Page 1

Feature Interview:

Prof. Rupert Lewis

Professor Emeritus UWI

Reflections on Garveyism and the Church

Articles:

• ‘Joseph’ The Film: An African-Caribbean Drama • Black Panther Echoes Garveyism • Interview at Liberty Hall, Kingston • Vox Pop: Should Church Leaders Teach about Marcus Garvey?

Also Inside:

• KIDS CREW: Black Like Me Part 2 • ‘The Black African Bloom’ by Errol Bean • Music Scores from Kom Mek Wi Worship


Testimonials REV. DR. CLINTON CHISHOLM Theologian The KMW magazine is a delightful, informative read. The breadth of the topics dealt with ensures that something beneficial is there for a wide readership and the depth of some of the articles will stretch your horizons all to the end of stimulating readers to offer authentic expressions in worship reflective of the distinctives of who we are in the region. p CAMEKA RUTH TAYLOR Author & Publisher As a publisher and authorpreneur I want to say that writing is a great platform for advocacy. Because you have written the vision it will get to places and people that you will never ever meet - an enduring legacy so that long after you are dead and gone, others will be able to take the vision and run with it. The magazine has been exceptionally written and published. You have set the bar really high. I look forward to you being a cultural ambassador from Jamaica to the nations. Congratulations! p GARNETT ROPER, JP PhD President, Jamaica Theological Seminary Heartiest congratulations on the effort at a magazine to raise issues of a ethno-cultural nature. I welcome you to the discipline and I welcome this magazine as a valuable addition. I know it is a labour of love but do not become weary in well doing. The issue of identity is the most significant issue facing the brown and black people of the world. Inequality is foisted on them because they themselves are unsure of who they are and that they have a legitimate narrative of their own rather than remaining a footnote to other people’s story. Tell a story with your magazine. Give our people a voice. Give them images of themselves and their own of which they can be proud. Help them to shape a counter-narrative and with it to develop new paradigms and new norms. Tell the story about our heroines and heroes; about the ways in which we have overcome and are still overcoming. If this can be done we will create a pathway towards justice for all. p


Formerly of the successful UK vocal trio Brown Sugar, Pauline Catlin now known as Shezekiel, pronounced She-Zekiel, along with Caron Wheeler and Carol Simms during the 70’s and 80’s was the first British Reggae music trio with a succession of hits and the pioneers of the popular genre known today as ‘Lovers Rock,’ produced by the acclaimed Dennis Bovell. As a tribute and return to her Reggae roots, Shezekiel’s Debut Album ‘Catch the Boat’ Showcases a wonderful and creative collision reflective of her Caribbean and British roots. Her contemporary sound showcases a biblically relevant and unique musical fusion of Jazz, Reggae and Neo Soul as she magically captures a musical vibrancy reflecting her life’s Spiritual journey to Christ. p

www.shezekiel.com Order your CD at shezzymuzik.bigcartel.com or download from:

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Also available on Authorhouse.com

4 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


Contents

FEATURE 28

Editorial ................................... 6 Black Panther echoes Garveyism . 8

8

Education & Entrepreneurship..... 10 Edith, God And Garvey................ 14 Quotes From The Philosophy & Opinions Of Marcus Garvey........ 16 Joseph the Film.............................. 18 Vox Pop: Should the legacy of Garvey be taught in Churches?. 20 Food Feature................................. 24 Interview with Dr. Shani Roper..... 26

10 18

Interview with Prof. Rupert Lewis. 28 Top Ten Things to Know About Garvey .......................................... 30 KIDS - CREW................................... 32

26

Poem - The Black African Bloom. 38 Devotional...................................... 40 11 Questions with C. Ruth Taylor.. 42 A CREWShall Testimony................ 46 Musical Scores............................... 52

38


Editorial

M

arcus Garvey was the first-named National Hero of Jamaica in 1962. His work was never just for the Jamaicans, though. His impact spread throughout the world, wherever people of African descent had settled. Hallmarks of his work include the affirmation 6 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

and upliftment of the black race, encouragement of a return to the African continent, unity among people of African descent, and entrepreneurship and self-reliance to build the economy of people of African descent. Despite his status in Jamaica, many Jamaicans know little about him, how great he really was,


KW worship

KOM MEK WI

Volume 2 - Issue 1 and what it was that made him great. This issue of the KW Magazine is focused on Garvey, Garveyism and the Church. We want to introduce him, look at some of his philosophies and teachings, and see how the church has interacted with them both. It has been an exciting process so far, unearthing the facts and discussing Garvey with Jamaicans and nonJamaicans alike. You may have some questions like: Was Marcus Garvey a Christian? Is the church in Jamaica sharing his teachings with their members? Are there aspects of his teachings that are not compatible with the teachings of the Bible? I hope you will find answers to these questions and more in this issue of the KW Magazine! It is our desire through this publication to build a community of like-minded persons around the theme of Worship and Cultural Identity. If you are interested in taking this conversation off the pages of this magazine, contact us at kommekwiworship@gmail.com and join us on Facebook at www. facebook.com/kwmagazine. p

Kom Mek Wi Worship Magazine is a quarterly publication of CREW 40:4 - a non-profit entity based in Jamaica, whose mission is to spread the message of the gospel of Jesus Christ through culturally relevant expressions of worship. The magazine’s aim is to facilitate conversations about worship and cultural identity among Christ-followers on the African Continent and in her Diasporas.

Disclaimer: We may not agree with all views expressed by contributors or interviewees. Telephone: + 876 820 0258 e-mail: kommekwiworship@ gmail.com Website: www.crew40-4.com

Kom Mek Wi Worship

@GodincidencesJA

Published by:

PUBLISHING

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 7


Black Panther Echoes

Garveyism

8 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


A Film Review

Coming out of the Cinema, the content - pan African pride, the context - post-colonial Africa, and the colour - the beauty of blackness within the phrase, “Wakanda Forever” affected me; demanding deeper consideration. Why is this film important to Africans globally? Historically, Africans have been underrepresented in mainstream entertainment due to segregation and bias, resulting in generations being without any hero in popular culture. Conversely, white children could easily find identity in numerous characters from Marvel or DC comics, or television, cartoon heroes. The Black Panther is an overdue hero. Marvel Comics’ struggle with The Black Panther character due to racial tensions during the height of the Civil Rights Movement in the USA, (late 50s - to 70s) echoes mainstream society’s fear of ‘Blackness’. After many evolutions and reinventions, Marvel to its credit did not abandon the franchise believing, it deserved its fair shot and there was a market for such a hero. Their diligence was rewarded. The

Black Panther exceeded every expectation. It is a significant game-changer for racial representation in cinema. It is the highest-grossing film in history directed by a black director and predominantly black cast, among the only 33 films of all time to gross over a billion dollars. Grossing 387 million in its opening weekend; it was number one for over 5 weeks, selling more pre-sold tickets than any other superhero movie. The ideal of Wakanda echoes Garveyism: Marvel Comic’s Concept of Wakanda is as relevant now as it was in Marcus Garvey’s time. Albeit society has developed more tolerance for the idea of an African Utopia. The film echoes Garvey’s voice in depicting an Africa that is liberated, economically and politically viable and socially balanced; forging a path into the future as a force to be reckoned with, a leader of technology. “Wheresoever I go, whether it is England, France or Germany, I am told, “This is a white man’s country.” Wheresoever I travel throughout Continued on page 50 Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 9


Education and

Entrepreneurship Following in the Footsteps of Garvey Tracy-Ann Hyman is the CEO

and Founder of SKOLASTIK OASIS CARIBBEAN (SOC).

H

ere is her story of the birth and development of a company with a fascinating mission. SKOLASTIK OASIS CARIBBEAN (SOC) was born out of a hobby that involved finding scholarships to further personal educational pursuits and explore training opportunities abroad. It then moved to searching for opportunities for family and friends, and has now extended to Caribbean Nationals, the Diaspora and Africans. SOC, therefore, searches for scholarships, fellowships and grants and makes this information available to clients, while providing scholarship application support at the Tertiary level. We don’t provide scholarships, but partner with clients to identify suitable career options, help them 10 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


review scholarship application forms, improve their CV’s, write persuasive essays, review research proposals and communicate their ideas to scholarship funders. SOC focuses on all disciplines such as the Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Humanities and S.T.E.M fields. The spelling of the Company name SKOLASTIK is based on the Frederick Cassidy Orthography (The New Patwa writing system), popularised by the Jamaica Language Unit, University of the West Indies (UWI) in 2012. About 5 years ago, I remember reflecting at home one day, pondering what my life’s contribution would be. Some of my friends and associates during this time were migrating to other countries, changing jobs, starting their families, and this led me into a time of self-searching. I asked the Lord: “What is my contribution in this life?” The scripture from Exodus 4 came to the fore. This was where God asked Moses: “What do you have in your hand?” “A Rod? So what is my Rod Lord?” I didn’t know, because all I had was a Masters’ degree from studying in Japan on a scholarship, and some international travel. Well, that turned out to be my rod; a rod that would start a company shortly after, and help several persons within Jamaica, the Caribbean and

the USA cross their red seas. As at October 2019, SOC has helped clients secure approximately JA $34 MILLION (including personal scholarships secured by the CEO as well) in scholarships, fellowships and grants. Since then we haven’t looked back! The teachings of Marcus Garvey have guided and will continue to guide me and the company. One of our mandates at SOC is to dramatically improve the socio-economics of the black race through education and entrepreneurship. Marcus Garvey was big on education and entrepreneurship. He believed in the principles of self reliance, community and finding solutions from within, instead of always without. SOC aims to empower persons through education, because only 6% of Jamaicans at the University age access Tertiary education, creating a system of elitism. We at SOC desire to close this gap, making more persons access tertiary education through scholarships and others forms of financing. SOC is here to debunk the myth that you have to be exceptionally bright to access a scholarship. You don’t have to be exceptional, but simply be a high performer that is determined! Marcus Garvey was all about that. Taking on the risk and challenge Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 11


of entrepreneurship as a black female is not an easy one! However it has to be done to pave the way for my mentees, my children and my children’s children. They must know they can. Samuel Johnson says ‘Clear your mind of can’t.’ Marcus Garvey said ‘Up, you mighty race, accomplish what you will!’ Entrepreneurship is challenging in Jamaica, due to a lack of access to capital for small businesses, but there are glimmers and shimmers here and there, as the venture capital market opens up. Marcus Garvey believed that economic power was key and fueled political power. This was the only way for blacks to be empowered: owning and operating their own businesses, which is a basic tenet of wealth creation. You cannot obtain sustainable or inter-generational wealth working a 9 to 5 job. This is the error that has been passed down for generations and is the result of slavery and an institutionalized slave mindset. In light of this, it is my desire to set an example for females, young persons, and black people to become self-reliant and to harness innovation in order to progress and leave a legacy for future generations. Entrepreneurship is one such tool for leaving a legacy, and it would be remiss of SOC not to do this. 12 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

SOC targets B average clients and above, who are between the ages of 17 - 44 years. These are males or females who could be parents, students and working professionals, open to an international experience. Persons who are willing to take on the challenge of the tedious scholarship journey to experience another culture and international exposure, willing to give back to their home countries, continuing the process of development. These persons should also be engaged in volunteerism and community service and come from diverse socio-economic backgrounds. Whether these persons are in the church or not, these are the criteria that SOC looks for. Recently SOC launched a new suite of products targeted at Scholarship Funders. Now in the simplest sense, a funder can be a large corporation or it can be an individual who desires to set up an academic scholarship in the memory of a deceased family member, or for a particular cause, but does not know how to do this. We at SOC can design the entire programme from applicant intake to selection, ensuring that the best candidates are selected. SOC’s vision is to become a Global Leader in Educational Services by 2022, through the identification, generation and dissemination of


resources for the development and empowerment of Caribbean Nationals, the Diaspora and Africans. SOC therefore intends to revolutionize the Global Scholarship Industry. We encourage potential clients to book an appointment for a scholarship consultation, as well as attend our scholarship seminars face to face or online. Learn to craft winning scholarship application for your Bachelors, Masters or

PhD. Scholarship Funders can also contact us to receive help with scholarship shortlisting and screening, scholarship promotion or scholarship fund management. You can also follow us on Instagram, facebook, youtube and twitter and check out our website on: https://skolastikoasiscaribbean. wordpress.com/. We also do speaking engagements, so you can book the CEO for functions, conferences, graduations etc. p

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EDITH, GOD AND GARVEY bring the midwife; by the time they returned my head was out. Nurse Cole caught me and held me up and Daddy said gleefully, “Oh good, it’s a boy!” Nurse Cole shot back “What’s wrong with you man, you can’t see its a girl?”

I was born on the beautiful wartorn little island of Antigua on Queen Victoria’s birthday in 1941. A public holiday; the Police band entertaining citizens at the ’pasture’ on East Street; my young parents were laughing and dancing as they shared out bowls of pepperpot when whoosh!! Mammy’s waters broke! First baby! She cried, “Arthur look!” Daddy cried back “The baby coming! Quick! Quick! Get in the bed!” He hurried one street over to 14 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

Mammy amidst all the excitement, had felt no labour pains. Daddy’s brother, fifteen-year-old Gershom meanwhile, was in the yard listening to my first cries. The object of all this excitement and joy, from that moment on, never looked back! My parents were Anglican and Methodist. Daddy carried the big silver cross at the head of the procession each Sunday. “Grannie”, my great-grandmother who raised my mother, was a firehot burning Wesleyan Holiness prayer warrior who taught us all by quoting scripture and Proverbs. Uncle Glen told me that she called the names of her ten children out


loud every morning and called those of their children born and those unborn! I have tender memories of my mom putting my hands together and teaching me, “Gentle Jesus, meek and mild, look upon a little child”, I was drawn to Jesus in those sweet moments; I was about three years old. I remember my aunts Chris and Daisy taking me to the Cathedral; I was too small to look over the rail so I put my head through and looked down below. After that I was constantly singing “Deeply wailing, deeply wailing, shall their true Messiah see.” I didn’t always ‘see’ a connection between my faith and culture. In our daily lives it was the way we lived. God was just naturally the centre of our lives. West Indian black people just loved and reverenced God; we honoured Him; it was our way of life. Jesus’ words in Matthew 25:34 – 36 influenced my dad to become a medical doctor to serve his impoverished fellow black people. I watched him live out that service daily. Mom made sure she “trained up her children in the way we should go”; it was church at 8.30 and Sunday School at 3.00 p.m. every Sunday. At school I would watch the sunbeams dancing on the roof and remember that “Jesus wants me for a sunbeam to shine for Him each day”. In school I learned

about loving others as I loved myself and wondered how Jesus would make me a ‘fisher of men’? It was in school as a teenager that tears came to my eyes as we sang “There was a green hill far away beyond the city wall, where my dear Lord was crucified, who died to save us all.” It was the custom on Good Friday for children to be sent to see the movie “The Crucifixion” I was horrified! That evening, walking home, the others behind me, Jesus appeared before me on the cross. I was awash in tears as I vowed in my little eight year-old heart that I would never sin again to put Him on the cross. I became a new creature from that moment. I knew that my life had changed. I was happy! It was Grannie who’d told me about sin, the cross and salvation. I discovered the great Marcus Mosiah Garvey early but was also told that he was a ‘fraud’. I became a more curious but silent follower. Through Tim Hector’s “Fan the Flame” newspaper, I learned about his philosophies and they resonated deep within me. I never liked the uniforms of the UNIA but understand the need for identity he tried to engender in the oppressed then. Mr. Garvey influenced my life and work to keep Africa in the forefront of my activities and work among our people to set them free. “Africa for the Africans, those at home and Continued on page 45 Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 15


Quotes From The Philosophy & Opinions Of Marcus Garvey Garvey, A., 1986. The

Philosophy and Opinions of

Marcus Garvey. 1st ed. USA: The Majority Press.

Chance has never yet satisfied the hope of a suffering people. Action, self-reliance, the vision of self and the future have been the only means by which the oppressed have seen and realized the light of their own freedom. (p. 1)

Life is that existence that is given to man to live for a purpose, to live to his own satisfaction and pleasure, providing he forgets not the God who created him and who expects a spiritual obedience and observation of the moral laws that He has inspired. (p. 1) 16 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


When man fears a creature like himself he offends God, in whose image and likeness he is created. Man being created equal fears not man but God. (p. 3)

A man’s bread and butter is only insured when he works for it. (p. 5)

The whole world is run on bluff. No race, no nation, no man has any divine right to take advantage of others. Why allow the other fellow to bluff you? (p. 8)

Leadership means everything - PAIN, BLOOD, DEATH. (p.9) The Negro who lives on the patronage of philanthropists is the most dangerous member of our society, because he is willing to turn back the clock of progress when his benefactors ask him so to do. (p. 10) Men who are in earnest are not afraid of consequences. (p. 10)

If you have no confidence in self you are twice defeated in the race of life. With confidence you have won even before you have started. (p. 11) Mob violence and injustice have never helped a race or a nation, and because of this knowledge as gathered from the events of ages, we as a people in this new age desire to love all mankind, not in the social sense, but in keeping with the Divine Injunction “MAN LOVE THY BROTHER.” (p. 12) Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 17


Joseph the Film

18 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


JOSEPH the film is an AfricanCaribbean drama, produced by Step By Step Productions Inc. an Independent film making company in Barbados. JOSEPH is aimed at rebuilding relationships between Africa, the Caribbean and its other diasporic children. The movie will Premiere in Accra Ghana as a part of the calendar of the Ghana Year of The Return 2019. In this regard the Tourism Ministry in Ghana and the Committee responsible for the Year of The Return has undertaken the full planning of the Premiere, to be held on Saturday, December 7th, 2019. At the request of the Barbados International Film Festival (BIFF), JOSEPH will OPEN their festival, with a Premiere in Barbados on January 14th, 2020 e. In addition to the Ghana Premiere, the film will also have a Nigerian Premiere in January 2020. The release date in Nollywood is on January 24th, 2020. The film stars some of the very best talents of Jamaica and Barbados, featuring actors Kevoy Burton and Christopher MacFarlane (Jamaica) and Alison Hinds and Shontelle Layne (Barbados) The success of JOSEPH, which is also aimed at breaking into the Nollywood movie market, will open many doors in the Caribbean.

Africa is a huge continent with a vast market for products and services which have been developed in the Caribbean and which will naturally resonate in such markets. Also, as a Caribbean people, there is much we can glean from our rich African ancestry. Hence this movie is very well poised to foster change in our region. To date, Step By Step Productions Inc. has produced six (6) featurelength films all of which have reaped a measure of good success within their local markets and internationally. Their previous film Barrow – Freedom Fighter (a Docudrama) went on to win an African Movie Academy Award (AMAA), for Best Diaspora Documentary. The AMAA is Nollywood’s largest movie Awards. Barrow – Freedom Fighter screened the weekend of Nov 9th at the British Film Institute (BFI). p Dave & Marcia Weekes (Praise Academy & Step By Step) 246-262-7595 (Praise) 246-537-1104 (SBS) 246-268-1578 (C) 516-345-8066 (Magic Jack) www.stepbystepfilms.com Rent or Download our movies at Vimeo OnDemand links: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/chrissy https://vimeo.com/ondemand/ hush2endthesilence https://vimeo.com/ondemand/ hush3twistedinnocence

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 19


Church Leaders Introduce Members To The Life, Work And Teachings Of Marcus Garvey?

VOX POP

Should

Number of Responses: 39

Through Reggae music: 48.7%

Countries Represented - Majority were Jamaicans. Also from the USA, Canada, Britain, Nigeria, Zambia, Anguilla, Belize, and Grenada. Almost 70% are Jamaicans.

One person learned from the community, and one (an American) didn’t have a clue who he was.

How they learned about Marcus Garvey At home: 28.2% At School: 61.5% At Church: 5.1% Through Books: 59%

Question:

Do you think Church leaders should introduce members to the life, work and teachings of Marcus Garvey? Yes - 64.1% No - 12.8% Not Sure - 23.1%

“Why or why not?” Answers: (He was) a leader who believed in Christ Aspects of his philosophy are important in making theology truly liberatory for black people.

20 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


If the church can teach about Moses who led the Jews, why not Marcus who led black people and taught us to believe in ourselves? I am wondering about promoting the criminal side of his past. His teachings were very important and would help with social awareness which the church doesn’t address too often. That’s the work of historians, authors educators and the like. The church is about the life, work & teachings of Christ as delivered through the prophets, apostles and saints, whose message of Salvation transcend nationalities and races. The role of the church is to make disciples of Christ not Garveyism Being that Marcus Garvey was Pan-Africanist, he shows how churches in Black-majority countries could engage in constructive Pan-African politics. Marcus Garvey is a very important figure in African American History. It is only right for the people to understand those who were integral in fighting for justice and critique their methodology. An unchallenged religion is a faithless religion. The church is about God. Nothing else. If it has a bearing on the spiritual message being conveyed, then sure but otherwise no From the limited knowledge I have of Marcus Garvey, I don’t believe his teaching or belief reflect that of Christianity, as such the Church would not be the ideal place to teach his ideology.

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 21


I believe it’s appropriate to utilize any wholesome teaching on any life and measure it against God’s Word. I think it is wise to educate members of the church on who their national heroes are, what they have done and what their ideologies were. This does not mean that the church will adhere to their ideologies when they conflict with scripture. But, I believe that there is much to gain in introducing this to the members of our churches and in the meantime, showing where certain ideologies or philosophies do or do not adhere to biblical teachings (if there is such a conflict). Because Black people are ashamed of their African ancestry and suffer from self-hatred. They are also unable to relate to Marcus Garvey and have misconceived ideas about him. He was a committed Christian who believed in Jesus. He fought for social justice and was scorned. He should be celebrated in the church. Marcus Garvey said a people without a knowledge of their history is like a tree without roots. How can people say they are confident and secure in Christ when they are ashamed and uncomfortable about their history and expressing themselves in African Caribbean-ness and would rather emulate European cultural worship expressions because this is seen as somehow better. In the UK we have remembrance service and celebrate this who paved freedoms for us such as world war veterans who sacrificed their lives and died and we honour Winston Churchill who was prime minister. Despite his flaws. In the same way, we should honour Marcus Garvey who fought for our freedoms and racial injustice Marcus Garvey was a Christian as well as a Pan African Nationalist whose Christianity dutifully and effectively informed his worldview.

22 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


At some points, illustrations may be derived from Garvey’s work and life, but the question is, how does that connect with the central mission of preaching? What is the endgame? How would the hearer learn the scripture and the gospel of Christ more? How would the biblical ethic be taught effectively through the use of Garvey’s material and biography? Church leaders have a responsibility to speak prophetically. Part of that is being able to speak out against oppressive systems and to support the empowerment of the oppressed through a strong sense of identity as a people (of God). It depends on the context. My personal belief is that history is important to the church in all forms. The ‘black church’ in particular needs to be more aware of the figures who affected its trajectory (regardless of how controversial they are). This means a particular type of teaching that is honest about both the negatives and positives of influential figures. p

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Available on

print and Kindle version

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 23


by Jo-Ann Richards Goffe, Editor

Food Feature Our Jamaican Vegan Life I am vegan. So is my husband. In fact, so is my entire household now, since my mom’s battle with cancer last year. We are convinced that this is giving us the best chance at a healthy life. My first foray into the vegan life began in 2008. Near the beginning of the year, my medical doctor, as well as my counsellor, said I needed a long break. Tests revealed that there were a number of hormonal imbalances, quite likely caused by frequent long aeroplane trips without adequate time to recover in between. I was placed on 6 months’ leave. My only assignment was to get well! The 6 months were almost up, and I still didn’t feel 100% recovered. It was at that point that I was introduced to a book about raw veganism. Almost immediately I decided to try it. Within a fairly short period of time, my energy was restored and I was not only recovered but was restored to better than I was before. In addition to feeling better, the weight I had been trying to lose for some time was released, and in about 6 weeks, I dropped from a size 12 to a size 6! I have not remained raw vegan this entire time, but I have been fully vegan for the past 5 years. I’m so happy I met my life partner after this because it’s so much easier to share a life with someone who is on the same eating plan as you are. Here are a couple of our favourite recipes. We look forward to releasing a vegan recipe E-Book very soon so look out for it! p 24 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


Banana Chocolate ‘Nice’ Cream

Ingredients 2 large ripe bananas 2 Tablespoons cocoa powder Method 1. Slice bananas and lay slices flat in a ziplock bag and place in the freezer. 2. When banana slices are frozen solid, pulse in a food processor along with cocoa powder until smooth. 3. Serve and enjoy!

Sorrel Jam Ingredients 1 cup fresh/frozen sorrel 1 cup pitted dates 1/2 lemon 1 teaspoon ginger powder Pure Water to cover Method 1. Soak dates and sorrel in water overnight 2. Drain off the water (you may enjoy drinking it and it has many nutrients!) 3. Pulse all ingredients in a food processor until you have your desired consistency 4. Store in the refrigerator preferably in a glass jar. Use within a week. Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 25


Interview at Liberty Hall with

Dr. Shani Roper

In July the KW Magazine team met with Dr Shani Roper-Edwards, then Director of Liberty Hall in Kingston, Jamaica to have a chat with her about the path that prepared her for this role and her view of the Church’s interaction with the opinions and philosophies of Marcus Garvey. Dr Roper is no stranger to the editor-in-chief, as her dad (Dr Garnett Roper) was her pastor at the First Missionary Church in Kingston for 17 years. That being said, though, there is much that was unknown, that was revealed in this interview.

Dr Roper-Edwards holds a PhD in history from Rice University in Houston, Texas. She taught for a while in the US but felt that it wasn’t as fulfilling for her to be there as it would be for her here in her homeland. The issues that consumed the African American, 26 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

as she saw it, were not the same as the issues of her own Jamaican people and she didn’t want to get caught up in that world when she could be making a significant contribution at home. Since our chat with her, Dr Roper-Edwards has stepped into a new and equally exciting post at the University of the West Indies as the Curator of the UWI Museum. EARLY BEGINNINGS

Dr Roper-Edwards’ mom was a high school teacher and her dad was a pastor, who was also known to be an academic. In fact, he is currently the Principal of the Jamaica Theological Seminary. Their home was (she is the eldest of three children) what she calls a ‘Book House’. Their mom was big on literature and had them acting out books they read. Family devotions on Saturday mornings


involved the acting out of what they read. There were book exchanges between them and other families. She remembers one particular book that shaped her from early childhood and helped her to embrace her identity - “I am Me and You are You!” Their parents allowed each child to feel empowered in their individual skill sets. This led to their development as wholesome individuals. A strong appreciation for Jamaican culture was encouraged. KW - How did your father influence your approach to Jamaican culture? Dad took a social justice approach in his ministry and work and chose the path of empowerment of the African heritage. He saw that public theology was directly connected to socio-economics and historical and cultural perspectives. This, however, is not the perspective of the majority. “Too much of our Christian understanding is grounded in a colonial interpretation and therefore tied to negative stereotypes of blackness and black behaviour.” However, from a more positive standpoint, “Black Jamaican values are rooted in a spiritual worldview that is community-based.”

KW - Do church members access the information available at Liberty Hall? And do you think the church should teach about the philosophies of Marcus Garvey? Unfortunately, most don’t. I admit I’m not a specialist on the religiosity of Marcus Garvey. Religion was being used as a tool to oppress. It should empower! Also, we should not divorce the church and bible from our historical reality. The more accepting we are of our past, the more likely we are to be transformed in the future. KW - What would you encourage the church to do as a response to Marcus Garvey’s message? 1. Be honest. Acknowledge where we have failed. 2. See yourselves as products of the Jamaican society. Do not be engaged in the perpetuation of self-hate and negative stereotypes. 3. Acknowledge how past trauma affects current violence. The traumatic landscape of slavery continues to be perpetuated. Liberty Hall is a cultural and educational institution dedicated to educating the public about the philosophy and opinions of Marcus Garvey and translating how Garveyism plays out in the 21st Century. p Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 27


Feature Interview

with

Prof. Rupert Lewis

Reflections on

Garveyism & the Church Rupert Lewis is Professor Emeritus at the University of the West Indies, Mona. He is a political scientist who has published extensively on Marcus Garvey’s activities in Jamaica and the Caribbean region. His father was a Baptist minister, and both parents worked in the institutions of church and school in Port Antonio and surrounding environs, including Moore Town, the home of Nanny of the Maroons. This article is a summary of information gleaned from Professor Lewis in a conversation with KW Magazine, as well as from readings of some of his published works. Prof. Lewis started out by declaring that the church is in need of a refreshing so that the young people can find and anchor themselves. From his perspective, if we are not anchored in a set of values, we become like ‘flotsam and jetsam’; blowing in the wind and not good 28 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

for anything except to create rubbish. He identified three significant Africabased values as being Hospitality, Law (laws and structure to govern the society), and Gerontocracy (taking care of our elderly). Prof. Lewis is of the view that Jamaica needs to find herself, and that in spite of having Garvey as a National Hero, this has not yet happened. Although Prof. Lewis is knowledgeable on many issues concerning Garvey, the focus of our conversation was Religion, Christianity and the Church. Here are some of the matters we discussed: Were Garvey’s teachings and philosophies compatible with the teachings of the church? Garvey’s teachings were definitely connected with people’s faith. The black system of belief developed in


the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League was based primarily on Christian principles. However, he didn’t work on his own to construct a theology for the black race. Rather, he collaborated with theologians like Bishop McGuire from Antigua. They worked on reinterpreting Christian theology from the perspective of the millions of people in the African Diaspora. At one point they were seeking to establish the African Orthodox Church. As the movement developed, and as a result of internal discussions, Garvey realized that since people of African origins did not all adhere to one religious expression, they should not strive to establish one single theological doctrine. Among UNIA members, for example, there were believers in Islam.

able to learn anything significant about Garvey’s spirituality from her. He shared that Mrs. Garvey always pointed out that it was Garvey’s belief in the All-Mighty that inspired him to think and to do. He believed in the power of the human spirit, which was rooted in their faith in the AllPowerful. Although they rejected the colonial views of the church, they had a strong faith in the God of the Bible. In an aside about the role of women in the Garvey movement, he also identified Amy as being as strong an intellectual as Garvey. KW asked Prof. Lewis a loaded question: What could the church do to help Jamaica find herself? “The church needs to know itself,” said the professor. “You are a missionary of a special kind. We need more missionaries like you in the field who understand what is required in terms of People’s faith, their image of themselves and of their God.” There are a few but we need to achieve a critical mass of such persons. He said we need to continue to chip away at the iceberg … or hope (and pray) for a global warming that will supernaturally melt it!

- The conversation naturally wandered into an exploration of the Western representations of God and Christ, and how the colonial views robbed African-Caribbean people of their self-esteem. If God made us in His image, and God is always being depicted as being white, then what does that say about the black person?! We spoke of how humanity began in Africa, and that African-Caribbean Thank you Professor Lewis for the decades of work you have put in so people need to know this. that persons who grew up differently Prof. Lewis actually lived in the same can be influenced by your writings house with Garvey’s second wife - and subsequently contribute to the Amy Jacques Garvey from 1969-1973. positive change we believe with all our hearts will come. Notn no de we KW sought to know whether he was Gad kyaahn du! p Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 29


Top Ten Things to Know 1910 to 1912 1887

Birth & Early Education

1

Born on 17 August in St Ann’s Bay Jamaica the youngest child of a stonemason. He went to the local elementary school. He first experienced racism in grade school in Jamaica, primarily from white teachers. Working in the printery - At the age of 14 he left school and became a printer’s apprentice where he led a strike for higher wages.

1922

2

Travels abroad

He went to Honduras, Ecuador,Colombia, Venezuela, Panama, Costa Rica and London.

3

Publishing - He established a magazine named after George William Gordon’s ‘The Watchman’, he published 3 issues. While living in Costa Rica he established, Nation/La Nación, a bilingual newspaper. It was controversial and so upset many of the dominant strata of society in Limón. After his printing press broke, he was unable to replace the faulty part and terminated the newspaper.

Imprisonment in the United States

6

Arrested for mail fraud in connection with the sale of Black Star Line stock and sent to prison, he was later deported to Jamaica.

30 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

1927 to 1929

Ran for political office in Jamaica

7

Deported to Jamaica, he settled in Kingston with his wife Amy Jacques, continued his activism and established the People’s Political Party in 1929, briefly serving as a city councillor.


About Garvey

A Chain of Events In a Significant Life

1914

Formation of the U.N.I.A.

4

He returned to Jamaica founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). In 1916, Garvey moved to Harlem in New York where the UNIA thrived.

1935 to 1940

Migration to England and Death

8

In 1935, he moved permanently to London where he died on 10 June 1940.

1964

Declaration as Jamaica’s First National Hero

9

His bones were returned to Jamaica and buried in National Heroes’ Park.

1919

Black Star Liner & Repatriation to Africa

5

To facilitate the return to Africa that he advocated, in Garvey founded the Black Star Line, to provide transportation to Africa, and the Negro Factories Corporation to encourage black economic independence.

His Legacy

10

During all this, Garvey advanced a PanAfrican philosophy which Influenced world leaders and groups and inspired a global mass movement, known as Garveyism. Movements like the Black Panthers, The Nation of Islam, Rastafarianism, the independence of African states from European control are some of the results of Garveyism.

References: www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/garvey_marcus.shtml www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcus_Garvey Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 31


Sylvia Gilfillian

Educator & Author

KIDS CREW Black Like Me: Part 2

A young Jamaican girl learns to accept and love her dark skin

Characters: The child: Ebony The adults: Sandra and Robert Setting: Ebony’s family home off Washington Boulevard; Sandra’s car 32 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


Scene Sandra, Ebony’s mother, called her husband and asked him to go to Paul’s football match. He was irritated and made no effort to disguise his feelings.

“Cho Sandra. Don’t wi did agree dat mi wud get mi Satide aftanoon dem fi play domino wid mi fren dem? A wa? Yu figet…?” Sandra interrupted, “Robert, Ebony has been crying non-stop since she come home from practice and I can’t leave her by herself.”

“How yu mean yu kyaa leave har? She a girl pikini an girl pikini moody an love fi cry. Lef di pikini an galang go pick-up Paul. Is bad enough dat yu miss di match.” “Robert! Are you listening to yourself? Your daughter is crying because she was told at church that she is black! She just asked me if she is adopted!” “Look here Sandra, Ebony is black. That’s why we named her Ebony and you just need to give her a mirror and remind her that black is beautiful. Mi kyaa believe dat yu interrupt mi domino game fi dis!” Sandra hissed in her husband’s ear, “Just make sure to pick up Paul from the match. When you get home, I won’t be here. I am spending the night at Uncle Natty and I am taking Ebony with me.” Ebony was silent as her mother pulled out of their short driveway and made the left turn on to the main road. She was driving fast and Ebony noticed that her mother’s normally pleasant face was tight with anger. This made her feel sad and guilty because she felt like she was responsible, and she did not know what to do. After the silence stretched between them for a while, Ebony took up her tablet from the seat where she had placed it and began to play a game. Soon she was caught up in popping bubbles, crashing sounds and flower petals. She quickly became completely engrossed in the game and did not respond when her mother first spoke.

“Ebony, do you know why we gave you your name?” Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 33


“Yes,” Ebony answered guardedly, wondering why her mother had asked the question. Her mother soon continued. “Do you wish we had given you another name?”

“Sometimes” “Why?” “I looked up Ebony on Google and it is black. I wish I didn’t have to think about black all the time.” “My darling child, do you think that there is something wrong with being black?” Ebony did not answer immediately, and her mother glanced at her briefly before turning her eyes back to the road. When she finally spoke, her voice trembled. “Mommy, you and Daddy are always telling me that I am beautiful but I don’t feel beautiful.” Sandra was at a loss for words and so she reached for Ebony’s hand and squeezed it. Ebony continued, “Mommy, yu nuo se Granny love Paul more dan shi lov me? Mi hear har tell Aunty P dat shi no believe me is har son pikni.” They were passing the Manor Park Plaza and Sandra made a sudden right turn and pulled into a parking space. The driver behind her had yelled something when she made the turn but Sandra ignored him. When she turned off the car and swivelled her body towards her daughter, she saw that her mother was crying. Sandra pulled Ebony into her arms, Ebony wrapped her arms around her mother’s neck and the two of them wept for many minutes. Sandra was the first to stop crying and after she pulled tissues from the glove compartment and began to dry her daughter’s tears she began to talk softly to her child. Ebony hung on to her every word, her eyes unblinking.

“I know exactly how you feel. As you can see, I am the darkest of all of my 34 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


brothers and sisters. Mama and Daddy never treated me any way bad but Daddy had a sister who didn’t like me and told me to my face that I wasn’t a part of her family because they were brown and pretty.” Ebony was so surprised that she blurted, “Mommy, she mos did blind or sopm. Afta yu no black!”

“To her, I was.” Ebony shook her head. This black thing was so confusing. She took her mother’s right hand and placed it on the seat next to her left hand. Her hand was blueblack while her mother’s hand was dark brown, the colour of tamarind balls and dark sugar.

“Look de Mommy. My hand is black and your hand is brown. We are not the same.” Sandra’s response was, “Do you see anything in common with our hands?” Ebony looked closely at the two hands on the seat and saw for the first time that their fingers and nails were the same shape. After another moment of shared silence, Sandra pulled her daughter into a close embrace, kissed her forehead and declared very firmly, “Ebony, this problem is bigger than we are and we cannot solve it today. Mek wi kom gwaan up a Uncle Natty go eat some cane and see if him kyan help wi fi mek sense outa nonsense.” v1 (To be continued). p

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 35


“AFRICA FOR THE AFRICANS... AT HOME & ABROAD” “Afrika fi di Afrikan dem... a yaad an a farin” 36 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 37


The

Black

African Bloom To The Rt. Excellent, Marcus Mosiah Garvey Sung: We need a black flower; a lovely black flower. Send a black flower; strong African flower. In a greenhouse, in the garden or in the pot, Cultured or wild, foliage green, flowers colourful -purple and shades; -yellow and shades; -blue and shades; -pink and shades -red and shades, and even white! But where is the black flower growing naturally? Is the sun too hot for black or its shadow sin, evil and death? We need a Black Flower to remind us of our African roots: to remind us of ANGOLA, CONGO, NIGERIA, IVORY COAST, SIERRA LEONE, GUINEA, GAMBIA, and SENEGAL! We need a Black Flower to remind us of the slave ships: HANNIBAL, AMISTAD, the ZONG and the GEORGE! We need a Black Flower To depict the coffles and the chains; the resistance, the struggle for freedom in the Americas and the West Indies. We need a Black Flower To sing the songs of redemption; To sound the Abeng of the Black Princess – Nanny of the Maroons; To beat the drum of the Black Hero – Marcus Garvey! 38 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


We need a Black Flower (like scarlet poppy) To rise from - the grave of our History; -the grave of our Pride; -the grave of our Power; -the grave of our Culture; -the grave of our Confidence; -the grave of our Dignity! We need a Black Flower to speak of Black courage and Black power; We need a Black Flower to create positive images of black beauty. We need a Black Flower to erase distortions of the black skin and stop bleaching. We need a Black Flower to dispel negative associations of blackness. Yes, let the Black Flower remove the stain of brain-washed concepts of self. O Almighty JAH! Send us a Black Flower with Beautiful Black Petals, Bright Red Sepals; Let it sit on a Strong Green Salk. Let the Black Flower Disturb the prejudices, the hate and the rejection. Let the Black Flower call for Reparation & Repatriation As well of the exoneration of Marcus Garvey. Let the Black Flower – “THE BLACK AFRICAN BLOOM”: Proclaim Freedom, Freedom, Freedom Let the Black Flower bloom, If only in my dream, my dream, my dream! Sung We need a black flower; a lovely black flower. Send a black flower; black African flower. We need a black flower; a lovely black flower. p © 2014[P2019] Errol D. Bean Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 39


Devotional SUP OR INF

NO

40 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

ERIORITY


M

en and women of Liberty Hall, men and women of my race, do you know that the God we love, the God we adore, the God who sent His Son to this world nearly two thousand years ago never created an inferior man? That God we love, that God we worship and adore has created man in His own image, equal in every respect, wheresoever he may be; let him be white’ let him be yellow; let him be red; let him be black; God has created him the equal of his brother. He is such a loving God, He is such a merciful God. He is such a God that He is no respecter of persons, that He would not in His great love create a superior race and an inferior one. The God that you worship is a God that expects you to be the equal of other men. The God that I adore is such a God and He could be no other. Some of us seem to accept the fatalist position, the fatalist attitude, that God accorded to us a certain position and condition, and therefore there is no need trying to be otherwise. The moment you accept such an attitude, the moment you accept such an opinion, the moment you harbor such an idea, you hurl an insult at the great God who created you, because you question Him for His love, you question Him for His mercy. God has created man, and has placed him in this world as the lord of the creation, as the sovereign of everything that you see, let it be land, let it be sea, let it be the lakes, rivers and everything therein. All that you see in creation, all that you see in the world, was created by God for the use of man, and you four hundred million black souls have as much right to your possession in this world as any other race. Created in the image of the same God we have the same common rights, and today I trust that there will be a spiritual and material resurrection among Negroes everywhere; that you will lift yourselves from the doubts of the past; that you will lift yourselves from the slumbers of the past, that you will lift yourselves from the lethargy of the past, and strike out in this new life - in this resurrected life - to see things as they are. p

(Excerpt from THE RESURRECTION OF THE NEGRO, Easter Sunday Sermon Delivered at Liberty Hall, New York City, N. Y. April 16th, 1922. Taken from The Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey, p.89-90)

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 41


uestions with

C. RUTH TAYLOR (Author)

42 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

KW


Cameka Ruth Taylor is a prolific Jamaican Christian writer of non-fiction books such as the bestselling Design to Win Roadmap: Your Winning Life & Career Compass. She hails from St. Mary in rural Jamaica, and then moved to an inner city community in Kingston at the age of 10. I met her while she was a student at the Jamaica Theological Seminary, and she has been a constant source of inspiration since. We thought it was very relevant to focus on her for 11 questions in this issue, since Marcus Garvey also was a writer.

1

What was your career goal growing up? Did you always want to be a writer? I wanted to be a Quality Control Chemist. No, I did not always want to be a writer although I wrote poems as a teenager and used the poems to make customized postcards which I sold. The Acting President of the Jamaica Theological Seminary, Dr. Dameon Black, in 2004 told me I had a gift to write. He encouraged me to do a Masters Degree that would enable me to write. A batch mate told me that she looked forward to my books in the future. It took 10 years before I wrote my first book.

2

What was the very first book that you wrote and published, and when? My first book was my autobiography, “Heartache Queen Unshackled,” published in January 2015. It is no longer in print. It emerged out of a tragedy of a broken relationship and a desire to turn my tragedy into triumph.

3

Which author is your greatest inspiration, and why?

I like so many authors but by virtue of what his book did for me, I would say Neil T. Anderson. His book “Victory Over the Darkness” is responsible for me being alive today. It delivered me from suicidal ideation as a teenager and helped in my identity formation. I aim to write books that bring healing and liberation to others like his book did for me. I also love Phillip Yancey.

4

Did anything in your family background prepare you for your present journey as a writer/publisher? Yes, I am a third generation teacher and my books are really recorded and organized teachings

5

What is the most fulfilling thing about what you do?

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 43


The testimonies of lives changed and activating people for greater service.

6

For a while you served locally and overseas with the international mission organization Operation Mobilization. What is your current mission, and how did you make the transition? My mission is to exalt God and empower people through authorship and authorpreneurship. As a missionary, my main responsibility was mobilizing Caribbean people to do global service. Through writing and publishing, I help to release Caribbean persons into global service (ministry) through their books. It is a continuation of the first mission. Prior to leaving OM, God gave me a new Design to Win, of which writing would be central to create impact multiplied. Four months before leaving OM, I penned my first book and published it five months after leaving.

7

How many books have you written and published so far?

I have written 16 books but have only officially published six at this point.

8

Which of your books would you say has had the greatest positive impact on you, and why? I would say “Keys to Win at Life.” Although I get great testimonies about the other books, this is the only book I know of thus far which has led 44 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

someone to Christ, and changed the reader’s life exponentially. In fact, the keys from this book are what I live by and are responsible for my success.

9

This issue of the KW Magazine is about Garvey, Garveyism and the Church. Do you see any connection between Garvey’s work and yours?

Absolutely! I am writing and publishing to continue the legacy of Garvey. I am honored to be featured alongside him in this magazine. As a publisher, Garvey highlighted the stories and accomplishments of our people. As a writer and publisher, I am doing the same and empowering our people to become economically independent through writing. By sharing stories of our accomplishments like Garvey did, I am helping to change the narrative about our people. We are a resource, a mission force and not just a mission-field.

10

I have heard you say that you don’t intend to continue publishing forever. What is your vision for the future?

I don’t intend to take on the everyday tasks involved in publishing for others forever but I will always publish my own books. I want to teach more people of the Caribbean, Latin America and


Africa to publish independently, so they can amplify their reach, increase their income and transform lives globally. My vision is to teach and create the systems for them to truly become successful Independent authors and publishers.

11

The final question - Is there a Bible verse or passage that you consider to be your life verse/passage?

Yes, it is Acts 20:24, “ I don’t care about my own life. The most important thing is to complete my mission, the work the Lord Jesus gave me –to tell people the Good News of God’s grace. p

Continued from page 15 - Edith God and Garvey those abroad.” His encouragement to slave descendants to return to Africa with our ‘knowledge, skills and resources to rebuild Africa’ remains a clarion call in my life to this day. I identified as an African at nine years old. I live as an African; I married African; I served God there as a missionary; its how I live and manifest my beliefs and culture. My mission in life as a disciple of Jesus Christ is to see people free. Isaiah 61:1-4 is the mission the Lord has given me to do, and like Jesus, my meat - what satisfies me - is to do the will of my Father and to finish the work He has called me to do. I thoroughly enjoy this enriching mission. As the church of the West Indies, the teachings of Marcus Mosiah Garvey should be part of our theological studies so that our people can be taught the reality of our need to know our history and cultures and how to live it out in a

confident reality of Emancipation. “A people without the knowledge of their history and culture is like a tree without roots.” Garvey’s words largely describe our people. The church needs to rediscover Garvey’s teachings. As a Christian and seeing his people’s suffering, his vision was to ‘set the people free’ by opening their eyes to their condition. It was his God-given vision. Marcus Garvey’s teachings brought good news to the poor; it lifted hearts damaged by slavery; it liberated captives and prisoners of ignorance and lies, so that the joy of liberation might fill our African hearts. This is the mission of the church; it was Mr. Garvey’s mission and it is my calling also. We the church must teach the people the truth. p Edith Oladele, President, African Slave Memorial Society, Antigua & Barbuda Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 45


Testimony

A CREWShall

Worship that makes a “Cognitive” Dance 46 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


I watched a TV interview with my friend Jo-Ann Richards-Goffe, as she extolled the importance of worship in one’s heart language. When Jo-Ann speaks on this matter her passion shines through, and she has done so for a long time. One of the first local Christian advocates for the use of Jamaican Patwa in Bible translation, Jo-Ann has championed the cause of culturally relevant worship, even when she has had to go it alone. Thankfully, today, many have caught her vision, and her bandwagon, though not yet crowded, is filling up nicely. Jo-Ann was one of my lecturers in the Department of Bible and Theology at the Jamaica Theological Seminary, first when I served as HOD and then as Academic Dean. I distinctly remember her “Theology and Practice of Christian Worship” classes back in the day, when her students were required to compile worship songs done in Patwa and used in their churches. I am not certain what sort of improvements to those numbers have taken place over the years, but I am confident that there has been an increase since then. Her passion seems to be finally paying off as her name is

becoming more well known, with her Kom Mek Wi Worship albums and magazine, CREW 40:4, as well as the daily Patwa Bible Reading videos on social media. I know that Jo-Ann’s passion is not in her growing popularity, but in the fact that her project for culturally relevant worship is becoming more widely accepted. Seeing her passion in the interview made me think a bit about myself and my ideas on Jo-Ann’s concerns for culturally relevant worship. You see, I am not the worship type that is tickled pink by the experience in church, though, given my complexion that might not be difficult if indeed I am moved by the activity. I am much more cognitively inclined, and spend most of my time in church impatiently waiting on the preacher to come, and then deeply analyzing the sermon for its Biblical and theological accuracy. I am also very mindful of the preacher’s ability to connect with the congregation, often picking apart the devices employed to gain and then keep a hearing from the easily distracted bunch. If given the opportunity I would discuss for hours on end the virtues of what was said and how it could be better said to capture the intent of the text. I simply love opportunities in Church to interact with the preacher in an Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 47


attempt to understand exactly what s/he meant by a particular comment or point and how that relates to the text quoted. If given the opportunity when I preach, I offer that interactive pleasure to the congregation with excited expectancy. Such is my joy at church. Yet, it almost amuses me to see myself in my mind’s eye relating (or not relating) to the praise and worship experience as it unfolds. I generally bristle at the commands of worship leaders that I sit, stand, raise hands, or do anything else. “Worship should be spontaneous!” That’s my excuse for standing (or sitting still), or for reading as other sing, or even “watching my eye lids.” The last activity seems to have become more prevalent over time, given the number of occasions my wife has poked me in the ribs to get awake (She does not buy my explanation that I am listening and concentrating). I have heard all the rebukes, especially the ones that I find worship boring because I come to church expecting to get and not to give and that I am too focused on those around me and not on God. The truth is, whether or not those rebukes are true, I find much of the worship songs employed in church much too romanticized and effeminate; they are just not for me, who finds the male image 48 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

of God lovingly hugging me a bit too off-putting. And so, as I see myself again I see a figure whose mind is way off somewhere over yonder, anxiously awaiting the end of the long and meaningless worship experience. And then - something happens to the picture. The worship ban strikes up a reggae tune with its heavy bass line. “The lion, of Judah, has broken the chain…” In the picture I am suddenly moving, swaying to the beat, lifting my right hand and pointing to heaven as the lyrics unfold, “…and given us the victory again and again.” My mind goes back to that song we used to sing back in the day: “My my my my my my my my my my my my my my Lord is sweet (Rep). My Lord is sweet, my Lord is sweet, My Lord is sweet, my Lord is sweet, My Lord is - sweeeeet.” The song goes into its heavy dancehall beat and in comes the Patwa lyrics: “Suga nuh sweet such, ackee nuh sweet suh, not even cherry pon di cherry tree. Sweeter dan suga, sweeter dan spice, fi mi Jesus im so nice” (or something like that). There is really something about our heart language that when it connects with our expressions of God it moves you – or at least me. And here is the thing: often as I endure my boring worship


experience, at least when I can keep my eyes open, I look around and notice that many men seem to feel the same way I do. They stand stiffly with their arms folded, and largely seem unmoved. Yet, when the reggae beat hits them they can’t help being carried along by the music. Could it be that there is indeed hope in worship for “cognitives” like me? Can it be literally true that men can spontaneously dance in church without a thought as to whether or not the lyrics are too feminized? I still do have a problem with feminized and trite worship, but I must confess that when I experience worship in the

musical genre most familiar to my culture, utilizing lyrics of my heart language, I do find it easier to freely participate in the activity. It is with all of the above in mind that I join in Jo-Ann’s call for more authentic Jamaican worship, which utilizes the music and language of our people. As we do it let us also write about our experiences with God in all aspects of our lives. I suspect that as such becomes our preferred mode of worship many more of us will find the experience that much richer. p David Pearson Theologian, Lecturer, Missionary to Tobago

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 49


Continued from page 9 - Black Panther the United States of America, I am made to understand that I am a “nigger.” If the Englishman claims England as his native habitat, and the Frenchman claims France, the time has come for 400 million Negroes to claim Africa as their native land... If you believe that the Negro should have a place in the sun; if you believe that Africa should be one vast empire, controlled by the Negro, then arise.” — Garvey, August 1920 [355] Themes in Garveyism addressed in The Black Panther

The film rattles the ‘Colonialist Cage’ exhibiting Wakanda, a utopic future Africa, as a selfdetermined leader alongside other nations via technological advances and shrugs off any hint of past servitude. We are introduced to a diversity of African cultures: Dahomey, Ethiopian, Himba, Igbo, Lesotho, Masai and Zulu. Secondly, strong women have been portrayed centre stage alongside leading men in Wakanda. They were the vanguard of the nation, in charge of warfare. It was beautiful to see warrior women who love and respect their men and who still are ‘a whole lotta woman.’ A failure of the Wonder Womanesque Amazonian way in my opinion. Characteristically African women supported Garvey vigourously. The contribution His 50 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

wife Amy Jacques Garvey no less so. Also, sustainable reclamation and retention of African pride and heritage is another Garveyian theme. Wakanda is the wealthiest nation in the Marvel universe this is dramatic irony, as this is not untrue of Africa, which has the most mineral wealth and natural resources but sadly has been plundered by the rest of the world and left to die. Wakanda projects, what Africa can be if left to self-determination. “Wakanda forever” echoes battered pride and irrepressible hope. Is racism still on the horizon? Yes, we still are bashing at the proverbial glass ceiling in Hollywood through boycotting the underrepresentation of people of colour in films plus lack of recognition of their work in Oscars. We are still unpacking White on Black racism and reverse racism of Blacks on Whites. The roles of Serkis and Freeman are sociologically important to evenly showcase the spectrum of human reality that regardless of the race there are good (Freeman as Everett K Ross) and evil (Serkis as Klaw) people in the world. As believers, we must have a biblically-based, righteous response to social injustice and discrimination, following the pattern of Christ.


We must fill the vacuum of anger and abandonment within the Black American diaspora, (the ‘Killmongers’ among us) with love.

any other people group on the planet. The African continent is vast, rich, and diversified in topography, climate, culture and peoples. Acknowledgement that Furthermore, humility and courage Pan Africanism is are needed to undeniably right and accept that there’s vision necessary for the an (Everett K. Ross) Garvey’s survival of the African out there and work for an African peoples; as much with him towards is now as any other people a better future. As utopia group ought to have Garvey did in print accepted into pride in itself and its media, politics and business, the popular heritage. pioneering African Caution Our American directors/ narrative... benchmark for living producers Spike cannot be outside Lee, Tyler Perry of biblical precepts: and Oprah, among others, have Other standards are susceptible made significant steps but more to human error of judgement. is needed to get us over the God’s perspective of the world is line. Many more Black-owned singularly and supremely just. The banks and financiers, lawyers and human measure is faulty; shaped politicians, judges, in short not by greed, oppressive, unjust, just athletes and entertainers but biased, discriminatory, susceptible more Black representation around to failure etc… Only One God, who the executive boardroom table, is died for One World, can restore needed. The Brotherhood Of Man, JESUS CHRIST! p Things to take away from the film are: Africans are beautiful, By Angela B. Slack complex, creative, intelligent, educator, curriculum/ sophisticated and have a diversity literacy specialist, technical author, editor and publisher. of things to offer the world like

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 51


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F©6

Ó

™ œ œ œj œ ™ ™

Yah- weh,

Yah- weh, Yah- weh,

round 2

B ## & # ## ™™ Ó

17

G©‹

C©‹

Ó

œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ

You're the on-ly God I wor- ship.

# # C©‹ & # ## œ ˙

23

life to.

D©‹

F©‹

G©‹

Ó œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ

You're the on-ly God I sing to.

You're the on-ly God I give my

round 3

™™ Œ œ œ ‰ j œ Œ œ œ ‰ œ œj œj ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ F©6

I

wor-ship

F©6 ## & # ## œ œ œ œ œ

28

You are ho - ly!

You, my Lord!

D©‹

Œ œ œ œ œ

Om - ni-po- tent!

C©‹

G©‹

B

Om-ni-po- tent!

Om-ni-sci- ent!

Om-ni-pre- sent!

‰ œ œj œj ‰ œ œ œœœ œ F©6

C©‹

G©‹

Œ œ œ œ œ

Om - ni-sci- ent!

Om - ni-pre- sent!

You are ho - ly!

round 4 B ## & # ## ™™ ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ

33

Œ

You can do a - ny- thing,

# # D©‹ & # ## ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ

37

G©‹

Œ

œ œ œ œ œ

You know ev ery - thing,

œ œ œ œ œ

You can do a - ny- thing,

œ œ œ œ

You know ev ery - thing,

Œ

œ œ œ œ œ

œ

You are ev ery- where, You are

ho - ly!

F©6

C©‹

G©‹

Œ

F©6

C©‹

œ œ œ œ

œ

™ œ œ œ œ œ ™

You are ev ery- where, You are

ho - ly!

Dancehall round 5

G©‹ ## & # ## œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œJ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ ‰ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œJ ‰

41

B

C©‹

Po-wa-ful Gad, a Yuu ron tingz! Fos an di laas, Yu a di King of Kings! Po-wa-ful Gad, a Yuu ron tingz!

D©‹ G©‹ # # F©‹ ™ & # ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ‰

44

Fos an di laas, Yu a di King of Kings! Po-wa-ful Gad, a Yuu ron tingz! Fos an di laas, Yu a di King of Kings!

B ## & # ## œ œ œ

47

Ϫ

Po - wa - ful Gad,

œ œ

œ

œ J

a Yuu ron tingz!

52 | KW Magazine Jan 2020

G©‹

œ œ

Fos an

œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ

di laas, Yu

of Kings!

a

di King

œ J

™™


Iemen (Amen) JoAnn Richards, score by James Gilliland of DiverseChurchMusic.com

Nyabinghi

verse (a capella)

# #4 U µ j j Œ Œ j j j j &#4Ó ‰ j œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ ˙ œ œ œœ œ œ œ ˙ A

Voice

Mi ier

ev - ri- ting in - a

evn

an

ev - ri ting pon di ort

## j j ™ & # œ ™ œ œ œ œj ‰ œ™ œj w œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œœ

7

an- da

## &#

13

di ort

an

ev - ri ting we de

in - a

di sii

‰ j œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ

po-wa tu di Wan, we

si- dung pon di

## &# œœ œœœœœ

18

˙

A

œ œ œ œ œœœ

Wi gi priez an an-a an A

œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœ œ

chruon

Wi gi priez an an-a an

‰ j œ

po-wa tu di Wan, we

œ™ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œœ œ œ œ œœ

si dung pon di chruon,

Œ

sing

Œ

ev - ri ting we de

chorus

Ó

D

˙

an

an wi gi priez tu di Lamb tu,

yes, wi gi priez tu di Lamb tu,

verse A ## Œ Œ ‰ j j j & # œ™ ‰ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

23

priez Im fi

## &#

29

˙

Œ

e-va an e- va

evn

an

ev - ri ting pon di ort

## & # œ ™ œ œ œ œ™ œj w E

in - a

di sii

## &# ˙

Œ

j j œ œ œœ œ œ œ ˙

35

41

priez Im fi

Œ

Ó Œ

sing

e-va an e- va

an

ev - ri ting we de

an da

di ort

chorus A

œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœ œ

Wi gi priez an an-a an

Wi gi priez an an - a an

ev - ri ting in - a

j j j‰ j j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

A

œœ œ œ œœœ

Mi ier

œ œœœ œ

po-wa tu di Wan,

an

ev - ri ting we de

‰ j œ œœ œœ œœœ

po-wa tu di Wan, we

si dung pon di chruon

‰ j œ œœœœœœœ we

˙

œ œœ

si dung pon di chruon,

an wi gi

A ## Œ & # œ œ œ œ œ œ™ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ ‰ œ™ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œœ

46

D

priez tu di Lamb tu,

## &# œ œ œ

yes, wi gi priez tu di Lamb tu,

52

e - va an

## &#

56

œ œ œ e - va

œ

Œ

Œ

priez Im fi

ending

œ

Œ

œ

Œ

Ie - men,

e-va an e- va

priez Im fi

E

œ

Œ

œ

Œ

œ

Ie - men,

Ie -

repeat ending twice A

œ

men,

Œ

Œ

œ

E

œ œ œ œ

A

œ

Ie - men, Ie - men, Ie - men

Œ

Œ

E

œ

œ

Ie - men,

Œ

Œ

A

œ

œ

Œ

Ó

Ie - men.

Jan 2020 KW Magazine | 53


54 | KW Magazine Jan 2020


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Profile for Jo-Ann Faith Richards

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KW Magazine Jan 2020  

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