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Joseph Iwaskiw Selected Works


Centreville Atheneum Spring 2008 Design Studio 2 Professor Alick Dearie Centreville, MD Design Problem: To design a space that could service as a museum, library, and overall meeting place for a small town in central Maryland. Building must be located on corner in downtown Centreville. Design Solution: The diagram to the left literally became the plan. A glass splice is wrapped in between two solid blocks. This splice is used to connect to Centreville’s agricultural history by giv- ing the atheneum “outdoor space� in the interior. The use of tube steel columns and spider-fitted glass give the feeling of trees overhanging the main space. A grand staircase terminates the axis of the columns.


1st

2nd

3rd


HKS Design Fellowship Spring 2011 HKS Inc. Franklin School Washington, D.C. Design Problem: In this two day charette, teams of students and professionals designed ways that the Franklin School in DC could be re-purposed to benefit the community. There were no restrictions other than the building must both generate revenue and benefit the less fortunate. Design Solution: Our team decided to preserve the original building, creating a boutique hotel. We then added a glass wrapper that encapsulated the building, creating studios where the homeless could express themselves artistically. The studios are integrated into the large atrium space in, ending at the top of the existing building with a restaurant and art gallery. The structure then de-constructs from the glazing to cross the street and engage Franklin Park, a community gem.


Connection


Aquatic Center Fall 2009 Graduate Design Studio I Professor Don Swearingen Old Town Alexandria Design Problem: To design an aquatic center along the Potomac River that serves two purposes. The first is to create a communal and recreational area able for use by residents in the area. The second purpose is to serve strictly for aquatic competition. The combination of these two uses needs to be harmonious as to not disturb the balance of two very different programs. Design Solution: I placed each use in a separate wing with a unifying lobby in the center. The entire body is in the form of the movement of the breaststroke, which I studied in depth. Because the space required for both programs was overwhelming for the small town of Alexandria, I chose to sink the two wings into the earth, creating two piers looking out over the Potomac. Skylights were placed in the ceiling to provide lighting to the underground pools.


Section A1 1/32”

Section A1 1/16” Scale


Recreation

Poche

Locker Rooms

Pools

Offices

P R O G R A M


WaterfrontConnection Connection Waterfront Section A1 1/32”

WalkableSurface Surface Walkable

Section A1 1/16” Scale

Approach Approach

Section A2 1/16” Scale

Walkable Surface Proposed Park


WAAC Digital Weave Fall 2010 Digital Fabrication Design Team WAAC Design Build Old Town Alexandria Design Problem: To design a partition wall within the WAAC campus, separating the library spiral stairs from a studio space. Exploration of digital fabrication techniques was a design priority. Design Solution: The wall is created from weaving metal strips back and forth from both sides of the program. On the studio side, the weaving pattern is uniform, creating pockets that can be used to store supplies. On the stair side, the spiral pattern the stairs create in space is continued on the weave. The strips were stacked on top of each other and rotated slightly, creating rigidity. A collaborative process between the physical and digital was established early, creating a wholistic design.


Weave 1

Extrusion

Setup

Curve Overlay

Weave 2


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26


Node Assembly


Prototypes


Modular Wall Planter Fall 2010 WAAC Concrete Competition Old Town Alexandria Design Problem: To design an object of significant function that uses concrete as the only material. One cubic foot of concrete was given to each student. Design Solution: I chose to look at the bigger picture of what this concrete form could become within the construction environment. By using the exact dimensions of a brick, I designed a modular wall planter that could be placed within a basic masonry wall. The planter would allow greenery to populate an otherwise normal masonry wall, adding both sustainable and aesthetic ideals. I created five different prototypes to discover the best form for construction.


Final


LIVE.WORK.PLAY Fall 2008 Design Studio 3 Professor Michael Ambrose 14th Street, Washington DC Design Problem: To design luxury apartments for a tenant in downtown D.C. The project outline required three smaller design problems to be solved before the final project was to be attempted. I allowed each problem to inspire a conceptual idea in my final piece. Each piece’s main concept is seen in my final design.


Project A Design a space that functions eating, bathing, and sleeping. 16’x16’x32’


Project B Design a facade that uses at least one curvi-linear system and one orthagonal system


FUKUOKA JAPAN, 1993 IWASKIW_JOSEPH AMBROSE SECTION PROJECT2C

UNITS: 28 FLOORS: 5 DIFFERENT UNITS: 2 TYPOLOGY: MIXED USE HOUSING SQ FEET: 14,000

VOID| HINGE HOUSING STEVEN HOLL FUKUOKA JAPAN, 1993 IWASKIW_JOSEPH AMBROSE SECTION PROJECT2C

UNITS: 28 FLOORS: 5 DIFFERENT UNITS: 2 TYPOLOGY: MIXED USE HOUSING SQ FEET: 14,000

Project C Project C Precedent Study Precedent Study Steven Holl Facade Steven Holl Facade


Design Solution: Project A explored the apartment as individual units. By attatching all core functions of living to one continuous surface, each function relates to one another while the rest of the unit can be used as inhabitable space. Project B allowed me to view the apartment as a collective identity. I explored facade as not only an ornamental, exterior feature for the building, but also as a functional piece usable by each tenant. In this way, each tenant uses the facade for their seperate uses, but still feels part of the collective. Project C explored historical context of apartment build- ings. In particular I became fascinated with Steven Holl. His Void-Hinge Housing in Japan allowed me to study facade as a wrapping/ folding piece around a larger mass. The final product uses all three projects as building blocks. Three units types are found on six floors with a total of 13 total units. The unit closest to the street is highlighted because of the extended living space that overlooks the main courtyard. A skin wraps the entire 4TH FLOOR massing creating spaces for each tenant as well as community spaces used for the entire building. Each unit has a continuos surface that function as the units core. These features allow for each tenant to have a home among a liveable, workable, and playable community.

3RD FLOOR


Units

Units


Skin

Skin


Joseph Iwaskiw - Graduate Portfolio  

Works from 2007-2011

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