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CAREERS. EDUCATION. IDEAS. ALL OF IT. | JOBPOSTINGS.CA

Seasonal work | Start looking now for holiday work opportunities Quick service & call centres | careers from the bottom to the top plus the usual suspects

Crunchin’ Numbers / interview tips / soft skills / Startup / education / timeline

SPECIAL REPORT

Working for a retailer isn’t just stocking shelves and handling money. Earn valuable skills, work your way up, and build a meaningful career, from part-time work to exec positions.

Native Canadians are thriving in communications and tourism. Check inside for top business practices to help them succeed.

OCTOBER OCTOBER2014 2014| VOL. | VOL.17 17NO.NO.2 2


ADVERTISING – MEDIA MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION EVENT MANAGEMENT FASHION MANAGEMENT & PROMOTIONS FINANCIAL PLANNING GLOBAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT MARKETING MANAGEMENT PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

business.humber.ca/postgrad


TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE FRONT PAGES 18

THE FRONT PAGES 07 Crunchin’ Numbers Stats on Canada’s aboriginal workforce.

09 Interview tips Matthew Slaney and Farhat Khan, recruitment consultants at Loblaw, ask and answer “What qualities do you look for in your manager in order to help you be successful in your job?”

11 SOFT SKILLS

Our HR expert tells us how to keep learning, in and out of the classroom.

12 Startup Simren Sandhu, founder of the True North Times, talks political humour, media, and the power of ambition.

27

CAREER REPORTS 15 Quickly moving up A part-time job in quick service can turn into a rewarding, lifelong career in no time.

16 Seasonal opportunities

Get up off your butt and make some extra cash with seasonal jobs in many different fields.

17 Making the call Outbound call centre work can be challenging, but rewarding. We find out how to make the best of a bad call.

SPECIAL REPORT 18 Aboriginals at work

Read on for info on communications, tourism, and best diversity practices, helping aboriginals achieve career gold.

FEATURE 27 Misconceptions of retail Don’t think of retail as just part-time, slogging work. There is a diverse array of careers in the field, which can be rewarding, fun, and lucrative.

EDUCATION

17

16

31 Aboriginal business

Check out these business programs specifically regarding Canadian aboriginals.

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

33 Health-savvy studies Do you enjoy watching what you eat? Chow down on nutrition programs across the country.

THE BACK PAGES 35 Timeline Want a step-by-step guide on landing a job? Here’s your timeframe, from sitting in your pyjamas to your corner office.

31 01


MASTHEAD | AD INDEX

THE FRONT PAGES

OCTOBER 2014 | JOBPOSTINGS.CA

// Publisher | Nathan Laurie | nlaurie@jobpostings.ca // Associate Publisher | Mark Laurie // Editor | James Michael McDonald | jmcdonald@jobpostings.ca, @mcjamdonald // Art Director | Anthony Capano // Staff Writer | Megan Santos | msantos@jobpostings.ca, @megnifisantos // Communications and Project Manager | David Tal // Communications Coordinator | Jamie Bertolini // Senior National Account Manager | Mary Vanderpas // Education Account Manager | Shannon Tracey // National Account Manager | Mirelle Shimonov Contributors: HEIDI MURPHY, MEHREEN SHAHID

Photos from thinkstock.com and istock.com are used throughout this issue; individual artists have been credited. Cover Photo: Luerat Satichob Jobpostings magazine is published eight times in the school year. Copies of Jobpostings are distributed to over 105 universities and colleges across Canada. Contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may not be reprinted in whole or part without permission of the publishers. “A nation’s culture resides in the hearts and in the soul of its people.” — Mahatma Gandhi

CONTACT: 25 Imperial Street, Suite 100 Toronto, ON M5P 1B9 | jobpostings.ca | 416.932.8866 ext. 221 | info@jobpostings.ca

24 Nexen

SCHOOL INDEX

04 CPA Ontario

30 Enterprise

06 Teck Resources

34 Bayer CropScience

IFC Humber, The Business School, Postgrad

10 Baker Hughes

IBC SaskPower

14 Target 20 Farm Credit Canada

IBC The New England Center For Children

20 Jazz Aviation LP

IBC Fintrac

26 Humber, The Business School, Fashion Management

0BC The Home Depot

32 Sheridan College

23 TD Bank Group

08 Humber, The Business School, Media Management

32 UC Berkeley, Master of Engineering 32 University of Lethbridge 32 Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine 32 Ross University School of Medicine

32 Dalhousie University, Corporate Residency MBA 32 American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine

32 Conestoga College

General Ads

32 Queen’s University

02 Insurance Institute of Canada

32 Brock University

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

whos hiring

03


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goCPAontario.ca CPA: Unifying CAs, CGAs and CMAs under one accounting designation.


EDITOR’S NOTE

THE FRONT PAGES

Promoting aboriginal career growth I grew up in Brantford, a small city right in the middle of southern Ontario. Adjacent to Brantford is the Six Nations of the Grand River Native Reserve, a large stretch of land designated to the aboriginal populations of the area. Because of our close proximity to the Six Nations, aboriginal culture and history became part of our history. I learned the names of the nations, the style of aboriginal art, and their tumultuous history. I went to school with many young aboriginals, so I saw first-hand that their issues are not always the same as other Canadians. And they’re about to encounter a new, pressing problem over the next few decades. The aboriginal population is growing at an exponential rate, far greater than that of non-aboriginals. Many more will be entering the workforce, finding their way as the rest of us find ours. Although with unique issues and culture, this transition could be more difficult than presumed. Luckily, there are companies across Canada that have impressive programs in place to include aboriginals in the discussion of how to take our country into the future. Not only are businesses adding integration and diversity initiatives, they’re partnering with key aboriginal organizations to strengthen their infrastructure as well. In this issue, we look at leading diversity initiatives companies are taking to encourage growth and success for aboriginal people in business. Aboriginal tourism is taking off, so we speak to individuals taking advantage of those opportunities. Even communications firms are taking note of the growing aboriginal community. We also have a feature on the misconceptions of working in retail: what is it actually like to build a career in or above the store-level, and is it possible to have a fulfilling career in retail? Our career reports also focus on making a career from part-time work, starting with seasonal work, call centres, and quick service.

Happy reading!

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

The employment landscape may be changing, but with the right business leaders and encouraging programs, the growing aboriginal population should be able to transition well into the Canadian workforce.

05


Crunchin’ NUMBERS | Aboriginal stats

THE FRONT PAGES

The Canadian aboriginal population continues to grow, and more and more companies continue to strive for workplace inclusivity. Here are some facts about Canada’s aboriginal community.

Words Megan Santos // Illustrations Anthony Capano

THE POPULATION OF PEOPLE WHO IDENTIFY AS ABORIGINAL IS PREDICTED TO JUMP TO 2.2 MILLION BY 2031.

Sources: statcan.gc.ca, The Globe and Mail

CRUNCHIN’ NUMBERS

ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE TELLS US THAT ABORIGINAL PEOPLE HAVE LIVED IN CANADA FOR AT LEAST 11,000 YEARS!

FIRST NATIONS PEOPLE WITH AT LEAST A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA BY GROUP

OFF-RESERVE 72%

INUIT 71%

MÉTIS 80%

6 OUT OF 10

OFF-RESERVE FIRST NATIONS, MÉTIS, AND INUITS SAID THEY WOULD RETURN TO SCHOOL FOR FURTHER EDUCATION.

IN 2011, OVER 1.4 MILLION PEOPLE IDENTIFIED AS ABORIGINAL. THAT REPRESENTS 4.3 PER CENT OF THE TOTAL CANADIAN POPULATION.

25%

PER CENT OF CANADA’S ABORIGINAL POPULATION BY PROVINCE 20%

15%

10%

5%

ATLANTIC

QC

SK

MB

AB

BC

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

ABORIGINALS UNDER 30 YEARS OLD ARE PART OF THE FASTEST-GROWING SEGMENT OF THE CANADIAN WORKFORCE.

ON

07


POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE

FROM MEDIA PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT TO ACCOUNT COORDINATION AND SALES, THIS PROGRAM OFFERS THE UNIQUE SKILLS YOU WILL NEED TO LAUNCH YOUR CAREER AS ACCOUNT COORDINATOR, MEDIA SALES REPRESENTATIVE, MEDIA BUYER, MEDIA PLANNER, AND MANY OTHER EXCITING CAREER OPTIONS.

business.humber.ca/postgrad


INTERVIEW TIPS | YOUR MANAGER

THE FRONT PAGES

INTERVIEW TIPS

Our HR connections tell us what they want to hear in an interview.

Farhat Khan & Matthew Slaney Recruitment Consultants | Loblaw Companies Limited

Q // What qualities do you look for in your manager in order to help you be successful in your job? I would like my manager to be someone who can provide clear directions when needed but also allow me autonomy in performing the tasks assigned to me, or I would like my manager to provide quick feedback and corrective coaching at the right time and not wait until the annual performance appraisal.

Reason why you are being asked this question This question will allow recruiters to determine an ideal fit between the candidate’s needs and what the manager wants. If the job they are applying to today does not work out perhaps the recruiter will think of the candidate for a future opportunity.

Be honest in answering the questions, as it would help the recruiter in getting the right fit for you to succeed. When looking at the job description, try to find clues as to the qualities that the job requires. (Example: independent work or training provided.) If you struggle to think of qualities you would like or need, try to think of a previous manager that you really enjoyed working with. Perhaps that will help you realize what you need to be successful.

How not to answer the question Don’t be generic. It is not recommended to say “I need my manager to be knowledgeable.” This may hint to the recruiter that you yourself are not “knowledgeable” in your job. Try to keep your answer positive and refrain from referring to negative experiences with previous managers.

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Advice

09


GRADUATE CAREERS

BECOME PART OF THE BIGGER PICTURE Baker Hughes is a leading supplier of services, products, technology and systems to the worldwide oil and natural gas industry. Our 60,000-plus employees work in more than 80 countries to help customers find, evaluate, drill, produce, transport and process hydrocarbon resources. Find out more and apply at bakerhughes.com/graduate

We offer a variety of amazing opportunities for talented graduates, with structured training programmes designed to help you build a rewarding career in field engineering, geoscience and R&D, technology, and supply chain. We also offer a range of roles in commercial and business functions, as well as local internships in some countries. If you are interested in working in a team environment that “challenges you every day, emphasizes continuous improvement

> Innovative technologies > Global operations > Career prospects > Diverse teams Visit the website to see where you might fit into the bigger picture of our global operations.

through learning, and rewards ingenuity and hard work, Baker Hughes is the right company for you. © 2014 Baker Hughes Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. 34517

Yemi, Area Engineering Manager, USA

If you are applying to a position in the US and you are an individual with disability or a disabled veteran and would like any type of assistance to submit an application or to attend any recruitment or selection event, we would like to help you to ensure that your experience is as smooth as possible. If you need assistance, information, or answers to your questions, feel free to contact us or have any of your representatives contact us at Baker Hughes Application Assistance Toll Free at 1-866-324-4562. This method of contact has been put in place ONLY to be used by those internal and external applicants who have a disability and are requesting accommodation.

Follow us on:

Baker Hughes is an equal opportunity employer


SOFT SKILLS | LIFELONG DEVELOPMENT

THE FRONT PAGES

Lifelong improvement is a requirement for any professional. After finishing university or college, the last thing you want to think about is more self-improvement. However, if you want to remain highly employable and current in your knowledge, it’s a necessity. There are so many options available for professional development that finding the ones that are relevant can be difficult. Sure, there are the standard conferences and university courses, but why not seek something different in your professional development journey.

Book clubs Reading books on your industry may seem like an obvious option. However, a valuable way to turn reading a book into a development activity is to ask your colleagues to join you! Whether with work friends or college buddies, there is real opportunity for learning when you include the opinions of others. Peruse the bestsellers list in your industry as well as the top business and leadership books, which are valuable for anyone to read. Invite some people to read the book with you and meet for lunch to discuss. It’s a great way to not only learn something new but to network and develop relationships.

Certifications

tions offer professional development, courses, and networking opportunities to continue your learning after you receive your designation.

Online courses There are many places to learn new things online; the world is at your fingertips. (If you can dream it, you can probably find a YouTube video to teach it.) However, there are many reputable institutions such as Stanford University that are offering free online courses in everything from stocks and bonds to coding. Learning new things especially outside your area of expertise is a smart way to broaden your skills and increase your employability. Take every opportunity that comes your way at work to learn something new. If you’re given the opportunity to attend a conference or other event in your industry, take it! Peruse blogs and online forums in your industry regularly and see what’s new and exciting. At some point, if you feel the investment may be worth it, considering a graduate degree or additional higher education programs could pay off as well. Continuing to acquire knowledge will help you not only develop as a professional but grow as a person and develop a love of learning.

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

If there is a reputable professional certification in your industry, you should begin the process to obtain it as quickly as possible after graduation. Knowledge is still fresh, so this is the best time to take any required examinations before you start to forget everything you learned. Many careers in various fields—like accounting, for example—require designations for higher positions, and they can be valuable assets to have on a resumé no matter the level of employment. Additionally, many of the boards that administer these certifica-

Words Heidi Murphy // Illustrations Anthony Capano

Out-of-the-box professional development

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STARTUP | THE TRUE NORTH TIMES

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Finding the lighter side of the North

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Simren Sandhu examines Canada’s politics and news with a comedic, satirical lens with the True North Times. “I had the idea when I was 18 years old. I was a big fan of Canadian politics and I like writing, comedy, and satire.” Simren Sandhu started the True North Times, an online political satire publication, in his first year at McGill in 2013. “I found in Canada, in particular, we don’t have a truly satirical

outlet,” he says. While there are some comedy-news sources, like the Rick Mercer Report and This Hour Has 22 Minutes, Simren says they just use politics as a premise for comedy. “I wanted to comment on politics, do something else, and make it funny.” In the beginning, Simren put only his own time and money into the project. “I very much believed in the project and thought it had real potential,” he says, stating he gave 100 per cent commitment to the launch of the project. Now, he has 25 contributors across the country from every province writing for the publication, including a core staff of four. In the beginning, Simren had trouble getting people to take the publication seriously. “I would come to people with the idea and they would say this is just a kid with an idea that’ll probably fall through and there’s nothing really substantial there.” Once he brought them a full, detailed proposal, showing the strength of the project, he began to change people’s minds.


THE FRONT PAGES

Words James Michael McDonald // Images The True North Times

I wanted to comment on politics, do something else, and make it funny. “Working toward our launch, the hardest thing we had to deal with was people mistaking us for parody, like the Onion,” he says. “They do political humour and they’ve done a great job, but what we’re trying to and make clear is we never make [our stories] up because it’s all real stuff that is happening. We want to actually talk about real issues we’re facing; Canadians are notoriously apathetic and doing fake news seemed like a copout for us.”

As the founder and CEO, Simren dabbles in every aspect of the business. He also focused on the over-arching vision and

“I see us continuing what we’re doing but just on an increasing scale,” he says. “We want to expand into different forms of media like video, podcasting, and interactive storytelling. We just want to keep doing what we’re doing but on a bigger scale.” As a new entrepreneur, Simren’s advice to young entrepreneurs is focused on drive and passion. He says ambition is very powerful and should not be ignored. Early on, he experienced a lot of rejection, and asked himself what was the point of approaching others if it was obvious they would say no. “I find that when you actually take the time to ask anyone for help and just give it a shot, what’s the worst than can happen? More often than not, you’ll actually see people stepping up that you wouldn’t think would and you’ll start getting some big names on board with your project; that’s what I found. It’s been really huge to our fast growth.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Because he is still a student, Simren and his colleagues have a unique work style. “Since the school year has started and because most of us are still students, we all work independently,” he says. “Obviously we’re always keeping each other up-to-date daily, but the editorial team will do their own thing, marketing will do their thing, and we’ll touch base.” He says they’ve built systems so that teams can be self-managed, following procedures, and everything is straight-forward and efficient.

long-term goals for the True North Times, deciding where he’d like to see it in the future.

13


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QUICK SERVICE | SKILLS AND GROWTH

CAREER REPORTS

Pouring grandes to landing business deals: Climbing the career ladder by starting in quick service.

When you’re young, you have more of the ability to take a shot at something new that you believe in.

Throughout my school years, I had a handful of friends who worked in restaurants and fast-food joints across my neighbourhood. For many, it’s the first job, pay-my-way-to-college route. But what others might not realize is that a job in the quick service industry can offer growth and long-term working skills to take in future careers.

“When you focus on results, you’re able to communicate the actual difference you made while working in quick service,” he adds. “It shows that you didn’t just take it as a first job or a summer job or a job to pass the time, and that attitude makes you an investment employee and future hire.”

Creating the foundation

With its upcoming entrance to the Canadian food-lovers market this fall, b.good is a fastcasual restaurant chain that Todd Brooks, president of b.good Canada, refers to as a “growth company.”

“I’ll even clean the bathrooms!” were the words 16-year-old John Haynes III used in a job interview to win him his first gig at a subs and pizza shop. Yes, he did start by cleaning bathrooms, but eventually found his way to become assistant manager in his college years. Now, 27 years later, as the vice-president of HR for an energy management company, Haynes III reflects on his time in quick service. “The most valuable lesson that I gained from my start in quick service was understanding the heart, mind, hands, and feet of a small business owner,” he explains, adding that he eventually understood the responsibilities that came with being a business owner, from employees to customers to profitability.

Amongst other skills Haynes III has taken with him to his job today was teamwork, management, the ability to sharpen problemsolving capabilities, and mastering the art of working quickly and accurately.

Growing with the industry

You may ask what this means. “It lets employees have as broad and as diverse of an experience as they want and can handle,” explains Brooks, resulting in growth within the company and industry. For example, sharing how the company’s head of operations started on the line grounding beef for hamburgers. “It’s one of those things that if you come and work hard, learn the brand, and learn the operations, then you can get to that breadth of opportunities that a growth company will have in front of it,” he says. “When you’re young, you have more of the ability to take a shot at something new that you believe in and I would encourage people to find something you’re passionate about, follow that path versus the path that you think is more lucrative.” In addition to the crucial customer service skills, Brooks says dealing with negative experiences is a contributor to personal and professional growth as well. “You’ll see what happens when there’s a bad experience, when an order gets messed up, and how critical the steps are dealing with unsatisfied customers.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Through realizing this, he believes the industry is an exceptional starting point for young careers. “The work is fast-paced. There is immediate and almost expected opportunity to cross-train and learn multiple aspects of the business.”

Words Megan Santos // Image Lightwave Media

Front line to front office

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SEASONAL WORK & CALL CENTRES | TONS OF OPPORTUNITIES

Words Mehreen Shahid // Images Wavebreak Media

’TIS the season to be employed

Those weeks after exams are a perfect time to rack up some extra dough.

What’s more important to students than getting good grades? Having money to pay their way through school! This holiday season, get out there and grab one of many seasonal opportunities so you have extra pocket change in the new year. adidas, for example, hires students at Reebok, Rockport, and adidas stores for their up-season sales from August to mid-September, as well as December. “We also hold special sales events at various locations throughout the year, such as tent or warehouse sales, where seasonal workers are a necessity for the set-up, take-down, and general maintenance throughout the event,” says human resources business partner Clara Battiston.

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Sales associates at adidas are required to have basic numeracy, literacy, and verbal communication skills along with ongoing high school or post-secondary education.

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“We look for brand ambassadors—individuals who consistently exhibit the attitude and values that showcase the values prized by adidas,” says Battiston. “Sales associates also assist with executing and maintaining store operations, visual merchandising, and in-store communications.” If you don’t like being cooped up indoors but prefer being out in fresh air (whether it’s warm or cold), a snow plowing company just might answer your call of the wild. “We offer great part-time and casual opportunities,” says Mikhail Evgrafov, director of operations at Monster Plowing Company in Toronto. “Paid hourly, snow shovellers are placed on our on-call list of workers to be called in throughout winter.”

Snowplough drivers need to have a high school diploma, a valid G-category licence, and some experience in the snow removal industry. Shovellers, however, don’t need any previous experience. If you decide to shovel snow this winter, be ready to work when Mother Nature wants you to work. Evgrafov says valuable assets include critical thinking, complex problem solving, good judgment and decision-making, active learning and listening, efficient body movement, excellent winter driving skills, and the ability to use a tablet, cell phone, and GPS. Snow shovellers clean small homes, corporate buildings, plazas, malls, and even factories. If you don’t like working out in the cold, there’s always work with moving companies. “Students have the opportunity all year long to work with us but especially in the summertime when we are at our busiest and they are off school,” says Chuck Resnick, vice-president of operations and marketing with Two Men and a Truck Canada (TMT). The busiest time of the year for Two Men and a Truck—and most moving companies—is July because people want to relocate to their new homes long before school begins. Work involves lifting heavy objects, thinking like a customer, and being professional at all times. Most movers at TMT are between 18–22 years old; however, insurance requirements dictate that drivers are older than 25 and have a G licence. The rest is easy: use common sense and don’t break anything! Seasonal work is an excellent way to build experience and enter the talent pool: it leads to future opportunities, helps build key career skills, and earns extra cash for the semester-to-come.


CAREER REPORTS

Mastering the outbound call centre job is an art, but it’s also challenging. How would you bounce back from a negative call experience?

It’s Monday morning and you’re just about ready to start a new week. You take a seat at your desk, glance at today’s to-do list, and adjust your headset. The first sales call you make is a total dud. Not only did you not make the sale, but the individual on the other line is, let’s just say, not having a great morning. The experience can be daunting, but coming across unpleasant callers is relatively common in an outbound call centre environment. So, how do you handle negative calls?

You’re going to have the people that’ll hang up on you, but you just brush that off and move to the next call.

Challenges “There’s always that potential to face a negative experience when you’re the person making that call, simply because the customer didn’t call us, we called them,” says Crystal Singh, national human resources manager for Stericycle Communication Solutions Canada. With their supervisors and peers, outbound call centre representatives have a strong support team to encourage a quick bounce back. “I honestly believe it’s the team environment that gets them through it,” says Singh.

Words Megan Santos // Images Wavebreak Media

Enduring the dial tone

trained on how to handle an irate customer.” Is the representative supposed to transfer the call to another person? Or determine the issue beforehand? Gavin explains that it varies on the situation and client but, because of the training, all associates are well versed in dealing with the appropriate next steps.

What it takes “The type of outbound person who is really successful in our organization is one that has a lot of the same values that our company has,” says Singh. “This includes individuals who thrive in teamwork, enjoy a challenge, and have enthusiasm in what they do.” And if you excel at the job, this could lead to potential growth within the outbound call centre, whether as a team leader, supervisor, account manager, or trainer. “We never go external to promote any higher position,” says Gavin. “The opportunities to branch off from there are endless and we would always promote that to our entire call centre first.” Stericycle Communication Solutions approaches promotion in a similar way with their Promote from Within Policy, where they also look to staff before posting externally.

“You’re going to have the people that’ll hang up on you, but you just brush that off and move to the next call,” says Jennifer Gavin, recruiter at APAC Customer Services, explaining what associates may experience on the sales floor. “We have them role play during training on irate customers. They’re

Although a post-secondary education is appreciated and encouraged, Singh says character is most important. “If the person has the qualifications for the job and displays innate character traits of being inclusive, friendly, compassionate, and enthusiastic, then the rest we truly can and will train.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

At APAC Customer Services Inc., outbound representatives confront potential negative experiences during their training.

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ABORIGINAL | MAKING THEIR MARK

MAKING THE MOST OF

increasingopportunities Aboriginal business is stronger than ever. From building local partnerships to the opportunities in the biggest corporate offices, Canada’s aboriginals are making their presence known at work. Words Megan Santos // Image Luerat Satichob

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

The number of aboriginal entrepreneurs grew by 85% between 1996 and 2006.

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1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006


SPECIAL REPORT

Communication is key

Getting the word out for aboriginal business is what communications pros are doing in their firms. Gettin’ cultured

We take you on a trip to Western Canada to see how aboriginal tourism is attracting visitors. Aboriginals at work

Corporations across the country are striving to increase opportunities for aboriginal professionals.

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014 19


“I’m being given the chance to succeed in a company where people believe in me.” – Jesse, FCC employee and First Nations University grad

Be comfortable with diversity At FCC, we’ve built a culture where you can be yourself. You’re an individual and it takes strong individuals to make a strong team. So, be who you are and feel at home when you come to work. fcc.ca/diversity

PICTURE YOURSELF HERE.

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SPECIAL REPORT

Communications firms nationwide are pushing to promote Canada’s aboriginal businesses. What started out as a stable teaching job for Marlene Finn later turned into a full-time consulting career when she noticed the need for a communications expert in the aboriginal community. “As much as I felt there was a need for someone like me to support the community, I also felt like I wanted to be a part of the community,” she says. “I didn’t feel that way when I was working as a teacher.”

In addition to managing her clients’ media relations, Deena also assists in developing strategies and tools, as well as communicates with their audiences in a way that resonates with them. “The media is a very important channel to tell client stories to the investors and public, so media relations can be a very important strategy in a communications plan,” she says.

Personally, that was the motivator to start her company at Marlene Finn Wolfman Consulting, but Finn also adds that she was encouraged by the radical change in aboriginal demographics. “We have this booming youth population that is really changing the face of the aboriginal community. We’ve got so many First Nations moving to the big cities in search of work and education.”

Finn works with both new aboriginal entrepreneurs and long-time organization owners on their communications and marketing needs. Depending on their requests, she outlines long-term strategies. “I plan conferences, anniversary dinners, awards presentations, produce videos; those services would be part of a larger plan to establish an organization in a certain community,” Finn explains. “I’ve also done a lot of work to help them revamp their brands. I’ve done brand identification and redevelopment with some of the boards of some of these organizations.”

Finn explains that through the work she’s done with her aboriginal clients, she found they were overwhelmed by the pressures to meet the needs of their markets in the big city, despite the tremendous potential.

What they offer

“Amongst the services we provide are government regulatory affairs, indigenous and right holders affairs, corporate and stakeholder communications, public consultation and engagement, issues and emergency response, communications and planning, communications research, and media relations,” lists Deena Tokaryk, account manager at the agency.

Simply put, both PR Associates and Marlene Finn Wolfman Consulting strive to do one thing: make a positive impact on aboriginal businesses and the community. “Within public relations and communications, in any business really, it’s about the relationship you develop with the clients,” Tokaryk explains. “At the end of the day, if you’re doing it right, you’re putting strategies into place that address the goals and objectives.” In order to obtain long-term success, communications is key, says Finn. “I try to inform people of that reality but, at the same time, also try and encourage them to be creative with what they have available to them.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Storytelling and reputation-building is what PR Associates are best known for. The BC-based public relations and communications company, with an expertise in the natural resource sector, works closely with the aboriginal community and local businesses.

The end result

21


ABORIGINAL | A NEW AND OLD KIND OF TOURISM

A

The Canadian tourism industry is taking notice of the potential in BC’s aboriginal communities. From the bustling city streets of Toronto and Montreal to the wintery slopes in Whistler, BC, and the picture perfect view of the Atlantic shores, the tourism industry is undoubtedly a huge economic driver in Canada. But there’s more to offer than just sightseeing and ski hills, some of which is present within the communities of Canada’s first inhabitants.

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Aboriginal tourism in Western Canada continues to grow as more visitors from around the globe are finding fun in the rich culture and history of Canada’s aboriginal communities. BC has set a goal of doubling their tourism revenues by 2015— an effort that very much includes aboriginal businesses and its 200-plus communities across the province.

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at the core of all aboriginal tourism is really the cultural interpretation of that area and the people that are supported by the community.” For Elsie Burton, operations assistant at the Haida Heritage Centre, located in Haida Gwaii in BC’s northwest coast, she sees tourists from around the world visiting the centre’s museum and attractions, which include canoeing, weaving, and totem pole tours.

The scope of tourism

“What we want people to come away with is a greater sense of what it is to be Haida, our cultural structure, social structure, history—so just to give people a well rounded idea of who we are,” she explains. “At the Haida Heritage Centre, part of our mission statement states that this is our gift to the world.”

“Aboriginal tourism is very diverse in BC. It could be cultural centres, restaurants, outdoor venture experiences, hotels, accommodations,” says Keith Henry, chief executive officer of the Aboriginal Tourism Association of BC, listing the wide range of aboriginal tourism experiences. “What needs to be

At the Aboriginal Tourism Association of BC, the team strives to ensure authenticity. “What [we] provide consumers, travel agents, and sales agents is quality assurance and getting an authentic experience that’s owned and operated by the communities and entrepreneurs directly,” says Henry.


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ABORIGINAL | DIVERSITY INITIATIVES

ESTIMATED WORTH OF ABORIGINAL TOURISM IN CANADA 2006

2012

SPECIAL REPORT

Diversify!

Leading companies have initiatives to support all groups, including the aboriginal workforce. It’s in almost every modern-day company mandate and noted at the bottom of many job listings. The dedication to diversity has been a continuing practice by Canadian businesses, with some are pushing to take it one step further.

$20 MILLION

$42 MILLION

Then and now The stress of authenticity has lead to a major improvement in the aboriginal tourism industry today versus a decade ago. “You sometimes have people that are scripting and not really knowing and living the art and the culture,” says Burton, “so it’s really nice to know that we actually have people that were born and raised here and they can give a really personal perspective.” Aboriginal tourism has become a serious player in BC’s tourism industry in the last decade, Henry adds. “On the other side of the equation with the aboriginal communities, it has almost created a cultural revitalization and renaissance because communities are embracing culture. You can see the pride when businesses are doing well.”

Widening the circle Major Canadian companies have collectively covered those 10 areas, tailoring them to their unique strategies. At TD, the company is committed to being an aboriginal employer of choice in Canada. They accomplish this by working alongside post-secondary institutions and student organizations like AFOA Canada and Indspire to create awareness to the opportunities the financial services for aboriginal people. “We have a dedicated team and resources focused on sourcing and attracting aboriginal talent to the bank and to ensuring we have the right programs, mentorship, and career development opportunities in place to support them in reaching their full potential,” says Monique Bateman, senior vice-president of TD Bank Group, and the chair of the TD Aboriginal Employee Subcommittee. For Krystal Abotossaway, diversity

“This program provides post-secondary aboriginal students up to three consecutive summer placements within Canadian banking,” says Abotossaway, who started her career with RBC as an intern in the program. “This national program has been identified as an opportunity to build career foundation for aboriginal youth to grow their careers within the financial industry.”

Business approaches In addition to the exceptional practices outlined in the Deloitte report, RBC is committed to bringing more aboriginal voices to their teams when making crucial business decisions. “For me, we no longer live in a static world where we can make assumptions that can stay true for years or that we can just generalize the aboriginal population as one entity,” says Abotossaway. “So at RBC we’ve done a lot of listening to our current aboriginal employees more than ever,” adding that the company looks at all segments from youth to experienced, and rural to urban areas. Similarly, role models play an important role at TD. “Our senior aboriginal leaders engage regularly with our aboriginal employee resource groups and the Aboriginal Circle @ TD,” explains Bateman, “a group of 600-plus aboriginal and non-aboriginal employees to create awareness, celebrate culture, and further our employee, business, and community strategies.” And with this vast knowledge, Abotossaway says “HR can then develop the right practices to attract and retain the valuable, diverse talent.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

With the revitalization within BC’s aboriginal communities, there has also been growth in the job market. “We are growing at a rate of about 10 per cent each year,” says Henry. “In 2006, our industry provided us with 1,400 full- and part-time jobs whether directly with our business, or aboriginal-type experiences with non-aboriginal operators.”

In a report conducted by Deloitte called Widening the Circle, it outlines “10 best practices” to increase aboriginal opportunities in the workplace, in addition to topics like reviewing hiring practices, preventing isolation, and supporting aboriginal businesses. With the help of corporate associates from some of the largest companies in Canada, Deloitte listed those 10 as: partner, provide, question, review, conduct, hire, promote, assess, develop, and communicate.

sourcing specialist at RBC, their aboriginal summer internship program is one of the company’s biggest success stories and checks off Deloitte’s best practice to “provide.”

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Words James Michael McDonald // Illustrations Anthony Capano

There aren’t many people I know that didn’t, at one time or another, work in retail. For most, it’s a good part-time job while in high school or post-secondary to get some early work experience and earn some extra money. The jobs are easily accessible for hard workers and social butterflies, people willing to put in the time and energy. The fact is, though, that working in retail is so much more than you think.

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Don’t feel like standing at a cash register all day? Unbeknownst to many, there ARE a variety of careers, countless opportunities, and skills to be gained throughout the retail industry.

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YOU DON’T KNOW RETAIL | SKILLS, GROWTH, OPPORTUNITY

Virtually any career that’s in Canada, you will find in retail.

Skills at the starting gate “Retail develops many skills and competencies which can be used within retail and cross-functionally in different industries,” says Nima Ghodratpour, MBA candidate at Queen’s, with over 11 years of Canadian and international luxury retail experience with Clinique, Bloomingdale’s, and Boutique 1. “Some of the skills picked up in a retail environment include interpersonal and listening skills, coaching and people management, negotiation skills, sales skills, building relationships, business management, and financial accounting.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Essentially, working a retail position as a young person, before you dive head-first into a career, is preparing yourself for future success.

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“The actual physical duties in retail are the least significant and important that a hirer cares about. What they truly care about is personality,” says Suzanne Sears, senior executive director of Best Retail Careers International Inc., which focuses on specialty retail recruiting across the world. “Are you able to make relationships with customers? That’s what they care about. Once you have these relationships, can you service these people and can you make the customer happy?” The great thing about young people working at the store level is if you don’t enter the field as someone able to instantly make relationships with customers, you will soon be able to. These environments are designed to train employees and encourage growth. “Working in a team can be difficult at times,” says Ghodratpour. “However, it also presents the opportunity to develop essential job skills and potentially long-lasting relationships. Good retailers pay a great deal of attention on teamwork and work to ensure that management is fostering a culture of team engagement.”


FEATURE

Moving past the pack If it turns out you like the company you work for, or love the idea of retail as an industry, you’re in luck. There are thousands—nay, millions—of retail positions out there that are in or above store-level. “There are functional roles,” says Sears. “There’s a tremendous demand for IT professionals who can design point-ofpurchase systems. There are people who sell retail fixtures. There are architectural roles in designing stores. There are statistical roles in financial analysis.” And the list goes on: financial accountants, lawyers, graphic artists, HR professionals, buying, merchandising, etc. There’s also a trend to keep up-to-date, so retailers are hiring social media pros, marketing gurus, and communications experts—all perfect careers for recent grads with the right skill sets. “Virtually any career that’s in Canada, you will find in retail,” she adds. While there is certainly opportunity for outsiders with professional backgrounds to dive into the retail industry in these roles, it’s also very possible for you to move up from a simple part-time job. “I’m an excellent example of moving up from a part-time store-level job to a full-time management-level position,” says Ghodratpour. “Retail is a fast-paced and highly competitive environment that includes many opportunities for growth and development. Many retailers—in particular luxury retail—put a huge emphasis on talent development and succession planning to ensure the retention of talent. This is done not only because it reduces staff turnover, which can cut into the bottom line, but also ensures that the company holds on to a workforce with intimate knowledge of processes and corporate culture.”

Aside from the baby boomers retiring en masse in coming years, there is also significant growth now and in the near future in retail. “A number of brands that have traditionally been carried in department stores or other multi-brand retailers are actually opening their own Canadian headquarters and are looking at expanding to Canada, opening either their own stores or opening concessions within department stores,” says Craig Patterson, editor-in-chief and founder of Retail Insider, providing a detailed analysis of the Canadian retail market. “There are also a lot of American retailers coming into Canada. We’ve had a lot of homegrown retailers in Canada who haven’t seen a lot of growth or are actually struggling so I think we’re going to see a lot more international retailers coming in. On the flip side, value-priced retailers are on the rise, so we’re going to see more jobs in places like Dollarama.” He mentions that value-priced retail is expanding by nearly 50 per cent over the next several years, meaning a lot of opportunities for both young people at store level and professionals in the expanding “head office” branch of retail. If you’re thinking against retail because of the pay, think again. “I think most people underestimate how well retail pays,” says Sears. “There are very few big box store managers who aren’t making up to $200,000 per year. It’s a highly paid trade.” When looking for a position that’s right for you, be it in a store or in any role in the industry, it’s best to know what you want and to go after it. To find out if a store is right for you, Ghodratpour says to visit, interact with staff, and gather information. Be sure to go to companies that you enjoy, because developing a long-term job or a lifelong career with a brand you love can only lead to career satisfaction. “Retail is ultimately about passion,” he says. “Making sure you align your passions with that of a company is of ultimate importance.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

Sears adds that there is great opportunity in coming years for those looking to make their mark. “Believe it or not, for retail employment in Canada, the last statistics I saw showed that the unemployment rate is about two per cent. It’s very low in the sense that retail doesn’t have near the number of people in the trade that is required ... People who have been in retail for 20, 30, 40 years are leaving the field within the next five years, so advancement is massive and quick for the right people.”

Checking out the finish line

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ABORIGINAL BUSINESS | EMPOWERMENT

EDUCATION

From partnerships to entrepreneurships, post-secondary schools push to strengthen aboriginal business.

Words Megan Santos // Image Monkey Business

Building on business

Believe it or not, Canada’s aboriginal community is in tune with business. Whether they decide to keep it local and within their bands or expand to partnerships with companies outside their communities, aboriginals are making an impact on the Canadian business landscape. To foster the growth of these future entrepreneurs, partners, and businesspeople, post-secondary schools have taken note of the importance of aboriginal business opportunities in education. What’s to be learned? Tailored for all students—aboriginal or non-aboriginal—who are interested in learning about the unique operations of business, the University of Manitoba introduced a brand new concentration, aboriginal business and economy, to their MBA program at the Asper School of Business. Exploring topics like aboriginal economic perspective, aboriginal healing ways, and environment, economy, and aboriginal peoples are just some of what’s covered in the program’s concentration.

Alternatively for the Ch’nook aboriginal management program offered at the Sauder School of Business at University of British Columbia, the students enrolled in the program come from aboriginal backgrounds. “We give them good business skills, but we don’t forget to face that their backgrounds potentially are different,” says Dr. Mahesh Nagarajan, a professor in the program. “Business skills are the same; we don’t compromise on the standards of those but we do tailor it to the context of where they come from and what they’re looking for.”

“What we do and what I think we do very well is we give them a tailored program, and differentiate this product to this market,” he says. “We also bring in industry folks to give them context on what it’s like to start a business in a band,” adding that it’s a much different approach compared to starting a business in downtown Vancouver, for instance.

What’s next? “For anyone who’s interested and anyone who’s working in Manitoba, not understanding the opportunities of working with aboriginal businesses makes them less competitive,” says Wuttunee. So through this concentration, students are able to develop insight, skills, and are recognized as being valuable. And for aboriginals in the aboriginal management program, Nagarjaran says there are many entrepreneurs with exceptional business ideas within these communities. “I think what they often lack is the idea that to do what they want often takes a whole bunch of different skills and rigorous business skills,” he explains. “What we tell them is to never forget the context of what they’re doing, be completely respectful to that, but give them tools that any regular business would have.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

“It’s absolutely open to anybody who’s interested in learning more about what [aboriginals are] doing,” says Wanda Wuttunee, professor of native studies at the University of Manitoba. “We have a huge economic footprint in Canada and people don’t always realize. It’s a really good opportunity for many people to be educated on what’s going on.”

Students can expect to study fundamental business disciplines like economics, entrepreneurship, accounting, and marketing. The program is designed to help develop entrepreneurial skills for aboriginals to take back to their bands or communities.

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Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

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Ross University School of Medicine RossU.edu Founded in 1978 and located in Dominica, West Indies, RUSM is a provider of medical education offering a MD degree program. RUSM graduates have attained more US residencies annually than those of any other medical school in the world over the last five years.

Conestoga College conestogac.on.ca Conestoga College, located in Waterloo region, is Ontario’s fastest growing college and a leader in polytechnic education. Our career-focused programs – from apprenticeships to diplomas, degrees to graduate certificates, continuing education and part-time studies – all reflect Ontario’s changing job market and will help you build the skills and knowledge that today’s employers are seeking.

Queen’s University WWW.QUEENSU.CA 100+ graduate programs with world-class research opportunities and strong support to enrich your educational experience and advance your career. Set your ideas in motion. Consider graduate studies at Queen’s.queensu.ca/sgs

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Dalhousie University dalmba.ca Dalhousie’s Corporate Residency MBA - Enter our 22-month program directly from any undergrad degree, no work experience required. Within six months you’ll be working in an 8-month, paid corporate residency with a top employer. Our personal and professional effectiveness course combined with career coaching from our Management Career Services team will accelerate your leadership skills.

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American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine has provided students with a quality medical education since 1978. In the years since AUC’s founding, more than 5,000 graduated physicians have made a significant impact in the field of medicine in countries around the world.


NUTRITION | FOOD FOR THOUGHT

EDUCATION

Words Megan Santos // Image Tijana Media

Health-savvy studies

Hey, foodies! Here are nutrition programs to get you fit for the field. Today, we see it all over social media: fitness progress photos, 15-second snippets of workout routines, and the infamous food pictures. Nutrition and healthy living is that new thing everyone is talking about. A career in nutrition doesn’t mean that you work at a gym for the rest of your life, nor does it mean your sole role is to tell people what they should and shouldn’t eat. It offers opportunities in a number of areas—hospitals, education, and long-term care included—with responsibilities in disease prevention, research, business, and even journalism. Post-secondary institutions nationwide are also well aware of what’s happening in the industry. Offering a postgrad education in nutrition, these programs can get you one step closer to becoming a full-fledged registered dietitian and an expert in all things food.

Applied nutrition The University of Guelph’s master of applied nutrition (MAN) program takes students through a clinical nutrition assessment course, a practicum course, and a final research project.

With busy schedules over the 12-month program, Prescod admits the workload can be challenging. “You’ll be switching hats between being in an academic environment and the work environment,” she says about the placements, but shares her students’ enthusiasm for the opportunity. “They’re so excited

Foods & nutrition Introducing the new cohort of 15 students this past September, Brescia University College (a division of the University of Western) offers its students in the master of science foods and nutrition program two options: thesis or internship. “The internship stream is designed for graduates who want to have a master’s degree and, at the same time, do their internship,” says Alicia C. Garcia, chair of the Division of Food and Nutritional Sciences, and director of the graduate program in foods and nutrition. On the other hand, “the master’s thesis stream is for those who are already registered dieticians but want to advance or upgrade their degree to a master’s.” To get closer to becoming a registered dietitian, entry-level competencies are required and students in the internship stream are able to acquire those skills through their placements. Kayla Glynn, internship coordinator for the program, says that communication, collaboration, and professionalism are key competencies to be successful in the field. “Key areas of dietetic practice are in nutrition care in a clinical setting, public health (community setting), and management,” she lists. “They’ll do rotations in a variety of organizations.” For thesis students, Garcia describes it as a win-win situation for students and employers. “The registered dieticians are using this time to advance their degrees and, at the same time, doing work they can apply back and give back to their home companies. Their research projects are basically things they can use when they go full-time back to their work again.”

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

“The research project course is for the students to have small research experience while they’re here doing the master of applied nutrition program,” says Alexia Prescod, coordinator of the program. And to become eligible to write the registered dietitian exam, students in the MAN program are required to take part in the project.

and intrigued by applied nutrition that they want to take different opportunities. What I see from students in September and July is they really blossom both professionally and personally.”

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TIMELINE | GET A JOB

THE BACK PAGES

From opening Word to negotiating salary, here’s a play-by-play of finding and getting a new job. 1

Wandering online

Redoing your resumé

2

You’re bored of your job or have been sitting on your couch for too long. Your Internet travels take you to a job board and you start seeing positions that intrigue you.

Check out examples, be specific, put fingers to keyboard, and whip up a clean resumé. List your accomplishments, education, work experience, volunteering—anything that will make you stand apart from your competition.

“What the heck is an arborist? Could I be that?” 3

Deciding on more than one position

Personalizing your cover letter 4

There are thousands upon thousands of postings out there every day. It’s best to decide on a bunch and put out your feelers into the world. You never know what’ll happen unless you try!

Every cover letter has to be different. You can use some of the same info—especially the intro and conclusion, slightly altered. You could also include a side-by-side comparison of your skills to the requirements in the posting!

“Trying is the best!”

“Should I list that I volunteer my time to my PS4?”

B:11”

S:9.75”

T:10.75”

5

you’re Hired!

ut abo “So, orner c that fice...” of

“Turn on the charm, self. Big smiles!”

6

et a I g ice?” o D “ ff er o corn

The dreaded second (or third!) interview

You’ve made it to the final round. Really prove your worth, bring ideas, do even more research—anything that will make you stand out from the other finalists. Also, this is your chance to ask questions to find out if the company is also right for you, not just the other way around.

Jobpostings.ca | OCTOBER 2014

You did it. And now it’s time to negotiate details, warm up to different members of staff, and set your things down. Be sure to get what you want while still being respectful of budgets and expectations. You don’t want to start off on the wrong foot, but don’t want to be short-changed either!

first interview

You’ve landed an interview. They want to get to know you, so just be yourself, stay calm, and wear deodorant. And be sure to do tons of research beforehand! Know your stuff!

I “Damn, eat!” r g d n u so 7

Words James Michael McDonald // Illustration Anthony Capano

Timeline of landing a job

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­— IN OUR NEXT ISSUE —

Women in tech Coming November 2014


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Jobpostings Magazine: October 2014 Vol. 17 No. 2  

Canada's largest career lifestyle magazine for students.

Jobpostings Magazine: October 2014 Vol. 17 No. 2  

Canada's largest career lifestyle magazine for students.

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