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2009-10 | IMAGESWILLIAMSONCOUNTY.COM

WILLIAMSON

COUNTY TENNESSEE

SAVING GREEN BY GOING GREEN Franklin’s sustainability plan takes root

SOUND KITCHEN GETS ITS GROOVE BACK

What’s s e Online McLemore House honors black community

View From the Top Franklin, Williamson County make national ‘best places’ lists

SPONSORED BY THE WILLIAMSON COUNTY–FRANKLIN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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WILLIAMSON COUNTY

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TENNESSEE SENIOR EDITOR SUSAN CHAPPELL COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, JESSY YANCEY STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS SHARON H. FITZGERALD, LAURA HILL, JOE MORRIS, JESSICA MOZO DATA MANAGER CHANDRA BRADSHAW EXECUTIVE INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER MARY ANN STAFFORD SALES SUPPORT MANAGER CINDY HALL SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN McCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, IAN CURCIO, J. KYLE KEENER PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT MANAGER ANNE WHITLOW CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS MELISSA BRACEWELL, KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, CANDICE SWEET, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER JESSICA MANNER GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, ALISON HUNTER, JANINE MARYLAND, AMY NELSON, MARCUS SNYDER WEB IMPLEMENTATION DIRECTOR ANDY HARTLEY WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR FRANCO SCARAMUZZA WEB PROJECT MANAGER YAMEL RUIZ

PICTURE PERFECT We’ve added even more of our prize-winning photography to the online gallery. To see these photos, click on Photo Gallery.

WEB DESIGN CARL SCHULZ WEB PRODUCTION JENNIFER GRAVES COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN TWILA ALLEN AD TRAFFIC MARCIA MILLAR, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN

RELOCATION Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./SALES TODD POTTER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS V.P./CUSTOM PUBLISHING KIM NEWSOM MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS BILL McMEEKIN MANAGING EDITOR/COMMUNITY KIM MADLOM PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS

VIDEOS

RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY SIMPSON DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH

In our Interactive section, watch quick videos by our editors and photographers featuring people, places and events.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR YANCEY TURTURICE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE SALES SUPPORT RACHAEL GOLDSBERRY SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR RACHEL MATHEIS EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

FACTS & STATS

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

Go online to learn even more about: • Schools • Health care • Utilities • Parks • Taxes

LOCAL FLAVOR From the simple to the sublime, the delicious offerings here are guaranteed to satisfy every appetite.

ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Williamson County gives readers a taste of what makes the region tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts.

Williamson County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Williamson County-Franklin Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Williamson County-Franklin Chamber of Commerce 134 Second Ave. N. • Franklin, TN 37064 Phone: (615) 794-1225 • Fax: (615) 790-5337 www.williamson-franklinchamber.com VISIT WILLIAMSON COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESWILLIAMSONCOUNTY.COM ©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

Magazine Publishers of America

Member

“Find the good – and praise it.”

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– Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

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Custom Publishing Council

Member Williamson County-Franklin Chamber of Commerce

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2009-10 EDITION | VOLUME 23

WILLIAMSON COUNTY

TENNESSEE

CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S

WILLIAMSON COUNTY BUSINESS 22 Just What the Doctor Ordered

8 VIEW FROM THE TOP Franklin and Williamson County are regulars on national “best places” lists.

10 FRANKLIN GETS A FACELIFT Renovation projects energize downtown.

Williamson County grows as a regional hub for health care.

24 Biz Briefs 27 Chamber Report

D E PA R TM E NT S

12 GOLDEN OPPORTUNITIES Activities keep seniors on the move.

6 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Williamson County’s culture

14 SAVING GREEN BY GOING GREEN Franklin’s sustainability plan takes root.

16 SMART CHOICES Educational options set the county apart.

19 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Williamson County

32 Sports & Recreation 33 Health & Wellness 34 Education 37 Community Profile: facts, stats

35 SOUND KITCHEN GETS ITS GROOVE BACK Legendary recording studio takes innovative approach to music business.

and important numbers to know

39 Membership Directory 51 Business Guide 64 Photo Finish

All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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ON THE COVER Cool Springs Photo by Jeffrey S. Otto

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Room To Roam Franklin has a wellmanicured park to suit any need, whether you’re looking for organized sports, walking trails, picnic pavilions – or just a fun place to hang out with the kids. The city is home to 10 parks, including the Jim Warren Skate Plaza – a 16-foot, kidney-shaped skate bowl for in-line skaters and skateboarders. Pinkerton Park on Murfreesboro Road is the most-used passive park, with a one-mile paved pedestrian trail, playground equipment, pavilions and picnic tables. The 85-acre Liberty Park features three tournament-play baseball fields, and upgrades completed in 2009 include walking trails, a playground and a nine-hole disc golf course.

Spreading the Word History Worth Revisiting Preserving Franklin’s heritage and open space is high on the city’s list of priorities, and Franklin’s Charge takes an active role. Organized in 2005, the nonprofit organization brought together all preservation groups operating in the county. Its members work to spread the word about Civil War events in Middle Tennessee, while also participating in heritage tourism, Civil War history programs and preservation efforts. Franklin’s Charge hosted its third annual Civil War Symposium in June 2009. For more information, visit www.franklinscharge.com.

Happy 20th, Thompson Station Church. From just a handful of people in Thompson’s Station’s community center in 1989, the Southern Baptist-affiliated church has grown to a weekly average of 1,800 worshippers. “The way we grew was by loving the individual,” says Executive Pastor Duane Murray. “Our primary key to success over 20 years was working through small groups and focusing on prayer.” As the church has grown, so have its outreach efforts. In 2008, 13 church teams went on mission trips from Nicaragua to India, eastern Asia to southern Louisiana. In addition to local efforts, more than 20 national and international trips are planned in 2009. For more information, visit www.thompsonstationchurch.org.

Ring It Up CoolSprings Galleria in Franklin is already a premier regional shopping destination, with more than a million square feet anchored by Belk, Dillard’s, JC Penney, Macy’s and Sears. Now the hub is getting a major new addition – an upscale, open-air shopping, dining and entertainment destination featuring about 200,000 square feet of new retail space, including sit-down restaurants and pedestrian-friendly walkways. The opening of the first phase of The District at CoolSprings Galleria, developed by CBL & Associates Properties Inc., is anticipated in 2011.

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Almanac

What’s Cookin’ at Carnton? Carnton Plantation is probably best known as the setting of Robert Hicks’ best-selling novel, Widow of the South, but another book out of Carnton is generating some positive press. View From the Porch: A Collection of Recipes From Friends of Carnton cookbook – with a foreword by Hicks – features 150 recipes, including an obscure recipe for Carnton Pickles that was found in a 1945 Louisiana cookbook and traced back to the Carnton Plantation. There are also eight recipes that Carrie McGavock, lady of the house in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, submitted to Nashville’s Centennial Celebration in 1897. Each entry shares a story about the plantation, and never-before-published photos fill the pages.

Williamson County At A Glance

Fast Facts

POPULATION (2008 ESTIMATE) Franklin: 56,587 Williamson County: 172,252 Williamson County (2013): 199,801

Q Williamson County is home to Nissan North America’s $100 million headquarters.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Williamson County-Franklin Chamber of Commerce 134 Second Ave. N., Franklin, TN 37064 Phone: (615) 794-1225, (800) 356-3445 Fax: (615) 790-5337 E-mail: info@wcfchamber.com www.williamson-franklinchamber.com

LOCATION Williamson County is just south of Nashville, in the scenic, rolling hills of Middle Tennessee. BEGINNINGS The city of Franklin was founded in 1799 and named for Benjamin Franklin. The famous American patriot was a good friend of Continental Congress member Dr. Hugh Williamson, for whom the county was named.

What’s Online e Take a virtual tour of Williamson County, courtesy of our award-winning photographers, at imageswilliamsoncounty.com.

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Q A fleet of trolleys operated by the Franklin Transit Authority, with clean-burning bio diesel fuel, helps shuttle people around the city. Q More than 25 national and international companies have their headquarters in Williamson County. Q The Factory at Franklin is one of the area’s most popular places for shopping, dining and entertainment.

College Grove Williamson County

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View From

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FRANKLIN AND WILLIAMSON COUNTY ARE REGULARS ON ‘BEST PLACES’ LISTS

What’s Online e Hear the story of Civil War Capt. Tod Carter in our quick video. Visit imageswilliamsoncounty.com.

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STORY BY JESSICA MOZO

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cultural landscapes and a strong commitment to historic preservation and revitalization. The honor did not surprise Mark Shore, executive director of the Williamson County Convention & Visitors Bureau. “Franklin is a place that engages the mind and warms the heart,” Shore says. “Our people value our strong sense of place and love to share it. It’s an honor for Franklin to make this distinguished list. Those who have visited will understand why Franklin was chosen. Those who have yet to stop in should consider this their invitation.” In 2008, Franklin also had the distinction of being the first city in the state to receive a Civil War marker as part of the Civil War Trails program, which lists sites in Virginia, North Carolina, Maryland, West Virginia and Tennessee in driving tours of Civil War sites. The marker is located in the center of Franklin’s town square and highlights the 1864 Battle of Franklin. The Williamson County Convention & Visitors Bureau expects it to bring even more visitors to the area.

JEFF ADKINS

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he secret’s out: Williamson County is one of the best places to live in the country. When Southern Living readers voted Franklin the fifth Best Small Town in America in the magazine’s January 2009 issue, people across the nation learned something Williamson County residents have known all along – this is a place where the good life isn’t just a pipe dream. It’s a reality. “Franklin and Williamson County have a lot going for them – a great location, beautiful landscapes, outstanding educational opportunities, a vibrant economy and a preservation ethic,” says Julian Bibb, an attorney with Stites & Harbison PLLC and a Williamson County resident since 1974. “But the most important attribute is the people in our community. They’re friendly and they have an entrepreneurial spirit. They have a great work ethic, and many are involved in community building. They’re compassionate and reach out to the underserved. And they care deeply about the well-being of the community at large.” Southern Living isn’t the only national publication to take notice of Franklin and Williamson County lately. The accolades just keep coming. In 2008, Money Magazine named Franklin among the top 50 on its annual list of Best Places to Live, while Forbes.com ranked Williamson County No. 10 on its list of the Best Places to Get Ahead. Money Magazine called Franklin “a rare blend of history and progress” and saluted the town’s thriving historic downtown, numerous corporate headquarters, affordable housing and charming history. Forbes.com cited Williamson County’s growing economy, hospitable business environment, and a median income boost of 18 percent since 2000. “The business climate in Williamson County is strong,” Bibb says. “Our county hasn’t been immune to the national market downturn, but our area isn’t suffering to the same degree as across the nation. We continue to have new businesses move into our area. People support each other’s efforts. There’s a great referral system among businesses in Williamson County.” The strong business climate is a good indication of why BusinessWeek, in March 2009, named Franklin one of the top 50 U.S. small cities in which to launch a business. The magazine used 11 factors such as affordability, quality of life and available talent pool to examine cities across the nation, and Franklin is the only city in Tennessee that made the cut. But there’s more. Franklin was also named to the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s annual Dozen Distinctive Destinations vacation list in 2009. The coveted Distinctive Destination title is presented to cities and towns across the country that combine dynamic downtowns, cultural diversity, attractive architecture,

Shoppers in downtown Franklin enjoy the sunny weather. Left: The Carter House in Franklin PHOTO BY BRIAN McCORD

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Franklin Gets a

Facelift

RENOVATIONS ENERGIZE AND BEAUTIFY DOWNTOWN

What’s Online e Take a tour of historic downtown Franklin in our quick video. Visit imageswilliamsoncounty.com.

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STORY BY LAURA HILL PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

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ramatic changes are taking place in downtown Franklin, with four major building and renovation projects underway that will change the city’s face. Perhaps most visually arresting is the city’s ambitious Streetscape project, a continuation of the major facelift Franklin underwent in the 1980s. That effort gave the city its attractive, historically inspired downtown streets and fostered the downtown area’s economic rebirth. The Gateway Corridors and Connector Streets Project, with a price tag of $4.3 million, extends that earlier work to Fifth Avenue from Main Street to Highway 96 West and along Third Avenue from the town square to the future site of the Bicentennial Park on Bridge Street. The project placed utilities underground, dressed up sidewalks with brick pavers at crosswalks, installed new “period” streetlights and planted new landscaping.

Beyond Beauty But the renovation is not just aesthetic in nature. Eighty percent of the budget went for sewer improvements, underground utilities and other essential infrastructure items. “Streetscape is a long-term investment in Franklin’s economic viability,” says city of Franklin Administrator Eric Stuckey. “We compete every day for jobs, investments, families moving here. What makes us competitive is Franklin’s uniqueness as a community – which things like Streetscape have made happen.” The Columbia Avenue corridor is the next Streetscape project. This is a complement, Stuckey says, to another major downtown project – construction of the city’s massive new police headquarters. Expected to be completed by the end of 2009, the new $26 million-plus facility will house all police functions, except a firing range and an emergency-vehicle training center. The 92,281-square-foot facility was

designed to grow with the community. “The decision was made to build a facility that would last 50 years out, but I think that we’re looking at 100 years out,” says Franklin Police Chief Jackie Moore. He is perhaps most proud of his new headquarters’ status as the first LEED-certified green public building in Williamson County. As the city’s newest public building goes up, its oldest public building is getting a new lease on life. The 1858 Williamson County Courthouse on the square has seen more than 150 years of life’s triumphs and tragedies, and it has been a vital part of the history of the community. So when the county built its new courthouse nearby, officials wanted to preserve the venerable building. “The commissioners and the community felt so strongly about preserving and protecting and reusing that facility,” says Rogers Anderson, Williamson County mayor. “It’s the right thing to do.” Improvements include the complete restoration of the historic courtroom on the third floor, which will continue to be used as a courtroom. The $7 million project also includes an elevated walkway to the new courthouse. The pride of Main Street, the old Franklin Theatre, is on its way to a new beginning, thanks to an ambitious project undertaken by the Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County. The foundation bought the 1937 theater building in October 2007 for $1,275,000. Now it will spend $3 million it has raised to renovate and expand the facility. The foundation hopes to reopen the theater in 2010 as a venue for live performances, films and events. “The theater opened in 1937 at the height of the Great Depression and is being redone in these very challenged economic times,” says Heritage Foundation Executive Director Mary Pearce. “Hopefully it will be a place to escape everyday troubles and be entertained by a film or live music.”

Historic buildings in downtown Franklin

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Golden

Opportunities FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS KEEP SENIORS ON THE MOVE

STORY BY CAROL COWAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

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hile young people these days keep in touch via social networking sites on the Internet, the 50-plus crowd in Williamson County has plenty of options for getting in on their own social networking scene. Through local entities FiftyForward, Williamson County Parks and Recreation centers, and the J.L. Clay Senior Citizens Center, seniors can get together with longtime friends and meet new ones while participating in interesting, fun, healthpromoting activities such as day trips, potluck dinners, personal enrichment and fitness classes, writers groups, bowling, and even Nintendo Wii video games.

Educational Options The opportunities available for vibrant mature living make Williamson County a great place for senior citizens. “We offer all kinds of educational programming,” says Gayle Bradley, center director for FiftyForward College Grove, one of two Williamson County centers affiliated with Nashvillebased private nonprofit organization FiftyForward. “We have an outstanding visual arts program in partnership with the Tennessee Association of Craft Artists. We have computer and financial planning classes, as well as history, genealogy and writers groups. “We are housed in a Williamson County Parks and Recreation facility that the department keeps in tip-top shape. The county really puts a lot of effort into providing services for College Grove,” Bradley continues. Facility amenities include a branch of the Williamson County Public Library and a health and wellness center that features a gymnasium and a workout room with weight machines and exercise equipment. Aerobics and yoga classes also are available. FiftyForward Martin Center is located on Heritage Way in Brentwood. The stunning wood and stone facility sits on five wooded acres and features fitness activities such as tai chi, yoga, pilates and line dancing, as well as games and a variety of enrichment classes. 12

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Annual fund-raisers, community support and partnerships with organizations such as United Way of Williamson County allow FiftyForward centers to keep membership rates affordable. Healthy Choices Williamson County Parks and Recreation likewise provides a wide variety of programs for mature adults at recreation centers in Franklin and Spring Hill. “We do a little bit of everything,” says Traci Hamby, senior coordinator for Williamson County Parks and Recreation. “We have day trips, aerobics, potluck and bingo nights, and we have two different exercise classes.” Aquamotion is a low-impact water exercise class that improves flexibility and eases arthritis pain. The Power Tools class focuses on strength training. The semiweekly classes meet at both centers and require no registration. Aquamotion costs $1 per session, and Power Tools costs $2 per session. Drop-in bowling at the Franklin Family Entertainment Center, a Nintendo Wii bowling league and the new Senior Lifestyle Enrichment Series of health education lectures provide additional outlets and resources for active senior living, Hamby says. The J.L. Clay Senior Citizens Center in Franklin also offers an array of enrichment programs. In addition to activities, Williamson County boasts numerous options for retirement housing, including The Heritage at Brentwood, Brighton Gardens of Brentwood, Legacy Crossing and The Manor at Steeplechase. And more are on the way, including luxury community The Club at Pleasant Creek, which comes to Thompson’s Station in 2010.

What’s Online e Check out the Williamson County Indoor Sports Complex in our quick video. Visit imageswilliamsoncounty.com.

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Clockwise from top left: An exercise class at Williamson County Recreation Complex; a card game at FiftyForward College Grove; an Aquamotion class at Longview Recreation Center; an art class at FiftyForward College Grove

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Saving Green

Going Green by

FRANKLIN’S PROGRESSIVE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN TAKES ROOT

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STORY BY JOE MORRIS

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oing green is going strong in Williamson County. Businesses and residents have long participated in recycling and other eco-friendly programs, and now the public sector is joining in. Building on its previous successes in energyuse reduction and similar policies, the city of Franklin is adopting a full-scale plan that will implement a wide range of energy-saving efforts throughout the community. The Alternative Fuel & Energy Action Plan got its start when city officials established a sustainability task force in 2008. The task force was charged with coming up with ways Franklin could become a national top 25 “green city,” or at the very least a regional sustainability powerhouse. Each suggestion had to have a fiscal note attached so that the financial costs – and savings – could be readily identified. “Even though we have a lot of green practices in place, we’re not doing enough,” says Dr. Ken Moore, alderman for the city of Franklin and one of the initiative’s major proponents. “While we’ve been working on this plan, the city has written guidelines to make its facilities green also, so the city has become a leader in this process.” The plan includes eight main areas: energy, office recycling/waste reduction; education; transportation/planning; water; air quality; open space and natural habitats; and economic development. Action items are listed for each category. The financial considerations and other factors are being studied, and some preliminary timelines are being drafted. Helping in all this is Johnson Controls, a national leader whose services include providing energy solutions for buildings. The Johnson team was brought in to craft the various directives and benchmarks for the plan’s components. The company received very clear marching orders from the city and the task force early on, says Helen Wu, director of innovation services for Johnson’s Building Efficiency division. “They want very much to be recognized on a ‘Top 25 Sustainable Cities’ list,” Wu says. “The community support was astounding from citizens, students and business leaders. The city leaders practice community engagement and truly listen to the voice of the community to shape the vision for Franklin.”

Left: Leiper’s Fork

Strong and vocal community input continues to be one of the most pleasant surprises of the whole process, Moore says. “I had more than 2,000 Post-it notes with citizen comments,” he says. “The consultants held five sessions, and we had almost 250 people show up overall. They have such vigor and enthusiasm, and out of those sessions came 10 sustainability needs and 10 sustainability practices identified by the community.” People were then asked to serve on one of nine committees for the various parts of the plan. Each committee is asked to draft at least three action items – summing up the issue, describing what action has been taken, what action needs to be taken, and the cost. Then each committee must come up with a recommendation for meeting the goal. All the information will be folded into a revised version of the master plan. In the meantime, the city has approved funding for a sustainability/grants coordinator position, so now there’s a go-to person at city hall to help shepherd the process and seek funding. “We think this position will pay for itself through the improved energy efficiencies and fuel efficiencies just within the city,” Moore says. “There are a lot of grants out there, as well as money within the federal stimulus package, for green initiatives. We’re really moving ahead on this, and it’s going to make a very big difference to the community.”

A Closer Look SPECIFIC ACTION ITEMS IN THE ACTION PLAN: Increase the use of renewable energy to meet 10 percent of the city’s peak electrical load within seven years. Decrease waste to the landfill. Implement activities for public education. Add a variety of alternative fuel vehicles within the city’s fleet. Develop policies for the implementation of aggressive waterconservation efforts. Source: City of Franklin For more information, visit www.franklintn.gov

PHOTO BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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Smart TOP-NOTCH EDUCATIONAL OPTIONS SET THE COUNTY APART STORY BY JOE MORRIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

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Ravenwood High School is part of the Williamson County Schools system.

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illiamson County is widely known for its excellent schools, which routinely boast some of the top test scores in the state. It’s not unusual for families to move to the county just for the public and private schools, including the Franklin Special School District, Williamson County Schools and private facilities such as Battle Ground Academy. And the schools are a big draw for new corporate residents. “The quality of K-12 education is at the top of the list of important factors in attracting and retaining economic growth and stability in a community,” says Dr. David Snowden, director of schools for FSSD. “In the FSSD we believe that it is our innovation that continues the district’s excellent reputation and provides the best educational environment possible to promote the continued economic growth in our community.” The emphasis on quality is the same at Williamson County Schools, which works to maintain its high standards while preparing students for postgraduate life through a combination of early-college work, mentorships and jobshadowing programs. “Williamson County students have dual-enrolled with institutions such as Columbia State Community College, Nashville State Community College, Middle Tennessee State University, Vanderbilt University and the Tennessee WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

Technology Centers,” says Jackie Baggett, career and technical education coordinator. “While these are our major players, Lipscomb, Belmont, O’More College of Design, Trevecca and others could become options for dual-enrollment programs in the future.” “Williamson County is very fortunate to have such willing partners within the higher-education options,” adds Dan Hampton, high schools director for Williamson County Schools. “The students of Williamson County are the recipients of these tremendous opportunities – opportunities that we believe are continuing to grow.” Student achievement in and out of the classroom has been the goal at private schools such as Battle Ground Academy for more than a century. A K-12 school, Battle Ground Academy takes its mission and its community roots seriously, says Dr. John Griffith, headmaster. “One of Williamson County’s strengths is the diversity of education and educational institutions,” Griffith says. “We have private schools, universities, specialized schools, the strong public system … and although we compete for students, we are all also the beneficiaries of the strength of the overall system.” With a wealth of universities in the region, many students choose to stay in the area to pursue their college degrees and professional careers. They’re often joined by adults who wish to further their studies and workers being trained in new fields or techniques at Columbia State Community College. The community college, founded in 1966, offers more than 50 programs of study in online, classroom, credit and noncredit formats. By offering early-college courses for high school students, as well as classes for adults, Columbia State fills a unique and growing niche in the community’s education spectrum. “We see ourselves in partnership with Franklin and Williamson County,” says President Dr. Janet Smith. “The role of the community college is growing nationwide, and it’s growing in Tennessee. You have people coming in for educational, personal and citizenship development, which gives you a strong triad for building the community.” WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

Celebrating 32 Years of Soccer Fun! Learning the game of soccer has never been so exciting! Recreational Leagues for Ages 4 to 19 U Fall & Spring Outdoor Soccer Indoor Arena Soccer Leagues U Hot Shots & Little Kickers Summer Camp

(615) 791-0590 info@williamsoncountysoccer.com

www.williamsoncountysoccer.com I M AG E S W I L L I A M S O N C O U N T Y. C O M

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Portfolio

Now That’s Courage FRANKLIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENT SAVES HER GRANDMOTHER’S LIFE

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ome quick thinking by a Franklin grade school girl saved the life of her grandmother – thanks to a maneuver that the little girl learned earlier that day from a TV show. In March 2009, 10-year-old Madeline “Maddie” Grayson Adams was presented with the inaugural Roderick Award of Courage at the historic Roderick Farm in Thompson’s Station. When Maddie was 9 years old, she miraculously saved her choking grandmother’s life by performing the Heimlich maneuver. Maddie had seen the technique earlier that day on an episode of the Disney Channel television show, The Suite Life of Zach & Cody. “For a 9-year-old to keep her wits about her and pull this off – it’s amazing,” said Thompson’s Station Mayor Leon Heron when he handed Maddie a crystal trophy and a check for $1,000. The Roderick Award of Courage is named for Roderick, a courageous Civil War horse that died at the 1863 Battle of Thompson’s Station. Despite having suffered three gunshot wounds, the horse bravely jumped a fence and galloped to his owner’s side. Today, the horse is buried at Roderick Farm. “I can’t think of a better recipient for this inaugural recognition of courage than Maddie Adams,” Heron said. In September 2008, Maddie’s grandmother, Jan Adams, was preparing dinner and talking on the phone to Maddie’s mother, Deanna. Jan took a bite of chicken that became lodged in her windpipe, making it impossible for her to breathe or speak. Deanna immediately realized something was wrong and called a neighbor for help before dialing 911. Meanwhile, Jan began to black out. Realizing she had to act quickly, Maddie came up behind Jan, put her arms around her grandmother’s midsection, and with her back against the kitchen counter for leverage, she delivered a few quick thrusts to Jan’s diaphragm. The chicken became dislodged and Jan was able to breathe again. WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

Madeline “Maddie” Adams and her 2009 Roderick Award of Courage

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Relax and Stay Awhile

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are visible to motorists traveling along the interstate, and they really add to the skyline of Franklin and Cool Springs,” says Mark Shore, executive director of the Williamson County Convention & Visitors Bureau. “They are ideal spots to serve the corporate-based travelers who visit the Cool Springs Corporate Center, which has boomed over the past five years. In addition, the hotels are perfect for recreational travelers whose destination is Middle Tennessee.” This is the first Aloft hotel that has

JEFF ADKINS

portion of Williamson County along Interstate 65 near Cool Springs Boulevard is now home to three new hotels that opened in 2009. The Aloft Nashville-Cool Springs hotel is located on the west side of I-65 on South Springs Drive, adjacent to the CoolSprings Galleria. The Courtyard by Marriott Franklin and the Residence Inn by Marriott have both opened in the Meridian Cool Springs corporate center, on the east side of I-65. “All three of these beautiful hotels

been constructed in Tennessee, and its target occupancy market is primarily younger professionals who enjoy living an active urban lifestyle. “Aloft has a younger feel to it,” Shore says. “Many people think of Franklin as a historic city, which it is, but there is also an urban-attitude culture with a hip-ness added in.” The other two hotels are part of the Marriott family of worldwide hotels, and they’re situated in arguably the fastest-growing corporate complex in all of Williamson County. “The Meridian Cool Springs area is ideal for these two Marriotts because the Meridian is almost a city in itself, with restaurants, coffee shops, spas and a number of unique businesses that are flourishing,” Shore says.

Aloft Nashville-Cool Springs

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Portfolio

Pumping Iron, and Now Recycling It

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t’s true that iron has played a big role in Bubba Miller’s entire adult life. Stephen “Bubba” Miller, born and raised in Franklin, was a star football player and wrestler in high school at Brentwood Academy, and he won two state wrestling titles in 1990 and 1991. He was also an offensive lineman for Brentwood Academy, and he ultimately signed a scholarship to play football for the University of Tennessee. Miller pumped iron and muscled his body to more than 300 pounds, and he started in 47 straight games for the Volunteers from 1992-1996. He was such a good college player that the NFL’s Philadelphia Eagles drafted him, and Miller played the center position in Philadelphia for six consecutive seasons. He then finished his football career with the New Orleans Saints for one season. After his football days ended in 2002, Miller returned home to Williamson County. He purchased an interest in Supershear LLC, a Franklin-based company that manufactures a portable hydraulic shear used to extract catalytic converters from vehicles that don’t function anymore. After learning more about the recycling of catalytic converters, Miller founded Arrington Metals in 2004 in the Williamson County community of Arrington. The growing company purchases and sells recyclable metal and has estimated sales of nearly $400,000 each year. In 2009, Miller expanded Arrington Metals by opening a new division called B. Miller Recycling, located on Carters Creek Pike in west Franklin. The fullservice scrap metal facility buys and sells metal, and it offers containers and specialized scrap metal service to large commercial and industrial customers. The company accepts metals such as aluminum, copper and iron, and large items such as stoves, refrigerators and car parts, as well as entire cars. – Stories by Kevin Litwin WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

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Business

Just What the

Doctor Ordered WILLIAMSON COUNTY GROWS AS A REGIONAL HUB FOR HEALTH CARE

STORY BY SHARON H. FITZGERALD | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

Vanderbilt Medical Group Franklin Right: Pam Birkel works with the digital mammography equipment at WMC’s new outpatient imaging center.

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ith medical services offered by local providers and some of Nashville’s biggest names in the industry, Williamson County is a regional hub for health care. Williamson Medical Center’s new $7.3 million outpatient imaging center, located at the northeast corner of the hospital campus on Carothers Parkway in Franklin, offers the latest technological advances, including bone-density scanning and digital mammography. Digital mammography “uses less radiation than film mammography and, for women younger than 50, it’s significantly better at finding cancers,” explains Laura Bustetter, the medical center’s associate administrator for business development. She says the driving force behind the new imaging location, which opened in November 2008, was to separate inpatient and outpatient services, thus improving efficiency and convenience. Patient convenience also was augmented in December 2008 with the opening of a 500-space parking garage for easy access to WMC’s six-story tower. Outpatient services are on the tower’s ground level, and the first floor is occupied by Williamson Surgery Center. Physician practices are on the other four floors. The tower was part of a massive expansion and renovation, wrapped up in early 2007, which also included additional floors for the existing patient tower and improvements to the emergency department. Recognized nationally in 2008 as a top hospital for surgical procedures, WMC has more than 150 active physicians and more than 500 doctors on its medical staff in 53 specialties and subspecialties. While WMC is countyowned, the hospital doesn’t require local tax dollars to operate, Bustetter says. Vanderbilt Medical Center also offers a healthy range of services throughout Williamson County. Denis Gallagher, chief administrative officer for the Vanderbilt Medical Group in Williamson County, says business has increased more than 100 percent in the last five years. Vanderbilt initially entered the

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market with the acquisition of a few physician practices. “Now it is more the presence of our specialty physicians coming from the campus to spend some time in Williamson County. About 20 different specialties are currently being provided,” Gallagher says. “We’re open to opportunities as they present themselves to us, but our absolute commitment is to continue to expand our services.”

The Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the Vanderbilt Eye Institute have Williamson County locations. Near WMC is a Vanderbilt walk-in clinic. Easy access to non-urgent health care is also available at Take Care Clinics in two Franklin Walgreens locations. The Little Clinic also offers walk-in care at the Kroger on Columbia Avenue in Franklin and in nearby Thompson’s Station.

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Business

Biz Briefs BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE WILLIAMSON COUNTY’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

$2,416,245 Retail sales ($1,000)

$238,798 Accommodation and food services sales ($1,000)

$17,674 Retail sales per capita

17,750 Total number of firms Source: U.S. Census QuickFacts

THE RED HOUSE Biz: Entertainment venue in downtown Franklin Buzz: The Red House is a vibrant entertainment venue that’s available for events of all kinds, including receptions, rehearsal dinners, private parties, corporate events, music showcases, CD release parties, fundraising events and much more. Built in 1877, the beautifully renovated home is decorated with music memorabilia and modern furnishings. www.ourredhouse.com 24

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TENNESSEE EQUINE HOSPITAL Biz: A full-service equine hospital Buzz: The Tennessee Equine Hospital is a multidoctor ambulatory practice with a full-service hospital, 24-hour emergency care and a state-of-theart reproductive facility. Located in Thompson’s Station, the hospital includes lameness facilities and a sports medicine department. A new surgical facility is in the works. www.tnequinehospital.com

The Golf Experience Reminiscent of a Gentler Age

SAFFIRE Biz: Upscale restaurant in The Factory at Franklin Buzz: Saffire uses locally grown produce and indigenous flavors combined with exotic ingredients to create a unique dining experience. This neighborhood restaurant has a big-city feel, featuring creative cuisine, an array of wines, welcoming surroundings and attentive staff. The lunch menu is casual, the dinner menu is elaborate, and an exposed kitchen allows diners to watch the chefs in action. www.saffirerestaurant.com

Nashville Golf & Athletic Club ~„‡€Û:jg[c]llÛJhjaf_kÛKjYadÛÝÛ9j]flogg\•ÛKEۀ„‡„ ¨ƒ~‚©Û€„‡¤€€ƒÛÝÛooof_Y[f]l

HARPETH TRUE VALUE HOME CENTER Biz: Full-service home and building supply store Buzz: At Harpeth True Value Home Center, customers can find just about anything for their home under one roof. From lawn mowers and plants to paint and building supplies, this locally owned store has it all – including a friendly, knowledgeable staff. Located near downtown Franklin, the store also rents tools and supplies for weddings and parties. www.harpethtruevalue.com BIRDSONG CREATIVE Biz: Graphic design strategy company Buzz: The professionals at Birdsong Creative in downtown Franklin are experts in print, Web and package design, branding, identity development and communications strategy. One of the company’s “recently hatched” efforts is the new Tennessee State Fair logo. Services range from consultation on strategy through implementation, including market research, new product development, integrated marketing campaigns and more. www.birdsongcreative.com WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

Pass the Peas ... Please!

Monell’s Dining & Catering Nashville – (615) 248-4747 Great Southern Food Served Family Style Serving Lunch, Dinner and Weekend Breakfast • Garden Weddings & Receptions (up to 240) • Bridal Luncheons • Rehearsal Dinners

Monell’s at Franklin’s Historic Lillie Belle’s A Restaurant and Wedding Venue 132 3rd Ave. South Franklin – (615) 790-6998 Wedding Tours & Appointments (615) 790-2300 Catering (615) 726-4938

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Business | Chamber Report

Helping Businesses Thrive WILLIAMSON COUNTY-FRANKLIN CHAMBER’S STRENGTHS SHINE IN TOUGH TIMES

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members, relocation information, demographics, chamber and community events and other information about Williamson County. The chamber helps educate students about the importance of local business through its World of Possibilities career fair. It’s also involved in Character Under Construction, a coalition of education and business leaders working to instill in children character traits such as trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, perseverance, courage, cooperation, caring, fairness and citizenship. The monthly Public Affairs Roundtable, televised and re-televised three times to the community, gives chamber members and others a chance to meet state legislators and follow

important issues. Enhanced communications options – including an upgraded Web site, an electronic annual report, and a timely newsletter distributed through The Tennessean newspaper – keep the community abreast of chamber members’ achievements and activities. The chamber’s staff of seven hardworking professionals is committed to providing the best possible service to the chamber’s growing membership, Conway says, as is a dedicated group of 75 regular volunteers who staff events, help in the office and take on other necessary tasks. “We could simply not do all the many things we do without our volunteers,” Conway says. –Laura Hill

JEFFREY S. OTTO

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n today’s difficult economic climate, businesses need support – the kind of expert support the Williamson County-Franklin Chamber of Commerce readily provides. With a thorough understanding of the local business community and the challenges of tough times, the chamber offers programs and services geared to the changing needs of businesses. This makes membership in the organization even more valuable these days. “This is the time to use your membership investment in the chamber to the fullest,” says Pam Von Ehr, the chamber’s membership services and marketing chief. “If you haven’t attended an after-hours mixer or participated in a sponsorship, you’re missing a businessto-business opportunity you’re not likely to get in another organization. This is a perfect time to join the chamber.” Special initiatives in 2009 included a June seminar on identity theft, a problem chamber President/CEO Nancy Conway describes as “rampant since the downturn in the economy.” A major benefit of membership is the chamber’s annual Business Expo, scheduled for Sept. 29 in Jamison Hall at the Factory at Franklin. Between 800 and 1,000 attended 2008’s free public event, where they learned about local businesses at more than 60 booths and other exhibits. “It’s a unique advantage to businesses, a one-on-one marketing concept,” Conway says. “You meet people, they meet you. People see your products and services and talk to you about them, ask questions. It’s invaluable.” The 2009 Business Expo will have a special focus on buying local, and the chamber also spreads a buy-local message through ribbon cuttings and grandopening events organized by Chamber Ambassadors. The chamber’s Web site, www. williamson-franklinchamber.com, offers a wealth of information helpful to businesses and individuals alike, with links to numerous resources. The site includes a directory of

Chamber President and CEO Nancy Conway and Chairman Rodger Klein

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Business | Chamber Report

Excitement and Opportunity FAIRVIEW WELCOMES INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES AND NEW DEVELOPMENTS

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ew developments are in the works for Fairview since the major portion of a statemandated sewer moratorium – put in place due to strains on the system – was lifted in 2008. The Water Authority of Dickson County, which supplies all sewer and water service to Fairview, has been upgrading and adding sewer lines since that time. “That is the best news for Fairview – we are pretty much free to now develop and build,” says Beverly Totty, president of the Fairview Area Chamber of Commerce. “There are still some minor restrictions, but The Water Authority is working very favorably with new development. In fact, once the news got out in 2008 that the moratorium would probably be lifted, Fairview received more commercial inquiries than during the previous 10 years put together.” Totty says several parcels of land were purchased in 2008 and 2009, and developers have been appearing before

Totty says existing local businesses are getting more involved in the community, and 125 are now chamber members. A total of 20 new members signed up in 2008 alone. “More and more businesses and community members want a voice in how Fairview will look in the next five or 10 years,” she says. – Kevin Litwin

JEFF ADKINS

the Fairview Planning Commission. “We should soon be seeing additional retail and office buildings being constructed, and hopefully some new subdivisions with home prices at $150,000 and up,” she says. “In fact, 88 new town homes are currently under construction along Highway 96. And rumor has it that a major grocery store will begin development in late 2009.”

Fairview Area Chamber of Commerce President Beverly Totty

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Integrity Experience Service

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Business | Chamber Report

Green Light for Smart Growth NOLENSVILLE MOVES FORWARD WHILE RETAINING ITS FRIENDLY, SMALL-TOWN FEEL

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his might not be big news in larger communities, but it’s a headline in Nolensville. The small town now has a traffic light, installed in 2009 at the main intersection on Nolensville Road at Clovercroft/Rocky Fork. A key reason for the light: It will help vehicular traffic going to and from the new Nolensville Elementary School. “We have a lot of traffic traveling east to west from Franklin to Murfreesboro that passes through Nolensville, so this will make our main thoroughfare safer,” says Chuck Fann, president of the Nolensville Chamber of Commerce. As for overall growth in Nolensville, Fann credits Mayor Beth Lothers along with the board of aldermen and the planning commission for doing a good job ensuring the community of 2,700 residents continues to grow carefully. “The mayor welcomes – in fact, almost insists upon – getting input from residents and business owners regarding how we should grow,” Fann says.

www.nolensvillechamber.com.

“Nolensville still has its quaintness, with Little League fields packed during the summer and organizations such as the Lions Club, Women’s Club and the Volunteer Fire Department all adding to our quality of life,” Fann says. “Nolensville remains progressive while retaining its friendly, small-town feel.” – Kevin Litwin

JEFF ADKINS

Mayor Lothers has introduced a Trees and Trails Committee to get neighborhood trails constructed in various subdivisions, and the town has also implemented a Design & Review Committee to develop building standards. A Town Events Committee organizes community-wide celebrations such as Fourth of July fireworks, and the chamber has launched a brand-new Web site,

Chuck Fann, president of the Nolensville Chamber of Commerce

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Sports & Recreation

Rah, Rah, Raucous in 2009 CENTENNIAL CHEERLEADERS WIN NATIONAL SMALL VARSITY DIVISION TITLE

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Centennial High School Competitive Cheerleading Squad

Dr. Louis J. Laratta & Dr. Amity M. Huskey U U U U U U

Laser Treatments Genetic Screening Grafting & Reconstructive Surgery Cryosurgery Electro Diagnostics Ultrasonography

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Medical & Surgical Treatments for Ocular Problems Including:

• Cataracts • Corneal Problems • Glaucoma • Eyelid Abnormalities

Nashville Area (Nolensville/Rivergate) • Chattanooga (615) 776-2019 • (615) 776-2018 fax • (800) 524-1910 www.vos-tn.com

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he Centennial High School Competitive Cheerleading Squad captured first-place honors in February 2009 at the National High School Cheerleading Championships in Orlando, Fla. The competition was hosted by the Universal Cheerleading Association, considered the top national sanctioning organization for competitive high school cheerleading. A total of 8,000 cheerleaders in Orlando made up 400 national teams that represented 12 different divisions, and Centennial was crowned the 2009 champion in the Small Varsity Division. “The Small Varsity Division features teams that have 12 girls or less, and we had 12 girls on our squad,” says Barbee Morgan, co-coach of the Centennial squad along with Bill and Jay Noffsinger. “One girl on our team actually tore her ACL prior to Orlando, and her spot was filled very well by a 13th girl.” The UCA Nationals is the largest annual high school cheerleading event in the United States, and this was the first time that a team from Middle Tennessee won any kind of national division championship. In 2008, Centennial actually finished runner-up in the Small Varsity Division. The 2009 Centennial championship squad was made up of six seniors, six juniors and one freshman. Team members were Izzy Arrendondo, Becca Bedock, Melissa Campbell, Kaitlin Chesak, Ashley Evans, Fallon Fliehser, Faith Hall, Jennifer King, Audrey Love, Jordan Parks, Sheridan Richardson, Becca Silva and Kathryn Traxler. “Tryouts for the Centennial team are in late March, then we practice three times every week from that point forward,” Morgan says. As for the UCA competition routines, they must be 2 1/2 minutes in length and feature plenty of tumbling, stunt work, dancing and a cheer. – Kevin Litwin WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

JEFF ADKINS

Health & Wellness

NHC Place at Cool Springs

Expanding To Meet Demand NHC PLACE AT COOL SPRINGS ADDS SPACE, OFFERS CONTINUUM OF CARE

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ou know you’re doing something right when demand for your services requires an expansion. That’s the case with NHC Place at Cool Springs, which opened its senior-care community in June 2004 and has blueprints in hand for new construction. “We’ll probably put a shovel in the ground this year [2009],” says Jerry Winton, NHC Place administrator. “We’ve been so successful that we’re about to double the size of our assisted living, and our rehab program is so successful that, while we’re not expanding the number of rehab beds, we’re adding additional space so we can provide more therapy for the community on an inpatient and outpatient basis.” NHC Place was Williamson County’s first multispecialty campus for older adults, offering assisted living, long-term care, rehabilitation and other services. The facilities are owned by Murfreesboro-based National HealthCare Corp., which owns and operates a variety of senior-care facilities in 12 states. In addition to NHC Place, the company’s Williamson County operations include a 90-bed, long-term care facility along with outpatient and home-care services. NHC Place has 43 assisted-living apartments, and that number will increase to between 90 and 95 units with the expansion, Winton says. The facility resembles an upscale hotel, with community areas that include a full-service dining WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

room, a casual soda shop, a sunroom and an enclosed courtyard. Residents have a choice of six different floor plans, all with a private bath, kitchenette and emergency-response system. Two levels of care are available, depending on the resident’s needs. The Health Center features 117 private and semiprivate rooms in five wings, offering long-term care, secure care for patients with cognitive problems, and palliative care for patients near the end of life. Winton says thinking of The Health Center as a nursing home is a mistake. “We’re so much more than that. Practically all of our patients come directly to us from hospitals and orthopedic practices, and right now, of the patients that we do admit, we send 90 percent of them back home,” he says. With an emphasis on rehabilitation and discharge, the center has 60 physical, occupational and speech therapists on staff. The Rehab Center is a separate facility, serving 90 to 100 inpatients monthly and another 30 as outpatients. The expansion will add gymnasium space and new equipment. “Everyone knows about Williamson County and its growth,” Winton says. “It’s a great place to live, and NHC as a company has been in the community since 1979. I think we’ve taken good care of its citizens.” – Sharon H. Fitzgerald I M AG E S W I L L I A M S O N C O U N T Y. C O M

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Education

Character Under Construction BUSINESS-EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP WORKS TO PROMOTE INTEGRITY IN STUDENTS

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n Williamson County, character certainly counts. That’s the idea behind Character Under Construction, a coalition of education and business leaders working to instill positive qualities in students – character traits such as trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, perseverance, courage, cooperation, caring, fairness and citizenship.

One of those words is the “character word of the month” countywide during the school year. “One goal is that everybody – whether you are at home, in school or in a business – would be emphasizing a particular character word of the month all over Williamson County,” explains Annie Sawyers, Character Under Construction chairwoman and

HARPETH

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instructional facilitator for student performance with the Franklin Special School District. Sawyers traces the roots of the initiative back more than a decade, when a few Williamson County educators attended a national conference emphasizing character education in K-12 schools. Their training included a strategy called Character Counts. “We had this dream of becoming a community of character,” she says. “There were cities that had banners and billboards saying, ‘A City of Character,’ and we were dreaming of doing the same thing.” Character Counts was tied to a federaland state-funded program called Education Edge, designed to infuse business principles into education and produce a better-prepared workforce. Funding for the program dried up, but not Williamson County’s desire to keep character education. “We got together, recruited other people in the community and had a meeting. Out of that beginning, we became known as Character Under Construction,” Sawyers says. Today, school counselors are charged with emphasizing character and including character discussions in disciplinary situations. A priority for Character Under Construction is a survey of schools to find out how businesses and other organizations could help with teaching and modeling character. That’s where the board of directors – composed of more than a dozen representatives of private industry, education and organizations such as the University of Tennessee Extension Service, Better Business Bureau and Williamson County-Franklin Chamber of Commerce – comes in. Meanwhile, the Character Under Construction banner and information booth are common sights at events such as the county fair, career days and the Fourth of July celebration in historic downtown Franklin. – Sharon H. Fitzgerald WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

Arts & Culture

Sound Kitchen Grooves Again LEGENDARY RECORDING STUDIO TAKES INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO MUSIC BUSINESS

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JEFF ADKINS

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or years the Sound Kitchen was known as one of the country’s premier recording studios, its headquarters on Seaboard Lane in Franklin a creative haven for some of the biggest names in music. But in 2007, it looked as if this legendary studio might shut its doors forever, ending an era that brought such musical supernovas as Bruce Springsteen, Barry Manilow, Earth, Wind & Fire and Jimmy Buffett to town. Enter Ira Blonder, a self-described nonmusician with a passion for music, and a veteran entrepreneur who had negotiated the sales of a dozen or so famous recording studios. He decided to take a chance. “I don’t write, I don’t play an instrument and I don’t sing, but I am an avid supporter of writers and musicians,” says Blonder, who runs a successful real estate consulting business. “This was an opportunity to craft a new, progressive entertainment organization.” Blonder bought the building in early 2008 and set about expanding the studio’s technical strengths – and its vision. Several hundred thousand dollars later, Sound Kitchen still encourages the world to “Eat Music” – its logo is a large fork – but it’s approaching the music business in more innovative ways. The emphasis is on creative synergy, collaboration and artistic growth. All seven of Sound Kitchen’s recording studios are flourishing, and the Big Boy, its renowned 3,000-square-foot megastudio, can still seat an entire symphony orchestra. The studio now hosts seven artistsin-residence from a variety of musical styles. Sound Kitchen is also home to its own record label, Well Done Music; a publishing company called Eat Music Publishing; and Kitchen Table Distribution. – Laura Hill

Rock artist Joshua Adams records a track at the Sound Kitchen in Franklin.

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URS! YOU TO YO G IN T T E G O U R JO B IS Affordable public transportation service six days a week! Monday-Friday 6 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Ride to work, medical centers, retail areas, the library and more!

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I M AG E S W I L L I A M S O N C O U N T Y. C O M

WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

Community Profile

WILLIAMSON COUNTY SNAPSHOT Williamson County is a vibrant, growing community known for its scenic beauty, quiet neighborhoods and thriving business districts. Home to many community groups, historic sites and an array of activities, the county offers something for the entire family.

SALES TAX

7%

HEALTH CARE

State Tax

2.25% Local Tax

COUNTY WHEEL TAX

$25.75 per vehicle annually

PERSONAL INCOME TAX

Williamson Medical Center, a 185-bed full-service community hospital, offers a highly qualified medical staff along with convenient, costeffective, inpatient, outpatient and emergency services. In addition to Williamson Medical Center, there are numerous clinics and healthcare facilities that provide professional medical services.

LOCAL UTILITIES

None PROPERTY TAXES

Cable Charter Communications (931) 388-3550

(25% of assessed value)

Comcast, (615) 244-5900

Williamson County, $2.31

Electricity Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corp. (615) 794-3561

Brentwood, $2.75 Fairview, $2.96 Franklin, $2.63 Franklin/FSSD, $3.60 FSSD (Outside city), $3.28 Nolensville, $2.32 Spring Hill, $2.86 Thompsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Station, $2.36

Franklin Special School District

Nashville Electric Service (615) 736-6900 Garbage Collection Franklin (city), (615) 794-1516 Natural Gas Atmos Energy Corp. (615) 794-2596

Piedmont Gas (615) 734-0665 Water Franklin Water Dept. (615) 794-4572

EDUCATION The county is served by two school districts: The Williamson County Schools is a student-centered, academically enriching district that supports the collaborative educational efforts of students, teachers, staff and community. The Franklin Special School District is an innovative, top-ranked K-8 school system with approximately 3,900 students.

MORE EO ONLINE imageswilliamsoncounty.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Excellence in Teaching and Learning for Allâ&#x20AC;?

Since 1906

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WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

I M AG E S W I L L I A M S O N C O U N T Y. C O M

37

BRIAN M C CORD

Photo Finish

H

istory still prevails in Franklin’s charming downtown district. Named as a 2009 Distinctive Destination by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the 15-block area offers interesting architecture, period streetlights, attractive landscaping and beautifully restored historic buildings. People enjoy walking among the district’s many hip boutiques, restaurants and entertainment venues. With a history that dates back more than 200 years, it’s no wonder that the entire downtown area is on the National Register of Historic Places.

38

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WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

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I M AG E S W I L L I A M S O N C O U N T Y. C O M

39

visit our

advertisers Aloft www.alofthotels.com/coolspringsoffers Ascend Federal Credit Union www.ascendfcu.org Audio Video Environments www.avenashville.com BancorpSouth www.bancorpsouth.com

Family law and mediation services to protect your family

Battle Ground Academy www.battlegroundacademy.org

Community association services to protect your neighborhood

Community First Bank & Trust www.cfbk.com

1650 Murfreesboro Rd. Suite 225 Franklin, TN 37067 (615) 550-7106 t (615) 550-7107 f office@williamemiller.com

www.williamemiller.com

BBE Company Inc. www.bbesolutions.com CharacterEyes www.charactereyespc.com

Crye-Leike Relocation www.crye-leike.com Factory at Franklin www.factoryatfranklin.com Franklin Special School District www.fssd.org Fridrich & Clark Realty www.fridrichandclark.com Harpeth True Value Home Center www.harpethtruevalue.com Heritage at Brentwood www.theheritagelcs.com Hyatt Place www.hyattplace.com Judy A. Oxford www.judyoxfordlaw.com Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation www.mtemc.com Monellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining & Catering Inc. www.monellstn.com Nashville Golf & Athletic Club www.ngac.net Nashville Pizza Company www.nashvillepizzaco.com NHC Place at Cool Springs www.nhcplace.com Regions Mortgage www.regionsmortgage.com/lancedammeyer Stites & Harbison www.stites.com Tennessee Commerce Bank www.tncommercebank.com TMA Group www.franklintransit.org Tollgate Village www.tollgatevillagetn.com Vanderbilt Legends Club www.vanderbiltlegendsclub.com Vanderbilt Medical Center Williamson www.vanderbiltwilliamson.com Veterinary Ophthalmology Services www.vos-tn.com William E. Miller & Associates www.williamemiller.com Williamson County Franklin Chamber of Commerce www.williamson-franklinchamber.com Williamson County Soccer Association www.williamsoncountysoccer.com Williamson Medical Center www.williamsonmedicalcenter.org Worth Properties www.worthproperties.com Zeitlin & Company, Realtors www.zeitlinrealtors.com

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I M AG E S W I L L I A M S O N C O U N T Y. C O M

WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

Now Private! Vanderbilt Legends Club has been the premier destination for golf in Middle Tennessee. As of January 1, Vanderbilt Legends Club is now totally private. 8FJOWJUFZPVUPMFBSONPSFBCPVUPVS NFNCFSTIJQQBDLBHFTTPZPVDBOFOKPZ IPMFTPGDIBNQJPOTIJQHPMGt-FHFOET(SJMMF 'VMMBDDFTTUPUIFSFHJPOTNPTUDPNQSFIFOTJWFQSBDUJDFGBDJMJUZ 4QFDJBMNFNCFSFWFOUTUISPVHIPVUUIFZFBS

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WILLIAMSON COUNT Y

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Ad Index 1 8 A LO F T 1 A S C E N D FE D E R A L C R E D IT U N I O N 2 3 AU D I O V I D EO E N V I R O N M E N TS 39 BA N CO R P S O U T H 17 BAT T LE G RO U N D AC A D EM Y

3 4 H A R P E T H T R U E VA LU E HOME CENTER 2 8 H E R ITAG E AT B R E N T WO O D C 3 H YAT T P L AC E 3 0 J U DY A . OX FO R D 39 M I D D L E T E N N E S S E E E L EC T R I C M E M B E R S H I P CO R P O R ATI O N

4 0 B B E CO M PA N Y I N C . 3 6 C H A R AC T E R E Y E S

2 5 M O N E L L’ S D I N I N G & C AT E R I N G I N C .

3 1 CO M M U N IT Y FI R S T BA N K & TR U S T

25 NASHVILLE GOLF & AT H L E TI C C LU B

3 7 C RY E- L EI K E R E LO C ATI O N

3 0 N A S H V I L L E P IZ Z A CO M PA N Y

39 FAC TO RY AT FR A N K LI N 3 7 FR A N K LI N S P EC IA L SCHOOL DISTRICT 3 0 FR I D R I C H & C L A R K R E A LT Y

41 N H C P L AC E AT CO O L S P R I N G S 2 R EG I O N S M O RTGAG E 2 9 S TIT E S & H A R B I S O N

Ad Index (cont.) 21 TENNESSEE CO M M E RC E BA N K 3 6 T M A G RO U P 2 6 TO L LG AT E V I L L AG E 41 VA N D E R B I LT L EG E N DS C LU B C 1 A VA N D E R B I LT M E D I C A L CENTER WILLIAMSON 32 V E T E R I N A RY O P H T H A L M O LO GY S E RV I C E S 40 WILLIAM E. MILLER & A S S O C I AT E S 17 W I L L I A M S O N CO U N T Y S O CC E R A S S O C I ATI O N C4 WILLIAMSON MEDICAL CENTER 3 6 WO RT H P RO P E RTI E S 2 0 ZEIT LI N & CO M PA N Y, R E A LTO R S

questions answers

©2002 American Cancer Society, Inc.

8 0 0 . A C S . 2 3 4 5 / c a n c e r. o r g


Williamson County, TN 2009-10