fairfield was to make the transition in mid-May. We’re now testing a new paywall concept that will eventually be used at our sister newspapers. And when we roll out our new electronic advertising program, we’ll likely launch it here first. Being small makes it easier to test, adjust and reinvent. It’s not that our sister newspapers can’t accomplish these new innovations. Our size and publishing cycle make us better positioned to try new concepts. Conversely, name a couple of benefits that sprout in Fairfield or Davis and then find their way up the hill. We recently consolidated our packaging departments at Fairfield. As we explored ways to reduce expenses and become more efficient we realized performing this function at our print site at Fairfield made better sense. We’re looking into centralizing See ESPOSITO Page 10


4 California Publisher Summer 2011

Brits are tweeting in the face of injunctions According to Experian, a In case you missed the latest company that tracks user data effort to legally corral the borderobtained from Internet serless Internet, the popular San vice providers, online traffic Francisco-based micro-blogging to Twitter’s website spiked the site Twitter.com is being asked to same day that Giggs sought to disclose the identity of an anonyforce Twitter to reveal its postmous user who publicly revealed ers’ identities. U.K. user traffic information that authorities in to the site was 22 percent higher London insist violated an injuncthan the previous day, repretion. senting millions of users coming Ryan Giggs, a married, Premier ONLINE to Twitter.com. League footballer who has long LEGALITIES The attraction? Forbidden played for Manchester United information that could not be (U.S. translation: a professional Tom Burke legally published in the U.K. soccer player, who has played with media. During this same 24his team since he was 17, in the top hour period, more than 12,000 tweets were English league) obtained an injunction to posted about Giggs and his alleged secret prevent the media from publicly identifying relationship. him concerning his alleged affair with Miss As of this writing, some 75,000 people Imogen Thomas, a TV reality-show conhave publicly revealed Giggs’ identity in testant. Serious stuff. (The U.K. enforces separate Twitter postings. A literal tweetthe Human Rights Act, which guarantees fest. a right to privacy, the basis for many such U.K. newspapers’ and broadcasters’ injunctions, typically only available to the attempt to lawfully get in on the action hapvery wealthy.) pening all around them bordered on the But in a brief online flurry, information that was once secret and legally unmention- desperate, though you have to admire their creativity. Before the information went able became Internet fodder, neutering the viral, reporters were left to listening to the injunction and causing the British prime chants of fans at a soccer match – hoping minister to announce a major review of the that the crowd might reveal information law in the wake of the Giggs/Thomas saga. about the player under suspicion that could I mention this situation not to overly be legitimately reported in some fashion. criticize a legal system that would tolerate A guest on BBC Radio’s flagship prousing a secret injunctive process to gag the gram, “Today,� mentioned Giggs’ first name media from writing about the sexual trysts during an interview, and this comment was of celebrities and athletes – after all, that promptly posted on the Internet, promptis news that must be reported – but to note ing one BBC correspondent to observe in a just how impossible it is now to keep inforTwitter post that the guest had “got just one mation secret if it moves onto the Internet. syllable into breaking the footballer superThe very public fallout from Giggs’ injunction.� injunction is now serving as a vehicle In an emergency debate in the House for the British courts to revisit the use of of Commons, Attorney General Dominic injunctions and even rarer issued, “superGrieve highlighted the practical inequities: injunctions.� “It is rather unsustainable, this situation, As this debacle illustrates, rumored where newspapers can’t print something “secret� information is particularly suscepthat clearly everybody else is talking about, tible to being revealed online, en masse, but there’s a difficulty here because the law if the public learns that efforts are being is the law and the judges must interpret made to keep the information secret.

 

 

I’m betting he will be proved correct.

what the law is.� He called for a break in the action: “So I think the government, Parliament, has to take some time out, have a proper look at this, have a think about what we can do, but I’m not sure there is going to be a simple answer.�

Thomas R. Burke is a partner with the San Francisco Office of Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, a CNPA Allied Member. Contact him at thomasburke@dwt.com or (415) 276-6552.

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PRESIDENTS From page 1 Democrat and the Evening Press to create The Press Democrat in 1897. He and Ruth were married in 1944 and, at the behest of the family, Person learned the publishing business from bottom up, beginning as a bookkeeper — “not very well paid� — he remembered, joking with an interviewer in 200. He was named co-publisher, with his mother-in-law, Ruth Woolsey Finley, in 1945. At her death in 197, Person became The Press Democrat’s publisher and president of Finley Broadcasting, the original owner of Radio Station KSRO, which Ernest Finley had begun in 197 as the first commercial radio station in the North Bay. He purposefully carried on the tradition his late father-in-law had started, supporting projects he felt were important to the growth and economy of the area, including the 101 Freeway and Warm Springs Dam. He sold the newspaper in 1985 to The New York Times for an undisclosed amount. In addition to many local and regional groups, Person was active in professional organizations and served as president of CNPA in 1981 as well Evert Person, 1915-2011 as president of the Institute Person held top posts at the of Newspaper Controllers newspaper from 1945 until its and Finance Officers and the sale to The New York Times in California Newspaper Youth 1985. Foundation. The son of Swedish immiPerson was “the last of a gengrants, Elida and Emil Person, eration of independent newsEvert grew up in Berkeley and paper publishers around the attended public schools and country and the last living link to the University of California. He Evert Person the family that created The Press worked at Kaiser’s Richmond Democrat in the 19th century,� defense plant in World War said Bruce Kyse, current publisher of The II before serving in the Army Corps of Press Democrat. Engineers. Excerpted with permission from The Soon he met Ruth Finley, daughter of Press Democrat, Santa Rosa. Ernest Finley, the pioneer Santa Rosa More Obituaries on Page 14 newspaperman who combined the Sonoma “I thought he was sort of a gallant warrior,� Giacomini said of the tall newsman. “He was extremely passionate and cared vigorously about the county.� Craemer had strong opinions and was not shy about voicing them in the pages of his family-run newspaper. Giacomini noted, however, that he always was open and respectful of others’ opinions. Giacomini credited Craemer for his courage during the 1970 typographers’ union strike that brought violent protests, the murder of an IJ executive, repeated death threats to the newspaper’s management and vandalism of IJ advertisers. The union fight was over the IJ’s move away from setting lead type; it became a labor standoff that eventually led to the IJ’s and other dailies’ move to new technology and offset printing. Craemer was named the Justus F. Craemer Newspaper Executive of the Year, the California Press Association award named for his father, in 1967. Excerpted with permission from the Marin Independent-Journal

This isn’t your father’s newspaper market. Nothing in life is constant except change, and what industry has experienced more change than ours? “Experience� is the operative word. Gregg Knowles has over 40 years of experience in the newspaper industry and has seen the changes from hot type to cold type to electronic publishing first-hand. (That’s his dad running the Duplex press at the Oelwein [Iowa] Daily Register, circa 1945.) Only this kind of background can prepare a broker to understand the financial and emotional investment you have in your newspaper company. Gregg Knowles offers you knowledge and experience to assist you in navigating choppy markets on a very professional level. Call him for a no-obligation and 100% confidential discussion of your specific condition and needs.

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Summer 2011 California Publisher 5

This is our kind of networking in respected California comWeek by month by quarter, munity newspapers: yours. If CNPA is rolling out new revenue you missed our May webinars, opportunities to its members. In contact Maria Rodrigues, (916) this space and in our email com288-6010. munications, I’ll work overtime to give you the rundown.  Our National Preprint Network links major market  CNPA is working with Staples newspaper paid-only and TMC to provide a self-serve Sticky Note programs. This gives your newsprogram that will provide mempaper a way to compete effecber papers a sticky-note ad at a tively for nationwide sharedreasonable price. You can increase AD mail business. Plus, every NPN sales by offering this to your local SERVICES member can be a seller and a accounts. Wolf Rosenberg distributor of new business.  CNPA is partnering with LJL Is your newspaper’s circulaMarketing on an eight-panel tion 25,000 or above? You can Sticky Note program for our membecome a member and seller and place bers and other accounts. This unique eightnationwide for your regional accounts. This panel note will only be available through CNPA. Also available are 8-by-11 fliers, two- offer applies to any newspaper nationwide. Call me for more information. page and four-page, for print and deliver that can be purchased through CNPA for  The Hispanic National Preprint Network our members and other accounts. aims to expand the reach of the successful National Preprint Network. Hispanic  We’re rolling out CaliforniaAdConnect. NPN is off to a successful start, with almost com, our self-serve ad-aggregation 0 Hispanic publications on board. They program. Created in partnership with include El Sentinel, Hoy Fin de Semana, AdPerfect, this is a destination classiImpacto, La Voz and Vida en el Valle. fied site that also publishes its lineage

Our Quarter Page Ad Network now includes 167 member papers with more than 4.7 million consumers across the state. If you opt to be a distributor, 70 percent of the net revenue generated from network ads will be paid directly back to your participating newspapers on a quarterly basis.  The California Banner Ad Network provides “Border to Border One Order” advertising access to hundreds of local markets. This will increase revenue opportunities for small and large newspapers. CNPA has 14 ad-ready newspaper websites generating 10 million impressions per month. All CNPA participating newspapers that have websites are eligible to join at no cost. CNPA newspapers can sell the banner network and deliver impressions. Active newspapers receive 15 percent on gross revenue for ads they sell. Delivering ad impressions in the network. Passive newspapers receive a pro-rata share of net revenue.  When your paper sells either a CalSDAN or Cal-SDAN ad, your newspaper keeps 15 percent. Call Maria Rodrigues (916) 288-6010 or Elizabeth Graziadei (916) 288-6019 for information. There you have it: a whole portfolio of opportunities. Can’t decide which network to join? Call me. I’d like to hear from you. 

In May, Wolf Rosenberg was named vice president of Advertising for CNPA Services, Inc., the for-profit division of CNPA. You can contact him at (916) 2886036 or wolf@cnpa.com.

Six quick fixes for headlines Research shows that the headline is the most important part of a print ad. If you have a headline that hits home with a reader, there is a good chance that he or she will read further. If not, you’ve lost your chance. Here are some ideas to power up your headlines: 1. Start with a verb. When you lead off with a verb, you can transform a message from passive to active. A verb puts readers in the present tense and calls them to take a specific form of action. Go ... find ... get ... take ... try ...: these are all verbs that add life to a headline. A lot of times, a small adjustment is all it takes. For example, “Get a free widget when you test drive a Zoom-mobile” is better than, “ZoomAD-LIBS mobile will give you a free widget with a test John Foust drive.” See the difference? 2. Start with “how to.” This is a handy copywriting tool. These magic words can create a superhighway to a benefit headline. Part of the magic is in the fact that, once you’ve written the headline, you can drop the words “how to” and still have a benefit headline. “Do yard work faster” promises the same benefit as “How to do yard work faster.” 3. Use the word “free.” In the Zoommobile example, the verb “get” is connected to a free offer. This is a strong combination, because a timely giveaway never goes out of style. Consumers love to receive free things. Free offers can be used to promote anything from restaurants (buy one pizza, get one free) to clothing (free alterations with new suit) to real estate (free relocation information). 4. Use the word “save.” This is one of the strongest verbs in your toolbox. Once again, it’s all about benefits. Show readers how they can save money, time or some other valuable commodity, and you will have their attention. 5. Use specific dollar amounts and percentages. Specifics always sell better than generalities. “Take $2,000 off the purchase of your new car” is better than “Take a big discount on the purchase of your new car.” And “Save 25% on new carpet” is more compelling than “Save a lot on new carpet.” Using specific numbers can help advertisers avoid meaningless phrases like “fantastic deals,” “unbelievable bargains” and “best prices ever.” As a result, their messages will have more clarity and impact. 6. Use short words. Two facts are worth mentioning: (1) People read publications – including newspapers – at a glance. (2) Short words are easier to read. People turn pages faster than advertisers would like. In fact, I have found that a typical reader spends about three seconds looking at a newspaper page. In that brief window of time, he or she makes decisions about what to read and what to skip. The challenge – and the solution – is obvious. Use short words, and you’ll give your headline stopping power. You’ll make it easier for those hurried page turners to catch the essence of your message. (c) 2011 by John Foust. All rights reserved.

E-mail John Foust for information about his training videos for ad departments: jfoust@mindspring.com

NEWSPAPER MARKETING Scott Little

Scott Little’s column will return next issue.


6 California Publisher Summer 2011

HYBRID

aggressive and embrace change?

From page 1

Ted Markle is senior vice president of the Newspaper Group at Transcontinental Printing, a CNPA Allied Member. Transcontinental is a Quebec- based provider of a full range of print and multiplatform solutions. Reach Markle at ted. markle@transcontinental.ca.

value in advertising in the newspaper medium and will allow the publication to attract and retain readers. Giving the publication a bold change can give newspapers a new life, both financially and visually. Imagine a newspaper that now has color on all pages rather than just a select few. One that with a second look might seem more like a magazine, making it more attractive to both readers and advertisers. Publishers who are willing to not only take technology one step further, but rather take it to the limits, can change their perception of their newspapers being stodgy and out of date to now being on the cutting edge of change.

to newspapers. More than anything, it is clear that the opportunities are there; the technology can do the job and newspaper publishers can look to reinvent their daily print newspapers and achieve measurable results. Is it time for your newspaper to be bold,

Do you want spectacular results? With the ability to shorten lead times, and now with the option to create new sections with the short high quality reproduction — presenting more of a magazine look— newspaper publishers can attract those elusive advertisers and their muchneeded dollars. Now with the technological capabilities, publishers can entice advertisers in high-end brands in categories such as cosmetics and fashion that previously allocated little of their advertising budgets

Subscribe to California Publisher: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan@cnpa.com

Advertise in California Publisher: Diane Donohue (916) 288-6017 diane@cnpa.com Change your address; update information: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan@cnpa.com Order a CNPA book or directory: Debbie Gerber (916) 288-6012 dgerber@cnpa.com Get help with a legal issue: Jim Ewert (916) 288-6013 jim@cnpa.com Place a recruitment ad in the Classified Job Bulletin: Debbie Foster (916) 288-6018 debbie@cnpa.com Better Newspapers Contest: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan @cnpa.com Membership Services: Bryan Clark (916) 288-6001 bryan@cnpa.com CNPA Foundation donations: Joe Wirt (916) 288-6021 joe@cnpa.com

Thank you,

2011-2012 donors:





         



Lowell Blankfort, Blankfort Unlimited Inc.





Jean Craemer, in memory of Jack Craemer, 1965 CNPA President



  



A grand opportunity Today’s hybrid printing technology can aid in dramatic redesigns of the traditional newspaper and generate a fresh look with noticeable print changes including: ď Ź A bolder, more visual overall presentation ď Ź 100 percent full-color pages with more graphics ď Ź Use of glossy paper stock for specific sections, including a wrap of the news section, and whiter, brighter paper throughout ď Ź A brighter emphasis on often-read life and style sections By outsourcing print production, newspaper publishers can look to re-engineer their print platforms without having to justify a financial model that would require significant capital investment. Newspaper publishers of all sizes can reap the benefits of this opportunity. Local and alternative weeklies can use the technology to their advantage as can smaller dailies to be competitive with bigger city papers. And they can look to concentrate on their core competency of delivering relevant news content in refreshing and appealing ways appropriate for a changing audience.

US

Submit a story idea, letter or comment to California Publisher: Joe Wirt (916) 288-6021 joe@cnpa.com

The nuts and bolts Hybrid presses come in a variety of flavors. But as the name implies, they are double-duty devices that bring flexibility, high productivity and new opportunities through an innovative print platform. Those being developed for the newspaper industry combine coldset and heatset (or UV) web units featuring multiple cut-off sizes. Technology has given the newspaper something it has never had before: the ability to look like a high-end magazine, but in a newspaper format. Other newspaper publishers are taking notice of the new technology that has been designed to help them be more creative and competitive. Transcontinental’s newspaper plant in Fremont is also equipped with hybrid technology, both coldset and heatset. Printing more than 250,000 to 25,000 newspapers every day, parts of the newspapers they print include high-quality photos, graphics and advertisements. With this new look, in a marketplace that is cutthroat, publishers now have access to some of the best tools in the marketplace, and they are ready for action to capture those elusive advertising dollars and stay competitive. Adding creativity, boldness Some in the industry fear newspaper publishers are losing belief in the product. That they are hanging on rather than moving boldly forward with new ideas. Publishers need to understand that to remain relevant, you not only have to stay current, but you must also have a vision: Think bigger than your competitors.

CONTACT

 

C. Deane Funk, 1975 CNPA President Mary H. Lewis Marcia McQuern, 2001 CNPA President Shirley S. Wood

Help improve journalism education     are being devoted to equipment, scholarships and training. We, the journalism leaders of today, must find the money to make it happen. Regardless of whether it’s $25 that you include with your CNPA dues or $100,000 that you dedicate to an endowment, every penny helps and goes directly to scholarships, equipment or training.       Foundation

OUR MISSION: The CNPA Foundation serves California’s newspaper readers by supporting and financially assisting the state’s high schools and colleges to teach quality journalism that is also responsive to changing technology and consumer preferences.


Summer 2011 California Publisher 7

ON CAMPUS

A cast of thousands shines in Anaheim By Konnie Krislock Special to California Publisher While you were at the CNPA Press Summit in downtown Los Angeles … South on the 5 Freeway, in Anaheim, ,868 high school journalists and their advisers and support teams were attending three days of media tours, workshops and writing, photography and designing competitions at the National Scholastic Press Association/Journalism Education Association (NSPA/JEA) spring workshop April 14-17. If any of you are in fear of the death of journalism, listen to keynote speaker, Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez, pleading with the kids in the audience “not to take my job.” His storytelling skills, appreciated by the ,000 in attendance, set a tone for the weekend, which featured the art of getting and relating a good story through both traditional print media and modern social networking. Following with the unofficial theme, Lisa and Laura Ling were the keynote speak-

ers the second day, sharing their experience in television reporting and “catch and release” in North Korea. The sisters signed more than 150 books after their presentation for students and advisers, who stood in an hour-long line in the lobby to have a memento of “Live From Anaheim,” the official theme of this spring convention. First-time events at the convention included a Saturday Night Student Film Festival with 122 minutes of footage from 12 different schools. The convention also featured a self-contained classroom for junior high advisers and staff members. An innovation from three years ago, College Connections, was revived to link up college representatives from around the country with prospective students. Fifteen colleges set up tables in the ballroom and in a roundtable format with each campus representative entertaining the questions of 2 future students who gathered information and publications from each site. Friday afternoon’s on-the-spot writing competition had 811 contestants with 619

more entering the mail-in/carry-in competition for design and photography categories. The judging by professional journalists and college representatives lasted from dinner time until 10:0 p.m. Awards were presented at the Sunday closing ceremonies. With 0 states represented, the convention featured the inclusion of an adviser from Australia who was paid by her district in Perth to “travel and find a new subject” to teach in their high schools. She said she looked for the most interesting convention in the farthest location from the west coast of her country. She found it in Anaheim, LIVE! Konnie Krislock, the author, and Jolene Combs led the local committee for the national convention described here. Both have been honored as CNPA Journalism Instructors of the Year. They also run a summer workshop, Newspapers2, each year at CSU Long Beach. Contact Krislock at kekrislock@sbcglobal.net.

Educators honored Honored this spring by the California Journalism Education Coalition were these stalwarts of scholastic journalism: José Luis Benavides, California State University, Northridge; Journalism Educator of the Year  Melissa Lalum, California State University, Northridge; Journalism Educator of the Year  Jay Seidel, Fullerton College; Journalism Educator of the Year  Juan Gonzales, City College of San Francisco; Lifetime Achievement  Sarah Nichols, Whitney High School, Rocklin; Journalism Educator of the Year  Kimberly Messadieh, El Camino Real High School, Woodland Hills; Journalism Educator of the Year  Olga Kokino, University High School, Los Angeles; Lifetime Achievement  Ed Borges, Principal, San Joaquin Memorial High School, Fresno; Champion of Journalism Education  Editors and Staff of The Orange County 

ALEX GUTIERREZ / SAN JOAQUIN MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL

Gary Rice, right, San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association, presents a Cal-JEC Champion of Scholastic Journalism plaque to Ed Borges, principal at San Joaquin Memorial High School in Fresno. Register; Champion of Journalism Education  Janet Ewell, Garden Grove, Champion of

Journalism Education Rowland “Reb” Rebele, Champion of Journalism Education

What if we could clone a winning program? Print journalism may be struggling for footing, but scholastic journalism, as a tool to teach students how to write and think, is having a field day. At Palo Alto High School, home of the largest journalism program in the nation, more than 500 students elect to take journalism as a way to learn 21st century skills as defined by the new State Common Core Standards adopted by 41 states last year. These skills include learning how to write in a variety of styles, learning grammar, punctuation, spelling and learning critical thinking skills, including how to figure out what is important. In addition, students learn technical skills including the use of Adobe Master Suite and Google’s suite of collaborative tools including Docs, Spreadsheets, Presentations, and Googlegroups. “In producing a newspaper, a magazine or a website, students learn important thinking and collaborative skills that are in demand in today’s work world,” Palo Alto High journalism teacher Esther Wojcicki said. The program is taught by Wojcicki, founder of the program, Ellen Austin, adviser to the sports magazine; Paul Kandell, adviser to the web program and the news magazine; and Mike McNulty, adviser to the television program. Students have won hundreds of awards, and all the publications have been recognized nationally for excellence. Wojcicki has a Knight Foundation Grant to support the scaling of this journalism program in English and social studies classes

TRACY ANNE SENA / JEA OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

Palo Alto High journalism teacher Ellen Austin receives a plaque from the California Journalism Education Coalition in April. She poses with Mike McNulty, second from left,. and previous CalJEC honorees Paul Kandell, left, and Esther Wojcicki, right. nationwide. The website is www.21stcenturyskills.org. “I need support from the local press and from other journalists if this is going to be able to scale,” she said. Publishers, editors and reporters who would like to help out should email Wojcicki at ewojcicki@gmail.com.

Keeping the shiny side up, we are Pssst! I’m being tailed. By a very persistent banner ad. For padded pants. The matronly readers out there will tsktsk, but I’m here to tell you all: I ride a motorcycle. On recent outings, seeking my therapeutic nirvana on distant byways, I’ve been dive-bombed by low-flying egrets. And some very meaningful crop-dusters – the real kind, with propellers – have come way too close. But why this web ad for pants with built-in protection (no, not that kind, Gramps; CNPA we’re talking Kevlar OUTREACH and padding, for extra Joe Wirt insurance in case you fall down) keeps following me online is something I should be able to explain, I think. Which got me thinking this-a-way instead … John Long, the long-ago general manager, lobbyist and chief poo-bah for newspapers in California, called it “the explainingest job in the world,” this CNPA outreach business. I’ve found it’s definitely that, plus much listening and remembering. And being discreet. And enduring a little cringing now and again: There’ve been way too many speed bumps and gravel pits these past few years among the member-folk. We’ve felt your pain. Back in the day, Elder Long and a generation of his fervent CNPA brethren (such as the late Jack Craemer, who is memorialized in this issue) made frequent trips across and down the state, showing up in person to talk shop with newspaper publishers. They’d include a few lines about such visits in This Very Publication. Neat, huh? Ah, but because of, or in spite of, modern conveniences and gadgets, we don’t get to marvel at member-folks’ doings so much in person. I used to do me some traipsing, I did. But not so much anymore. Aside from some on-demand legal updates, CNPA has offered no on-site training since 2007. I know this online training (one editor on the phone called them “web-ee-nars”) is supposed to be the next best thing. But from this vantage point, they’ve not gone near as gangbusters as our best workshops did. There’s a tangibility thing missing. In their long-ago road-trips, Long & Co. would take pains to look in on the Momand-Pop shops and the rural publishers. Like the CNPA-ers of yore, I’m certain we can never provide enough insight into the doings of California’s newspapers. Yeah, getting out and about more would be dandy. But like the dues-payers, we’re not so flush either in these days of $4.25-agallon petrol and much pricier flivvers. Still, we can try harder to be the “explainingest” association in the country. More proactive, if you will. While we’re committed anew to telling you all about how CNPA is engaging on all fronts in support of our state’s newspaper business, you can do your part, too. Contact me if you’ve got something to brag up, an innovation or achievement. Or yell if you need to know anything. About ducking wayward egrets, even. Joe Wirt is the editor of California Publisher. He is also secretary-treasurer of the CNPA Foundation. Contact him at (916) 288-6021 or joe@cnpa.com.


 California Publisher Summer 2011

20 11SUMMIT 201 PRESS & G.A.

Speaking Truth and Serving Communities: The Newspaper in its Fourth Century

Clark Gilbert, president of Deseret News and Deseret Digital Media.

Editors Jeff Light, above, The San Diego Union-Tribune; Dennis Anderson, Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale; and Kevin Keane, Bay Area News Group, with Marc Wilson, TownNews.com. Ron Redfern, The PressEnterprise, Riverside; transfers the gavel to new President Ralph Alldredge, Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas.

Host Newspapersst

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2011 SUMMIT SPONSORS

Premiere

Palm Springs. Visalia. Salinas.

Platinum

Roger Coover, The Record, Stockton, with a new tool of the paid-content trade.

Gold

Mark Twain (McAvoy Layne)

Correspondent Farzad Mashhood, UCLA, interviews Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times. Our coverage team also included Janine Rayford, USC; Scott Smeltzer, Costa Mesa; and Craig Harrington, The Intermountain News, Burney. View articles, video and photos at cnpa.com.


Summer 2011 California Publisher 

Scenes from a Summit

Talking shop at the Resource Roundtable session.

Jeff Gottlieb, left, and Steve Marble, Los Angeles Times staffers who worked the City of Bell stories.

All CNPA Press Summit photos in this issue by Scott Smeltzer

Frank Escobedo, The Press-Enterprise. Riverside

Agency representatives share strategies and discuss alliances with attendees of the Advertising Roundtables.

Former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Ron George was the Lifetime Achievement Award recipient.

Listening to Clark Gilbert’s presentation on the future of newspapers were Grace Reed, Idyllwild Town Crier; and Cheryl Dell, background, The Sacramento Bee. Karlene Goller, Los Angeles Times, receives the Freedom of Information award from Times Publisher Eddy Hartenstein. From Community Media Corp. were Daniel Verdugo, left, Linda Townson and Edward Verdugo.

Randall Brant, left, American Circulation Innovations, Long Beach; Mark Adkins, San Francisco Chronicle; and Mike Hinson, Transcontinental Northern California, Fremont.

Among General Excellence winners in the Better Newspapers Contest: John Burns, Petaluma Argus-Courier; Bruce Brugmann, San Francisco Bay Guardian; James Meier, The Desert Sun, Palm Springs; Dan Evans, Glendale News-Press; Don Miller, Santa Cruz Sentinel; Kathryn Dunn, Claremont Courier; and Allen Matthews, San Francisco Chronicle.


10 California Publisher Summer 2011

CNPA 2011-2012 Board of Directors Officers

Ralph Alldredge

Amy Pack

President Calaveras Enterprise San Andreas

President-elect Visalia Times-Delta

John Burns

Cynthia Schur

Vice President Petaluma Argus-Courier

Secretary-Treasurer Santa Maria Times

Ron Redfern Immediate Past President The Press-Enterprise, Riverside

Directors Jeff Ackerman The Union, Grass Valley Bill Brehm Jr. Brehm Communications Inc., San Diego Cheryl Brown The Black Voice News, Riverside Cherie Bryant Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale Toebe Bush Century Group Newspapers George Cogswell Ventura County Star Roger Coover The Record, Stockton Dean Eckenroth Coronado Eagle & Journal Karlene Goller Los Angeles Times Fred Hamilton Los Angeles Newspaper Group David Herburger Galt Herald Debra Hershon Half Moon Bay Review Terry Horne The Orange County Register, Santa Ana Paul Hutcheson Novato Advance Bill Johnson Palo Alto Weekly Eric Johnston The Modesto Bee Gene Lieb Los Banos Enterprise Pluria Marshall Wave Newspapers, Los Angeles Ed Moss The San Diego Union-Tribune Paul Nyberg Los Altos Town Crier Phyllis Pfeiffer La Jolla Light Scott Pompe Tribune Community Newspapers Brenda Speth The Napa Valley Register Mike Taborski Feather River Bulletin, Quincy Mac Tully Bay Area News Group Frank Vega San Francisco Chronicle Marty Weybret Lodi News-Sentinel John Wilcox The San Francisco Examiner Arnold York The Malibu Times

When editing, look at the pictures else is on the page, skip the We live in an increasingly visual cute, double-entendre stuff and society. Our pages and websites write plain vanilla. It’s better to are filled with images. So why sacrifice a little punch than to does it seem too often that the end up circulating as the butt of editor has failed to pay attention online jokes. to what the image says or where it But paying attention to the is placed? pictures can prevent even Paying attention to the visual more routine errors, such as as well as the text can prevent getting someone’s sex wrong. embarrassing gaffes, such as the For instance, a person’s name classic headline “Clintons have COMMON is “Chris,” which can be male gay time at ball” right under a picSENSE ture of a gay rights parade. JOURNALISM or female. The story refers to a “she,” but the photo shows My favorite, immortalized in Doug Fisher a boy (which then should set a book, has “Child Molesters the editor to asking not only is Indicted” over a picture of Ronald Chris a “he,” but is it even the right photo). Reagan smiling in some photo op with his Or there was the recent story in my local hand on the back of a young boy sitting at alternative weekly about “Jack Daniels a school computer. (Make a note: Even a Tennessee Honey.” Later, it was “Jack heavy rule, as was used on that page, is not Daniels’.” But had someone looked at the going to provide the separation you need photo of the glass with a corporate logo on that.) next to the story, it clearly said “Jack Online can be just as treacherous. For Daniel’s.” instance, in my files is a screen shot from In this visual environment, editors need the New York Times website. On top is a to learn “mapping” – looking at all the picture of a U.S. soldier crouched inside details in the graphic or photo and mapa mosque he is guarding and the caption ping each one back to the text to see if they “Firefights Near Shiite Shrines.” Below it is match. And pay special attention to photo the headline “National Gay Mecca Is Less captions to make sure they say the same of Key West, More of Mayberry.” thing, and spell the names the same, as the Oops. story. Thus comes one of the golden rules of That Jack Daniel’s story also referred to headline writing, probably even more true it as “whisky,” which brings us to a couple in the digital age: If you don’t know what

ESPOSITO From page 2 other important functions that may find their way up the hill. Name a recent way your ad people have added value for your local advertisers. One of the best values we can provide our local advertisers is quality customer service. Our salespeople have autonomy to make decisions, within reason of course. We’ve pushed decision-making to the lowest level and continually seek ways to reduce paperwork. What kinds of community outreach do your papers do? We encourage all of our employees to be active in the communities in which they live and serve. Our Village Life editor, for example, is a member of the El Dorado Hills Rotary Club. The Mountain Democrat Advertising and Circulation directors belong to Kiwanis, and our editor is active with the Lions Club. Our newspapers promote and support a number of community nonprofit organizations throughout the county. You write a regular column. Why is it important for a publisher to write? Writing a local column may not be ideal for everyone, but doing so gives readers greater insight to the publisher, the newspaper’s positions and our role in the community. I started writing my own column in 2005 after being named publisher of The Oak Ridger in Oak Ridge, Tenn. It was

HELPLINE From page 2 benefits, bonuses and any other payment that constitutes compensation to each public employee. Additionally, Government Code Section 625(d) says nothing in the CPRA permits an agency to delay or obstruct the inspection or copying of records. Since Section 625(d) prohibits the city from delaying or obstructing your ability to access this information, the city is prohibited from referring you to the bargaining unit to obtain information that the city is required by law to provide to you. Jim Ewert was named CNPA general counsel in May. He welcomes your Helpline calls at (916) 288-6013.

necessary to quickly connect with readers as the newspaper lacked direction and focus. Subsequently there were many local initiatives the newspaper needed to get behind. A weekly column helped define our position. The same holds true today here in El Dorado County. A local column helps connect readers with their publisher. Although I tend to keep my columns on the lighter side, more often than not I delve into local issues, providing my own personal perspective. Whatever we can do to engage readers and bring them closer to their community newspaper, the better. It’s a demanding business climate. Any advice on balancing work and life? This is the most challenging economic environment I’ve ever experienced. It takes a toll on one’s time, energy and mind. And we tend to forget how this stress impacts our employees. My good friend Peter Starren, a longtime career newspaper publisher, always encouraged me to make time for the family. Everyone needs to step back and take time off. How has CNPA membership helped you? We rely heavily on the legal support CNPA provides. Although we have a local attorney on retainer, we first and foremost contact CNPA for input. CNPA membership keeps us abreast of what other member newspapers are experiencing. It’s an invaluable organization that protects and supports our mission. Where do you see this industry heading? Some folks have real concerns about the fate of their local newspaper and the impact the Internet has on our business. I firmly believe this is the most exciting time to be working in this industry. Real change is under way. We’re seeing our industry transition to meet new demands of readers and advertisers. And we’re far from the point of seeing newspapers disappear. It’s how we evolve in our objective of disseminating and delivering news via various media platforms that makes it all the more exciting. And we must always be mindful of delivering results for our customers, the underlying reason we remain in business today and long into the future.

of usage notes this month. “Whisky,” as the AP Stylebook notes, is generally reserved for Scotch. Jack Daniel’s is bourbon, so the preferred spelling is “whiskey.” Those pesky homophones have also been at work again in the follow-ups to the killing of Osama bin Laden. For instance, this headline was on PCWorld’s website: “Elite Navy SEALs Secure Motherload of Intelligence During Bash and Dash.” Unless those SEALs were grabbing a heavy woman who had children, the term is “mother lode.” The London Evening Standard, the Scotsman, and at least a handful of U.S. papers were among those that also fell prey. And I found a dozen or more publications referring to bin Laden’s “burial rights.” I don’t know whether one has a “right” to be buried, but the term referring to the ceremony, practice or protocol is “rites.” In this slap-dash, get it online now world, it’s even more important that editors – and reporters – keep tuned to the homophone gremlins among us. Doug Fisher, a former AP news editor, teaches journalism at the University of South Carolina and can be reached at dfisher@sc.edu or (803) 777-3315. Past issues of Common Sense Journalism can be found at http://www.jour.sc.edu/ news/csj/index.html.

New members approved The CNPA Board of Directors approved these applicants for membership at its April 14 meeting:

Additional Active Tehachapi News Weekender (weekly); Claudia Elliott, general manager

Allied AdPerfect, New Westminster, Canada; Christine Hamann, marketing manager CIPS Marketing Group Inc., Los Angeles; Kennedy Higdon, vice president of business development Classified Concepts, Santa Barbara; Sarah Sinclair, president and chief executive officer Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, Los Angeles; Kelli Sager, partner DoApp Inc., Rochester, Minn.; Wade Beavers, chief executive officer Ebyline Inc., Sherman Oaks; Bill Momary, chief executive officer Gumiyo, Woodland Hills; Richard Abronson, vice president of marketing Hiscox Inc., Los Angeles; Sinead Murphy, vice president Impact Engine Inc., San Diego Marketwire Inc., Miami; Juan Carlos Valdés, manager, community and media relations Mather Economics, Roswell, Ga.; Matt Lindsay, president Mediaphormedia: Ellington, Lawrence, Kan.; Karen Boyer, sales representative Myles Mellor Crosswords, Lake View Terrace; Myles Mellor, chief executive officer OwnLocal, Pflugerville, Texas; Jeremy Mims, newspaper partnerships liaison Ram & Olson LLP, San Francisco; Karl Olson, partner Reuters, San Francisco; Sebastian Laver, senior publisher solutions specialist Southwest Offset Printing Inc., Gardena; Jennifer McDonald, executive vice president TotalPaas, Palo Alto; Tami Tran, chief executive officer Transcontinental Northern California Inc., Fremont; Mike Hinson, senior business development manager The Ultimate PrintSource, Ontario; Jeff Ferrazzano, president VMIX, San Diego; Terry Ash, executive vice president Campus The Musket, Orange Glen High School, Escondido; Jessica Young, adviser Wolves’ Chronicle, Stockton Early College Academy; Rachel West, adviser


Summer 2011 California Publisher 11


12 California Publisher Summer 2011

CALENDAR June

September

Newsroom by the Bay high school workshop, June 26-July 1, Stanford University. newsroombythebay.com/

National Newspaper Association Annual Convention/Trade Show. Sept. 22-Sept. 25, Albuquerque, N.M. nnaweb.org/

July

October

California Scholastic Press Association annual workshop, July 17-29, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. cspaworkshop.org

CNPA Quarterly Meeting, Oct. 6-7, The Catamaran Resort Hotel & Spa, San Diego. cnpa.com

National Newspaper Association Governmental Affairs Conference, July 2023, Washington, D.C. nnaweb.org/

Journalism Association of Community Colleges SoCal Conference, Oct. 14-15, CSU Fullerton. jacconline.org

CNPA Quarterly Meeting, July 21-22, Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza, Sacramento. cnpa.com

August Newspapers2 high school workshop, Aug. 8-11, CSU Long Beach. Newspapers2.com

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December California Press Association Annual Meeting, Dec. 2, Marines’ Memorial Club & Hotel, San Francisco. diane@cnpa.com

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Summer 2011 California Publisher 1

PEOPLE Gloria Beverage is now editor of the Placer Herald in Rocklin. She replaced Lauren Gibbs. Martha Garcia succeeded Beverage at the Colfax Record. Gerard Delaney is the new publisher at the Imperial Valley Press in El Centro. Most recently, he had been with Cox Newspapers in Atlanta. Delaney succeeded Teresa Zimmer. Ashley Dunn became California editor and assistant managing editor of the Los Angeles Times. He was deputy national editor and succeeded David Lauter, who became chief of Tribune Co.’s Washington bureau. Eddy Hartenstein, publisher of the Los Angeles Times, became chief executive officer of Chicago-based Tribune Co. He will continue as Times publisher. Also, former Times executive Kathy Thomson was named president and chief operating officer at The Times.

Halie Johnson is now production manager of the Idyllwild Town Crier in Riverside County. Johnson, daughter of former Town Crier Editor and Publisher Becky Clark, had been online editor for MainStreet Media’s newspapers in San Diego County. Eric Johnston, president and publisher at The Modesto Bee, added publisher oversight of the Merced Sun-Star upon the retirement of Debra Kuykendall. Tracy Kelley is now advertising director at the Lodi News-Sentinel. He had been advertising director of the Imperial Valley Press in El Centro and succeeds Kimberly Anger, who retired. Ken Larson is now publisher of the Folsom Telegraph. He had been general manager of Brehm Communications’ Desert Entertainer and Desert Mobile Home News in Palm Desert. Larson also oversees advertising at The Telegraph and El Dorado Hills

Telegraph, replacing advertising Manager Nina Jaeger. John Maher is now publisher and president of the Reno Gazette-Journal. He had been publisher of the Lincoln (Neb.) Journal Star since 2006. Maher succeeded Ted Power, who heads The Gannett Co.’s new Design Studio in Des Moines, Iowa. Jack Robinson is now editor of the weekly Sacramento Business Journal. He had been managing editor at The Fresno Bee since 2006. Robinson succeeded Ron Trujillo, who had been editor for five years. Jim Shaw is now vice president of advertising for the Daily Breeze in Torrance and auxiliary products. He had been director of interactive media sales at CBS2TV/ KCAL9 TV. Shaw also oversees sales efforts at the Press-Telegram and Palos Verdes Peninsula News. Joyce Terhaar became executive

editor and senior vice president at The Sacramento Bee. She had been managing editor since 1999 and succeeded Melanie Sill, who took a position at USC. Charlie Waters is now assistant managing editor at the Las Vegas ReviewJournal. He had been director of editorial support services for parent company Stephens Media. Previously, Waters was executive editor at The Fresno Bee. Mark Zieman became a vice president of Operations at The McClatchy Co. He had been publisher of the Kansas City Star and succeeded Frank R.J. Whittaker, CNPA’s 1997 president, who retired. Zieman will oversee 1 McClatchy properties in seven eastern states. Robert Weil, also a VP/ Operations, now oversees McClatchy’s properties in Alaska, California, Idaho, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington. And Patrick Talamantes adds oversight of Florida operations to his duties as chief financial officer.

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14 California Publisher Summer 2011

OBITUARIES Bill Bell, Whittier Bill Bell, former editor and columnist for the Whittier Daily News, died April 1, 2011, of complications of a stroke. He was 77. Following a reporting career at the San Gabriel Valley Tribune and Los Angeles Examiner, Bell spent 25 years as editor of the Whittier newspaper. Tedi Cantalupo, Long Beach Tedi Cantalupo, who co-founded the Grunion Gazette weekly with husband Pat in 1975, died April 9, 2011. She was 71. They sold the paper in 1981 to Fran and John Blowitz, who later sold the Gazettes to MediaNews Group. Jane Clark, Vacaville Hazel Jane Clark, a California newspaper executive for more than 0 years, died May 10, 2011, after a long battle with cancer. Clark, the wife of CNPA staff member Bryan Clark, was 69. She had worked both in advertising and circulation at The Sacramento Bee, as corporate train-

ing director for the Contra Costa Times, publisher of the Concord Transcript, classified director at The Reporter in Vacaville and later was a consultant for Brehm Communications Inc. in Auburn and for the Sacramento News & Review.

Robert Lund, Los Angeles Robert Lund, a former editor of the Daily News of Los Angeles, died April 7, 2011, in Brevard, N.C. He was 54 and was on longterm disability for acute diabetes. Lund was with The Daily News from 1985 to 2000.

Walter Dodd, Corning Walter Dodd, former editor and publisher of the Corning Observer in Tehama County, died March 0, 2011, in Redding. He was 8. Dodd moved from Oregon when he bought the Corning Daily Observer in July 1986 and operated it until its sale in October 1991.

Rich McKee, La Verne Richard McKee, a tireless warrior for California open government, died April 2, 2011, in his La Verne home of natural causes. He was 62. McKee educated public officials across the state about open-meeting laws, and he filed nearly 0 lawsuits against public agencies in the past 16 years, winning the vast majority.

Les Hayes, Madera Les Hayes, publisher emeritus of The Madera Tribune, died April 6, 2011, of complications of Alzheimer’s disease. He was 82. Hayes worked in several roles for The Tribune and Merced Sun-Star before becoming Madera publisher in 1965. He later oversaw operations at The Chowchilla News and Sierra Star in Oakhurst.

Duane Spencer, Poway Wallace “Duane� Spencer, former publisher of the Pomerado Newspaper Group in Poway, died March 21, 2011, in Mesquite, Nev. He was 86. Spencer was publisher for Pomerado from 1978 to 1988. He then served as publisher of the Ramona Sentinel before retiring in 199.

Ted Tajima, Alhambra Ted Tajima, former Alhambra High School journalism adviser and CNPA’s Outstanding High School Journalism Teacher in 1968, died Feb. 20, 2011, in Altadena of complications from emphysema. He was 88. Rosemary Toney, Folsom Rosemary Toney, wife of the late J. Clifton Toney, 1972 CNPA president, died April 9, 2011. She was 95. They owned The Folsom Telegraph in the 1960s and ’70s. Luis Zaragoza, Pasadena Luis Zaragoza, a former managing editor of the Pasadena Star-News who worked at several other California newspapers, died May 12, 2011, in Orlando, Fla. He was 47. Zaragoza also had worked for other San Gabriel Valley newspapers, for The Orange County Register’s community editions, the Los Angeles Times syndicate, The Fresno Bee and the San Jose Mercury News.

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The Tab

The Winners Edition

Saturday, April 16, 2011

2010 Better Newspapers Contest California Newspaper Publishers Association

Vol. 68

No. 8

Winners Selected, Victory Declared! Writing, Weekly (4,300 & Under) First Place Turlock Journal

Hunger in the Valley Families in the nation’s top ag producing region struggle to put food on the table BY SABRA STAFFORD sstafford@turlockjournal.com

On any given day thousands of gallons of milk, tons of nuts, and truckloads of fruit roll out of the Central Valley headed to dinner tables across America and the world. And on any given night, thousands of Central Valley residents go to bed feeling the pangs of hunger. It is a bitter irony that one of the world’s leading producers of food also is home to one of America’s largest populations of people dealing with the daily struggle of finding enough food for themselves and their families. At a time when the Central Valley is experiencing one of the worst unemployment rates in the state and a growing number of families and individuals are living below the federal government’s poverty line, the hunger situation in the region is reaching new magnitudes. The economy’s downward spiral and resulting recession have stretched the boundaries of hunger and sent more and more people into the long lines outside of food banks and soup kitchens. “Who is the face of hunger?” asked Mike Mallory, the chief executive officer of the Second Harvest Food Bank in Manteca. “Well, it’s the unemployed, the underemployed, a neighbor, a coworker, or a relative. It could be someone you least expect. The people who were donating to us last year are now recipients.” A recently released report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture provides a grim picture of the growing prevalence of hunger in America. The Economic Research Service annual report on Household Food Security for 2008 revealed startling results even to those who have spent years advocating to end hunger. More than 49 million Americans, including nearly 17 million children, are classified as food insecure. The USDA defines food insecurity as a disruption to a person’s eating patterns and a reduced food intake for an extended time period. The survey showed one out of every seven households had difficulties obtaining enough to eat. The food insecurity rate of 2008 was at its highest level since

the USDA started the surveys in 1995. In a year’s time the number of Americans who experienced a shortage of food supplies grew from 11 percent to 16 percent, representing 13 million more people who went hungry at some time

increase in food requests over the last year. “People sometimes tend to look at hunger through rosecolored glasses and think of it as a holiday issue,” Mallory-

Feature Story, Daily (10,000 & Under) Second Place The Davis Enterprise,

‘What grief feels like’ Yolo Hospice’s Stepping Stones program uses art and compassion to help children grieve

By Anne Ternus-Bellamy ENTERPRISE STAFF WRITER In the serene comfort of the children’s room at Yolo Hospice, a young girl grieving the death of a family member is given a blank outline of a body and asked to

ages 5 to 18 who are grieving. Ross said very often, children themselves don’t know what they’re feeling until they see it come out in their artwork. And that’s why art is such a huge component of the Stepping Stones program. “We let them feel their feelings here,” Ross said. “Parents sometimes try to protect them from their feelings. But here, they come to a place where they know they’re safe, and they blossom. They create these objects that really show how they’re feeling.” “It’s so revealing to see this artwork,” added Joe Lumello, bereavement services manager for Yolo Hospice. It’s a reminder, he said, “that grief is grief. And it’s a personal journey.” Seven-year-old Marú Marquez began her journey at Stepping Stones a couple of months after the sudden death of her baby sister Zaia last August. Her grief had transformed the formerly exuberant and vivacious girl into someone somber and withdrawn, her mother said.

“Blaze lit up” Breaking News Photo, Weekly (11,001 – 25,000) Second Place, by Nick Lovejoy, Photographer The Weekend Pinnacle, Hollister draw how she feels. during the last year. increase in food requests over the With a marker, she scribbles “It is tragic that so many people last year. blue over the arms and legs in this nation of plenty don’t “People sometimes tend to look because, she says, they feel numb. have access to adequate amounts at hunger through rosecolored The stomach and throat she colors of nutritious food,” said Vicki glasses and think of it as a holiday green because in those places she Escarra, the president and CEO issue,” Mallory said. “But hunger feels sick. of Feeding America, the nation’s is 365 days a year. Hunger has no leading hunger-relief organization. holiday.” The heart is purple with sadness “Although these new numbers are and the brain red with anger; all in Hunger by the staggering, it should be noted that all, it’s a picture of a child pretty these numbers reflect the state of much hurting all over. numbers the nation one year ago, in 2008. And that’s the point. To express U.S. Agriculture Secretary Since then, the economy has visually what can be so difficult Tom Vilsack said the USDA’s significantly weakened and there for children to sum up verbally: report findings reflected the rise are likely many more people strugwhat grief feels like. in unemployment rates in 2008 gling with hunger than this report and the number of people workIn doing so, the exercise allows states.” the young girl to continue her The prevalence of people coping ing at low wage jobs. The survey unequivocally found that poverty journey through grief, a journey with food shortages has become guided and supported by the folks abundantly clear in the Central Val- was the fundamental cause of food insecurity and hunger. The report at Yolo Hospice’s Stepping Stones ley. Mallory, who oversees Second also shows that just over half of the program. Harvest, the food bank that supContinued on Page 13 plies food to 228 agencies in seven Jane Ross is the bereavement counties, including Stanislaus, specialist who runs the year-old San Joaquin, and Merced, said the program, which serves children organization has seen a 30 percent

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

“I was worried because she was very quiet,” Claudia Marquez said. “She used to be always happy, always talking and excited … and now she was just so quiet.” But something happened when she came to Stepping Stones. “She would never talk about Zaia before,” Marquez recalled. “Then, she did all the time.” The transformation that took place in Marú during her eight weeks of group therapy at Stepping Stones is visible in herartwork — artwork that she proudly showed off one afternoon last week. The earliest drawings show her sadness and fear: One has a tiny red heart, split in two, “because my heart broked when my baby sister died,” Marú said. Another shows a drawing of Marú standing beside what she called “the flower of love,” which Continued on Page 15

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


2

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Awards Edition

Participating Newspapers

2010 BNC Blue Ribbon Judges Richard Wagoner, Deputy Metro Editor, Seattle Times John Irby, Editor, Bismark Tribune Vivian Sade, Government Reporter, Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

DAILY NEWSPAPER ENTRANTS

The Union, Grass Valley

Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale

Ventura County Star

Appeal-Democrat, Marysville

Visalia Times-Delta

Jack (John) Ronald, Editor and Publisher, The Commercial Review

The Argus, Fremont The Bakersfield Californian

WEEKLY NEWSPAPER ENTRANTS

Jim Smith, Executive Editor, Past President, New England Society of Newspaper Editors

Chico Enterprise-Record

The Acorn, Agoura Hills

Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

The Almanac, Menlo Park

David Offer, Executive Editor, Central Maine Newspapers

Daily Breeze, Torrance

Amador Ledger-Dispatch, Jackson

Auburn Journal

Daily News-Los Angeles, Woodland Hills

The Ark, Tiburon Atascadero News

Daily Republic , Fairfield

Big Bear Grizzly, Big Bear Lake

The Daily Review, Hayward

Brentwood News

The Daily Transcript, San Diego

Burbank Leader

The Davis Enterprise

The Business Journal, Fresno

The Desert Sun, Palm Springs

Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas

The Hanford Sentinel Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Ontario

The Camarillo Acorn The Cambrian, Cambria Carmel Valley News, San Diego Chico News & Review

Lake County Record-Bee, Lakeport

Chino/Chino Hills Champion

Lodi News-Sentinel

Clear Lake Observer American, Lakeport

Lompoc Record Los Angeles Times Marin Independent Journal, Novato

Claremont Courier

Coastline Pilot, Laguna Beach Culver City News Denair Dispatch

Merced Sun-Star

Dispatch, Gilroy

The Modesto Bee

Elk Grove Citizen

The Monterey County Herald

The Escalon Times

The Napa Valley Register

Feather River Bulletin, Quincy

The Oakland Tribune The Orange County Register, Santa Ana

Maura Casey, Freelance Editor/Writer, Connecticut Newspapers

The Argonaut, Los Angeles

Daily Press, Victorville

Glendale News-Press

Tim Harmon, Managing Editor, South Bend Tribune

The Alpine Sun

Daily Pilot, Costa Mesa

The Fresno Bee

Nancy Thompson, Associate Editor, The Journal Inquirer

Ukiah Daily Journal

The Ferndale Enterprise The Foothills Sun-Gazette, Exeter Fort Bragg Advocate-News

“Foothill students join march in Sacramento ” Photo Essay, Weekly (11,001 – 25,000) First Place , by Michelle Le, Photographer, Mountain View Voice Writing, Weekly (4,301 – 11,000) First Place Elk Grove Citizen

Hope is on the horizon

The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa

Free Lance, Hollister

The Press-Enterprise, Riverside

Galt Herald

Press-Telegram, Long Beach

Garden Grove Journal

By Katie Freeman, Lifestyle & Arts Reporter

The Record, Stockton

Good Times, Santa Cruz

Record Searchlight, Redding

The Grapevine Independent, Rancho Cordova

For Joni Victorino and Pam Hunker, the light at the end of the tunnel is a faint twinkle. But it’s enough to keep them pushing ahead toward their goal of getting an apartment. Right now, Joni and Pam live in Pam’s PT Cruiser. The chip-free, blue exterior of the fairly new car doesn’t hint at what’s inside. An asthma inhaler sits in the sun on the dash, along with dozens of packages of pills they take for their various health problems. Clothing and blankets pack the back seat of the car, which, Pam said, they soon will downsize because the warm weather is coming and they’ll need more space. Pam owns a 10x10 storage space where she keeps some furniture from the triplewide mobile home she used to live in before she became homeless. They hope to use that furniture one day when they are able to afford an apartment. I t ’ s a l l the two

Redlands Daily Facts The Sacramento Bee The Salinas Californian The San Diego Union-Tribune San Francisco Chronicle San Francisco Daily Journal San Gabriel Valley Tribune, West Covina San Jose Mercury News

Grunion Gazette, Long Beach Half Moon Bay Review Healdsburg Tribune Hesperia Star Hughson Chronicle Huntington Beach Independent Idyllwild Town Crier The Intermountain News, Burney

San Mateo County Times

La Cañada Valley Sun, La Cañada Flintridge

Santa Barbara Daily Sound

La Jolla Light

Santa Barbara News-Press

Lamorinda Weekly, Moraga

Santa Cruz Sentinel

Lincoln News Messenger

Santa Maria Times

Loomis News

The Signal, Santa Clarita

Los Altos Town Crier

The Sun, San Bernardino

Los Angeles Downtown News

Times-Herald, Vallejo

Los Banos Enterprise

Times-Standard, Eureka

The Mendocino Beacon, Fort Bragg

The Tribune, San Luis Obispo The Union Democrat, Sonora

Merced County Times Continued on Page 10

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Homeless, but with a plan womenbothin their 50s- have after each endured financial and emotional hardships that led them to the streets and each other. They met three years ago on the Internet. Joni was living with her mother in San Bernardino and Pam was on the verge of becoming homeless. Within a short time, both Pam’s parents died, her lover tried to commit suicide andleft Pam with a bunch of bills that placed a bigger burden on her already precarious financial situation. Pam was forced to sell her trailer for a little money and move into her car. “The only thing I could think to do was become homeless,” she said. Joni said she loves Pam and would be with her no matter what. “I chose to stay with her because I love her, regardless of whether it was good or bad,” Joni said. It takes more than street smarts to stay alive and optimistic while homeless. Joni and Pam lean on each other

for support, even though, they said it can be hard to coexist while living in a car. Their “children,” three apillon dogs that provide them constant companionship, also share the cramped car with them. “We can’t go to shelters because we have animals that we love dearly,” Pam said. Despite their circumstances, Joni and Pam are still able to smile and joke. When asked to see their PT Cruiser, Pam said it’s too dirty. “Oh it’s been washed,” Joni said with a big smile. “It was pouring down rain- don’t be silly now.” Pam opened the door and greeted her dogs. She explained a trick the dogs have learned to do. “They can open water bottles,” she said proudly. Their financial situation is on the up-and-up as well. Six months ago, Joni landed a part-time job at a local discount store. Continued on Page 12

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


Awards Edition

Saturday, April 16, 2011

3

Sports Story, Daily (100,001 & Above) Second Place San Jose Mercury News

THE SHOO-IN

It’s clear legendary 49er receiver Jerry Rice deserves induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame By Daniel Brown

“It’s Joe Montana,” Miller said.

dbrown@mercurynews.com

Then he sat back down.

Two snapshots, one at hello and one at goodbye, demonstrate why Jerry Rice will be elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame today in one of the least surprising announcements in sports history.

Rice also needs no elaboration. The committee could pick a number, any number. His 22,895 receiving yards put him 4.4 miles (7,687 yards) ahead of the next guy on the list, Isaac Bruce. Rice also has 208 touchdowns 50 of that total is former Cowboys running back Emmitt Smith (175), who also is a lock for a Hall of Fame spot today.

Click! There’s Rice as a 49ers rookie in 1985, and he’s dropping footballs as if they’re greased bowling balls. Rice flubs so many in one early-season game that Ronnie Lott silently vows to watch how the kid handles himself in the locker room. Lott nds Rice sitting alone, crying. “When I saw that, I knew we had something special,” said Lott, a Hall of Fame defensive back for the 49ers. “It’s the guys who don’t care that you worry about.”

With Rice, statistics tell only half the story. And the other half is way more fun. Rice’s life story reads like a collection of fables. He was born in dinky Starkville, Miss., be-

Rice’s dad was a no-nonsense bricklayer who demanded that all six of his sons serve an apprenticeship. (Rice was the youngest boy; he had two younger sisters). During shifts that could last from 5 a.m. to sundown in the sizzling Southern heat, Rice would stand on the scaffold or the second story of an apartment building while dad tossed bricks from below. If Rice dropped one, the cost of the brick was deducted from his paycheck. “Some like to say that’s where my great catching hands for football came from — I’m not so sure,” Rice wrote in his autobiography. “Brick-catching requires hard

Click! There’s Rice on the verge of retirement at age 42, having turned the NFL record book into a chapter of his personal biography. He’s racked up more yardage than a frequent flier and caught more touchdown passes than Hall of Famers Lynn Swann, Raymond Berry and Charlie Joiner combined. Lott bumps into Rice and commends his friend for an amazing career. “Still not perfect,” Rice tells him. “I still haven’t played that perfect game.”

generate much national attention. Still it proved big enough. John McVay, now 79, was there at the precise moment that Rice came onto the 49ers’radar screen — technically a television set in a Houston hotel room. The 49ers were in town for an Oct. 21, 1984, game against the Oilers. But the night before, head coach Bill Walsh was flipping channels when he happened across the action at Mississippi Valley State. Walsh watched for a while, mesmerized by a wiry receiver named Rice. He promptly summoned McVay and public relations Director Jerry Walker into his room. “Bill had such an unbelievable eye for talent — it’s actually spooky,” recalled McVay,a longtime 49ers executive. “He kept saying over and over again that Jerry looked super. “Bill would say, ‘Look at the way he moves. Look at his concentration. Look at the way he uses his hands.’ I saw it, too, but only because I was sitting at the hands of the master.” The biggest knock against Rice as an NFL prospect was his lack of foot speed. He was timed at 4.6 seconds in the 40-yard dash, which made him a tortoise

“Snowboards” Sports Photo, Daily (100,001 & Above) First Place, by Robert Gauthier, Photographer, Los Angeles Times

“I’ll never forget those two meetings,” Lott says now. “That humility, that drive, that determination — those things say more about Jerry Rice than any catch he ever made.”

fore moving to even dinkier Crawford (pop. 445). He ran four miles down a dirt road road each day to get to B.L. Moor School. There were only 20 kids in his sophomore class, so one day when Rice decided to skip out and loiter in the corridor. It didn’t take long for the principal to crack the case.

Rice will get his turn at the podium today in South Florida, shortly after a 44-person selection committee makes the easy call to include him in the Hall of Fame class of 2010.

As the story goes, the principal tried to confront Rice, but the kid fled the scene like a startled hummingbird. It’s the first documented case of Rice being as fast as the situation required.

The decision-making process will be brief, perhaps as short as when longtime football writer Ira Miller stood before the assembled group, cleared his throat and made the case for 49ers quarter back Joe Montana.

The next day, when the vice principal caught up to him, he whipped Rice six times and ordered him to report … to the football coach. Rice fit in quickly, thanks to his principal-eluding speed, his sturdy body and strong hands, the result of his summer job working for his father, Joe.

Two snapshots, one portrait.

hands and an aggressive approach; catching a football requires soft hands to cradle. Regardless, the hand-eye coordination had to help me down the road.” Rice played well at Moor High School, but the venue was hardly a showcase for his talents. The stadium, such as it was, seated about 100 people and had light poles on just one side of the field. The only college to recruit him was Mississippi Valley State, a Division I-AA school in Itta Bena with an enrollment at the time of 2,500. Rice Rice thrived there, too, catching 112 passes for 1,845 yards and 28 touchdowns as a senior. His coach, Archie “Gunslinger” Cooley, was fond of saying that Rice “can catch a BB on a dead run at night.” Mississippi Valley State was too small to

in a field of 4.4-second hares.

But Walsh and McVay noticed something else about Rice’s alleged lack of speed: Nobody ever caught him. Rice was always one step ahead, regardless of the distance or how many defensive backs were in pursuit. “To get an accurate 40 time on Jerry,” McVay says now, “you’d have have somebody chasing him.” The 49ers owned the last pick of the first round in 1985, but they bundled their three top choices and traded them to the New England Patriots for No. 16 and used that spot to grab Rice. Arguably the greatest coup on draft day history hardly looked that way at the start. The bricklayer’s son from the dirt roads of Mississippi had a hard time adjusting to SanFrancisco. Rice has said that he stepped off the plane, he wanted to get Continued on Page 15

2 0 1 0 DailY Awards by Categ ory 1. General Excellence Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – San Francisco Chronicle 2nd – The Sacramento Bee

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs 2nd – Ventura County Star

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Daily Press, Victorville

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Davis Enterprise 2nd – The Signal, Santa Clarita

2. Public Service Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – San Jose Mercury News 2nd – Los Angeles Times

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – San Gabriel Valley Tribune, West Covina 2nd – Press-Telegram, Long Beach

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Visalia Times-Delta 2nd – San Mateo County Times

Daily (D) 10,000 & under (No entrants in this division)

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – Los Angeles Times

2nd – San Jose Mercury News

Daily (A) 100,001 & above

2nd – The Sacramento Bee

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – The Fresno Bee 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Daily Pilot, Costa Mesa 2nd – Daily Pilot, Costa Mesa

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – San Mateo County Times 2nd – Visalia Times-Delta

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Signal, Santa Clarita 2nd – Redlands Daily Facts

4. Environmental or AG Reporting

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Ventura County Star 2nd – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa

1st – The Bakersfield Californian 2nd – Chico Enterprise-Record

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Record Searchlight, Redding 2nd – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale

1st – The Napa Valley Register 2nd – Daily Republic, Fairfield

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Signal, Santa Clarita 2nd – The Davis Enterprise

5. Business or Financial Story Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – San Jose Mercury News

1st – The Daily Transcript, San Diego 2nd – The Davis Enterprise

6. Local Breaking News Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – San Francisco Chronicle 2nd – The Fresno Bee

Continued on Page 9 CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


4

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Awards Edition

Columns, Weekly (4,301 - 11,000) Second Place, Sierra Star, Oakhurst

Thank you, veterans, for your sacrifice, our freedom

2 010 W eekly Awards by Catego ry 1. General Excellence

by Dr. Bill Atwood

T

hose should be the words spoken to every Veteran you encounter,

especially this weekend. Monday marks the day that this nation honors a select group of veterans. Those wounded in service of their country and those who gave the ultimate sacrifice. We honor as a nation all veterans on Veterans Day in November and really they should be honored every waking second of our lives but those are the veteran’s special days. Memorial Day was originally called Decoration Day when folks would go out and decorate the graves of the fallen in cemeteries across the fruited plains and around the globe. On this holiday it is correct procedure to fly your flag at half staff until noon in honor of those killed in battle and then

forget that there are wounded warriors among us and that there are American military dead buried in National Cemeteries here and abroad. This Monday most of us will take a break from work to relax at picnics and at campsites. Many will sit around pools or along the shore of a lake or beach. Some will travel to other areas to visit friends and relatives or to take in the sights away from the beautiful sights here that still others will come to visit. During those periods of relaxation we need to set aside time to remember the sacrifice. I keep mentioning sacrifice not to be repetitive and irritating but to be emphatic. It was a sacrifice. Earl left his hand in a foxhole when the grenade exploded. He was trying to throw the North Korean grenade back to the North Koreans and his actions cost him a hand but saved the lives of five men.

all have knowledge of a friend or family member who made our liberty a reality. Monday is that day we need to make it a point to say thank you.

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

When I had the high honor of meeting Jon Caviani last week it was only the third time I got to shake the hand of a recipient of The Medal of Honor. I looked at his medal around his neck as he came to talk to my students about being patriots. I had never seen the medal up close and my eloquence was dazzling. I looked at it around his neck and said, “Wow.” I think I said wow four or five times and was speechless. What do you say when looking at a hero who suffered so very much during his days in Vietnam and those months in the POW camp? All I could mutter was a thank you.

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

I reminded my students that it is the service men and women who have ensured that we still get to live in the United States

1st – San Francisco Bay Guardian 2nd – Palo Alto Weekly

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – Burbank Leader 2nd – San Francisco Business Times 1st – Petaluma Argus-Courier 2nd – Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – Claremont Courier 2nd – St. Helena Star

2. Public Service

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – North Coast Journal, Eureka 2nd – The Almanac, Menlo Park

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Half Moon Bay Review 2nd – San Rafael News Pointer

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

1st – Tahoe Mountain News, South Lake Tahoe 2nd – Times-Press-Recorder, Arroyo Grande

5. Business or Financial Story Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

1st – Palo Alto Weekly 2nd – SF Weekly, San Francisco

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – North Coast Journal, Eureka 2nd – North Coast Journal, Eureka

1st – Sacramento News & Review 2nd – Palo Alto Weekly 1st – The Almanac, Menlo Park 2nd – Pleasanton Weekly

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Lincoln News Messenger 2nd – Amador Ledger Dispatch, Jackson

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – Feather River Bulletin 2nd – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000 Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal 2nd – The Sonoma Index-Tribune

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

1st – Tahoe Mountain News, South Lake Tahoe 2nd – Tahoe Mountain News, South Lake Tahoe

6. Local Breaking News Weekly (A) 25,001 & above 1st – The Press-Tribune, Roseville 2nd – San Francisco Bay Guardian

Weekly (B) 11,001 ��� 25,000

1st – Mountain Democrat, Placerville 2nd – Mountain Democrat, Placerville

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – La Cañada Valley Sun, La Cañada Flintridge 2nd – Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – Free Lance, Hollister 2nd – Claremont Courier

7. Local News Coverage Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

1st – Los Angeles Downtown News 2nd – Good Times, Santa Cruz

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – San Francisco Business Times 2nd – North Coast Journal, Eureka

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal 2nd – Half Moon Bay Review

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

1st – Mount Shasta Herald 2nd – Mountain Echo, Fall River Mills

8. Sports Coverage Weekly A & B Combined Circulation Divisions 1st – The Press-Tribune, Roseville 2nd – Palo Alto Weekly

Weekly C & D Combined Circulation Divisions

“Convoy”‚ General News Photo, Daily (100,001 & Above) Second Place, by Carolyn Cole, Photographer, Los Angeles Times to raise Old Glory to the top of the pole for the rest of the day in honor of those wounded on our behalf. This is an important day for our country. It is important that we remember to honor the service of men and women who put their lives on hold to serve and to protect our liberty. It is important that we tell the children that a sacrifice was made to provide them with a life of liberty. It is important that we remind ourselves of the sacrifice made for us. It is important that we never, ever

Jon made sure that his men got out by helicopter when surrounded by superior numbers of the enemy in Vietnam. He held off the enemy for two days and was captured saving his men. He spent 23 months in the POW camps of Vietnam. Sam had his jet shot down over Laos and is still missing in action. Robert walks with a limp today because of an injury sustained in France on June 6, 1944. There are many Jon’s, Earl’s, Robert’s, and Sam’s and we

of American as a free people. Without them we would have been conquered and enslaved. When we have thanked them a million times we can say thank you a million times more and we still won’t have said it enough.

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above 1st – Palo Alto Weekly 2nd – Sacramento News & Review

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – San Francisco Business Times 2nd – North Coast Journal, Eureka

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000 1st – Morgan Hill Times 2nd – Merced County Times

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

Thank you veterans.

1st – The Recorder, San Francisco 2nd – Free Lance, Hollister

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you.

4. Environmental or AG Reporting Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

1st – Chico News & Review 2nd – SF Weekly, San Francisco

1st – Petaluma Argus-Courier 2nd – The Foothills Sun-Gazette, Exeter

9. Lifestyle Coverage Weekly (A) 25,001 & above (No entrants in this division)

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – Pacific Sun, San Rafael 2nd – Coastline Pilot, Laguna Beach

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Half Moon Bay Review 2nd – Amador Ledger Dispatch, Jackson

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

1st – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang 2nd – The Foothills Sun-Gazette, Exeter

10. Arts & Entertainment All Weekly Divisions Combined 1st – Pacific Sun, San Rafael

Continued on Page 8

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


Awards Edition

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Columns, Daily (25,001 – 100,000) Second Place, The Bakersfield Californian

Weaving Tandy skates away

by Lois Henry

C

ity Manager Alan Tandy was pulled over Tuesday night, driving a cityowned car, on suspicion of drunken driving. Officer Sean Underhill, who is on the city’s DUI enforcement detail, saw him weaving and driving extremely slowly on Truxtun Avenue. He asked if Tandy had been drinking and Tandy said he’d had one drink with dinner. Underhill sized up the situation and called his supervisor, Sgt. Melvin Johnson. Johnson spoke with Tandy briefly outside of earshot and eyesight of Underhill and let him go. No field sobriety test. “Sgt. Johnson contacted Mr. Tandy and did not observe any outward signs of intoxication and he was released,” Sgt. Mary DeGeare said. She called it routine. Come on. Let’s be honest. If it were you or me, we all know we would have been out of that car touching our noses and walking the line — at a minimum. All Johnson did, according to him, was have Tandy blow into his cupped hand and smell for booze on his breath. That’s not a standard field sobriety test. DeGeare said that, no, the cupped hand

Tandy called the episode “very minor and it resulted in nothing because there was no cause for it.” No cause, he repeated. Being pulled over, he said, was “rather odd.” He speculated it was motivated not by his driving but by the city’s relationship with the police union. The city is at impasse with police, who have been without a contract for four years. The union is preparing to take the city to court for a second time for unfair bargaining practices. “I thought it was very strange in the first place and now your having been called about this very minor event makes it stranger yet,” Tandy said. “It smacks of union relations. “I can’t prove that.” Thanks to how this all went down, no one can prove anything. Which makes that a really heavy accusation to hang on Underhill, Tandy’s subordinate, who has no way to defend himself. I asked Tandy if he had, in fact, been drinking before getting behind the wheel of a vehicle owned and insured by the taxpayers and he acknowledged he’d had one drink with dinner. So, what’s the city’s policy on alcohol con-

2 0 10 Awards by Newspaper The Acorn, Agoura Hills (W) 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place

The Almanac, Menlo Park (W)

2. Public Service, 1st Place 4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place

Amador Ledger Dispatch, Jackson (W) 2. Public Service, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place

Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale (D)

5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 8. Sports Coverage, 2nd Place 10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place 18. Columns, 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place 21. Editorial Cartoon, 1st Place

Appeal-Democrat, Marysville (D) 12. Page Layout & Design, 2nd Place 28. Online Breaking News, 2nd Place

Auburn Journal (D)

19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place

Burbank Leader (W)

12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid), 2nd Place

Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas (W) 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place

The Cambrian, Cambria (W) 16. Feature Story, 1st Place

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Daily Press, Victorville (D)

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place 21. Editorial Cartoon, 2nd Place

Daily Republic, Fairfield (D)

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place 29. Online Coverage, 2nd Place 30. Best Video, 1st Place

The Daily Transcript, San Diego (D) 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 29. Online Coverage, 1st Place 30. Best Video, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

The Davis Enterprise (D)

The Desert Sun, Palm Springs (D)

25. Feature Photo, 1st Place

Opinions expressed in this column are those of Lois Henry, not The Bakersfield Californian. Her column appears Wednesdays and Sundays. Comment at people.bakersfield. com/home/ Blog/noholdsbarred, call her at 395-7373 or e-mail lhenry@bakersfield.com

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place

The Business Journal, Fresno (W)

Brentwood News (W)

sumption and driving city vehicles? “It’s to not be inebriated and drive a vehicle, which I was not, not in any way, not even close,” he said. Then he spent a little time lambasting me: “This is really a contrived news story. And while I realize that doesn’t stop you, this is fantasy land.” OK, moving on. There was a simple, fail-safe way for everyone to be assured that everything about this stop was on the up and up. Tandy should have been given the standard field sobriety tests or asked to blow into a PAS. Then we’d all know absolutely whether the city boss was sober. I asked Tandy why he hadn’t insisted on that, given who he is and his belief the stop was based in union harassment. “It didn’t occur to me at the time,” he said. Well, it should have occurred to someone, especially Johnson and his superiors who were very well aware of the situation as it unfolded. As it is, we’ll never know whether Tandy was drunk. We just have to trust that Johnson didn’t hand him a Mulligan. I’d prefer to know — for sure.

Daily Pilot, Costa Mesa (D)

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet), 1st Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place

thing isn’t standard nor even a common technique, but it is a reasonable way to help the officer determine alcohol consumption. Uh-huh. A portable alcohol screening device takes just as little effort, is a whole lot more accurate and Underhill surely had one as part of the DUI enforcement detail. Using it requires consent, however, so Tandy would have had to acquiesce to it. He apparently wasn’t even asked by Johnson. Bakersfield Police Chief Greg Williamson insisted the whole stop from start to finish was handled correctly. “We pull people over every day based on driving observations and the officer’s state of mind that the person is possibly intoxicated,” he said. “And every day we substantiate or eliminate those suspicions.” Sorry. As much as they want to stick this into the ho-hum drawer, it’s not every day the CEO of the city, the chief’s direct boss and a man who’s tangled with the very people pulling him over gets stopped. I’d say that puts this in the kid gloves realm. For his part, Tandy was annoyed with the whole thing — by being stopped and especially by my phone call. He was adamant that he wasn’t drunk. And said he was NOT weaving. The only reason he was driving slowly, he said, was because a cop car was following him and he didn’t want to exceed the speed limit. “He followed me for a very long time,” he said. Yes, that’s what they’re trained to do in order to see if there’s a driving pattern and not just one wobble, which wouldn’t indicate impairment.

8. Sports Coverage, 1st Place 18. Columns, 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page, 1st Place 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place 18. Columns, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place

The Bakersfield Californian (D)

Big Bear Grizzly, Big Bear Lake (W)

“Eyeing the Opponent”‚ Feature Photo, Daily (Daily 25,001 - 100,000) Second Place, by Kent Porter, Photographer, The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa

5

Carmel Valley News, San Diego (W) 15. Writing, 2nd Place

Chico Enterprise-Record (D)

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place

Chico News & Review (W)

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place

Chino/Chino Hills Champion (W) 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place

Claremont Courier (W)

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 11. Front Page (Tabloid), 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid), 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

Coastline Pilot, Laguna Beach (W) 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place

Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek (D) 4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 8. Sports Coverage, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place

Daily News-Los Angeles, Woodland Hills (D)

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 8. Sports Coverage, 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

Dispatch, Gilroy (W)

12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet), 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place

Elk Grove Citizen (W) 15. Writing, 1st Place

Feather River Bulletin (W) 2. Public Service, 1st Place

The Ferndale Enterprise (W) 14. Freedom of Information, 2nd Place

The Foothills Sun-Gazette, Exeter (W) 8. Sports Coverage, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place

Fort Bragg Advocate-News (W) 14. Freedom of Information, 1st Place

Free Lance, Hollister (W)

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place 6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place 28. Online Breaking News, 2nd Place

The Fresno Bee (D)

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 22. Illustration or Info Graphic, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place

Good Times, Santa Cruz (W)

7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid), 1st Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place 30. Best Video, 2nd Place

Grunion Gazette, Long Beach (W) 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place

Half Moon Bay Review (W)

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st

Continued on Page 14

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


6

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Awards Edition

Daily General Excellence Winners

Comments provided by Blue Ribbon Judges

San Francisco Chronicle Daily (A) 100,001 & Above “This is an energetic, lively newspaper. The design is inviting and the stories well-written and well-edited. The front pages are newsy and the inside pages are welldesigned. Congratulations on a great job!”

The Desert Sun, Palm Springs

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000 “This is a traditional but classic-looking newspaper that is well designed. Solid covers, centerpieces and writing. Good use of color and graphic presentation. Excellent work! Congratulations!”

Sports Story, Weekly (11,001 - 25,000) Second Place Mountain Democrat, Placerville

Lady Trojans are No. 1 The Oak Ridge girls basketball team makes state tournament history in Bakersfield by Jerry Heinzer , Staff Writer

B

AKERSFIELD — They did it! Against tall odds Saturday night in Bakersfield, the Oak Ridge High girls didn’t blink. Facing a formidable opponent in nationally-ranked Poly, Long Beach, for the 2010 California Interscholastic Federation Division I state title, they didn’t back down. Playing in foreign territory against the third-ranked team in the country at Rabobank Arena, the Lady Trojans, who were ranked 40th, grabbed their share of history after dethroning the four-time champion Jackrabbits 55-42 to cap a remarkable postseason run. “Alot of people didn’t think we had much of a shot as the underdogs but we were contending and tonight the contenders won the state title,” Trojan coach Steve White said. “I’m so proud of the girls ... what an amazing performance. The defense was outstanding and we did a great job controlling the tempo. The girls played with confidence and we’ve said all along that ‘we’re playing to win it and not here to lose.’” Oak Ridge had nothing to lose — but everything to gain against a Poly team defending for the fifth straight season — and with all the added pressure. The Jackrabbits, who were used to being in front, didn’t have a game plan for playing from behind. They grew more and more frustrated in their inability to overtake the Trojans in the second half and then wilted under Oak Ridge’s game-closing 15-2 run. “I think had they took the lead it would have given them an adrenaline rush but I was confident the girls would right the ship and we could come back,” White said. Now the only ship Troy plans to take is at Disneyland’s Pirates of the Caribbean where the team will celebrate being the first-ever large school from the Sac-Joaquin Section to win a state D-1 basketball title. And the Trojans beat a team from the largest high school in California — 5,130 students, which is twice the size of Oak Ridge.

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Oak Ridge had a big postgame dinner planned Saturday as hundreds of Trojans fans waited for the team to appear on Rabobank’s concourse. The girls are the second Oak Ridge team to win an improbable state title by knocking off the pregame favorite. The boys program won the D-II title in 2005 against powerhouse Mater Dei, in what was billed a no-contest contest before the game by all the “experts.” “I can’t wait for the state championship emblem to go on the floor next to the boys. This is a dream come true and it’s great to know that some of our younger girls really came through tonight,” said Sara James, whose brother Kevin played on the 2005 team. “In warm-ups you could tell people were looking at us like ‘that’s the team that beat Berkeley?’ But we’ve been underestimated the whole season and just played harder, kept our composure and worked together.” James scored 26 points, 20 in a remarkable first half, before fouling out with 55 seconds left in her last game for Oak Ridge. Just as it looked like Poly was off to the races early in the game, James literally took over. The Trojans also got a big contribution off the bench from junior Dakota McLarnan, who pumped in 14 big points and tied a state finals record by making four, three-pointers. Junior Stefanie Walberg also gave Oak Ridge a lift inside when she came in for Caitlin Welsch, who was in foul trouble early, to battle Poly’s post players. With James saddled with second-half foul trouble, the El Dorado Hills squad banded together to hold, protect and extend the lead. Key to the Trojans’ victory was their zone defense that successfully slowed a Jackrabbit offense averaging 68 points a game. Oak Ridge held Poly to .292 shooting from the floor and 2-for-12 in the fourth quarter when Troy honed in on the win. From beyond the arc, Poly was 2-of-15. Welsch and Megan Griswold both blocked shots and the Trojans hauled down 21 defensive rebounds against a team known for its rebounding.

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


Awards Edition Oak Ridge took a 38-34 lead into the fourth quarter but the Jackrabbits tied it on two free throws by Ta’nitra Byrd. Walberg answered on the other end with a driving shot from the left side before Sheila Boykin’s turn-around jumper knotted the score again at 40all. “No one stopped me so I kept going. I was looking to pass but I found a seam and took the shot,” said Walberg, who hopes to step into the starting lineup next year. “This was huge for me. I haven’t had much playing time in the playoffs so to go in and get significant minutes is big for me.” It also was about to get a lot better for the Trojans. Natalie Stone was fouled and made two free throws to break the tie and then, after a Poly miss, kicked a pass to McLarnan on the wing for a three with 3:36 left that forced the Jackrabbits into a timeout. “Carly (Bettencourt) found me with a pass and to tell you the truth I can remember the basket but not the play,” McLarnan said. “I just knew I had to get open — I could feel it off my fingertips tonight and knew when it was going in. This is beyond incredible and I can’t even describe it.” Up 47-40, Oak Ridge drove it home as Bettencourt, held scoreless in the first half, made a tough, twisting shot inside she’d later describe as a “huck,” and James, Stone, Bettencourt and McLarnan each made two free throws down the stretch before the Trojans ran out the clock and mobbed one another at the final horn. “It hasn’t kicked in ... it’s in there andI feel it’s coming,” Bettencourt said about winning it all while clutching the game ball. “We’ve worked so hard from the beginning and it shows how hard work can lead to your goals.” James’ three opened the scoring but Poly fought back to lead 13-6 late in the first quarter before James went in from the left side and McLarnan knocked down a three seconds before the buzzer. Against a team out for its fifth straight state banner that includes four scholarship players, Oak Ridge was pleased to trail by just two after the first eight minutes. James torched the Jackrabbits in the second for 13 points. After Stone converted high off the glass on Bettencourt’s

Saturday, April, 16, 2011

feed, the Trojans trailed by four but came back as James stuck a banker, ran down a long rebound for a driving layup and then took Walberg’s assist for a cut to the basket and a 3-point play. James then drew the defense and passed out for McLarnan’s three, drained four straight free throws (she was 9-of-10 overall) and took Stone’s backdoor pass for a shot off the glass and a 2923 halftime lead. Oak Ridge headed to the locker room to a standing ovation from the Trojan faithful. “Poly is a great team and bigger, faster and stronger than us so we really had to keep our poise,” White said. “We came in confident because everyone we’ve been playing has been a little better version than the team before so we had a game plan and knew the girls were very capable and could make adjustments. It was in believing that we could do it ...these girls are very resilient and don’t get rattled too much.” If they ever could have been rattled it was in the third when five consecutive turnovers threatened to derail the Trojans’ eight-point cushion. But Oak Ridge forced a travel and James went coast-to-coast to draw a foul and hit two free throws before the team headed into the fourth for its big finish. “This group worked their tails off,” White said. “The hard part about the playoffs is that the rotations get shorter but those girls work hard on the scout team preparing the starters and it was a total team effort.” Asked at halftime what would happen if the Jackrabbits came out with a different defense to shut James down, White was confident that the other girls would step up — and they did. Poly put on the press but nothing could stop Oak Ridge. The Trojans shot .500 from the floor and were 20-of-26 from the foul line. James led all scorers with 26 points, McLarnan had 14, Stone, seven, Bettencourt, six, and Walberg, two. Poly’s Tajanae Winston tallied 13 points, Byrd added nine, Brittany Wilson had seven, Destiny King chipped in five, and Boykin and Ariya Crook-Williams each had four.

7

Daily General Excellence Winners (cont.) Santa Cruz Sentinel Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 “This is a well-designed, well-written newspaper that – in the issues we read – presented a strong commitment to local news coverage. The front page on March 5 is a good example great reporting on the student protest at UC Santa Cruz with an excellent photo taken by Shmuel Thaler. The paper is clean and consistent in displaying news on the inside pages. Headlines are accurate, and they did a good job of drawing the readers into stories. Overall, this is a good newspaper that certainly earned first place.”

The Davis Enterprise Daily (D) 10,000 & Under “This is an attractive, well-written, wellphotographed newspaper that covers its community comprehensively and passionately. The Davis Enterprise combines hard news like the hate crimes and tuition protests with charming views of Davis life, like Pig Day at the Farmer’s Market. Clean layout, strong headlines and good sports coverage. A great newspaper!”

Both Oak Ridge and the Jackrabbits finish the season with overall records of 32-3.

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


8

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Awards Edition

20 10 Weekly Award by C ateg o ry Continued from Page 4 2nd – Metro Silicon Valley, San Jose

11. Front Page (Broadsheet)

1st – Burbank Leader 2nd – Vida en el Valle, Fresno

Weekly A & B Combined Circulation Divisions

Weekly C & D Combined Circulation Divisions

1st – Mountain Democrat, Placerville 2nd – Hesperia Star

Weekly C & D Combined Circulation Divisions

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – The Sonoma Index-Tribune 2nd – Paso Robles Press

1st – Dispatch, Gilroy 2nd – Half Moon Bay Review

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under/ Monthly

Weekly A & B Combined Circulation Divisions

11. Front Page (Tabloid)

1st – Healdsburg Tribune 2nd – Sonoma County Gazette, Forestville

14. Freedom of Information

1st – Good Times, Santa Cruz 2nd – Metro Silicon Valley, San Jose

Weekly A & B Combined Circulation Divisions

1st – Sacramento News & Review 2nd – San Francisco Business Times 1st – Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal 2nd – Claremont Courier

12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet)

1st – San Francisco Business Times 2nd – Tracy Press

12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid)

1st – Petaluma Argus-Courier 2nd – Half Moon Bay Review

Weekly C & D Combined Circulation Divisions

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

Weekly A & B Combined Circulation Divisions

Weekly C & D Combined Circulation Divisions 1st – Claremont Courier 2nd – The Business Journal, Fresno

All Weekly Divisions Combined 1st – Fort Bragg Advocate-News 2nd – The Ferndale Enterprise

15. Writing

1st – Elk Grove Citizen 2nd – The Sonoma Index-Tribune

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

1st – Turlock Journal 2nd – The Foothills Sun-Gazette, Exeter

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

1st – North Coast Journal, Eureka 2nd – Santa Maria Sun

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Tahoe Daily Tribune, South Lake Tahoe 2nd – Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – The Cambrian, Cambria 2nd – The Mendocino Beacon, Fort Bragg

Comments provided by Blue Ribbon Judges

San Francisco Bay Guardian Weekly (A) 25,001 & Above

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – The Sonoma Index-Tribune 2nd – The Sonoma Index-Tribune

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – Mountain Echo, Fall River Mills 2nd – Claremont Courier

1st – Good Times, Santa Cruz 2nd – Chino/Chino Hills Champion

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – Los Altos Town Crier 2nd – Mountain Democrat, Placerville

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Sierra Sun, Truckee 2nd – Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

1st – Turlock Journal 2nd – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang

1st – Claremont Courier 2nd – Claremont Courier

18. Columns

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

1st – Tracy Press 2nd – Mountain Democrat, Placerville

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Twin Cities Times, Larkspur 2nd – Sierra Star, Oakhurst

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – Los Banos Enterprise 2nd – Los Banos Enterprise

19. Editorial Pages Weekly (A) 25,001 & above 1st – The Acorn, Agoura Hills 2nd – Chico News & Review

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – San Francisco Business Times 2nd – The Almanac, Menlo Park

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

“Comprehensive local coverage: front pages reflect a good mix of stories with government, crime, sports and business. Wide range of columns cover aspects of community. Paper is well-organized, good local editorial cartoons and local sports coverage, and photos are nicely displayed. Great job!”

1st – The Almanac, Menlo Park 2nd – The Almanac, Menlo Park

25. Feature Photo

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

Weekly (B) 11,001 - 25,000

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

1st – SF Weekly, San Francisco 2nd – Los Angeles Downtown News

Burbank Leader

1st – The Press-Tribune, Roseville 2nd – Palo Alto Weekly

17. Sports Story

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

“The San Francisco Bay Guardian knows itself, knows what it does and does it very well. In-depth reporting, with an attitude yet fully fair, is a real contribution to a democratic society. The FOI awards are a shining diamond in the rough. The arts and culture coverage sparkle s in words and design. The listings are endless.”

1st – Claremont Courier 2nd – Claremont Courier

24. General News Photo

1st – SF Weekly, San Francisco 2nd – Good Times, Santa Cruz

Weekly General Excellence Winners

1st – Half Moon Bay Review 2nd – The Sonoma Index-Tribune

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

13. Special Issue

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Simi Valley Acorn 2nd – Grunion Gazette, Long Beach

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

1st – North Coast Journal, Eureka 2nd – Carmel Valley News, San Diego

1st – Coastline Pilot, Laguna Beach 2nd – The Weekend Pinnacle, Hollister

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 16. Feature Story

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

1st – Vida en el Valle, Fresno 2nd – Grunion Gazette, Long Beach

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – Half Moon Bay Review 2nd – Dispatch, Gilroy

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – The Winters Express 2nd – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang

1st – Simi Valley Acorn 2nd – Simi Valley Acorn

1st – Tracy Press 2nd – San Francisco Business Times 1st – Brentwood News 2nd – Big Bear Grizzly, Big Bear Lake

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

26. Sports Photo 1st – Grunion Gazette, Long Beach 2nd – Simi Valley Acorn

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000 1st – Poway News Chieftain 2nd – The Weekend Pinnacle, Hollister

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – Ramona Sentinel 2nd – Big Bear Grizzly, Big Bear Lake

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – Free Lance, Hollister 2nd – Free Lance, Hollister

27. Photo Essay Weekly (A) 25,001 & above 1st – Palo Alto Weekly 2nd – Los Angeles Downtown News

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000 1st – Mountain View Voice 2nd – The Almanac, Menlo Park

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000 1st – Dispatch, Gilroy 2nd – Half Moon Bay Review

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – Claremont Courier 2nd – Claremont Courier

28. Online Breaking News All Weekly Divisions Combined

20. Editorial Comment Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

1st – The Intermountain News, Burney 2nd – Free Lance, Hollister

1st – Sacramento News & Review 2nd – Palo Alto Weekly

29. Online Coverage

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

All Weekly Divisions Combined

1st – The Almanac, Menlo Park 2nd – San Francisco Business Times

1st – The Mountain Enterprise, Frazier Park 2nd – Palo Alto Weekly

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000 1st – Petaluma Argus-Courier 2nd – Amador Ledger Dispatch, Jackson

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

30. Best Video All Weekly Divisions Combined

1st – The Recorder, San Francisco 2nd – Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang

1st – Pacific Sun, San Rafael 2nd – Good Times, Santa Cruz

21. Editorial Cartoon

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above

All Weekly Divisions Combined

1st – Palo Alto Weekly 2nd – SF Weekly, San Francisco

1st – Novato Advance 2nd – Petaluma Argus-Courier

22. Illustration or Info Graphic All Weekly Divisions Combined 1st – Half Moon Bay Review 2nd – San Francisco Business Times

23. Breaking News Photo

31. Best Website

Weekly (B) 11,001 – 25,000

1st – Burbank Leader 2nd – San Francisco Business Times

Weekly (C) 4,301 – 11,000

1st – The Sonoma Index-Tribune 2nd – Sierra Sun, Truckee

Weekly (D) 4,300 & under 1st – The Mountain Enterprise, Frazier Park 2nd – Claremont Courier

Weekly (A) 25,001 & above 1st – Thousand Oaks Acorn 2nd – Huntington Beach Independent

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


Awards Edition

Saturday, April, 16, 2011

9

20 10 Daily Awards by Categ o ry Continued from Page 3

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Press-Telegram, Long Beach 2nd – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Visalia Times-Delta 2nd – Appeal-Democrat, Marysville

Daily (D) 10,000 & under Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Record Searchlight, Redding

(No entrants in this division)

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – San Francisco Chronicle 2nd – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside

1st – The Davis Enterprise 2nd – Ukiah Daily Journal

7. Local News Coverage Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek 2nd – San Francisco Chronicle

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Press-Telegram, Long Beach 2nd – The Oakland Tribune

13. Special Issue Daily (A) 100,001 & above

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs 2nd – Santa Barbara News-Press

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 1st – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale 2nd – Santa Cruz Sentinel

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – The Signal, Santa Clarita 2nd – The Davis Enterprise

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

14. Freedom of Information Daily A & B Combined Circulation Divisions

8. Sports Coverage Daily (A) 100,001 & above

Daily C & D Combined Circulation Divisions

1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Times-Standard, Eureka 1st – The Signal, Santa Clarita 2nd – The Signal, Santa Clarita

1st – San Francisco Chronicle 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Daily News-Los Angeles, Woodland Hills 2nd – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – San Jose Mercury News 2nd – San Francisco Chronicle

1st – Record Searchlight, Redding 2nd – Visalia Times-Delta

Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – San Francisco Chronicle 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs 2nd – Daily News-Los Angeles, Woodland Hills

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 1st – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale 2nd – Auburn Journal

Daily (D) 10,000 & under (No entrants in this division)

20. Editorial Comment Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – San Jose Mercury News 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Marin Independent Journal, Novato 2nd – The Tribune, San Luis Obispo

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 1st – Santa Maria Times

2nd – Record Searchlight, Redding

2nd – The Union, Grass Valley

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

23. Breaking News Photo Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – Ukiah Daily Journal 2nd – There was no second entrant.

1st – Los Angeles Times 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

21. Editorial Cartoon Daily A & B Combined Circulation Divisions

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Marin Independent Journal, Novato 2nd – The San Diego Union-Tribune

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

Daily C & D Combined Circulation Divisions 1st – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale 2nd – Daily Press, Victorville

22. Illustration or Info Graphic Daily A & B Combined Circulation Divisions 1st – The Fresno Bee 2nd – San Francisco Chronicle

Daily C & D Combined Circulation Divisions 1st – Santa Maria Times

1st – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Ontario 2nd – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa 1st – Daily Republic, Fairfield 2nd – Santa Maria Times

Daily (D) 10,000 & under 1st – Ukiah Daily Journal 2nd – The Davis Enterprise

24. General News Photo Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside 2nd – Los Angeles Times

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Press-Telegram, Long Beach Continued on Page 13

Weekly General Excellence Winners (cont.)

15. Writing Daily (A) 100,001 & above

Petaluma Argus-Courier

1st – Los Angeles Times 2nd – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside

1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

Weekly (C) 4,301 - 11,000

1st – San Francisco Chronicle 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

16. Feature Story Daily (A) 100,001 & above

“Great weekly newspaper that’s chock-full of local news. Given the limited resources most weeklies endure, this newspaper deserves kudos for producing an excellent product week after week.”

(No entrants in this division)

9. Lifestyle Coverage Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – Santa Barbara News-Press 2nd – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Daily Republic, Fairfield 2nd – Santa Cruz Sentinel

Daily (D) 10,000 & under (No entrants in this division)

10. Arts & Entertainment Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – San Francisco Chronicle 2nd – San Jose Mercury News

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – The Monterey County Herald 2nd – The Tribune, San Luis Obispo

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Davis Enterprise 2nd – The Signal, Santa Clarita

11. Front Page Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – San Jose Mercury News 2nd – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000 1st – The Oakland Tribune 2nd – The Modesto Bee

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 1st – Merced Sun-Star 2nd – Santa Cruz Sentinel

Daily (D) 10,000 & under 1st – The Davis Enterprise 2nd – Ukiah Daily Journal

12. Page Layout & Design Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – San Francisco Chronicle 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa 2nd – The Monterey County Herald

1st – Ventura County Star 2nd – The Oakland Tribune

1st – Record Searchlight, Redding 2nd – Record Searchlight, Redding 1st – The Signal, Santa Clarita 2nd – The Davis Enterprise

1st – Los Angeles Times 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000 1st – The Oakland Tribune 2nd – The Monterey County Herald

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Daily Press, Victorville

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Signal, Santa Clarita 2nd – The Davis Enterprise

17. Sports Story Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – San Jose Mercury News 2nd – San Jose Mercury News

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa 2nd – Marin Independent Journal, Novato

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Daily Republic, Fairfield 2nd – Lodi News-Sentinel

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Davis Enterprise 2nd – The Signal, Santa Clarita

18. Columns Daily (A) 100,001 & above

Claremont Courier Weekly (D) 4,300 & under

1st – San Jose Mercury News 2nd – Contra Costa Times, Walnut Creek

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Daily News-Los Angeles, Woodland Hills 2nd – The Bakersfield Californian

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 1st – Antelope Valley Press, Palmdale 2nd – The Napa Valley Register

“A highly readable and comprehensive weekly. The Claremont Courier connects deeply with its readers and its community. A pleasure to read.”

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Davis Enterprise 2nd – The Signal, Santa Clarita

19. Editorial Pages

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


10 Awards Edition

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Par t icipat ing Newspape r s

Continued from Page 2

Metro Silicon Valley, San Jose

Poway News Chieftain

Sierra Sun, Truckee

Mill Valley Herald

The Press-Tribune, Roseville

Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal

MONTHLY NEWSPAPER ENTRANTS

Montclarion, Oakland

Ramona Sentinel

Simi Valley Acorn, Agoura Hills

Sonoma County Gazette, Forestville

Moorpark Acorn

Rancho Bernardo News Journal, San Diego

The Sonoma Index-Tribune

Tahoe Mountain News, South Lake Tahoe

The Recorder, San Francisco

Sonoma West Times & News, Sebastopol St. Helena Star

BNC COMMITTEE

Morgan Hill Times Mount Shasta Herald Mountain Democrat, Placerville Mountain Echo, Fall River Mills The Mountain Enterprise, Frazier Park Mountain View Voice The New Mountain Pioneer, Frazier Park North Coast Journal, Eureka Novato Advance The Oakdale Leader Pacific Sun, San Rafael Palo Alto Weekly Pasadena Weekly Paso Robles Press Petaluma Argus-Courier Placer Herald, Rocklin

Reedley Exponent Rosamond News Ross Valley Reporter

Tehachapi News

Sacramento News & Review

Thousand Oaks Acorn, Agoura Hills

San Francisco Bay Guardian

Times-Press-Recorder, Arroyo Grande

San Francisco Business Times

Tracy Press

San Rafael News Pointer

Trinity Journal, Weaverville

Dean Eckenroth, Coronado Eagle & Journal

Sanger Herald

Turlock Journal

Amy Pack, Visalia Times-Delta

Santa Cruz Weekly

Twin Cities Times, Larkspur

Santa Maria Sun

Vida en el Valle, Fresno

Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang

The Weekend Pinnacle, Hollister

Sausalito Marin Scope

The Weekly Calistogan

SF Weekly, San Francisco

The Windsor Times

Sierra Lodestar, San Andreas

The Winters Express

Debra Hershon, Half Moon Bay Review Mike Taborski, Feather River Bulletin

CNPA Jack Bates, Executive Director Bryan Clark, BNC Director Terri Vanderveer, Contest Coordinator

Sierra Star, Oakhurst

Pleasanton Weekly

Chairman, Marty Weybret, Lodi News-Sentinel

The Star-News, Chula Vista Tahoe Daily Tribune, South Lake Tahoe

Columns, Weekly (25,001 & Above) Second Place Los Angeles Downtown News

Lessons From The Ticket Scandal Why Free Admission to High-Profile Events Doesn’t Always Pay

by Jon Regardie

In recent weeks Antonio Villaraigosa, whose

day job is mayor of Los Angeles, has found himself swimming in a sticky swamp for apparently accepting free, great seats

THE REGARDIE REPORT to scores of concerts, basketball and baseball games and other high-profile events. The resulting maelstrom of media coverage brings to mind three important lessons that every politician should know about political scandal. First, political scandal is not that hard to avoid. I realize this may sound shocking in a country where reports of graft and extramarital relations flow like a shopping cart in the L.A. River. But really, the key to not getting caught taking bribes or selling a senate seat is not to take bribes or sell a senate seat in the first place. This should be McChrystal clear by now: You may get away with it for a little while, but ultimately they’ll catch ya. It’s the same with sex scandals. If you don’t want your private life dragged into newspapers and across TV screens, then don’t do things like look for assignations in public restrooms, don’t claim you’re hiking the Appalachian Trail while cheating on your wife, and don’t tell reporters that the reason you’re not wearing your wedding ring is because you’ve been working out so much that you’re mucho buff and have lost weight in the fingers. Again, excuses may buy time, but in the long run, they’ll catch ya. The second important thing to know is that, if it’s a mini scandal and you didn’t hurt anyone or engage in any felonies, you can usually make it go away with a well-timed and sincere mea culpa. It’s the old adage about making something a one-day story. Come clean, admit mistakes, and the most lasting damage may be a knuckle-smacking editorial from a newspaper. But if it’s small stuff and you continue to deny, deny, deny, it can erupt like an Icelandic volcano. The third thing to know is the pretty truth about the American public: While your foes will always denigrate you, past supporters actually want to forgive you and, if you don’t treat your constituents like morons, they’ll give you a second chance. Ted Kennedy had a stellar career after Chappaquiddick. Marion Barry was elected to office in Washington, D.C, even after being videotaped smoking crack. Gavin Newsom survived some off-putting philandering and just snagged the Democratic nod for lieutenant

governor. Bill Clinton has become an éminence grise despite being Lewinskyed. Any of the above lessons would serve AnVil well as his ticket pickle grows more sour, with the Ethics Commission now investigating and the District Attorney’s office inquiring into the matter. Villaraigosa finally released some details and tried to tell his side of the story on Friday, but it came so late that it can’t reverse the damage already done.

Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein cracked was known as Watergate because would be for a scandal involving a fence company so it could be awesomely known as Gategate. The second lesson is that Villaraigosa actually has decent taste in music. It’s very mainstream, to be sure, but in the wake of reports by John Schwada on Fox 11 and in the Los Angeles Times, we’ve learned that Villaraigosa and sometimes Lu Parker have taken in (or at least appeared at) performances by U2, Beyonce, Tina Turner, Aretha More lessons Franklin, Shakira and Mary J. Blige, among The issue isn’t that he This is not to say others. He seems to that ticketpalooza has got caught, but that he have an affinity for been without educais wiggling and trying respected female R&Btional fodder. In fact, tinged artists as well as the growing scandal to evade the matter. critically lauded Latino — it’s at the point It’s turning into ticketpop acts and crooners where reporters are such as Juanes, Luis whack•a-mole, and each pestering him about Miguel, Mana and Pepe it at many events, time a new charge comes Aguilar. Yeah, he’d and he keeps dodging down there’s a new excuse. up his cool quotient the questions — has if he mixed it up a bit taught us three imporand checked out/presented nice certificates to tant things. the Flaming Lips, Kings of Leon, Green Day The first lesson is that this should not be or the Buzzcocks, but at least he’s not taking in called Ticketgate. Attaching “gate” to any politithe Jonas Brothers or Miley Cyrus. Good on ya, cal scandal of significance — e.g. Irangate, mayor! Iraqgate, and there are dozens of others on The third, and arguably most important lesWikipedia — is stupid and lazy. The case that son, is that he still doesn’t grasp why people are

“Crane Crushes House” Breaking News Photo, Daily (25,001 - 100,000) Second Place, by Christopher Chang, Photographer, The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

so upset. At this point excuse. Look, a legitimate argument can be made that the mayor of Los Angeles should be out in public, generating attention and excitement for the city. This adds up over time. One of the strikes against Jim Hahn was that he preferred to stay in the background and, when he did go out, barely chose to interact. But, if you attend these events and don’t pay, you need to follow the rules. You may think that rules such as having to report who gave you the tickets are stupid, but they’re still the rules. AnVil thought he found a loophole by claiming he was performing important city business and thus didn’t have to ID the donor. About the only way this could fly is if he persuaded Tina Turner and Juanes to oversee a chorus comprised of the City Council (I can totally picture Ed Reyes doing a solo on “Proud Mary”). Claiming that official business means presenting a pretty city certificate to celebs who could care less doesn’t fool anyone. Everything would be fine if Villaraigosa detailed his donors and then paid his own way to other concerts or games, and even though he has shared some sacrifice and taken a pay cut, his salary still allows him to afford some choice seats. Sure, he may not have cash like New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and be able to purchase four-figure front-row tickets to every home game of the NBA Finals, but why not at least pull a man-of-the-people stunt and watch a game or two in a bar? Uh oh, I think I just had a Good Political Photo Opp Idea. Stop me before I come up with another. Villaraigosa has turned this thing into a case of my-ticket-you-stick-it. After the story broke, all he needed to do was call a press conference, say, “My bad, I misinterpreted the law due to errant advice from my former legal counsel, and I apologize. In the future I’ll pay for my tickets or properly reveal who donated them.” The whole thing would have blown over. Instead, he waited a month, until he was forced to act. Actually, there is a fourth lesson in all of this. On at least two occasions, on nights when he could have done anything in the entire world, Villaraigosa chose to go to Staples Center to watch the Clippers. We’ve learned he may have been temporarily insane.

Contact Jon Regardie at: regardie@downtownnews.com

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Awards Edition

Saturday, April, 16, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANTS

Contra Costa College - The Advocate

Bear Creek High School - The Bruin

Cuesta College - The Cuestonian

Castro Valley High School The Olympian Claremont High School - The Wolfpacket Del Campo High School - The Roar Enochs High School - Eagle’s Eye Franklin High School - The Buzz Gabrielino High School Tongva Times George Washington High School - The Eagle Golden Sierra High School The Bear Facts Granite Bay High School - The Gazette Hart High School - The Smoke Signal

Diablo Valley College - The Inquirer East Los Angeles College Campus News El Camino College - Union Long Beach City College - The Viking Orange Coast College - Coast Report Palomar College - The Telescope

San Diego Mesa College The Mesa Press San Joaquin Delta College The Collegian San Jose City College - City College Times Santa Ana College - el Don Santa Barbara City College The Channels

Liberty High School - The Revolution

Santa Monica College - The Corsair

Mission Hills High School Silvertip

Skyline College - The Skyline View

Orange Glen High School The Musket

Southwestern College - Sun

Pacific Hills Balance - The PH Balance

4-YEAR UNIVERSITY ENTRANTS

Pleasant Valley High School The Saga San Luis Obispo High School - Expressions Shalhevet High School - The Boiling Point Skyline High School - The Oracle Sonoma Valley High School The Dragon’s Tale Stagg High School - The Stagg line Stockton Early College Academy - The Wolves’ Chornicle Temple City High School Rampage Tennyson High School - First Glance Thousand Oaks High School The Lancer Torrey Pines High School The Falconer Washington High School - The Hatchet Whitney High School - The Roar

2-YEAR COLLEGE ENTRANTS Bakersfield College Renegade Rip Cerritos College - Talon Marks City College of San Francisco - The Guardsman College of San Mateo - The San Matean College of the Desert - The Chaparral

Student Winners Comments provided by Blue Ribbon Judges High School Division

2-Year College Division

4-Year University Division

First Place

First Place

Granite Bay High School

The Sun, Southwestern Collge

First Place

The Gazette,

Second Place

Second Place

Second Place

The Chronicle,

The Channels, Santa Barbara City College

Harvard-Westlake School

The Daily Bruin, University of California, UCLA The Lumberkack, Humbolt State University

San Diego City College - City Times

Harvard-Westlake School The Chronicle

Palo Alto High School Campanile

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The Gazette Granite Bay High School High School Division “This is a very ambitious high school newspaper, with lots of news, good photography and it’s well written. Congratulations on another victory!”

The Sun Southwestern College

Cal State Long Beach - The Daily 49er California Lutheran University - The Echo California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Mustang Daily

2-Year College Division “This is a terrific campus newspaper! It would be even if it hadn’t been caught up in the controversies that swirled at Southwestern College last fall. By refusing to be silenced by the administration, The Sun stood up for the highest principles of American journalism. Their first issue of the academic year was cancelled; their second was printed through a private donation. It included an eloquent editorial about the issues that were at stake.

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona - The Poly Post California State University, Chico - The Orion California State University, Fresno - The Collegian California State University, Fullerton - The Daily Titan

Through the controversy, The Sun’s staff never lost sight that it was serving the students. The Sun still had top-notch features, columns and sports, attractive photos and graphics and an effective design.

California State University, Northridge - Daily Sundial California State University, Sacramento - The State Hornet Chapman University - The Panther Humboldt State University The Lumberjack Loyola Marymount University - Los Angeles Loyolan San Jose State University Spartan Daily Santa Clara University - The Santa Clara UC Berkeley - The Daily Californian University of California, Irvine - New University University of California, Los Angeles - The Daily Bruin Whittier College - Quaker Campus

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Keep up the good work, Sun staff!”

The Daily Bruin, University of California, Los Angeles 4-Year University Division “A strong, professional college newspaper. The paper deals well with important issues affecting the University community, including state and local government and embracing national matters when appropriate. The issues reviewed included well-reported stories on a doctor in Iraq, problems caused by campus-area construction, and plans for a new technology building. The paper is well designed and organized. The sports coverage is excellent! Congratulations!”

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


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Awards Edition

Continued from Page 2

Hope is on the horizon

The extra income “feels like a weight lifted off my shoulders,” Pam said. Joni said her manager is very understanding and accommodating of her and Pam’s situation. Once, Joni had a mental breakdown and was committed to the hospital for four days and was unable to call in to work. When she got out, her manager let her have her job back. Both Pam and Joni have diabetes. Joni has a bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Pam has fibromyalgia and Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.). Pam receives Social Security, which paid for a surgery in November to treat her P.A.D., but her legs still ache. She had a motorized scooter for three months until it was stolen from the side of their car. Joni said both of their illnesses “balance out.” Meaning, Joni can take care of Pam, who can hardly walk and is lethargic because of the mass amounts of medication she takes to ease the pain of fibromyalgia. And Pam provides the mental stability. When Joni is not working, she collects bottles and cans for extra money. Joni said she feels embarrassed to dig bottles and cans out of the trash because of the ridicule she faces from people. “Sometimes we go out late at night and collect cans and bottles,” Joni said. They get about $5-$6 from the cans and they use the money to buy food at Burger King, Joni said. “We’ve seen a lot,” Joni said, adding that too many people mistreat the home-less. Pam recalled a man driving by them in a silver truck, “and he yelled out, ‘Why don’t you guys go to work and stop begging for money,’” Pam recalled, adding they never hold signs or ask for money. “There’s hundreds of people living out of their cars and living on the streets,” Joni said, adding that if she saw the man in the truck living on the streets she would help him out. But there are also nice people too, “who actually have a heart,” Pam said. There’s one story Pam will never forget. “One lady came up (to them)- and I really got a kick out of this- and she said, ‘My purse is so heavy and I have all this change and I’m just wondering if you would like to take it off my hands,’” she recalled. Pam said she thought the way the woman worded it was “so cute.” They accepted the money, which amounted to about $26. The women were profusely grateful. They’ve been given $20 a few times, they said, which makes their day. Joni said her best day was when a stranger offered to give her an umbrella in the rain. “It was raining one day and I didn’t have an umbrella. I was crossing the street and this lady in an SUV kept honking her horn and I’m going, ‘What did I do wrong?’” The woman motioned her over to the SUV and handed her an umbrella. Sometimes they buy a cup of coffee so they can sit inside a local restaurant and get warm, but they are usually “86ed out” or asked to leave.

Their car is the one of the few places they can sit and get warm without being kicked out. But it doesn’t provide them with much safety. “We have to watch out all the time,” Joni said. They park their car in parking lots and see drug deals go down at night and other crimes occurring. “It’s not safe out there for any homeless person,” Joni said. When their back window was knocked out from a brick falling from another vehicle on the high-

Writing, Weekly (11,001 - 25,000) First Place North Coast Journal, Eureka

Chloe’s Legacy Mourning parents hope to educate through the suicide of their teenage transgender daughter By Ryan Burns ryanburns@northcoastjournal.com

n the Friday before Labor Day weekend, Karin Fresnel was on her weekly shopping trip at the Eureka Co-op when she noticed that she was being watched — first while standing in the beer aisle, then again at the meat counter. Finally, the petite, blond-haired

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town visiting her 18-year-old daughter, Chloe, who until last year was known only as Justin. Murphy, the portrait of a concerned mom, had unknowingly stumbled across an ideal resource. Not only is Fresnel a trans woman, she’s also involved in numerous organizations that fight discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and sexually ambiguous persons,

“A Unique Yosemite Sight” Feature Photo, Daily (100,001 & Above) Second Place, by Eric Paul Zamora, Photographer, The Fresno Bee way, Pam said they felt particularly vulnerable. “That was fearful when we had just plastic, anybody could have pulled that off or sliced it,” Pam said. The Elk Grove Food Bank Services purchased a replacement windshield for their PT Cruiser. The women said the food bank provides them with a lot of services they are grateful for. “I don’t know where we’d be without them,” Pam said. Joni and Pam hope to qualify for an apartment someday soon. Joni looks forwards to cooking Hawaiian- Filipino food when they move into a home. “It will get better, eventually,”Joni said. “Something has to give.” Keep reading the Citizen for a future story about Pam and Joni.

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

Saturday, April 16, 2011

woman who’d been following her through the store stepped forward and said, “Can I ask you a personal question?” “My first thought was, ‘I’ve been clocked,’” Fresnel told the Journal last week. As a transgender woman, such confrontations are common. Not three days earlier a stranger on the street had called her “an abomination in the eyes of God.” So, fearing the worst, Fresnel drew herself up to her full height (sixthree in heels) and answered, “Yes, you may, and yes, I’m trans.”But the woman wasn’t looking to insult. “Her response was, ‘Oh, thank God. Do you know of any resources up here? My son … daughter … is transitioning.” This woman was Allison Murphy of Clovis, a rodeoloving suburb six miles northeast of Fresno. She was in

including Humboldt Pride, which she co-chairs. Fresnel and Murphy talked for nearly an hour in the aisles of the Co-op, and three days later they met up again — this time with Chloe. “She asked lots of questions,” Fresnel said. Chloe had been suffering from severe depression and crippling anxiety for years, but on this day, in the company of her mom and someone who could finally answer her questions, she seemed hopeful, even happy, Fresnel said. “The expression ‘bright as a penny’ came to mind when I met her.” On Sept. 24, 18 days after this meeting, Chloe committed suicide. She was 10 days shy of her 19th birthday. Chloe’s premature death follows a series of suicides among LGBT youths, including Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi, who killed himself after his roommate

surreptitiously filmed him having sex, and 13-year-old Seth Walsh, who was bullied for being gay. Nationwide, no fewer than seven gay teens have killed themselves in the past month, according to nonprofit civil rights group Equality Forum. This rash of deaths has inspired a nationwide movement that includes a push for stricter anti-bullying legislation (The Safe Schools Improvement Act of 2010), a YouTube channel for troubled LGBT youths (the It Gets Better Project) and a series of rallies across the country, including one organized by the Arcata-Eureka chapter of Parents, Family and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG), held Friday evening on the steps of the county courthouse. Murphy and her husband, Sean Dempsey, drove up from Clovis to attend the rally and share Chloe’s story. They hope that by doing so they can help other parents understand LGBT issues and help teens see that they’re not alone. The transgender population in particular has dramatically increased rates of suicide and suicide ideation. In a 2009 study by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, more than 30 percent of transgender respondents said they’d seriously considered suicide in the previous year, compared to 4.4 percent among gays/ lesbians and 2.3 percent among heterosexuals. Fresnel sympathizes with this impulse all too well: She’s a survivor of six suicide attempts, as she told the crowd of more than 100 supporters at last weekend’s rally. “I don’t intend there to be a seventh,” she said, prompting cheers of support. Murphy climbed the steps to the podium, where she took the microphone and, with tears in her eyes, told the crowd about Chloe, her only child. Many in attendance personally thanked her for doing so. After the rally, Chloe’s parents headed over to the Lost Coast Brewery where they revealed more details of Chloe’s abbreviated life. Murphy spoke of Justin and Chloe as two separate people who, for a time, happened to share one body. Justin was the child she had when she herself was only 18, the boy who wanted to be a sniper, loved snowboarding and covered his room in camouflage. Chloe was the kid who felt weird on the day in kindergarten when students were separated by gender and she was lumped in with the boys. She was the person who believed deep down that there was something weird about her, that she must be some kind of freak. And she’s the one who in seventh grade caught an Oprah Winfrey-type talk show about transgender people and had an epiphany: That’s me. Murphy didn’t learn of this epiphany until years later. While she’d noticed that Justin was depressed, she simply chalked it up to their unstable family life (she and Justin’s dad divorced when Justin was 5). The first sign of Chloe showed up one night on her computer screen after Justin, then a high school sophomore, had gone to bed. He’d written her a letter in which he asked her to buy him some girls’ clothes. He said he’d been talking to a doctor online who recommended that he open up to his mom. Murphy sees in retrospect that this letter was actually from Chloe. “She was talking to me about it, but the word ‘transgender’ wasn’t used,” she said. “I was very ignorant at that time. You go into panic mode because it’s your kid: ‘Oh my gosh, is he gay?’ I thought he was trying to explain to me that he had sexual Continued on Page 16

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Awards Edition Continued from Page 1

qualifying households took advantage of government food assistance programs available to them. “During challenging economic times, the pool of those in need of vital food assistance expands,” Vilsack stated in a press release. “USDA’s role — along with our partners — is to ensure individuals do not fall through the cracks, and can access nutritional services with dignity and respect.” Some of the key findings ofthe USDA survey. • There were 6.7 million households in America experiencing hunger in 2008, and of those, representing 506,000 households or one-third, were children and adults struggling with very low food security or outright hunger. • The other two-thirds of food insecure households obtained enough food to avoid substantial disruptions by using a variety of coping strategies like eating a less varied diet, participating in food assistance programs such as food stamps, and getting emergency food from community organizations. • The prevalence of food insecurity varied considerably among different types of households. Rates of food insecurity were substantially higher than the national average in households where the income was below or near the federal poverty line; households with children headed by a single parent; and African- American and Hispanic households. • Food insecurity was more common in large cities and rural areas than in suburban areas and other outlying areas around large cities. • Food secure households spent more for food than food insecure households. In 2008, the median U.S. household spent $43.75 per person for food each week, which is 14 percent higher than the cost of the USDA’s Thrifty Food Plan. The median food insecure household spent 10 percent less than the cost of the USDA plan. • Fifty-five percent of the food insecure households said they had used one or more of the nation’s food assistance programs — the National School Lunch Program, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps), and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. • The USDA National School Lunch program serves about 31

Saturday, April, 16, 2011 million children a healthy meal each school day. • Nearly half of all infants in the United States participate in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children program. • About 20 percent of food insecure households obtained emergency food from a food pantry at some time during the year and 2.6 percent ate one or more meals at an emergency food kitchen. • When food is scarce in a household, the survey found that adults will often shield children from the effects by eating less themselves. Even with that trend, 17 million children lived in food insecure households in 2008, up by 4 million from the year before. The number of children who experienced hunger rose from 700,000 in 2007 to approximately 1.1 million in 2008. “When I look at the numbers it’s overwhelming,” Mallory said. “It’s scary how quickly these numbers are going up, but you can’t allow yourself to think that you won’t be able to feed these people. We all just have to step up and work together to feed them.” Unfortunately for the San Joaquin Valley, the numbers are even bleaker when it comes to hunger and poverty. According to the 2003 California Health Interview Survey, the percentage of people experiencing food insecurity was 39.2 percent of the population and those dealing with hunger were 12.3 percent of the Valley’s population. Broken down by county, Stanislaus had 38.6 percent of the population as food insecure and 15.4 percent as hungry. San Joaquin had 41 percent reporting food insecurity and 11.4 percent reporting hunger, and Merced was at 34.9 percent for food insecure and 9.2 percent for hunger. Those numbers have assuredly gone up as the economy faltered, according to local emergency food providers. “Every month we are seeing new people applying for emergency food boxes and more people are coming in with emergency referrals while they wait for their food stamp application to be processed,” said Barbara Bawanan, director of the Turlock United Samaritans Foundation. “As the economy started changing, more people started relying on our services forfood. If you can’t afford food on your own, you have to find it somewhere.” Every month the foundation

doles out emergency food boxes to residents. In 2007, they handed out 6,665 boxes and in 2008, it reached 7,852 boxes. So far, through October, the foundation has given out 6,484 emergency food boxes for 2009, Bawanan said. The Daily Bread food trucks, which delivers lunches throughout Stanislaus County five days a week, gave out more than 422,000 lunches last year. Bawanan said the number for 2009 will be lower because several trucks had to be off the road for repairs this year, but that the need was still high, if not even higher. “People just can’t afford to buy food right now and need assistance,” said Maris Sturtevant, the chief operating manager at United Samaritans.

The effects of hunger

Sixty-two year old Linda knows all too well about having to rely on a food bank to put food on her table. The Turlock resident, who asked that her last name not be used, worked as a clerk in the area for 30 years before she was laid-off this year. To make matters worse, her husband was laid-off on the same day. For six months they have both been out of work and have found no prospects. “It’s been a real struggle trying to find a new job,” Linda said. “I’m 62-years old. Nobody wants to hire me, they want someone young.” Linda said her family never had problems with food before they were laidoff, but as the months have gone by, the ability to put food into their pantry has been more and more difficult. Ultimately, Linda made the decision to seek help from the United Samaritans in September. On Tuesday, she picked up one of the emergency food boxes that are stocked with three days worth of food. She said her and her husband will stretch that three-day supply out and when it runs out,they’ll turn to family members who might have a bit to spare. “At first it was real hard to come ask for help, but now I don’t care, because I look around and everybody is in the same boat,” she said. The effects of living in a food insecure household can vary from the worrisome to the devastating. A health policy study by the University of California, Los Angeles found that children living in a food insecure home miss more school and on average have poorer grades. Both children and teens in low food security homes experience

more emotional problems and more adults suffer from anxiety and depression. The UCLA study found that individuals living in food insecure homes are less likely to fill prescription medicines and seek medical care. Ironically, the study also found that households dealing with food insecurity are more likely to have overweight or obese adults, because they cannot afford healthier options like fresh produce. “Too many households in California lack the means to put sufficient food on the table every day and the consequences affect all Californians,” said Gail Harrison, professor of community health sciences at UCLA and senior research scientist for the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. “Consequences of food insecurity include not only poor nutrition, but also physical and emotional illness requiring greater use of medical care, increased complications from chronic diseases such as diabetes, and

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poor school performance among children and adolescents in these households.”

Awareness raises hopes Walking through some of the empty aisles at SeconHarvest, Mallory hopes that as people become more aware of the growing hunger problem in the area, more people will decide to get involved. “We need people to donate food and money and volunteer,” Mallory said. “But we also need people to advocate. Talk to your family, friends and churches, because this problem is never going to go away until we all step up to face it. “Hunger is a world problem, but by starting at the local level we can begin to raise awareness that will benefit both our community and the issue at large.” To contact Sabra Stafford, e-mail sstafford@turlockjournal.com or call 634-9141 ext.2002.

2010 Daily Awards by Categ ory Continued from Page 9 2nd – Ventura County Star

2nd – The San Diego Union-Tribune

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

25. Feature Photo Daily (A) 100,001 & above

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Santa Cruz Sentinel

1st – Santa Barbara Daily Sound 2nd – The Signal, Santa Clarita

1st – Los Angeles Times 2nd – The Fresno Bee

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Daily News-Los Angeles, Woodland Hills 2nd – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa

1st – The Record, Stockton 2nd – The Oakland Tribune

1st – Record Searchlight, Redding 2nd – Appeal-Democrat, Marysville

(No entrants in this division)

29. Online Coverage Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside 2nd – The Orange County Register, Santa Ana

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000 Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Daily Republic, Fairfield 2nd – Santa Cruz Sentinel

1st – Ventura County Star 2nd – The Record, Stockton

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 Daily (D) 10,000 & under 1st – Lompoc Record 2nd – The Davis Enterprise

26. Sports Photo Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – Los Angeles Times 2nd – San Francisco Chronicle

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa 2nd – The Monterey County Herald

1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Daily Republic, Fairfield

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Daily Transcript, San Diego 2nd – There was no second entrant.

30. Best Video Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – San Jose Mercury News 2nd – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000 Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – The Salinas Californian

1st – Ventura County Star 2nd – The Oakland Tribune

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 Daily (D) 10,000 & under 1st – The Davis Enterprise 2nd – Lompoc Record

27. Photo Essay Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – The Press-Enterprise, Riverside 2nd – Los Angeles Times

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000

1st – Press-Telegram, Long Beach 2nd – Ventura County Star

1st – Daily Republic, Fairfield 2nd – Santa Maria Times

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Daily Transcript, San Diego 2nd – There was no second entrant

31. Best Website Daily (A) 100,001 & above 1st – San Jose Mercury News 2nd – The Sacramento Bee

Daily (B) 25,001 – 100,000 Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000

1st – Santa Cruz Sentinel 2nd – Daily Republic, Fairfield

1st – Ventura County Star 2nd – The Desert Sun, Palm Springs

Daily (C) 10,001 – 25,000 Daily (D) 10,000 & under “Return of La Niña” Illustration or Info Graphic, Daily (10,001 – 25,000) First Place, by Len Wood, Graphic Artist, Santa Maria Times

1st – The Davis Enterprise 2nd – The Davis Enterprise

28. Online Breaking News Daily (A) 100,001 & above

1st – San Francisco Chronicle

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

1st – Record Searchlight, Redding 2nd – Visalia Times-Delta

Daily (D) 10,000 & under

1st – The Daily Transcript, San Diego 2nd – The Signal, Santa Clarita

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Saturday, April 16, 2011

Awards Edition

2 0 1 0 Awards by Newspaper Continued from Page 5 Place 7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page (Broadsheet), 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet), 2nd Place 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place 22. Illustration or Info Graphic, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place

Healdsburg Tribune (W) 13. Special Issue, 1st Place

Mills (W)

7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place

The Mountain Enterprise, Frazier Park (W) 29. Online Coverage, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

Mountain View Voice (W) 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place

The Napa Valley Register (D)

Hesperia Star (W)

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place

Huntington Beach Independent (W)

North Coast Journal, Eureka (W)

11. Front Page (Broadsheet), 2nd Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place

Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Ontario (D) 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place

The Intermountain News, Burney (W)

28. Online Breaking News, 1st Place

La Cañada Valley Sun, La Cañada Flintridge (W) 6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place 4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 15. Writing, 1st Place 16. Feature Story, 1st Place

Poway News Chieftain (W) 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place

The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa (D)

Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place 11. Front Page (Tabloid), 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place

5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place

The Salinas Californian (D)

The Press-Enterprise, Riverside (D)

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place

11. Front Page, 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place 29. Online Coverage, 1st Place 30. Best Video, 2nd Place

Press-Telegram, Long Beach (D)

2. Public Service, 2nd Place 6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place

Lincoln News Messenger (W)

26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place

The San Diego UnionTribune (D)

21. Editorial Cartoon, 2nd Place 28. Online Breaking News, 2nd Place

San Francisco Bay Guardian (W)

San Francisco Business Times (W)

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page (Tabloid), 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place 22. Illustration or Info Graphic, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

2. Public Service, 1st Place

Lodi News-Sentinel (D) 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place

25. Feature Photo, 1st Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place

Los Angeles Downtown News (W)

2. Public Service, 2nd Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place 15. Writing, 1st Place (D) 16. Feature Story, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place

The Mendocino Beacon, Fort Bragg (W) 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place

Merced County Times (W) 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place

Merced Sun-Star (D) 11. Front Page, 1st Place

Metro Silicon Valley, San Jose (W)

10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid), 2nd Place

The Modesto Bee (D) 11. Front Page, 2nd Place

The Monterey County Herald (D)

10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 1st Place 12. Page Layout & Design, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place

Morgan Hill Times (W) 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place

Mount Shasta Herald (W) 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place

Mountain Democrat, Placerville (W)

6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 11. Front Page (Broadsheet), 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place

Mountain Echo, Fall River

Santa Cruz Sentinel (D)

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 8. Sports Coverage, 1st Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page, 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place 29. Online Coverage, 1st Place

Santa Maria Sun (W) 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place

Santa Maria Times (D)

20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place 22. Illustration or Info Graphic, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 30. Best Video, 2nd Place

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 15. Writing, 1st Place 18. Columns, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

Los Angeles Times (D)

17. Sports Story, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place 21. Editorial Cartoon, 1st Place

9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place

SF Weekly, San Francisco (W)

7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place

Marin Independent Journal, Novato (D)

Santa Barbara News-Press (D)

2. Public Service, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place

Los Altos Town Crier (W)

18. Columns, 1st Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place

24. General News Photo, 1st Place

Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang (W)

Lompoc Record (D)

Los Banos Enterprise (W)

Reporting, 2nd Place

Santa Barbara Daily Sound (D)

Sierra Star, Oakhurst (W) 18. Columns, 2nd Place

Sierra Sun, Truckee (W) 17. Sports Story, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

“Llama Love” Feature Photo, Weekly (25,001 & Above) Second Place, by Jann Hendry, Photographer, Simi Valley Acorn Novato Advance (W)

21. Editorial Cartoon, 1st Place

The Oakland Tribune (D)

7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 11. Front Page, 1st Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 1st Place 28. Online Breaking News, 2nd Place 30. Best Video, 2nd Place

The Orange County Register, Santa Ana (D) 29. Online Coverage, 2nd Place

Pacific Sun, San Rafael (W) 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 1st Place 30. Best Video, 1st Place

Palo Alto Weekly (W)

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 2. Public Service, 2nd Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 8. Sports Coverage, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place 29. Online Coverage, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

Paso Robles Press (W) 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place

Petaluma Argus-Courier (W)

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 8. Sports Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page (Broadsheet), 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place 21. Editorial Cartoon, 2nd Place

Pleasanton Weekly (W) 2. Public Service, 2nd Place

CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

The Press-Tribune, Roseville (W)

6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 8. Sports Coverage, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place

Ramona Sentinel (W) 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place

The Recorder, San Francisco (W) 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place

The Record, Stockton (D)

28. Online Breaking News, 1st Place 29. Online Coverage, 2nd Place

Record Searchlight, Redding (D) 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 14. Freedom of Information, 1st Place 15. Writing, 1st Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place 28. Online Breaking News, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

Redlands Daily Facts (D) 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place

The Sacramento Bee (D)

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

Sacramento News & Review (W) 2. Public 3.

Service, 1st Place

San Francisco Chronicle (D)

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 8. Sports Coverage, 1st Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 1st Place 12. Page Layout & Design, 1st Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place 14. Freedom of Information, 2nd Place 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place 22. Illustration or Info Graphic, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place 28. Online Breaking News, 1st Place

San Gabriel Valley Tribune, West Covina (D) 2. Public Service, 1st Place

San Jose Mercury News (D) 2. Public Service, 1st Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 2nd Place 11. Front Page, 1st Place 14. Freedom of Information, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place 18. Columns, 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place 30. Best Video, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

San Mateo County Times (D) 2. Public Service, 2nd Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place

San Rafael News Pointer (W) 4. Environmental or AG Resource

The Signal, Santa Clarita (D)

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place 4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place 15. Writing, 1st Place 16. Feature Story, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal (W)

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page (Tabloid), 1st Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place

Simi Valley Acorn (W) 16. Feature Story, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place

Sonoma County Gazette, Forestville (M) 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place

The Sonoma Index-Tribune (W) 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

Continue on Page 15

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


Awards Edition

Saturday, April, 16, 2011 Continued from Page 1

2010 Awards by Newspaper St. Helena Star (W)

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place

Tahoe Daily Tribune, South Lake Tahoe (W) 16. Feature Story, 1st Place

Tahoe Mountain News (M) 4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place

Thousand Oaks Acorn (W) 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place

Times-Press-Recorder, Arroyo Grande (W)

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place

grew taller as it was nourished by Marú’s copious tears flowing down the page. “I was crying, and the flower growed higher,” Marú said. “It’s really special.” Her fears and nightmares are revealed in a pictured titled “Bad Eagle Eating My Fa mily,” but her resilience shows through as well: In it, her baby sister had become an angel who defeated the eagle. Later drawings feature the full “Fairy Team”: her baby sister — now an angel — along with a dog, a cat and a horse, all with halos and wings of their own. Beside her bed at home, Marú keeps a white box. The outside is

15

‘What grief feels like’ been turned. “She saw how sad I was one day and she said to me, ‘Don’t be sad. Zaia is happy. She is in my heart. I feel her, and she is very warm and happy,’ ” Marquez said.

“They want to spare the child. But children are smart, so they’ll start trying to put it together, but it ends up getting misconstrued. “They are in a vacuum where they come to the wrong conclusions.”

Stepping Stones serves about 60 children every year, completely free of charge, and is open to any child, whether they had a loved one in hospice care or not.

So at Stepping Stones, that information comes first. Then the children are given an opportunity to work through it using art as their medium.

The children may receive initial one-on-one care, then meet in a group once a week for about eight weeks. There are two groups — one for children under age 12, another for teens.

One child might take that same outline of a human body, and draw where a tumor began, or where an injury was located. A 12-year-old girl drew a detailed map of the intersection where her aunt was killed in an auto accident. She

over his grandfather drew a stark forest, full of trees with bare branches and only the light of the moon. “He said it expressed his loneliness,” Ross said. Another girl made a clay mask — a project all of the kids do. She carefully formed the contours, the eyes and the nose. But where the mouth should be, there was nothing. Because she could not yet talk about her feelings. Later, after focusing on feelings, Ross said, “We move toward acclimating to life without that person. We explain that even though the body is gone, the relationship still remains.”

Times-Standard, Eureka (D)

And throughout the process, there is benefit to the family.

Tracy Press (W)

“There is a sense of relief among parents that we are able to assist their children on an intimate level,” Lumello said. “But we’re also helping adults to understand what their kids are going through. And seeing their kids go through the grieving process can help parents go through it, too.”

7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place 18. Columns, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place

The Tribune, San Luis Obispo (D)

10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place

Turlock Journal (W)

Marquez said there was great relief in seeing Marú blossom at Stepping Stones.

15. Writing, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place

Twin Cities Times, Larkspur (W)

“She loved it from the very beginning,” Marquez said. “She didn’t want to stop coming.”

18. Columns, 1st Place

Ukiah Daily Journal (D)

6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 11. Front Page, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place

The Union, Grass Valle (D) 22. Illustration or Info Graphic, 2nd Place

Ventura County Star (D)

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 15. Writing, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place 29. Online Coverage, 1st Place 30. Best Video, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

Vida en el Valle, Fresno (W) 12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet), 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place

Visalia Times-Delta (D)

2. Public Service, 1st Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design, 1st Place 14. Freedom of Information, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

The Weekend Pinnacle, Hollister (W)

“Fully Engulfed” Breaking News Photo, Weekly (4,300 & Under) First Place by Steven Felschundneff, Photographer, Claremont Courier decorated with Zaia’s name and inside, nestled amid silk flower petals, is a tiny clay angel Marú made at Stepping Stones. It is Zaia. But after it was formed and fired, Marú couldn’t picture the face to paint on it. She was suddenly at a loss. “A month and a half passed,” her mother said. “We went away, and when we came back, she said, ‘Now I’m ready.’ ” She painted brown hair, a smiling face and blue wings. “It remembers me of my baby sister,” Marú said. At some point in all of that, Marú’s mom realized a corner had

23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place

The Winters Express (W)

Continued from Page 3

19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place

right back on and fly home. He’d dazzle on the 49ers practice field but falter under the glare of NFL game days. Rice would muff a pass. Montana would glare. Fans would boo. A Mercury News headline would blare: “Snap, Crackle, Drop.” “What do I remember about young Jerry Rice?” longtime offensive lineman Guy McIntyre said. “I remember that he dropped a lot of passes.” Things got so bad that Walsh summoned McVay again. This time, Walsh had him call Rice’s old Mississippi Valley State coach for ideas on how to get Rice to snap out of his funk. “Just keep CNPA, 2000 O Street, Suite 120, Sacramento, CA 95811

For all of them, the journey begins in the same place: “We start with information,” Ross said. “Just the information of how the person died is important.” It’s information that can be in short supply simply because the people who would normally provide it simply can’t. “Oftentimes a grieving parent is locked behind a door crying,” Ross noted. Other times, adults simply think the less said the better. “With children, what frequently happens is people don’t want to talk about it,” Lumello said.

carefully marked where the collision happened, and even added the place nearby where a little memorial was built. Often children will draw the memorial service. “With the memorial service,” Ross said, “it’s often a water-color painting they make.” Once the children have had the opportunity to really work through that information, Ross said, they begin to focus more on feelings. And as personal and varied as grief is, so too is the artwork that comes from it.

Marú’s affection for Stepping Stones, and for Ross in particular, was evident when she stopped by last week. After she and her mother had visited and then said their goodbyes, they headed down the hallway. Then Marú suddenly darted back in, wrapping her arms around Ross for one more hug. Ross turned to hug her back, and leaned down with a reminder. “You can call me any time,” she said. And with one last smile and wave, off went Marú. As a component of Yolo Hospice, Stepping Stones is a nonprofit program dependent on community donations. To learn more about Stepping Stones, visit http://www. yolo hospice.org — Reach Anne Ternus-Bellamy at (530) 747-8051 or aternus@davisenterprise.net. Comment on this story at www.davis enterprise.com

An 11-year-old boy grieving

THE SHOO-IN throwing the ball to him,” Cooley told McVay. “He’ll work his way out of it.” Rice remained after practices for extra sessions with veteran receiver Freddie Solomon. Other veteran teammates such as Lott, McIntyre, Dwight Clark and Mike Wilson helped him calm down. In the 14th game of Rice’s rookie season, with the “Monday Night Football” spotlight, Rice broke loose for 10 catches and 241 yards. Just as Cooley had predicted, Rice worked his way out of it. Rice

worked his way out of everything. For more than a decade, he helped set the tone for excellence at 49ers practices by treating mundane afternoons as if they were the fourth quarter of the Super Bowl. If he caught a 15-yard route, Rice would run it the length of the field just to rehearse another touchdown. That was the goal of every pass, right? Rice and running back Roger Craig waged sweaty battles each day to prove who could work the hardest.

he was also the hardest worker on the field,” Lott recalled. “What that established for everyone — Joe, myself, Steve Young, everybody — is the idea that you couldn’t relax. You couldn’t rest. You practiced for the purpose of being the best. “Jerry played just as hard on Wednesday that he did on Saturday. That, to me, is the essence of Jerry Rice.”

For more on the 49ers, see Daniel Brown’s Hot Read blog at blogs.mercurynews. com/49ers.

“Not only was he head and shoulders above everybody else, but Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


16

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Awards Edition

20 1 0 W eekly Awards by Newspaper The Acorn, Agoura Hills 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place

The Almanac, Menlo Park

2. Public Service, 1st Place 4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place

Amador Ledger Dispatch, Jackson 2. Public Service, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place

Big Bear Grizzly, Big Bear Lake 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place

Brentwood News

25. Feature Photo, 1st Place

Burbank Leader

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet), 1st Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

The Business Journal, Fresno

12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid), 2nd Place

Calaveras Enterprise, San Andreas 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place

The Cambrian, Cambria 16. Feature Story, 1st Place

Carmel Valley News, San Diego 15. Writing, 2nd Place

Chico News & Review

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place

Chino/Chino Hills Champion 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place

Claremont Courier

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 11. Front Page (Tabloid), 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid), 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

Coastline Pilot, Laguna Beach 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place

Dispatch, Gilroy

12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet), 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place

6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place 28. Online Breaking News, 2nd Place

Good Times, Santa Cruz

7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid), 1st Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place 30. Best Video, 2nd Place

Grunion Gazette, Long Beach 13. Special Issue, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 1st Place

Half Moon Bay Review

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page (Broadsheet), 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet), 2nd Place 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place 22. Illustration or Info Graphic, 1st Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place

The Foothills Sun-Gazette, Exeter 8. Sports Coverage, 2nd Place 9. Lifestyle Coverage, 2nd Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place

Fort Bragg Advocate-News 14. Freedom of Information, 1st Place

Free Lance, Hollister

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place

Pacific Sun, San Rafael

9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 1st Place 30. Best Video, 1st Place

Palo Alto Weekly

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 2. Public Service, 2nd Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 8. Sports Coverage, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 1st Place 29. Online Coverage, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

Sierra Star, Oakhurst 18. Columns, 2nd Place

Sierra Sun, Truckee

17. Sports Story, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal 1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page (Tabloid), 1st Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place

Simi Valley Acorn

Petaluma Argus-Courier

Sonoma County Gazette, Forestville

23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place

The Intermountain News, Burney 28. Online Breaking News, 1st Place

La Cañada Valley Sun, La Cañada Flintridge 6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place

Lincoln News Messenger 2. Public Service, 1st Place

Los Altos Town Crier 17. Sports Story, 1st Place

Los Angeles Downtown News 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place 27. Photo Essay, 2nd Place

Los Banos Enterprise 18. Columns, 1st Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place

The Mendocino Beacon, Fort Bragg 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place

Merced County Times

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place

Metro Silicon Valley, San Jose

10. Arts & Entertainment Coverage, 2nd Place 12. Page Layout & Design (Tabloid), 2nd Place

13. Special Issue, 2nd Place 1. General Excellence, 1st Place 8. Sports Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page (Broadsheet), 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place 21. Editorial Cartoon, 2nd Place

Pleasanton Weekly

2. Public Service, 2nd Place

Poway News Chieftain

26. Sports Photo, 1st Place

The Press-Tribune, Roseville 6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 8. Sports Coverage, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place

Ramona Sentinel

26. Sports Photo, 1st Place

The Recorder, San Francisco 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place

Sacramento News & Review

2. Public Service, 1st Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place 11. Front Page (Tabloid), 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 1st Place

San Francisco Bay Guardian

Morgan Hill Times

1. General Excellence, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place

San Francisco Business Times

Mount Shasta Herald

6. Local Breaking News, 1st Place 6. Local Breaking News, 2nd Place 11. Front Page (Broadsheet), 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place 18. Columns, 2nd Place

Mountain Echo, Fall River Mills 7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place

The Mountain Enterprise, Frazier Park 29. Online Coverage, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

Mountain View Voice

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place 3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 1st Place 7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place 11. Front Page (Tabloid), 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place 22. Illustration or Info Graphic, 2nd Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

13. Special Issue, 2nd Place

The Sonoma Index-Tribune

5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place 15. Writing, 2nd Place 23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 24. General News Photo, 1st Place 24. General News Photo, 2nd Place 31. Best Website, 1st Place

St. Helena Star

1. General Excellence, 2nd Place

Tahoe Daily Tribune, South Lake Tahoe 16. Feature Story, 1st Place

Tahoe Mountain News

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place

Thousand Oaks Acorn

23. Breaking News Photo, 1st Place

Times-Press-Recorder, Arroyo Grande

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place

Tracy Press

13. Special Issue, 2nd Place 18. Columns, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place

Turlock Journal 15. Writing, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 1st Place

Twin Cities Times, Larkspur 18. Columns, 1st Place

Vida en el Valle, Fresno

San Rafael News Pointer

12. Page Layout & Design (Broadsheet), 2nd Place 13. Special Issue, 1st Place

Santa Maria Sun

23. Breaking News Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place 16. Feature Story, 2nd Place

Santa Ynez Valley News, Solvang

The Weekend Pinnacle, Hollister

The Winters Express 19. Editorial Pages, 1st Place

2. Public Service, 2nd Place

Chloe’s Legacy

Continued from Page 12

fantasies.” She went downstairs and found Justin already in bed, asleep. She crawled in beside him and whispered in his ear, “I love you regardless.” Remembering this moment, Murphy broke down crying. When she brought up the letter to Justin later, he brushed it off, saying it was just a phase he was going through. In truth, it was much more. It was around this time that Justin/Chloe started having panic attacks. Murphy urged him to seek counseling. A therapist they consulted together recommended Justin be put on antidepressants, but he feared they would turn him into another person. Murphy said the most painful thing now is looking back and thinking about how much pain her child was in. Justin may not have been bullied,

21. Editorial Cartoon, 1st Place

4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 2nd Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 15. Writing, 1st Place 18. Columns, 1st Place 31. Best Website, 2nd Place

Huntington Beach Independent

Mountain Democrat, Placerville

14. Freedom of Information, 2nd Place

Novato Advance

SF Weekly, San Francisco

Paso Robles Press

11. Front Page (Broadsheet), 2nd Place

15. Writing, 1st Place

The Ferndale Enterprise

3. Investigative or Enterprise Reporting, 2nd Place 4. Environmental or AG Resource Reporting, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 1st Place 5. Business or Financial Story, 2nd Place 7. Local News Coverage, 2nd Place 15. Writing, 1st Place 16. Feature Story, 1st Place

9. Lifestyle Coverage, 1st Place 17. Sports Story, 2nd Place 19. Editorial Pages, 2nd Place 20. Editorial Comment, 2nd Place

Hesperia Star

13. Special Issue, 1st Place

7. Local News Coverage, 1st Place

2. Public Service, 1st Place

North Coast Journal, Eureka

16. Feature Story, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 1st Place 25. Feature Photo, 2nd Place 26. Sports Photo, 2nd Place

Healdsburg Tribune

Elk Grove Citizen Feather River Bulletin

27. Photo Essay, 1st Place

she said, but his true self — Chloe — lived in fear and shame. “Growing up in the community we grew up in, the high school Chloe went to, there was no way she could come out. She coulda been beaten up. There’s so much hate in these kids these days.” Self-hatred, too: Chloe, Murphy recalled, always showered in the dark. After graduating high school last year, Chloe (publicly still Justin) moved to Humboldt County with a friend, looking for adventure. They ended up living on Clam Beach for a while, which worried their parents (Chloe was just 17 at the time), who helped the two find a rental in Eureka. Chloe attended classes at College of the

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Redwoods (though never officially registered) and talked about majoring in environmental science. On her way home for Christmas vacation, Chloe finally came out completely to her mom in a series of text messages. “I embraced it,” Murphy said. In fact, while many parents struggle to accept their transgender kids, Murphy considers it a blessing, despite the tragic end. “A mother and her son is a pretty close bond. A mother and her daughter is a pretty close bond. And I got to have both of those,” Murphy said. “I’m lucky that I got to meet Chloe — and do her hair, her makeup and have her tilt her head at me and say, ‘Thanks, Mama.’ What a blessing.” Ultimately, though, Murphy

understands why the road ahead must have looked bleak to Chloe. Even people who support gay and lesbian causes can have difficulty understanding transgender issues, she said. Hatred, bullying and discrimination aren’t limited to high school. Through Chloe’s death, she and her husband hope to reach out to parents and teens in an effort to change that landscape. (They’re currently working to establish a nonprofit to those ends.) And they’re hopeful that society is slowly, reluctantly making progress. “Unfortunately it wasn’t soon enough for my little Miss Chloe,” Murphy said, crying again. “But I think she’s going to be pretty amazed when she sees us 20 years down the line. I definitely believe that, and I’m gonna be part of that movement.”

Ph: 916-288-6020, Fax 916-288-6034, Website: www.cnpa.com


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