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TENNESSEE

2007-2008

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

tnedg.com

A STATE WITH DRIVE – FROM WHEELS TO FUELS

RISING IN THE EAST Doing business with Japan and China

Commissioner Matt Kisber

Governor Phil Bredesen

Home Delivery

Business climate, livability attract major companies


contents

OVERVIEW

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BUSINESS ALMANAC

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WE LCOME TO TE NNESSE E

New Carpet, New Color

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Economic development ofďŹ cials are focusing on luring companies to the state’s rural areas. BUSINESS CLIMATE

Home Delivery

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Tennessee is a natural for corporate headquarters, thanks to the state’s central location and pro-business mindset.

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The Loan Ranger

Tennessee Tax Incentives

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Economic Development Incentives

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GLOBAL IMPACT

READ MORE ONLINE

TNEDG . com LINKS Click on links to local Web sites and learn more about the business click climate, demographics, service providers and other aspects of life here. WEATHER Find current conditions, immediate and long-range, forecasts and historical averages.

TENNESSEE

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A new loan program will provide lowinterest loans of up to $5,000 to smallbusiness entrepreneurs in rural communities.

ONLINE VIRTUAL MAGAZINE Flip through pages of the Tennessee Economic Development Guide on your computer screen, zoom in to read the articles, and click on the ads to be linked to the Web sites of advertisers. 2007-2008

Export Education

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The Export Tennessee program offers training and resources to businesses to encourage the expansion of foreign exporting.

Rising in the East

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China’s booming economy has led to a surge in export goods.

A Worldwide Economy

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Nearly half of the state’s $22.5 billion in foreign direct investment comes from Japan.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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ARCHIVES Read past editions of the Tennessee Economic Development Guide. ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Tennessee Economic Development Guide is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is sponsored by the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. In print and online, TEDG gives readers a taste of what makes Tennessee tick â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from transportation and technology to health care and quality of life.

COMMUNITY DEVE LOPMENT

Three Cheers for Three-Star

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Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Three-Star Program has added a new resource to its curriculum.

A Three-Star Rating

Meet Me on Main Street

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The Tennessee Main Street Program is working to make local downtowns the place to be again.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find the good â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and praise it.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

jnlcom.com

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contents TR ANSPORTATION AND DISTRIBUTION

Move It, Move It

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Whether by land, air or water, Tennessee has the network to move the goods.

Port a Plus for Area’s Transportation Options

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The Port of Cates Landing in Northwest Tennessee is scheduled for completion in 2008.

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MANUFACTURING

The Place To Be

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The state has been named one of the top five most desirable business locations.

Gearing Up for Business

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Move over Detroit. Tennessee’s automotive industry is in high gear.

Top Projects

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E DUCATION

Funding the Future

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Gov. Phil Bredesen’s 2007-08 budget proposal was education-minded.

On the FastTrack

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A grant program helps employers with workforce training. TECHNOLOGY

Tennessee Scores With EPSCoR

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Research competitiveness among universities has improved dramatically.

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HEALTH CARE

We Have You Covered

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A new health-care plan, Cover Tennessee, has replaced TennCare.

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E N E RGY

A State With Drive

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Tennessee’s Alternative Fuels Strategy is stimulating the economy in rural areas.

The Magic of Soybeans

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TOURISM

The Business of Fun

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If you think of Tennessee strictly in terms of the Grand Ole Opry and Dollywood – think again.

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

Economic Profile

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Resource Guide

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TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

SENIOR EDITOR AMY STUMPFL COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, SUSAN CHAPPELL, KIM MADLOM, ANITA WADHWANI ASSISTANT EDITOR REBECCA DENTON STAFF WRITERS KEVIN LITWIN, JESSICA MOZO EDITORIAL ASSISTANT JESSY YANCEY DIRECTORIES EDITORS AMANDA KING, KRISTY WISE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS RENEE ELDER, DEAN FLENER, ANNE GILLEM, AMY GREEN, K. DAWN RUTLEDGE JONES, DENISE MITCHELL, JOE MORRIS, VALERIE PASCOE, MAURY RICH, CINDY SANDERS ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER TODD POTTER AD PROJECT MANAGER ELIZABETH WEST SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR SARA SARTIN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS WES ALDRIDGE, ANTONY BOSHIER, MICHAEL W. BUNCH, IAN CURCIO, BRIAN M C CORD PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT JESSY YANCEY CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR SHAWN DANIEL PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS ASSISTANT PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR HAZEL RISNER SENIOR PRODUCTION PROJECT MGR. TADARA SMITH PRODUCTION PROJECT MGRS. MELISSA HOOVER, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, BRITTANY SCHLEICHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER CANDICE HULSEY GRAPHIC DESIGN JESSICA BRAGONIER, LINDA MOREIRAS, DEREK MURRAY, AMY NELSON WEB PRODUCTION JILL TOWNSEND DIGITAL ASSET MANAGER ALISON HUNTER COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN CORY MITCHELL AD TRAFFIC SARAH MILLER, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./PRODUCTION & OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING SYBIL STEWART EXECUTIVE EDITOR TEREE CARUTHERS MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS MAURICE FLIESS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA MCFARLAND, LISA OWENS, JACKIE YATES RECRUITING DIRECTOR SUZY WALDRIP CLIENT SERVICES DIRECTOR CINDY COMPERRY DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH IT SYSTEMS DIRECTOR MATT LOCKE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR NICOLE WILLIAMS CLIENT & SALES SERVICES MANAGER/ CUSTOM PUBLISHING PATTI CORNELIUS Tennessee Economic Development Guide is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development 312 Eighth Ave. N., 11th Floor • Nashville, TN 37243 (615) 741-1888 • Fax: (615) 741-7306 www.tnecd.gov VISIT TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE ONLINE AT TNEDG.COM ©Copyright 2007 Journal Communications Inc., 361 Mallory Station Road, Ste. 102, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member Member

Magazine Publishers of America Custom Publishing Council

On the Cover PHOTO BY MICHAEL W. BUNCH ECD Commissioner Matt Kisber and Gov. Phil Bredesen

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Tellico Reservoir Development Agency

www.tellico.com

Profitability and room to expand await you at Tellico Industrial Properties in East Tennessee. Tellico has 2,000 reasonably priced acres for consideration by companies seeking a strategic and attractive location for corporate offices, manufacturing and distribution facilities. For more information, please visit our new Web site at www.tellico.com.

For more information, please contact Mr. Ron Hammontree, Executive Director Tellico Reservoir Development Agency 59 Excellence Way â&#x20AC;˘ Vonore, TN 37885-9641 E-mail: trda@tds.net 1-800-562-8732


overview

TENNESSEE IS A MAGNET FOR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY Welcome to the Tennessee Economic Development Guide.

total state and local tax burden.” (April 2007) The Tax Foundation is a nonpartisan tax research group based in Washington, D.C.

Sponsored by the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development, this guide provides a closer look at some of the state’s leading industries while highlighting the many benefits of doing business here. It also provides economic development contact information for each of Tennessee’s 95 counties.

• Overdrive magazine has named Tennessee’s roadways among the best in the nation for the eighth consecutive year. In addition, Interstate 40 in Tennessee is listed as the best road in the nation. (December 2006) “Tennessee has demonstrated our state is a great place to locate a business and attract top business talent,” says Matthew H. Kisber, commissioner of the Department of Economic and Community Development. “Through Gov. Bredesen’s leadership, we’ve eliminated red tape, improved customer service and created strong partnerships with local leaders leading to more than 108,000 new jobs since 2003 and capital investment of $13.4 billion.”

The state’s track record for business development is well documented: • For the second year in a row, Site Selection magazine has ranked Tennessee among the top five states in the nation for its business climate. (November 2006) • Tennessee holds the No. 3 spot on The Tax Foundation’s list of Tax Friendly Places, based on “the average taxpayer’s

The ECD provides a comprehensive menu of services for companies looking to expand or relocate – including research on available buildings, facilities, industrial properties, demographics, community and county data profiles, labor statistics, and wage surveys. Technical assistance also is available in energy, environmental regulations, transportation, licensure, site location and export development. To learn more about the advantages of doing business in the Volunteer State, contact: Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development 312 Eighth Ave. North, 11th Floor Nashville, TN 37243 (615) 741-1888, Fax: (615) 741-7306 Toll Free: (877) 768-6374 www.tnecd.gov

Clarksville

Nashville

75

Knoxville 40

Murfreesboro

Jackson 40

Memphis

65

Tennessee

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

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40

24

40

Tri-Cities

40 40

75

Chattanooga

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business almanac

DIG THIS

P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F S T E V E N C . WA L L AC E

No bones about it – the Gray Fossil Site in East Tennessee is home to fossils that date back as far as 7 million years. In 2000, road crews with the Tennessee Department of Transportation uncovered a fossil-rich plot of land near Daniel Boone High School in Gray, Tenn. Now, a $10 million visitors center has been constructed nearby on the campus of East Tennessee State University, for tourists interested in learning more about the fossils at the ETSU Museum of Natural History and Gray Fossil Site. Archeologists have already unearthed remains of red pandas, ground sloths and rhinoceroses, and the site is being heralded as having some of the world’s richest tapir deposits.

REDS, YELLOWS AND ORANGES The first week of October means more than just falling temperatures. That is usually the kick-off of the fall foliage season in Tennessee. The season often runs through the first week in November. The colors in East Tennessee peak before other parts of the state due to the higher elevation. In Middle Tennessee, leaves generally begin to change color during the second week of October, while foliage changes in West Tennessee tend to occur a week later. Foliage tours have become so popular that the state even has a Tennessee Fall Color Hotline (800-647-4200) that provides up-todate information on peak times and locations.

STANDING OVATION Take note: Tennessee is known worldwide for its musical heritage. Bluegrass music has its roots in the East Tennessee hills, while Nashville is home to the renowned gospel music of the Fisk Jubilee Singers and country music’s Grand Ole Opry. Meanwhile, Memphis is known for birthing the blues, as well as being a key breeding ground for rock ‘n’ roll and soul music. By the way, 2007 marks a couple of important musical celebrations in Tennessee. The Stax Museum of American Soul in Memphis turns 50, and so does the historic Studio B in Nashville where Elvis Presley recorded 200 of his songs.

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A CULTURAL LEGACY From the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis to Knoxville’s Beck Cultural Exchange Center, Tennessee offers a wide range of opportunities to celebrate African American history. Each year, thousands of people visit important sites such as the Chattanooga African American Museum/Bessie Smith Hall, the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum in Memphis, and the childhood home of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alex Haley in Henning.

P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F I N T E R N AT I O N A L S TO R Y T E L L I N G C E N T E R

ALL THE STATE’S A STAGE It’s all a big act in Tennessee. The state is graced with a diverse number of performing arts venues that stretch from Bristol to Memphis. Jonesborough offers the International Storytelling Center, Nashville is home to the Tennessee Performing Arts Center, and Memphis is center stage for the long-standing Orpheum Theatre. Pigeon Forge has the Miracle Theater, Knoxville is home to the Historic Tennessee Theatre, and the Palace Theatre in Crossville is the oldest silent movie theater still standing in the state.

THE 1860s IN 2008 From Shiloh to Chickamauga, Civil War history buffs, tourists and curiosity seekers can explore historic battlefields, monuments and museums. Tennessee ranks No. 1 in the total number of soldiers who fought in the Civil War, and more battles were fought in Tennessee than any other state except Virginia. Key sites include the ChickamaugaChattanooga National Military Park, Fort Negley in Nashville, Shiloh National Military Park, and The Carter House and Carnton Plantation in Franklin.

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JOB SEEKERS

Dayton (423) 570-1107

Chattanooga (423) 894-5354

Dunlap (423) 949-6648

Cleveland (423) 478-0322

Kimball (423) 837-9103

www.secareercenter.org

Where people and jobs connect WE BRING CAREER RESOURCES TO

Athens (423) 745-2028

&

EMPLOYERS

JOB LISTINGS

POST JOB OPENINGS

JOB SEARCH TOOLS

EMPLOYEE RECRUITMENT

SKILLS UPGRADE ASSISTANCE

HIRING INCENTIVES

SKILLS CREDENTIALS

JOB PROFILING/ASSESSMENTS

This project is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. TDD/TTY TN Relay 711.


business almanac

TENNESSEE: A GREAT PLACE TO SETTLE DOWN Move over, Florida. Tennessee is a great place to retire. The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development began a program in 2006 called “Retire Tennessee,” promoting the Volunteer State as an ideal place for retirees to call home. The ECD chose nine Tennessee communities to participate in the pilot promotional program: Cumberland, Greene, Hamilton, Hardin, Henry, Lawrence, Marshall, Putnam and Sullivan counties. One reason that Tennessee is attracting so many retirees is because it has four distinct seasons, with none of them being too extreme. There is also an abundance of lakes and parks, major medical centers and a number of active civic organizations.

WORTH THE DRIVE There was a time when hamburgers were 25 cents, hot dogs were 15 cents and movie tickets cost just 50 cents. Drive-in theaters became an American phenomenon in the 1940s and 1950s, but eventually this entertainment avenue began to fade. Fortunately, there are still 17 drive-ins operating in Tennessee. Two are in Memphis while others are in Athens, Bristol, Centerville, Dickson, Dunlap, Elizabethton, Estill Springs, Harriman, Lafayette, Lewisburg, Maryville, Sparta, Watertown, Waverly and Woodbury. Many of the drive-ins are open from March to October.

WILD ABOUT WILDLIFE Take a walk on the wild side at one of Tennessee’s beautiful zoos or aquariums.

SHOP ’TIL YOU DROP Be sure to wear comfortable shoes before venturing out to the numerous shopping malls, specialty stores, outlet centers and antique shops that call Tennessee home. East Tennessee is home to the 107-store Tanger Five Oaks Outlet Center, while Nashville plays host to Opry Mills mall. West Tennessee features The Avenue Carriage Crossing, the Victorian Bell Buckle Antique & Craft District, and Peabody Place.

Chattanooga is home to both – the Chattanooga Zoo at Warner Park and the Tennessee Aquarium. Meanwhile, other wildlife viewing destinations include the Knoxville Zoo, Memphis Zoo, Nashville Zoo at Grassmere, Rainforest Adventures in Sevierville and the Smoky Mountain Deer Farm in Sevierville. And for bald eagle fans, the Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge and Reelfoot Lake offer the perfect showcase for these majestic creatures.

Nashville is also home to a couple of yearly antique festivals, and don’t forget the annual 450 Miles of Yard Sales each summer that stretches along the Highway 127 corridor from Covington, Ky. to Gadsden, Ala.

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ROOM TO VROOM Feeling the need for speed? Tennessee is home to more than 45 speedways, racetracks and dragways. Perhaps the best known is Bristol Motor Speedway, which hosts two NASCAR Nextel Cup races each year. Nashville Superspeedway hosts a couple of annual NASCAR Busch Series races and a NASCAR Truck Series event, while Memphis Motorsports Park is home to a Busch Series race every summer. Other popular racing venues include Music City Motorplex at the Tennessee State Fairgrounds in Nashville, and Highland Rim Speedway just north of Nashville.

WINE ALL YOU WANT Tennessee may be known for its whiskey distilleries, but there are plenty of wineries here as well. And don’t forget about the agricultural festivals and farm museums. More and more visitors are seeking out agri-tourism as an opportunity to slow down and explore the countryside. For example, the Tennessee Agricultural Museum is located in Nashville, while distillery tours are available at Jack Daniel’s in Lynchburg and George Dickel’s in Tullahoma. And be sure to sip some of the tasty selections at Beachaven Vineyards & Winery in Clarksville, Holly Ridge Winery and Vineyard in Livingston, and Keg Springs Winery in Hampshire. A couple of more unusual agri-tourism stops are the Tennessee River Freshwater Pearl Farm and the Rocking R Sheep Farm.

AND ROLL ’EM Film at 11 – and any other time of the day. The mission of the Tennessee Film Entertainment & Music Commission is to attract more motion picture, TV and video advertising business to the Volunteer State. The agency has already put together a Tennessee Production Directory that lists more than 1,000 film-related individuals and companies already doing business here. The Commission also publishes an annual Tennessee Music Directory, a guide to help filmmakers find professional musicians and technicians who can help in the production of music videos and other projects.

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welcome to tennessee

New

Carpet, New

Color

Orange-carpet tours and Rural Opportunity Initiative shine spotlight on growth opportunities in rural Tennessee

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fter four years of success attracting hundreds of new companies to Tennessee, the state’s economic developers face a challenge: how to expand that job creation success across a broader range of Tennessee communities, both urban and rural? The answer may lie in a series of new initiatives under way in Tennessee focusing on rural job growth. Patterned after a series of highly successful “red-carpet tours” for site selection consultants, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development is launching a series of companion “orange-carpet tours” for ECD Commissioner Matt Kisber and Gov. Phil Bredesen

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

rural communities – the idea being once corporate site locators know what the state’s smaller cities and towns have to offer, they’ll more readily recommend them to their corporate clients. “What we envision is that we’ll take a handful of site selection consultants around the state, maybe to see what the University of Tennessee at Martin is doing, or to Cates Landing near Tiptonville to see the Tennessee Regional Port Authority’s project, which will be a slack water port on the Mississippi River associated with an industrial park, or to Paris and Benton County to see the successful recruitment of new industry that’s taking place,” says Matt Kisber, commissioner of economic development. “The idea is to hub around a major point of interest and, over the course of two

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welcome to tennessee

or three days, get out into different parts of the region to see what kinds of opportunities could be best suited for those communities.” The tours are part of a larger strategy Kisber is calling ROI, or the Rural Opportunity Initiative. It includes setting different levels of assistance for rural counties based on poverty levels and historic unemployment, among other factors. The greater the jobless rate, for example, the more extensive the Jobs Tax Credits the state will be willing to offer companies who create new jobs in affected counties. “The governor’s economic development vision really hits on four areas of emphasis,” Kisber says. “The first is a more skilled workforce. In conversations with every prospective industry and with existing ones, that’s the No. 1 issue. As we compete for knowledge-based jobs and those that are more highly skilled, we have to assure companies that we’re going to have the public-education system that can supply the type of skilled workforce they need.” Kisber wants the consultants who tour Tennessee’s rural communities to provide written feedback, so that the communities themselves will have a “real world” view of their strengths and weaknesses. “Companies today don’t have the lead times they’ve had in the past, so we’re hoping to help our local communities be better prepared with ready sites, ready infrastructure and to provide job creation opportunities and capital investments for those companies looking to locate within the state,” Kisber

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

says. “We also want to foster innovation, and the governor feels very strongly that it is incumbent on this administration to plant the seed that will become the leadership areas for our economy in the next generation.” For his part, the governor says that Tennessee’s mix of small and large population centers is a strength to which the state should be playing. “This combination of urban and rural areas is one of the things that makes us such a great place to live,” Bredesen says. “And we’re not going to be able to keep that unless we pay some real attention to how we recruit and retain business in some of the smaller communities across the state.” Bredesen says that success stories in Nashville, Knoxville and other cities have shown that the state’s recruiting template is working, but that it can be expanded. “A lot of our individual communities can’t go out and spend the money to recruit people,” he says. “But maybe the state can be an intermediary here, getting those relocation specialists, real estate specialists, in to take a look. [We] have done a good job at ramping up our recruiting; I just want to make sure that we’re recruiting for all communities. This program will make sure that we get outside the usual suspects for relocation and show people our more rural areas. And even if that company doesn’t come here, the feedback the local people get about their strengths, or what they’re lacking, helps them to better hone their presentations and offers for the next time.” – Joe Morris

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business climate

H OT Spot for

Headquarters Tennessee offers pro-business assets to corporations

T

ennessee is a natural for corporate headquarters, thanks to the state’s central location and probusiness mindset. Fortune 500 companies such as ServiceMaster and Akzo Nobel chose Tennessee in 2006, and several other large corporations have recently decided to mind their business in the Volunteer State. For example, the capital city of Nashville has attracted a number of high-profile projects. “Nashville is a growing city – a thriving metropolis that is a cool place to be,” says Kingsley Brock, administrator of business development for the

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state Department of Economic and Community Development. “The city is a hub for great banking centers and health-care corporations, and there is an excellent labor force with folks who have moved here from all across the country. Plus, there is good weather and good entertainment options.” Zoi Interactive Technologies decided in 2006 to move its operations from Las Vegas to Nashville. Company officials say they were attracted to the lower cost of living in Nashville compared to many other major cities. “When we decided to leave Las Vegas for Nashville, multiple people told us we

couldn’t attract top people to Nashville – oh, how wrong they were,” says Safa Homayoon, Zoi chief operating officer. “For example, in February 2007 we recruited a guy from Silicon Valley who had multiple national job offers. In fact, we’ve had a 90 percent close ratio on the people we have recruited to Zoi from other parts of the country.” Zoi develops interactive computer software and advertising-based content for the Internet. “We set up our headquarters in Cummins Station in downtown Nashville, which is a hip area of the city,” Homayoon says. “Everything

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


PHOTOS BY BRIAN M C CORD

Zoi Interactive Technologies relocated from Las Vegas to Nashville in 2006. Below: Safa Homayoon, chief operating officer for Zoi Interactive Technologies

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business climate

ServiceMaster recently selected Memphis as the site of its new headquarters. The company provides a wide range of household cleaning products and services, including brands such as Terminix, TruGreen Chemlawn and Merry Maids.

about our experience in Nashville has been positive.” But Nashville isn’t the only hot spot for companies looking to set up operations in Tennessee. Knoxville’s location along interstates 40 and 75 make it logistically popular, as is the case with Chattanooga and its positioning along interstates 24 and 75. Memphis is also becoming increasingly attractive to businesses, as demonstrated by ServiceMaster moving its headquarters there. “We see Memphis as a city that is on the move, has strong momentum, and we plan to be a larger part of that,” says Scott Cromie, group president of ServiceMaster. The company provides household cleaning products and

services, with brands such as Terminix, TruGreen Chemlawn and Merry Maids cleaning services. Brock also points out that a tip of the hat should go to Gov. Phil Bredesen for playing a key part in helping to attract major corporations to Tennessee in recent years. “Gov. Bredesen is our No. 1 strength because he is pro-business, proven by the fact that he started his own HealthAmerica Corp. years ago and eventually sold that business in 1986 for $700 million,” Brock says. “The governor is a businessman who is not a career politician, and he has luckily had the support of both [political] parties when it comes to attracting companies to Tennessee.”

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Along with Bredesen, Brock says several other state department officials work together to attract corporate clients. For example, Matt Kisber, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development, leads the governor’s Jobs Cabinet. “The Jobs Cabinet includes state officials from workforce development, revenue, transportation, tourism and other departments who all work as a team to attract companies,” Brock says. “Whether a company is looking at Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Knoxville or any other Tennessee city, the state provides whatever information it can to help lure these companies here.” – Kevin Litwin

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business climate

The

Loan

Ranger State offers startup money to rural entrepreneurs

A

nyone with a good business idea – rejoice. A new Micro-Enterprise Loan program has been introduced in Tennessee to provide low-interest loans from $500-$5,000 to small-business entrepreneurs in rural communities. The program was formed in late 2006 by the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (ECD) through its Business Enterprise Resource Office (BERO). An ECD-BERO startup fund of $125,000 was secured through a federal USDA Rural Business Enterprise Grant. “The goal of our program is to create new businesses and new jobs in rural

The USDA’s Dan Beasley recently presented a $125,000 check to ECD Commissioner Matt Kisber and the ECD BERO team.

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areas, with entrepreneurs able to use the loan money for working capital or to buy equipment,” says Michelle Proctor, BERO director. “The people who qualify for such a loan must live in a rural area and must also set up their business in a rural area. In addition, the business they form can only have up to five employees, including the owner.” The loans can be repaid in as many as seven years, with interest ranging from 9 to 11 percent. “Most interest payments in microenterprise loan programs across the United States average 12 to 16 percent, because people in startup businesses in rural areas are considered high-risk,” Proctor says. “But we give people a chance, plus each applicant is provided with free technical assistance and business advice for the lifetime of the loan. BERO experts will help fledgling business owners with subjects such as setting up a business plan, cash flow management and marketing training.” Proctor says the program’s first micro loan was issued in April 2007 to a homebased caterer in Franklin County.

“The woman has a full-time job completely outside of food services, but she has been doing small catering jobs for the last 10 years,” she says. “She wanted to grow her business, so she got a loan of $4,000 to buy commercial kitchen equipment and also for some marketing funds. It’s too early to say if she’s made a success of things, but we [BERO] are going to help her every way that we can.” Proctor says BERO will heavily weigh a micro loan applicant’s background within the industry they are pursuing. “For example, if someone has been a mechanic for 10 years, that is obviously beneficial if they want to go out on their own,” Proctor says. “As a result, we would loan this person money to buy tools or machinery or whatever else he needs to start his business in a rural area.” By the way, a rural area is defined by the USDA as a non-urbanized region with 50,000 people or less and is not located adjacent to an urban area. “We are going to the most remote areas of the state, and the word is just

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

starting to get out on this program,” Proctor says. “We fully expect to allocate 25 to 30 loans over the first three years, and will then make more loans as these are repaid.” – Kevin Litwin

BERO Director Michelle Proctor is helping rural businesses succeed.

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business climate

Tennessee Tax Incentives • No income tax on personal wages. • No state property tax. FRANCHISE TAX • Tax on the greater of net worth or book value of property owned or used in Tennessee. • Tax rate is 25 cents per $100. • Finished goods inventory in excess of $30 million may be excluded. • Pollution Control Equipment is exempt. • Property under construction and not being utilized is not included. • Property rented from the industrial development corporation may be valued by capitalizing it on the books.

NO SALES TAX IS LEVIED ON: • Purchases, installation and repairs of qualified industrial machinery. • Raw materials for processing. • Pollution control equipment for manufacturers. • Reduced sales tax rates for manufacturers’ use of energy fuel and water (1.5 percent vs. 7 percent). • Qualified industrial supplies. • Items purchased for resale. • Containers, packaging and wrapping materials. • Additional exemptions or credits may be available.

EXCISE TAX • Tax is based on the net earnings of the company derived from doing business in Tennessee. • Tax rate is 6.5 percent. • No throwback provision – sales outside of Tennessee are not taxed. • Receive 1 percent tax credit for the purchase of qualified equipment associated with the required capital investment by a distribution or warehouse facility. • All capital losses are claimed in the year incurred. • Net operating losses can be carried forward for 15 years. SALES AND USE TAX • 7 percent state sales tax plus the applicable local rate (2.25 percent-2.75 percent) on any person or company that manufactures, distributes or sells tangible personal property within the state.

MONROE COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

JC/J/WC Economic Development Board 603 E. Market St., Ste. 200 Johnson City, TN 37601-0200 (423) 975-2380 • Fax: (423) 975-2385 jcedb.org

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Shane Burris, Director 103 College St., Ste. 6 • JPK Building Madisonville, TN 37354 (423) 442-3652 • Fax: (423) 442-7933 E-mail: shaneb@monroegovernment.org www.monroegovernment.org

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JOBS TAX CREDIT • A company investing $500,000 and creating 25 new jobs can claim a $2,000 credit against its F&E taxes over a period of 15 years. • Jobs Tax Credit increases to $4,500 per job with a 15-year carry-forward in economically distressed counties. • Companies can offset liability, ranging from 33.33 percent to 100 percent, based on the number of jobs created. JOBS TAX SUPER CREDIT For larger, more capital intensive investments, Tennessee has created a Super Credit, which applies to companies investing capital of $100 million or more and creating a minimum of 100 jobs paying at least 100 percent of Tennessee’s average occupational wage. These credits can be used to offset up to 100 percent of the company’s F&E tax liability but must be taken in the first tax year after the job creation and capital investment thresholds have been met and can be taken annually. The Super Credit does not include carry-forward provisions and is available in addition to Jobs Tax Credits.

and telephone equipment purchased in order to meet the capital investment thresholds of the Jobs Tax Credit. This credit has a 15-year carry-forward. HEADQUARTERS TAX CREDIT • With a capital investment of $50 million or more, the company may qualify for a credit of 6.5 percent against sales and use taxes incurred on the purchase of materials used in a new regional, national or international headquarters. • A project involving a capital investment of $10 million or more and creating 100 jobs paying 150 percent of the state’s average occupational wage may qualify for a credit of 6.5 percent against sales and use taxes incurred on the purchase of materials used in

a new regional, national or international headquarters. • Companies qualifying for the sales and use tax credit may also qualify for credits against their F&E tax liability based on the amount of qualified relocation expenses incurred in the establishment of a headquarters facility. • Companies with a regional, national or international headquarters facility in Tennessee may (with approval from the Commissioner of Revenue and the Commissioner of Economic and Community Development) convert unused net operating losses (NOL) to a credit against F&E tax liability. • The NOL credit is available only if the company is unable to use the NOL to offset net income during the current tax year.

EMERGING INDUSTRY TAX CREDITS Tennessee law gives the Commissioner of Revenue and the Commissioner of Economic & Community Development broad latitude in classifying certain projects as part of an emerging industry. If companies can demonstrate a strong growth potential and commit to creating jobs that pay above the county’s average occupational wage, the state may waive the threshold of 25 new jobs created in order to qualify for the Jobs Tax Credit. INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY TAX CREDIT For capital investments in industrial machinery, Tennessee offers manufacturers a tax credit offsetting up to 50 percent of F&E tax liability. To qualify for this credit, companies are not required to create new jobs. The credit applies to the purchase, installation and repair of industrial machinery as defined in T.C.A. 67-6-102. The credit also applies to the purchase and installation of computer

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global impact

Export

EDUCATION Export Tennessee program targets small businesses

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global impact

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hen Paul Bonovich established CiS Inc. in 1997, he was its only employee. Today the business, which sells parts for earth-moving equipment used in construction and other industries, has nine employees and customers as far away as Australia. The business grew with support from Export Tennessee – a program of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development that offers training and resources to small- and medium-sized businesses to encourage the expansion of foreign exporting. Last year Bonovich traveled to Australia with a group associated with the program and met with customers in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. “It brought business to the table,” says Bonovich, whose business is based in Alcoa, outside Knoxville. “The way I look at it, I pretty much covered the cost of my trip just through my business there, and anything we do in the future will just be a bonus.” Tennessee has earned a reputation in recent years for landing new business, most notably Nissan’s North American headquarters in 2005. But the state also has sought to expand foreign trade – already a strong part of the state economy, says Mark Drury, assistant commissioner with the state Department of Economic and Community Development. “The goal of our department is job creation in Tennessee, and 80 percent of the jobs that we worked with companies to create have come from existing industry within Tennessee,” he says. “So while there is a lot of attention that’s focused on

our efforts to attract companies from elsewhere to come and locate in Tennessee, we’re devoting a lot of time and effort and resources to helping companies grow.” State leaders partnered with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and its TradeRoots program – established with a grant from Congress to promote foreign exporting among small- and medium-sized businesses – to establish Export Tennessee. The state-funded program organizes conferences and other training for business leaders. Last year’s trip to Australia brought together business leaders with their Australian counterparts. In April, a delegation from China also visited Nashville to talk about expanding trade there. State leaders are putting together an electronic newsletter to keep businesses posted on foreign opportunities and delegations visiting the region. The Department of Economic and Community Development also is setting up an office in China – its latest among foreign offices already located in Canada, Germany and Japan. Bonovich says his Australian trip expanded his exporting and his vision. “You feel pressure every day just to deal with your daily paperwork,” he says. “With the resources that the [state] brings to the table, it makes it easier to look beyond your immediate neighborhood, your immediate marketplace and to markets that hold some interesting opportunities. I don’t know if we would have done this otherwise.” – Amy Green

State leaders organized a business expedition to Australia last year to expand trade opportunities there.

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global impact

A New

of World Opportunity Changes in China mean potential profits for Tennessee

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Gov. Phil Bredesen and ECD Commissioner Matt Kisber meet with Chinese Ambassador Zhou Wenzhong in 2006.

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hina’s booming economy has led to a surge in export goods – with everything from toys to cars and computers making their way to consumers around the world. With a 1.3 billion population that is growing increasingly affluent, China also is emerging as a promising market for exporters of American-made products, something Tennessee business leaders are eager to explore, says Mark Drury, assistant commissioner at the state Department of Economic and Community Development. Drury was part of a delegation of Tennessee civic, government and business leaders who

traveled to China for a week in April 2007 to learn more about the potential market for Tennessee-made goods and other business opportunities there. “We talked with Chinese government trade officials, as well as with some Tennessee companies that are already doing business in China,” Drury says. “We want to be able to provide Tennessee companies who want to enter that market with a clear picture of what it takes to be successful.” A number of Tennessee-based businesses are already tapping into the Chinese market – most notably FedEx Corp., which has announced plans to

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construct a new $150 million Asia Pacific hub at the Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport in the Chinese province of Guangdong. The total value of products shipped to China from Tennessee has risen significantly in recent years, from $184 million in 2001 to $1.8 billion in 2006, Drury says. Along with opening its market to exports, China recently has begun loosening some of its restrictions on Chinese investments in foreign companies, says Lori Odom, Asian business development director for the state. A Deutsche Bank study released in January 2007 showed that China’s overseas investments are likely to grow by 20 percent annually over the next five years. “That’s a hot topic right now, and we are trying to position the state to be where we need to be when that business actually comes,” Odom says. “We want to make sure that the right people have heard about Tennessee, and so we are working to build those relationships and knowledge.” China is also now allowing some foreign-owned companies to operate there independently, without making it a joint venture with the Chinese government as had been previously required, Drury says. “The reality is that it’s a complex market to enter because the government has so much of a stake in the business enterprises there,” he adds. “Yet it is a market growing by leaps and bounds.” In-depth knowledge of the legal and governmental regulations affecting businesses is key to doing business in China, and so is an understanding of the intricate social forces in play. “The personal relationships have to be in place before the business relationship can exist,” Odom says. “They are more likely to do business with people they know and trust.”

Strong business relationships can result from exchanges like the 2007 visit by a delegation of trade officials from Guangdong province and by the growing relationship between Tennessee and the

China Council for the Promotion of International Trade (CCPIT). Both organizations presented at a forum hosted by ECD in Nashville. – Renee Elder

A significant number of Tennessee-based businesses have managed to tap into the burgeoning Chinese marketplace, which now represents the second-largest economy in the world with a purchasing power adjusted GDP of $8.5 trillion.

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global impact

Worldwide

Economy

Japanese investment key to Tennessee’s global success

Development for the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. “We have a network of highways that run through the state and make it a natural distribution center,” she says, adding that FedEx headquarters in Memphis is another plus. Like Nissan and Bridgestone, many of Tennessee’s Japanese investors have ties to the automotive industry. “As the Japanese segment of the overall auto industry grows in America and as more Japanese vehicles are assembled here, there is more opportunity for Japanese suppliers to be close by,” she says. Recently, Koyo Corporation of USA and Nakatetsu Machining Technologies – both automotive industry suppliers – selected the Washington County Industrial Park in East Tennessee as the site of their latest North American expansion. David Terdik, assistant plant manager for Koyo’s Washington County facility – which will produce tapered roller bearings – says the labor pool played heavily into the company’s decision to locate in the park near Jonesborough, Tenn. “We view East Tennessee State University and Northeast State Technical Community College very favorably for building a potential candidate pool,” he says. Location was another factor in the decision to move here. “One of the prime draws was logistics,” Terdik says. “We’re close to our suppliers, close to our customers and close to our sister facilities.”

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In addition to being a convenient business location, Odom says Tennessee offers a network of resources to help transplanted Japanese families assimilate culturally. She adds the state’s already high visibility among Asian investors could receive another boost in early 2008 when the Japanese Consulate is expected to relocate from New Orleans to Nashville. For Odom and her colleagues at Tennessee ECD, adding Japanese companies to the state’s economic mix is a classic win/win. “Most have grown and prospered in the area,” Odom says of Tennessee’s Japanese investors. “They are good corporate citizens, providing good jobs with benefits and good working environments.” – Cindy Sanders

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issa n, A lcoa Fuji kura, Bridgestone, Komatsu, DENSO, Koyo … what do these Japanese companies have in common? They all call Tennessee home. Nearly half the state’s $22.5 billion in foreign direct investment comes from Japan. With more than 150 Japanese firms employing more than 43,000 Tennessee workers, the state has forged both a strong business partnership and cultural relationship with its Pacific Rim neighbor. There are multifaceted reasons Southeastern states like Tennessee have attracted Asian investment. Dr. Kiyoshi Kawahito, the recently retired director of the Japan-U.S. Program and professor of economics at Middle Tennessee State University, cites a combination of infrastructure, geographic desirability and a favorable business climate. “Certainly there are several common factors that are attractive to Japanese investors,” he says. “Right-to-work laws exist in almost all Southeastern states.” He adds the region’s mild climate and friendly people are also key selling points. “State and local governments have been very outgoing in arranging or providing tax and other incentives to invite manufacturing industries to the South,” he continues, noting that Tennessee’s governors, in particular, have been enthusiastic in their efforts to welcome foreign investment. Another major selling point for Tennessee is its location. Nearly 75 percent of the U.S. population is within a day’s drive of Tennessee, points out Lori Odom, director of Asian Business

Lori Odom, the ECD’s director of Asian business development, works closely with Japanese investors.

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community development

Three Cheers for Three-Star State program teams up with the Tennessee Center for Performance Excellence

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ennessee’s Three-Star Program has added a new resource to its curriculum, giving communities across the state something to cheer about. The Tennessee Center for Performance Excellence (TNCPE) has partnered with the Three-Star Program to assess the strategic plans developed by certified communities, and to provide coaching and feedback on how to implement and improve those plans. “In the four years I’ve been ECD commissioner, I have learned that communities are usually diligent about compiling strategic plans, but what separates the successful communities from the others is their ability to execute those plans effectively,” says Economic and Community Development (ECD)

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Commissioner Matt Kisber. TNCPE, which is modeled after the Baldrige National Quality Program, has entered into a three-year, $450,000 contract with ECD to provide important services to Tennessee’s Three-Star communities. TNCPE serves as a resource to businesses and organizations throughout the state and offers quality assessments, training, conferences, networking opportunities, and an award program. TNCPE helps organizations streamline their operations and contribute to the economic vitality of the state. The organization will assess ThreeStar communities using the Criteria for Performance Excellence, a framework that identifies characteristics of world-

class organizations. The Criteria evaluation process will assist communities as they implement their strategic plans. In addition, it provides tools that measure and improve results. Katie Rawls, TNCPE’s president and CEO, says that the partnership will help Tennessee’s Three-Star communities evaluate their internal structure and organization. “This way, they can work more efficiently as they implement effective programs that lead to economic growth,” she explains. According to Kisber, a strategic plan is not what’s printed in a binder. It’s in the conversation between the economic developer and the consultant. It’s how the community positions itself to

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A Three-Star Rating RHEA COUNTY CONTINUES TO SHINE, THANKS TO THREE-STAR PROGRAM

potential investment and the ability of its leaders to network and build relationships at the state and national level. “A community’s success depends on its ability to put its plan into practice,” Kisber says. “After all, a plan that doesn’t get results is just a waste of paper.” Focusing on leadership, strategic planning, customers, measurement systems, workforce development, process management and results, the TNCPE program will help communities become more attractive to new business. “We believe that focusing on these key concepts will help elevate the profile of Three-Star communities within the business and manufacturing sector, resulting in more jobs and increased capital investment,” says Rawls. Three-Star Program Director Melinda Keifer hopes Tennessee’s certified communities will use this program to assess their progress and evaluate strengths and weaknesses to determine the best economic approach for their region. “There are best practices that communities can follow, but there is no cookie-cutter approach to community development,” Keifer says. “That is why communities must evaluate themselves and implement strategic plans that make sense for their community. The hope is that we will build stronger communities in Tennessee with more diverse economies and greater job opportunities for Tennesseans.” – Maury Rich

S TA F F P H OTO

Three-Star Director Melinda Keifer

Longtime participants in the Three-Star Program are quick to tout its virtues, noting that the new requirements are already producing results. “We have been a Three-Star community for 24 years,” says Anita Crittenden, administrative assistant at the Rhea Economic & Tourism Council, which administers the program for the county and its municipalities. “We have been able to apply for grants which have helped us recruit industries and other things that we would not have been able to do without those incentives.” The program’s new requirements – designed to make it of more value to the state’s rural communities in terms of incentive grants and other assistance – require more work, Crittenden says, but she and the council’s executive director, Raymond Walker, have been able to keep pace. “It’s a year-round process, working on the various parts of the certification,” Crittenden says. Rhea County has eight committees under its Three-Star program: beautification, education, health care, retirees, existing industry, tourism, housing and workforce development. Tourism and existing industry are both new, and are being formed to meet new requirements for the program. “We have a report card to complete, and there are a lot of things you can pick and choose to do beyond the requirements,” she says. “You can’t do everything at once, but we make sure that we’re adding things all the time.” Such perseverance enabled Rhea County to achieve the program's Level 3 designation. This means that when Rhea County seeks state grants, the county and its cities will be required to match a reduced amount, which translates into huge savings. More importantly, Crittenden adds, the program has made all the county’s involved parties come together in the planning process. “We have a community workshop every year and invite the public to come out and determine with us what we want in this five-year plan,” she says. “That gets everybody involved, and we’re actually implementing the things that we come up with through different committees and groups. It’s really helping to bring the community together, and helping us make Rhea County a wonderful place to work and live.” – Joe Morris

The Rhea County Courthouse in Dayton is a focal point for community life.

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community development

Meet Me on Main Street Tennessee’s Main Street Program breathes life into historic downtowns

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efore shopping malls, big-box retailers and chain restaurants became the norm, downtown was the place to be in any community. And the Tennessee Main Street Program is working to make that true again. A statewide program of the Department of Economic and Community Development, the Tennessee Main Street Program is part of a national network of Main Street programs that operate under the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “We provide guidance in developing long-term strategies to assist communities in revitalizing their downtown historic areas,” says Kimberly Franklin Nyberg, Tennessee Main Street Program manager. “Tennessee is blessed with tiny towns and metropolitan cities, and all our communities have a history, a home place. Main Street identifies those tiny historic squares and downtown areas.” Tennessee has 21 certified Main Street communities, including Rogersville, which was added in March 2007. One of the benefits of becoming a certified Main Street community is eligibility to apply for Innovation Grants from the state. Each of the 20 communities that applied for grants in 2006 received $10,000 for revitalization projects. The Main Street Program follows a four-point approach to downtown revitalization: design, promotion, economic restructuring and organization. Design refers to the visual aspects of a community historic buildings, cleanliness, streetlights and landscaping. Promotion involves rekindling the pride of downtown by drawing attention downtown with things like festivals, heritage reenactments, music and farmers markets, Nyberg explains. Economic restructuring refers to recruiting and retaining businesses downtown, creating second-floor living spaces,

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making downtown user-friendly and walkable, and adding technological benefits such as Wi-Fi. The last point, organization, means building partnerships among groups and individuals that care about downtown. “Main Street is a unique economic development program, because it relies on both public and private investment. It’s a beautiful blend of the two,” Nyberg says. “Last year, we had $83 million reinvested in 20 Tennessee communities through private and public investment.” In 2006, Tennessee’s 20 Main Street communities saw 556 new downtown jobs created, 96 new downtown businesses, 43 new construction projects and 58 new downtown housing spaces. Fayetteville, which became a Main Street community 17 years ago, has seen the benefits of the program firsthand. “We have a 6 percent vacancy rate downtown right now, and before it was as much as 30 percent,” says Susan Hancock, executive director of Fayetteville Main Street. “Years ago, we had quite a few empty buildings and even homeless sleeping in them, but we have a thriving downtown today. Our square is the heart of our community.” Fayetteville’s square is dotted with coffee shops, boutiques, art galleries and even a historic theater. It hosts one of the largest Christmas festivals in the Southeast, drawing a crowd of 25,000 people, as well as several other annual events. “Main Street communities show a level of pride in who they are and where they came from. They respect their past and apply new ways of thinking to promote future economic growth,” Nyberg says. “We encourage communities to be both lovely and lively, and when those come together, it’s a beautiful thing.” – Joe Morris

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STAFF PHOTO

Tennessee has 21 certified Main Street communities, including Jackson (left) and Murfreesboro (below).

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transportation & distribution

Move It, Move It Comprehensive transportation network enhances overall business climate

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hether by land, air or water, if you’ve got to get it there, Tennessee has the transportation network to help you do it. With a skilled workforce, good quality of life and strong business climate among its A-list attractions, the marketing moniker of ‘location, location, location’ is a key draw for business development – and Tennessee is in the right one. “Certainly, it adds to your competitive edge to have more than one way to move raw materials and products,” says Wilton Burnett, special projects director for the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. “Tennessee’s primary asset is that it’s strategically located near interstate highways, airports and rail lines and within one day of three-fourth’s of the nation’s population.” According to the Tennessee Department of Transportation, the 1,105-mile interstate system – encompassing seven major highways crisscrossing the state – is ranked 6th in the nation in cargo carried by trucks and has provided thousands of jobs. Interstate 40, a major link across the country, provides access to 20 Tennessee counties. And a proposed extension to I-69 is in the works, creating an interstate that will travel from Canada to Mexico. Other transportation outlets – such as six major rail lines and 20 short line railroads, six commercial airports, 78 public/general aviation airports and 888 main channel miles of navigable rivers – are also huge assets in attracting and expanding business. The city of Memphis is just one community that’s proven to be a transportation jewel for business development. The city boasts the world’s largest cargo airport and is home to

five Class 1 railroads, standing in the company of only two other cities in the U.S. with this designation – Chicago and New Orleans. Randy Richardson, deputy director of the International Port of Memphis, says that while there has been no real study conducted on the overall economic impact of the rail business, he has no doubts about its significance. “I can tell you that there is in excess of 1.3 million containers coming into Memphis annually on rail consisting of appliances, electronics and other consumable goods,” Richardson says. “Just in the port complex alone, about 32,000 freight cars come through Presidents Island every year. These cars carry higher value products such as gasoline, chemical and materials. The number of jobs created continues to grow with expansion efforts as well.” In the Jackson, Tenn., area, dis-

cussions are still in the infancy stages regarding the growth and future of the Kansas City Southern Railroad franchise. The company, which acquired the Mexican railway – TFM, now KCS de Mexico, is exploring options for expanding its operations there to speed up delivery times and edge costs. “There’s some very strong potential emanating from the connection of a short line with Kansas City Southern, which is looking at possibly establishing a connection from the far East running from Mexico and Texas through Mississippi and Jackson,” says Tony Lynn, director of the West Tennessee Railroad District. “This would place them [Kansas City Southern] in the mid-section of the U.S. and provide a shorter distance than going through Oakland, Los Angeles and other California lines that are already overburdened.” – K. Dawn Rutledge Jones

The International Port of Memphis plays a key role in the transportation network.

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transportation & distribution

New Port

Spurs Economic

Growth

New facility will open up opportunities in Northwest Tennessee

A rendering of the Port of Cates Landing in Lake County

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P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F P H I L C I C E R O

Col. Charles O. Smithers III, Congressman John Tanner, Gov. Bredesen and ECD Commissioner Kisber broke ground on the Port of Cates Landing in October 2006. The $20 million project includes an intermodal river port and a 3,000-acre industrial park.

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ith the Port of Cates Landing on the horizon in Northwest Tennessee, the state will have another key component to add to its strong, vital transportation system. The massive port project, targeted for completion in 2008, will not only open up multiple transportation options in the area, but has enormous potential for economic development in Lake, Obion and Dyer counties for years to come. “I think it’s going to be a huge plus,” says Kingsley Brock, Administrator of Business Development for the state Department of Economic & Community Development. “It’s hard to say exactly what the effect will be. But any time you have a project of that magnitude go into an area that’s off the beaten path … it’s going to have a huge economic impact.” The $20 million intermodal river port project includes a 9,000-linear foot slack-water harbor on the Mississippi River in Lake County and more than 3,000 adjacent acres for an industrial park. The port will be accessible to barge traffic year-round. Also on the drawing board are plans to link the port from State Route 22 to U.S. Highway 78 in Tiptonville following upgrades to the state highway. Other upgrades to local roads are also planned. The port will also be accessible by short-

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line railroad to the Canadian National Railroad, some 30 miles away. Jimmy Williamson, chairman of the Northwest Tennessee Regional Port Authority and president and CEO of the Dyersburg Electric System, has been part of the effort to get the Cates Landing project off the ground for nearly a decade. He says cooperation between government entities has been gratifying. “When you are working with so many state and federal agencies, there are so many rules you have to follow and sometimes they conflict with each other. But everybody we’ve worked with on this project has been very helpful. “We think the port will help the economy of all the communities within a 50- to 60-mile radius,” he adds. “And, it will help our existing industry. It’s a huge potential, no matter what kind of business you’re in, to be successful economically.” U.S. Rep. John Tanner, D-Tenn., another longtime advocate for the Port of Cates Landing, agrees. At the groundbreaking in October 2006, he called the project, “the biggest economic development project we’ve seen in Northwest Tennessee in my lifetime.” – Anne Gillem

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manufacturing

The

Place To Be Tennessee continues to rank high on lists of desirable corporate locations More importantly, these companies are scattered across the state, so no single area is receiving the lion’s share of the growth. That kind of border-toborder approach is a key goal for Kisber and his staff. “We’re very fortunate to have a high level of expansion activity among our existing industries, as well as growth by new companies,” he says. “And that’s happening all over the state. We’re not depending on any one sector or industry for that growth.” The state’s aggressiveness was one factor in Olhausen Billiards relocating to Portland from its home near San Diego. And the help the company received once it announced that decision has only made its Tennessee experience more worthwhile, says Sue Doyle, marketing director. “One of our goals was to try and have as many employees move with us as we could, so we wanted a location that had as many opportunities to enjoy a great quality of life as San Diego does,” Doyle says. “We had been in our former location for 16 years, and the area had become more expensive, so we also were looking for a community with a more affordable lifestyle, but one that also was near some larger metropolitan areas.” Olhausen fielded offers from several states before selecting Tennessee. It opened its 250,000-square-foot billiardtable manufacturing facility in August 2006, and has settled into its new home nicely. The company employs around 110 people, with additional staff added on during the peak months of August

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through January. “We had about 65 families move here,” Doyle says. “A lot of people came who have been with the company anywhere from six to 25 years, so that was really significant.” That kind of feedback only spurs further growth, Kisber says, adding that the state couldn’t buy that kind of positive publicity. “I saw Gregg Hovey, Olhausen’s president on television one night and he was talking about how aggressive the state and local communities were when they were being recruited,” he says. “He said that in Tennessee we don’t make companies fit their square needs into round programs, but offer to meet needs and create programs that bring value. That’s the kind of thing Gov. Bredesen says when he says we ‘need to get the talk right.’” – Joe Morris

P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F T I M M A N TOA N I

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t’s official: Tennessee has made the list. Again. The state has been named one of the top five most desirable business locations by Site Selection magazine, which assesses states using a wide range of criteria, including recruitment efforts. While being chosen is an honor, it just highlights what state officials and others involved in the business-recruiting process already know: Tennessee is willing to do whatever it takes to attract, and retain, quality businesses that offer steady, high-paying jobs. “Whenever a well-respected organization rates Tennessee highly, it brings a great deal of attention to the state,” says Matt Kisber, commissioner of the state’s economic and community development department. “It validates that we have a very attractive business climate. Gov. Bredesen has focused on enhancing our business climate since his first day in office, and he’ll tell you that we have a workforce that is second to none. Our citizens know that we have a wonderful quality of life, so we try to put those things and others into our economic-development toolbox so we can build on that foundation.” The state has posted some impressive numbers in this regard. In 2006, it drew in 193 new companies, with an estimated 19,000 new jobs created. Companies that have chosen to locate, relocate or expand operations in Tennessee include big names such as Sysco, T-Mobile USA, ServiceMaster, Oreck Corp., Mi-Jack Products, Nucor Corp., Christensen Yachts and Olhausen Billiards.

Olhausen Billiards recently opened a major manufacturing facility in Portland.

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manufacturing

Gearing Up

Nissan has manufactured more than 7 million vehicles at its Smyrna plant.

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for Business The automotive industry continues to thrive in Tennessee

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ove over Detroit. Tennessee’s automotive industry is in high gear. The Volunteer State is the fourthlargest producer of passenger vehicles and the fifth-largest employer of automotive workers in the nation. “The automotive industry is one of Tennessee’s largest employers,” says Matt Kisber, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. “It provides more than $6.5 billion in payroll to 160,000 Tennesseans who work in the auto industry. In the last 27 years, the auto industry has developed into one of the most significant industries in the state’s economy, and it brings a lot of recognition to Tennessee.” One example is the highly publicized relocation of Nissan’s North American headquarters from the Los Angeles area to Franklin, Tenn., in 2006. Nissan’s partnership with Tennessee began in 1980 when the company started manufacturing pick-up trucks at its plant in Smyrna. Twenty-seven years later, the Smyrna plant builds five Nissan models, including the Xterra, Altima, Pathfinder, Frontier and Maxima. “In 2006, we built 465,000 vehicles in Tennessee,” says Frederique Le Greves, vice president of Corporate Communications for Nissan North America. Nissan has manufactured more than 7 million vehicles at the Smyrna plant since it opened. So when the company began looking for a new site for its North American headquarters, Tennessee was a no-brainer. “We are always looking to improve our performance and the efficiency between our different functions,” Le Greves says. “We had parts of our activity in Smyrna, some in L.A., and our

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manufacturing engineering based near Detroit. We wanted to put everybody together to work as a team.” Nissan considered several states in the South, and “Tennessee made the most sense.” “We wanted to be close to Smyrna, and Tennessee had a low cost of doing business,” Le Greves says. “It also made the commute much easier. More than 80 percent of our executives and more than 45 percent of our employees moved here, and everybody’s really happy in Tennessee.” Nissan received more than 70,000 resumes from people all over the country to come work for the company in Tennessee. “Relocation was easy, because all the positions filled up quickly,” Le Greves says. One reason the automotive industry is highly sought after by every state is because it has a multiplier effect. “Every one automotive job creates several support jobs,” Kisber explains. “Nissan’s move from California to Tennessee is a great example of that multiplier effect. Nissan moved 1,300 headquarter jobs to Tennessee, and for every one of those, there will be 10 jobs created here. There’s $500 million of new income in Tennessee as a result of Nissan being here.” With BMW in Alabama; Toyota in Kentucky and Mississippi; Honda, Mercedes and Kia in Alabama and Georgia; and Nissan and General Motors in Tennessee, it appears much of the automotive industry is migrating south. And Tennessee is emerging as its nucleus. “We’re in a central, strategic location for automotive parts and suppliers to locate,” Kisber says. “Being in Tennessee puts suppliers close to the Southeast’s auto market and gives them a direct connection to Detroit and the auto industry there.” With certif ied mega-sites in Chattanooga, Clarksville, Crockett County and Haywood County, more growthv is sure to come. “I think we’ll see large-scale manufacturers locate to these mega-sites,” Kisber says. “And it’s probably accurate to predict they’ll be automotive.” – Jessica Mozo

The Corporate Business Park in Clarksville is one of four Tennessee mega-sites.

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manufacturing

Top Projects COMPANY

LOCATION

Dell Computer Corp.

Nashville

ACTIVITY E

NEW JOBS 1,000

PRODUCT

T. Mobile

Chattanooga

N

700

Call Center

Manufactures, sells and supports computers

Christensen Yachts Inc.

Greenback

N

500

Manufactures large custom fiberglass pleasure boats

Federated Department Stores

Portland

N

500

Distribution

Service Master

Memphis

N

500

Corporate HQ

Eastman Chemical Co.

Kingsport

E

406

All other basic organic chemical manufacturing

Oreck Corp.

Cookeville

E

400

Manufactures household vacuum cleaners

Image 1 Wireless

Bristol

E

350

Cell phones

Cobalt Yachts LLC

Vonore

N

350

Manufactures fiberglass pleasure boats

Gateway Inc.

LaVergne

N

300

Assembles desktop and notebook computers

D & B Specialty Foods USA Inc.

Johnson City

N

300

Manufactures ready-to-eat, shelf-stable, self-heating meals

Hickory Hardware

Nashville

N

300

Wholesaler for hardware

Mars Petcare

Brentwood

N

300

Corporate HQ

Wright Medical Technology

Arlington

E

266

Manufactures surgical & orthopedic implants & devices

Rubbermaid Home Products

Maryville

E

255

Manufactures plastic office accessories

General Electric

Cleveland

E

250

Wholesales lighting products

Homesteader Inc.

New Tazewell

E

231

Cargo trailers

Colgate Palmolive Co.

Morristown

N

220

Manufactures toothpaste

Sysco Corp.

Knoxville

N

213

Distributes food products to commercial food service companies

Tecumseh Co. Products

Dunlap

E

200

Manufactures lawnmower engines

Chism Hardy Enterprises LLC

Memphis

N

200

Manufactures and distributes beer and sport drinks

Nucor Corp.

Memphis

N

200

Manufactures high-quality carbon and alloy rounds

Technicolor Home Entertainment Services Memphis

E

200

Distributes video cassettes, tapes & discs

Swisher Mower & Machine Co.

Lawrenceburg

N

200

Manufactures lawn care equipment

Formall Inc.

Clinton

N

200

Manufactures thermoformed plastic products

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education

Funding the

Future

Governor’s budget seeks record numbers with a focus on education

W

hen Gov. Phil Bredesen delivered his fiscal year 2007-08 budget proposal to the Tennessee General Assembly in February, he also delivered good news for students, educators and the people of Tennessee. Of the record $584 million Bredesen set aside for education in the plan, $366.5 million new dollars were proposed to fund programs that would expand learning opportunities in the state. “We’re ready to take the next steps to seize the future for ourselves, for our children and for our children’s children, and to do this we must start with education,” says Bredesen. In addition to fully funding the state’s basic education plan, Bredesen’s budget calls for an increase in teacher salaries, an expansion of the state’s pre-K programs, 100 percent funding for atrisk students and complete funding to pay for all growth in school districts across the state. The governor’s plan also promotes a program to purchase and administer ACT tests for all students during the eighth- and 10th-grade years and benchmark their overall readiness for post-secondary success. One of

Bredesen’s goals for the program is to make Tennessee a leader in the country’s standards movement. “I want to get some strong standards into our schools and honestly measure people against not just what they’re doing in the next town or in other states, but also what they’re doing in other countries because that’s where these children are going to have to compete when they grow up,” he says. The governor has also expanded the HOPE scholarship program to include “C” students that score an average of 19 on the ACT, demonstrating his commitment to providing opportunities for all students with a desire to attend college. Bredesen says the emphasis on education not only means a brighter future for the young people of Tennessee, it also means a more qualified workforce for businesses and stronger economic prospects for the future. “As I have traveled around the state as governor and a candidate and talked to businesses, it seems to me in many cases the limiting factor in their growth in the state and their investment in the state is the availability of a skilled workforce,” says Bredesen. “I want to

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do everything in my power to make sure we’re turning out the young people who have the skills it takes to attract businesses and capital to our state.” Bredesen hopes his legacy will live on in the form of an exemplary state educational system where every student and teacher has the opportunity to reach his or her maximum potential. “I want these next four years to be the time when we set Tennessee on the path of truly putting our children and their education at the head of the list,” he says. – Valerie Pascoe

Gov. Phil Bredesen shares a story with a classroom full of eager young students.

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education

On

the

FastTrack Corporate workforce training programs get a boost from speedy state grants

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An international medical technology firm, Medtronic, recently used FastTrack funds to expand its Memphis area headquarters.

W

hen Teresa Creasy began exploring options to help finance her growing company’s workforce training program three years ago, she couldn’t believe what little red tape she had to cut through to get state funds. “People can be intimidated by paperwork, but you don’t have to go through a lengthy process to get the funding you need to train your employees. Tennessee makes it as cut and dry as it gets. Our small company has secured nearly $60,000 in state funds in three years,” says Creasy, who coordinates training for Design Team, a Savannah-based graphic sign manufacturer with 85 employees. Quick responses to requests and fast decisions on funding are cornerstones of the governor’s FastTrack workforce training grant program. According to Rick Meredith, assistant commissioner of the community development division for the state’s economic and community development department, FastTrack also provides speedy reimbursements for employers to conduct on-the-job training for newly hired employees. “The reason for the name FastTrack is that by executive order from the governor we have to provide a response within 72 hours once a company makes an inquiry about our program, regardless of whether it’s for infrastructure or training,” says Meredith. “It’s a very flexible system and has been tremendously successful.” More than 100 companies participate in the FastTrack program, which will provide over $21 million in funding to businesses of all sizes across the state in 2007. For larger companies like Medtronic, an international

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

medical technology firm employing more than 1,300 people in Tennessee, FastTrack helps during periods of hiring growth. Medtronic most recently used FastTrack job training assistance during an expansion of its Memphis-area headquarters during the years 2003-2005. Keith Murphy, manager of Medtronic’s global operations finance, says the company has been impressed with the hands-on approach of FastTrack training coordinators and is applying for a new FastTrack grant to help with another upcoming expansion. “Programs such as FastTrack are the reason that companies like Medtronic continue to grow in Tennessee,” he says. “This growth, in turn, leads to new job opportunities for Tennesseans.” For Louisiana Pacific, a major manufacturer of building products based in Nashville, FastTrack was part of an attractive recruitment package that led the company to choose Tennessee over North Carolina and Virginia in 2003. “FastTrack was one of the contributing factors that prompted us to move our corporate headquarters to Tennessee. We’ve been very pleased with the results,” says Mary Cohn, the company’s manager of corporate affairs. According to Susan Cowden, administrator of employment and workforce development for the state, Tennessee has long been known for its comprehensive workforce development resources. In addition to the FastTrack program, the state is anchored by a solid community college system and the presence of more than 25 Tennessee Technology Centers for technical instruction and career training. – Valerie Pascoe

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technology

Tennessee Scores With EPSCoR Research competitiveness among universities has dramatically improved Tennessee EPSCoR Committee. “In addition to Vanderbilt and UT-Knoxville, money has also gone to Middle Tennessee State University, Tennessee Technological University, Fisk University, University of Memphis, Rhodes College and other institutions in the state.” Another key issue addressed by NSF under EPSCoR is to encourage collaboration among researchers within targeted states. Funding priority is given to projects that increase the competitiveness of the state as a whole. “Collaborations between private institutions such as Vanderbilt University and public institutions in both the University of Tennessee system and the Tennessee Board of Regents have become more common as a result of EPSCoR,” says Sedrick, who is working to ensure that Tennessee’s research institutions maintain their competitiveness through the three-year transition period. Although Tennessee is moving out of the program, the state will still benefit from EPSCoR. Researchers will continue to participate in events designed to encourage cross-campus collaboration among researchers throughout the state. Tennessee researchers also will be eligible to collaborate with researchers in other states who are receiving funding under the EPSCoR program. And Tennessee’s graduation from EPSCoR does not necessarily mean that the state will receive less federal funding for research. In fact, graduation from the program demonstrates the state’s research competitiveness.

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

“Tennessee’s ability to get money has improved and progressed steadily upward,” Hercules says, noting that the state has received $23 million in grants under the EPSCoR program. “The state receives enough federal funding that we no longer qualify to participate. Other states haven’t been able to bring themselves up to NSF standards.” – Denise Mitchell

STEPHEN CHERRY

I

n April 2006, Tennessee became the first state to begin to transition out of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). NSF created EPSCoR in 1978 to help states become more competitive in terms of federal research and development money. “If you keep investing your money at just a few key institutions, it makes it more difficult to attract and keep good researchers, both faculty and students, at other institutions. Thus, it becomes even more difficult for universities in states traditionally receiving a low percentage of funding to compete for federal dollars,” explains Dr. Greg Sedrick of the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI). Sedrick is head of the committee that is helping Tennessee transition out of the program. NSF has a mandate to support research across the United States while avoiding a geographical concentration of research facilities. Under EPSCoR, NSF sets aside money that can only be allocated to states in the program, thereby broadening the geographical distribution of federal research money. “It is a way of partitioning off a portion of research dollars allocated by NSF, to give states a helping hand – not a hand out,” Sedrick adds. The program also has worked to spread research dollars across Tennessee. “EPSCoR grants have been distributed over a wide variety of institutions,” says Dr. David Hercules of Vanderbilt University. Hercules is a member of the

Educational institutions such as MTSU benefit from EPSCoR research money.

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health care

We Have You

Covered Tennessee’s new health-care initiative caters to working adults, kids and the chronically ill

A

Cover Tennessee features flexibility, even for those suffering from chronic illnesses and pre-existing conditions.

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t one time, Tennessee had one of the most generous government-sponsored health-care programs in the country – TennCare. But when it threatened to bankrupt the state, it was clear change was in order. “We had one of the most extensive and expensive Medicaid programs in the nation, yet we had one of the worst health status scores in the country,” says Laurie Lee, Tennessee’s deputy executive director for insurance administration. “Basically, we had spent a lot of money without improving our state’s health status.” Another problem was that even at the height of TennCare, more than 600,000 Tennesseans were still uninsured. “We did a survey in 2005, and we found that most of the adult population that was uninsured were working 40 hours a week, and more than half of those were working for small businesses that couldn’t afford health insurance,” Lee says. In response, the state created Cover Tennessee – a new health initiative administered by BlueCross BlueShield that will address the problem of working adults who have no health insurance, as well as uninsured kids and chronically ill adults who’ve been deemed uninsurable due to pre-existing medical conditions.

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Launched in early 2007, Cover Tennessee offers a family of three insurance products – CoverTN for adults working for small businesses, CoverKids for children and pregnant women, and AccessTN for chronically ill adults with preexisting conditions. “CoverTN is really unique, because it’s a partnership between the state, an employer and an employee,” Lee explains. “The state, employer and employee each pay equal shares, or one-third, of the premium.” Monthly premiums under the CoverTN plan are approximately $150 per month, with the employee paying $50 per month on average. There are no deductibles, and pricing is straightforward: a $20 co-payment for a doctor’s office visit and $10 for most prescription drugs. The plan also includes coverage for hospitalization, diagnostic tests and other basic medical needs. “It’s a terrific way to bring people into the health-care system who’ve never had access to it,” Lee says. To promote personal responsibility, premiums vary based on age, smoking status and weight. “A person could pay between $34 and $99 per month,” Lee says. “People will see if they smoke or are obese, they’ll pay a little more than a non-smoker at their target weight.” Another benefit of CoverTN is its portability, meaning if a person leaves their employer, they can take the insurance with them if they agree to pay the employer’s share. “This is not Medicaid, and it’s not TennCare. CoverTN is funded exclusively through state funds,” Lee says. “We wanted

flexibility in the program design, and we wanted it to reflect the priorities and principles important to Tennessee.” Small businesses can visit www.covertn.gov or call 1-866-COVERTN to see if they qualify. “Governor Bredesen describes it as the first step to help solve the problems of the uninsured,” Lee says. “It’s a national problem, but this is a wonderful start to solving it close to home.” – Jessica Mozo

Thanks to Cover Tennessee, working Tennesseans are now able to purchase affordable and portable health insurance.

750 Million New Retail Dollars Here & Now* Wow, That’s Good. Wow, That’s Goodlettsville. As gateway to Sumner County, Goodlettsville, Tennessee has become one of the hottest retail locations in the state. Fifteen thousand new, singlefamily homes are approved in the region and will be built in the next three to five years. New residents and new retail dollars are here, and Goodlettsville is where you get to them. The I-65 Long Hollow Corridor, Conference Drive, the Main Street Master Plan, Northcreek Boulevard, Caldwell Square and Rivergate Parkway all offer prime retail locations to serve an exploding shopping population.

To learn more, call Jim Thomas at (615) 851-2231 *Derived from Claritus EBI data and a boat load of new people who are moving to Sumner County who have to drive right through Goodlettsville to get to their new $369,000 homes, and who need groceries, movies, clothing, dinner, shoes, furniture and a whole lot of other stuff!

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energy

Energizing Economic

GROWTH An alternative fuels strategy and a new $125 million national biofuels research center put Tennessee at the cutting edge

T

Crops such as switchgrass are opening up new opportunities.

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ennessee is making significant advances in its farmto-consumer alternative fuels strategy to stimulate economic investment and meet the state’s future energy needs. Alternative fuel research – already under way at Tennessee’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee (UT) – has led to scientists developing ethanol from switchgrass, a crop that can be grown virtually anywhere in the state. Biomass crops like switchgrass represent significant new markets for Tennessee’s farmers and new economic opportunities for the state overall. Tennessee’s challenge is being able to produce ethanol and biodiesel, another fuel alternative, in large enough volumes and at a price competitive with gasoline. Gov. Phil Bredesen is leading Tennessee’s charge in taking the state’s alternative fuels discoveries in the laboratory

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


PHOTO PROVIDED BY STATE PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES

Gov. Phil Bredesen fills the tank with 85 percent ethanol during an event to promote biofuel use.

directly to the marketplace through a comprehensive strategy devoted to production, distribution and research. “Tennessee is at a critical point where we can lead in the development of the alternative fuels market,” Bredesen says. “It’s a smart energy strategy, a smart economic strategy and a smart environmental strategy. Most importantly, it helps create new markets and new opportunities for all Tennesseans.” To position Tennessee as a leader in the production of alternative fuels, Gov. Bredesen’s plan commits $61 million toward research into improving the efficiency of ethanol made from cellulose, construction of a pilot cellulosic ethanol refinery, expansion of the state’s network of alternative fueling stations, and helping Tennessee farmers tap into farm-based fuel markets. Those efforts set the stage for the U.S. Department of Energy’s announcement in 2007 that Tennessee would be the site of one of three National Biofuels Research Centers with $125 million in federal funding. Through the coordination of Gov. Bredesen’s Alternative Fuels Working Group, six state agencies – including the Department of Economic and Community Development (ECD) – have set up grant and loan programs to stimulate investment and use of fuel alternatives in the state. The $3.5 million in grants and loans are devoted to three key areas: attracting investment in soybean crushing facilities to create local markets for Tennessee-grown soybeans and supply the oil needed to create biodiesel; helping governments and statefunded universities increase the use of alternative fuels in their fleets; and building a network of publicly accessible ethanol and biodiesel refueling stations along Tennessee’s major highways. “Tennessee’s economic growth and our standard of living are tied to energy production,” says ECD Commissioner Matt Kisber. “The alternative fuel industry in Tennessee promises to be the next arena for long-term economic stability, job growth and research development, especially in rural areas.” – Dean Flener

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

The Magic of Soybeans MILAGRO BIOFUELS IMPACT ALTERNATIVE FUELS INDUSTRY THROUGH ‘MIRACLE’ BEANS Milagro Biofuels, Memphis’ first biodiesel plant, makes its home in an 1870s cotton-seed mill, which is also listed on the National Registry for Historic Buildings. Make no mistake though – Milagro Biofuels is definitely a 21st-century Tennessee company. Milagro Biofuels produces 5 million gallons of soy-based biodiesel annually, at a rate of 14,280 gallons per day. The company’s automated, continuous and waterless production of biodiesel leads to a product that can be used in any diesel vehicle and doesn’t require engine modifications. Furthermore, Milagro Biofuels’ production process does not produce air emissions or effluent discharges. To make biodiesel, the company uses the equivalent of more than 3 million bushels of soybeans, with one bushel making 1.5 gallons of biodiesel. That adds up to more than 83,000 acres of soybeans per year. Diane Mulloy, Milagro Biofuels’ president, says the company’s mission is to “refine our future with biodiesel, one community at a time.” The owners of Milagro Biofuels are life-long Tennessee residents who chose Memphis for their first refinery because they wanted to make an impact on Tennessee communities. Other investors include Barbara and Gary Meloni of Memphis and Lehman-Roberts Co. The Melonis own the building where the plant is located, and Lehman-Roberts is an asphalt and mining company that has committed to converting its sizable company fleet to biodiesel. Milagro means “miracle” in Spanish. To Milagro Biofuels, soybeans are alternative fuel’s miracle beans for the 21st century. – Dean Flener

Milagro Biofuels is home to Memphis’ first biodiesel plant.

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tourism

The

Business of Fun

Tourism remains a driving force behind state economy

Graceland is by no means the only attraction in Memphis. Here, the Dr. Feelgood Potts Band warms up the music scene at the Blues Hall Juke Joint in Memphis.

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I

ment of Tourist Development. “But the tourism industry has grown at such a rapid clip in the last few years, people are starting to take notice.” One factor behind this growth is the tremendous diversity of Tennessee’s attractions, Whitaker says. “We have three distinct regions, each with its own unique characteristics,” she says. “People are attracted by the bigger drivers – such as Dollywood or the Grand Ole Opry, but once they’re here they discover all kinds of other smaller attractions that are just as

WES ALDRIDGE

f you think of Tennessee tourism strictly in terms of the Grand Ole Opry and Dollywood – think again. This burgeoning industry consistently ranks among the top nonagricultural industries within the state. In fact, tourism injected $12.4 billion into the state’s economy in 2005 – an 8.3 percent increase from 2004. “Most people relate to tourism personally, thinking only in terms of their last vacation. They don’t think of it as an industry,” says Susan Whitaker, commissioner of the Tennessee Depart-

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

interesting. So you might decide to visit Memphis because of Graceland or Beale Street, but while you’re there you’ll probably want to check out Stax Museum of American Soul Music and the National Civil Rights Museum, and then maybe you’ll head over to see the pandas at the Memphis Zoo. And once people discover Tennessee, they’re likely to return because there’s always something new to see.” Graceland is indeed one of the state’s most popular destinations, attracting an estimated 600,000 visitors each year. “We have a very diverse base of fans,” says Paul Jankowski, chief marketing officer for Elvis Presley Enterprises. “With younger generations being exposed to Elvis through so many channels – including everything from Lilo & Stitch to “American Idol” – we find that the majority of our visitors are 35 and under. That surprises some people.” What’s not surprising is that Elvis’ reach extends far beyond the gates of Graceland. “Graceland is certainly the hub – it’s the ultimate rock and roll pilgrimage,” Jankowski says. “But because Elvis was connected to so many other musicbased attractions throughout the state, we maintain a great relationship with them in terms of marketing. The state has done a phenomenal job and is always very supportive of our efforts.” “Music is a huge part of Tennessee tourism,” Whitaker says. “That’s our legacy and kind of an over-riding theme. We celebrate music of all kinds, and each of the three regions has its own story to tell. But I think we’ve gotten smarter about marketing too, and cities like Nashville have done a great job of broadening their appeal. Nashville will always be Music City, but it’s so much more than country music now – and that is attracting a lot of young, creative people.” And Whitaker is hoping to entice some of those young people to choose a career in tourism. “For years, people thought of tourism in terms of low-paying, entry-level jobs,” she says. “But because the industry is growing, there are all kinds of opportunities and career paths – whether it’s in marketing, operations or things like Web design. Most tourist attractions are small, privately owned businesses – and they need good business people to run them.” – Amy Stumpfl

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The Land of Rivers, Lakes, Mountains and Valleys A Good Place to Live, Work, Shop and Play Located on the Tennessee River Connected to Three Major Interstates (I-24, I-40 and I-75) by a Four-lane Highway (Hwy. 27) Major Railroad Through County Award-winning Tennessee Airport of the Year, Featuring 5,000' x 100' Runway, with Low Lead Jet Fuel Available Land Available in Dayton and Spring City Industrial Parks Rhea Economic & Tourism Council, Inc. (423) 775-6171 107 Main Street • Dayton, TN 37321 rheacountyetc.com

Cities of Dayton, Spring City and Graysville

Rhea County A Certified Three-Star Community Ad Sponsored by:

Volunteer Energy Cooperative 18359 Hwy. 58 N. • P.O. Box 277 • Decatur, TN 37322 P HONE: (423) 334-1020 • FAX: (423) 334-7002 • www.vec.org

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ECONOMIC PROFILE BUSINESS CLIMATE

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT Workforce development and career services receive special attention in Tennessee. Thirteen Local Workforce Investment Areas, administered by local boards, offer customized, comprehensive services for employers and job seekers. Specific information also is available through the state’s online information center, The Source: tennessee.gov/labor-wfd/source. Additionally, Tennessee Career Centers in each cluster provide free services including workshops, access to resources and office equipment. Seventyfive percent of the state’s population is located within 25 miles of a full-service Career Center. To locate a Career Center, visit tennessee.gov/labor-wfd/cc.

LOW COSTS Tennessee’s low cost of doing business is the direct result of the following business advantages and incentives: Right-to-work state

Tennessee offers a wide array of advantages to businesses considering a startup or relocation within its borders. The following section offers a brief statistical look at the state, from transportation resources to job training opportunities.

One of the lowest overall utility costs in the nation

manufacturers; no tax if used directly in manufacturing process

Workers’ compensation reform

“Double Weighting” of Tennessee sales for franchise and excise taxes

Consistently one of the lowest per-capita taxed states in the nation No state sales tax on manufacturing equipment for qualified businesses

HIGH-TECH CONNECTIONS

No sales tax on raw material

Industries in Tennessee can receive high-level support from major research and technology centers, including:

No state property tax

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

No property tax on work in progress or finished product inventories

University of Tennessee SimCenter at Chattanooga

No sales tax on pollution control equipment

Investment tax credit of 1 percent Franchise and excise tax jobs credit Accelerated depreciation on personal property Infrastructure and training grants up to $750,000 Reduced sales tax on energy fuel and water for qualified

University of Memphis FedEx Institute of Technology Vanderbilt Medical Center The Tennessee Manufacturing Extension Partnership also assists manufacturing firms by providing access to engineers and scientists at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center in nearby Huntsville, Ala., and public and private universities and colleges.

Local workforce investment areas Source: Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development Tennessee’s counties are grouped into 13 clusters with similar workforce needs.

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economic profile

Year-to-Year Job Changes by Industry Sector 2005-06

Tennessee has entered the international job market in a major way, with growth fueled by the substantial automotive industry within the state.

 

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INTERNATIONAL IMPACT

More than one-sixth of all manufaturing workers in Tennessee depend on exports for their jobs. More than 5,000 companies export from Tennessee locations.

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Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s export shipments grew 68 percent from 2001 to 2005.

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Sixty-three Canada-based satellite companies employ 13,810 Tennesseans and represent a total investment of approximately $2 billion. Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2005 exports to Canada totaled more than $6.1 billion, making Canada the largest consumer of Tennessee exports.

Non-agricultural employment by industry sector

To date, 159 Japanese companies employ approximately 43,277

Source: Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, 2006

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• Three-star community • Location between I-65 and I-40 • A safe, economical place to live and conduct business • SACS-accredited school system • Available workforce • Tennessee Technology Center (classroom and on-site training) • MTIDA-certified “Deal Ready” developed industrial park • Available industrial building • Rail service available • Competitive utility rates • Rural environment

City of Hohenwald 118 West Linden Avenue Hohenwald, TN 38462 (931) 796-2231 Fax (931) 796-6055 Chamber of Commerce 106 North Court Street (931) 796-6012 Fax (931) 796-6020 Hohenwald-Lewis County EDC

www.lewisedc.org

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economic profile Tennesseans, with investments of more than $10 billion. These investments make Japan the largest foreign investor nation in Tennessee and make Tennessee one of the top five states in the U.S. for investments from Japan.

Distribution of manufacturing jobs (May 2006) Source: Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, May 2006

FURNITURE 5%

Source: U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development

FOOD 9%

BEVERAGE & TOBACCO PRDTS • 1% APPAREL 2% NONMETALLIC MINERAL PRDTS 4%

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT • 16%

TEXTILE MILLS & PRDTS • 3% ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT & APPLIANCES • 6%

CHEMICALS 7%

ELECTRIC POWER Tennessee offers an abundant supply of affordable electric power, available through the Tennessee Valley Authority.

PLASTICS & RUBBER PRDTS 8%

COMPUTER & ELECTRONIC PRDTS • 3%

PRINTING & PUBLISHING • 5%

MACHINERY 9%

Electric rates in Tennessee are among the lowest in the nation – about 14-26 percent below the national average.

TEXTILE PRODUCT MILLS • 1% FABRICATED METALS • 11% PRIMARY METALS 3%

For five years in a row, TVA has delivered power to customers with 99.999 percent reliability.

WOOD PRODUCTS 4%

PLASTICS & RUBBER PRDTS 7%

Technical, financial and consulting services are available

Per-capita income Tennessee vs. Southeast region & United States Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, BEA, March 2006

$35,000 $30,000 $25,000 $20,000 $15,000 $10,000 $5,000

1998 Tennessee

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

1999

2000

2001

2002

Southeast Region

2003

2004

2005

United States

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FRANKLIN COUNTY

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All Right Here!

MA

University of the South

New High School

World-Class Industry

Bear Trace Golf

Beautiful Lakes Top Tier

3 Star

See for Yourself Chamber of Commerce Phone: (931) 967-6788 www.franklincountychamber.com Industrial Development Board Phone: (931) 967-5319 www.fcidb-tn.org Franklin County Government Phone: (931) 967-2905

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economic profile to help companies locate and find business solutions that generate savings and create profits.

Newly available 184 acres of prime industrial property, including water, sewer, gas and roads, waiting for you in Lewisburg, Tennessee!

TVA’s Megasites program features community sites precertified for large automotive plants or other specifically identified industries.

GAS PIPELINES 37,383 miles of natural gas pipelines and distribution lines crisscross the entire state.

RAIL 20 short-line railroads operating on 810 miles of rail 3 major railroads cross parts of the state: NorfolkSouthern, CSX, IllinoisCentral/ Canadian National 6 major rail lines operating on 2,340 miles of rail

SITE CHARACTERISTICS • 184 acres on Highway 373 • 7/10 of a mile from I-65 (exit 32) • Located in business park • Infrastructure developed on site water sewer gas & roads • Additional property available

Memphis is the thirdlargest rail center in the U.S.

• • • • •

Phase one environmental complete PILOT Program available 48 miles south of Nashville 54 miles north of Huntsville, AL 22 minutes from Spring Hill Manufacturing (GM) • 65 minutes from Nissan plant

Terry Wallace • Industrial Economic Development Director Lewisburg, TN 37091 • (931) 359-1544 Cell (931) 993-7512 • Fax (931) 359-7055

WATERWAYS 1,062 miles of navigable waterways Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway provides direct access to Gulf of Mexico harbors and international markets. Access to deep-water ports on the Gulf of Mexico (TennesseeTombigbee Waterway) and the East Coast Memphis is the fourth-largest inland port in the U.S.

PUBLIC TRANSIT 25 transit systems (bus, van and light rail) serve 95 counties

A TOP-RATED STATE Tennessee continues to stand at the top of the charts when it comes to economic development. Included in its growing list of recognitions are the following ratings: No. 1 in debt management by Expansion Management

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

Peerless Pinnacle Company Business Broker Mergers & Acquisitions Intermediary Experienced in Helping Others to Sell or Buy a Business Previously Executive and Manager in Corporate America Gerald P. Esmer, President P.O. Box 682405 • Franklin, TN 37068-2405 (615) 591-6490 • Fax: (615) 591-6391 gpesmer@comcast.net • www.peerlesspinnacle.com Gerald P. Esmer, CBB, CBC, CBI, AMAA – Member BBN® (Business Brokers Network) BNG (Brokers Network Group) ICBC (Institute of Certified Business Counselors) IBBA® (International Business Brokers Association) M&A Source® APMAA (Association of Professional Merger & Acquisition Advisors™) ESOP Affiliates MBA (Master of Business Administration) MSME (Master of Science, Mechanical Engineering) MSEE (Master of Science, Electrical Engineering) BSEE (Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering)

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SPRINGFIELD • ROBERTSON COUNTY

Seven Local Offices with 3,000 Miles of Distribution Pipeline Fueling the Growth of 20 Tennessee Counties

• Bordered by I-24 and I-65 • Award-winning airport with a 5,000-ft. runway; rail access served by CSX • Labor force of over 200,000 within a 25-mile radius • School system accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools • Community hospital with state-of-the-art medical facilities and 180 affiliated physicians • Small-town atmosphere, only half an hour drive from Nashville • Affordable housing, including golf course communities, historic districts and rural home sites Springfield/Robertson County Chamber of Commerce 100 5th Ave. W. • Springfield, TN 37172 • (615) 384-3800 mfosnes@sprobchamber.org • www.sprobchamber.org

The mission of Middle Tennessee Natural Gas Utility District is to improve the welfare of the communities it serves by providing quality Natural Gas service at competitive rates in a safe, environmentally clean and efficient manner.

Headquarters: 1030 W. Broad St. Smithville, TN 37166 Phone: (615) 597-4300 Fax: (615) 597-6331 mtng.com

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magazine. December 2005

HICKMAN COUNTY

No. 2 spot on Site Selection magazine’s annual ranking of Top

Centerville

10 Competitive States, May 2006 No. 4 on Site Selection magazine’s Top 10 States with the most micropolitan areas, March 2006

Nashville’s Backyard

No. 5 on Site Selection magazine’s 2005 Top Business Climate Ranking,

Rural Work Ethic Available Sites Interstate & Rail Access

November 2005 No. 9 on Expansion Management magazine’s 2005 Top Legislative Quotient List, December 2005 No. 10 among technology exporting states by the American Electronics Association’s 2006

N35° 46.716 W 087° 27.998

Cyberstates Report, June 2006 No. 16 in the nation for insourcing jobs by the Organization for International Investment January 2006

Hickman County Economic & Community Development Association Daryl Phillips, Executive Director 130 Progress Center Plaza • P.O. Box 204 Centerville, TN 37033-0204

Silver Shovel Award given by Area Development magazine for successful job creation and retention efforts, July 2006

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

(931) 729-5953

vision21@hickmanco.com • www.hickmanco.com/vision21

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economic profile

AIRPORTS

Airports â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Longest runway length Source: Tennessee Department of Transportation, Aeronautics Division

All six commercial airports have invested heavily in new cargohandling infrastructure.

 

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central hub for Federal Express â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and is the No. 1 transporter of air cargo in the world.

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Memphis International is a

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HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES Seven different interstates Eight interstate spurs around major metropolitan areas 14,162 miles of roadway 1,105 miles of interstate 13,077 miles of state roads 7,580 state-owned bridges 12,010 locally owned bridges 19 interstate rest areas 13 interstate welcome centers 9 truck weigh stations

FOR MORE INFORMATION Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development www.tnecd.gov TVA Economic Development www.tvaed.com www.tvasites.com

SOURCES: www.tennessee.gov/ www.labor-wfd/source

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TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


resource guide The following Resource Guide contains economic development listings and contact information for each of Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 95 counties. The information, compiled by the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development, was current as of mid-2007. Demographic information is available from the department and individual chambers of commerce. Montgomery Montgomery Macon Robertson Sumner

Pickett Pickett

Hancock Hancock Sullivan Claiborne Scott Campbell Hawkins Fentress Johnson Trousdale Overton Henry Washington Cheatham Grainger Houston Jackson Weakley Union Carter Smith Hamblen Morgan Anderson Davidson Wilson Dickson Putnam Greene Unicoi Benton Jefferson Dyer DeKalb Humphreys Knox Carroll Gibson Cumberland Rutherford White Cocke Roane Williamson Hickman Cannon Crockett Sevier Van Loudon Lauderdale Henderson Buren Warren Blount Perry Maury Madison Rhea Bledsoe Lewis Haywood Bedford Decatur Tipton Monroe Chester Coffee Grundy Meigs Marshall McMinn Sequatchie Moore Fayette Wayne Giles Shelby McNairy Hamilton Lawrence Hardeman Hardin Lincoln Marion Bradley Polk Franklin Lake Obion

Stewart

ANDERSON Anderson County Economic Development Association 245 N. Main St., Ste. 200, Clinton, TN 37716 (865) 457-1785 Fax: (865) 457-8969 andersoncountyeda.com timthompson10@comcast.net Oak Ridge Economic Partnership 1400 Oak Ridge Turnpike Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (865) 483-1321 Fax: (865) 483-1678 denton@orcc.org, orcc.org

BEDFORD Shelbyville/Bedford County Chamber of Commerce 100 N. Cannon Blvd. Shelbyville, TN 37160 (888) 662-2525, (931) 684-3482 Fax: (931) 684-3483 shelbyvilletn.com bedfordchamber@bellsouth.net

BENTON Benton County/Camden Chamber of Commerce 266 Hwy. 641 N. Camden, TN 38320 (731) 584-8395, Fax: (731) 584-5544 bentoncountycamden.com chamber1@usit.net Big Sandy Chamber of Commerce 17 Depot St., Big Sandy, TN 38221, (731) 593-0814

BLEDSOE Bledsoe Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 205, Pikeville TN 37367, (423) 447-2791

Clay

pikeville-bledsoe.com

BLOUNT Blount County Economic Development Board 201 S. Washington St. Maryville, TN 37804 (865) 983-2241, Fax: (865) 984-1386 blountindustry.com bdaniels@blountindustry.com

BRADLEY Cleveland/Bradley Chamber of Commerce 225 Keith St., P.O. Box 2275 Cleveland, TN 37320-2275 (423) 472-6587 Fax: (423) 472-2019 clevelandchamber.com info@clevelandchamber.com

CAMPBELL Campbell County Chamber of Commerce 1016 Main St., P.O. Box 305 Jacksboro, TN 37757 (423) 566-0329 Fax: (423) 566-4896 http://co.campbell.tn.us chamber@campbellcountygov.com Campbell County Mayor Jerry Cross P.O. Box 435, Jackson, TN 37757 (423) 562-2526, Fax: (423) 562-2075 mayor@campbellcounytgov.com

CANNON Cannon County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 140, Woodbury TN 37190, (615) 563-2222 Fax: (615) 563-2788

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

CARROLL Carroll County Chamber of Commerce 20740 E. Main St., P.O. Box 726 Huntingdon, TN 38344 (731) 986-4664 Fax: (731) 986-2029 carrollcounty-tn-chamber.com cchamber@earthlink.net McKenzie Industrial Development Board 15144 South Highland, McKenzie, TN 38201, (731) 352-2004 Fax: (731) 352-9875 mckindbd@earthlink.net

CARTER Carter County/ Elizabethton County Mayor 801 E. Elk Ave., Elizabethton, TN 37643, (423) 542-1801 Fax: (423) 542-9279 cartercountytn.com Carter County Chamber of Commerce 599 19E Bypass, Elizabethton, TN 37643, (423) 547-3850

CHEATHAM Cheatham County Department of Economic Development 100 Public Square, Ashland City, TN 37015, (615) 792-4316 Fax: (615) 792-2001 cheathamcountytn.gov/ economicdevelopment.htm james.fenton@ cheathamcountytn.gov

CHESTER Chester County

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resource guide Chamber of Commerce 140 Main St., P.O. Box 1976 Henderson, TN 38340 (731) 989-5222, Fax: (731) 983-5518 chestercountychamber.com cccc@charterinternet.com

CLAIBORNE Claiborne County Economic & Community Development P.O. Box 318, Tazewell, TN 37879, (423) 626-2592 Fax: (423) 626-1661, ccecd.org erlindamcmeel12006@yahoo.com Claiborne County Industrial Development Board 3222 Hwy. 25E, Ste. 1 Tazewell, TN 37879 (423) 626-4149 claibornecounty.com

CLAY Clay County Partnership Chamber of Commerce 424 Brown St., P.O. Box 769 Celina, TN 38551, (931) 243-3338 Fax: (931) 243-6809 dalehollowlake.org claychamber@twlakes.net

COCKE Newport/Cocke County Economic Development Commission 433 Prospect Ave., Newport, TN 37821, (423) 623-3008 Fax: (423) 625-1846, edcncc.com donaldhurst@bellsouth.net

COFFEE Manchester Area Chamber of Commerce 110 E. Main St., Manchester, TN 37355, (931) 728-7635 Fax: (931) 723-0736, macoc.org manchestercoc@bellsouth .net Tullahoma Area Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 1205, Tullahoma, TN 37388, (931) 455-5497 Fax: (931) 455-5350 tullahoma.org tullahomachamber@tullahoma.org

CROCKETT Crockett County Chamber of Commerce 330 S. Bells St., Alamo, TN 38001, (731) 696-5120 Fax: (731) 696-4855

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crockettchamber.com crockettchamber@crockettnet.com

CUMBERLAND Crossville-Cumberland County Chamber of Commerce 34 S. Main St., P.O. Box 453 Crossville, TN 38555 (931) 484-8444, (877) 465-3861 Fax: (931) 484-7511 www.crossville-chamber.com thechamber@crossville.com

DAVIDSON Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of Economic & Community Development Metropolitan Courthouse Nashville, TN 37201 (615) 862-4700 Fax: (615) 862-6025 nashville.gov/ecdev ecdev@metro.nashville.org Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce 211 Commerce St., Ste. 100 Nashville, TN 37201 (615) 743-3024 Fax: (615) 256-0393 nashvilleareainfo.com contactus@nashvillechamber.com Bellevue Chamber of Commerce 177A Belle Forest Circle Nashville, TN 37221 (615) 662-2737, Fax: (615) 662-0197 thebellevuechamber.com info@thebellevuechamber.com Donelson Hermitage Chamber of Commerce 5653 Frist Blvd., Ste. 740 Hermitage, TN 37076 (615) 883-7896 Fax: (615) 391-4880 d-hchamber.com

DECATUR Decatur County Chamber of Commerce 139 Tennessee Ave. N., Parsons, TN 38363, (731) 847-4202 Fax: (731) 847-4222 decaturcountytennessee.org dccc@netease.net

DEKALB Smithville-DeKalb County Chamber of Commerce 301 N. Public Square, P.O. Box 64 Smithville, TN 37166 (615) 597-4163, Fax: (615) 597-4164 smithvilletn.com/chamber dekalbtn@dtccom.net dekalbtn.com chamber@dekalbtn.com

DICKSON Dickson County Chamber of Commerce 119 Hwy. 70 E., Dickson, TN 37055-2080, (615) 446-2349 (877) 718-4967, Fax: (615) 441-3112 dicksoncountychamber.com contactus@ dicksoncountychamber.com

DYER Dyersburg/Dyer County Chamber of Commerce 2000 Commerce Ave., P.O. Box 747 Dyersburg, TN 38024 (731) 285-3433 Fax: (731) 286-4926 ddcc.dyercountychamber.com chamber@ecsis.net

FAYETTE

Madison-Rivergate Area Chamber of Commerce 301 Madison St., P.O. Box 97 Madison, TN 37115 (615) 865-5400 Fax: (615) 865-0448 madisonrivergatechamber.com president@ madisonrivergatechamber.com Old Hickory Area Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 506, Old Hickory, TN 37138, (615) 847-3958 oldhickorychamber.org mail@oldhickorychamber.org

Fayette County Chamber of Commerce 107 W. Court Square, P.O. Box 411 Somerville, TN 38068 (901) 465-8690 Fax: (901) 465-6497 fayettecountychamber.net fcc@fayettecountychamber.net

FENTRESS Fentress County Chamber of Commerce 114 Central Ave. W., P.O. Box 1294 Jamestown, TN 38556 (931) 879-9948, (800) 327-3945 Fax: (931) 879-6767 jamestowntn.org info@jamestowntn.org

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


FRANKLIN Franklin County Industrial Development Board 100 First Ave., Winchester, TN 37398, (931) 967-5319 Fax: (931) 962-1478 fcidb-tn.org jpayne@franklincotn.us

GIBSON Greater Gibson County Chamber of Commerce 200 E. Eaton St., P.O. Box 464 Trenton, TN 38382 (731) 855-0973 Fax: (731) 855-0979 gibsoncountytn.com info@gibsoncountytn.com Humboldt Chamber of Commerce 1200 Main St., Humboldt, TN 38343, (731) 784-1842 Fax: (731) 784-1573 humboldttnchamber.org jim@humboldttnchamber.org Milan Chamber of Commerce 1061 S. Main St., Milan, TN 38358 (731) 686-7494 cityofmilantn.com/chamber.htm chamber@cityofmilantn.com

GILES Giles County Chamber of Commerce 110 N. Second St., Pulaski, TN 38478, (931) 363-3789 Fax: (931) 363-7279 gilescountychamber.com gilesdirector@bellsouth.net Giles County Economic Development Commission 203 S. First St., P.O. Box 633 Pulaski, TN 38478, (931) 363-9138 Fax: (931) 363-3408 gilescountyedc.com gcedc@usit.net

GRAINGER Grainger County Industrial Development Board P.O. Box 1218, Morristown, TN 37816-1218, (865) 587-4500 Fax: (865) 587-4509 Grainger County Mayor P.O. Box 126, Rutledge, TN 37861 (865) 828-3513, graingertn.com

GREENE Greene County Partnership 115 Academy St., Greeneville, TN 37743, (423) 638-4111 Fax: (423) 638-5345 GreeneCountyPartnership.com econdev@xtn.net

GRUNDY Grundy County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 387, Gruetli, TN 37339 (931) 779-4050 Monteagle Mountain Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 353, Monteagle, TN 37356, (931) 924-5353 Fax: (931) 924-2264 monteaglechamber.com info@monteaglechamber.com

HAMBLEN Douglas-Cherokee Economic Authority 534 E. First North St., P.O. Box 1218, Morristown, TN 37814 (423) 587-4500, (800) 637-2656 Fax: (423) 487-4509 douglascherokee.org mhavely@douglascherokee.org Morristown Area Chamber of Commerce 825 W. First North St., P.O. Box 9 Morristown, TN 37815 (423) 586-6382, (877) 586-6382 Fax: (423) 586-6576 morristownchamber.com industry@morristownchamber.com

HAMILTON Chattanooga African American Chamber of Commerce 535 Chestnut St., Ste. 200 P.O. Box 1189, Chattanooga, TN 37402, (423) 265-0021 chattanoogaAACC.org Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce 811 Broad St., Chattanooga, TN 37402-2690, (423) 763-4335 Fax: (423) 267-7242 chattanoogachamber.com thamilton@ chattanoogachamber.com

HANCOCK Hancock County Chamber of Commerce Clerk & Master

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

P.O. Box 277, Sneedville, TN 37869, (423) 733-4524 Fax: (423) 733-2762 scollins22001@yahoo.com

HARDEMAN Hardeman County Chamber of Commerce 500 W. Market St., P.O. Box 313 Bolivar, TN 38008, (731) 658-6554 Fax: (731) 658-6874 hardemancountychamber.org rjensikhccc@bellsouth.net

HARDIN Hardin County Chamber of Commerce 320 Main St., Savannah, TN 38372 (731) 925-2363, (800) 750-2363 Fax: (731) 925-8069 hardincountychamber.com Team Hardin County Inc. (Industrial and Economic Development Office) 495 Main St., Savannah, TN 38372 (731) 925-8181 Fax: (731) 925-6987 tourhardincounty.com teamhardin@charterinternet.com

HAWKINS Hawkins County Industrial Development Board 403 E. Main St., Rogersville, TN 37857, (423) 272-7668 Fax: (423) 272-0200 hawkinscounty.org/development rprice@hawkinscounty.org Rogersville/Hawkins County Chamber of Commerce 107 E. Main St., Ste. 100 Rogersville, TN 37857 Phone/Fax: (423) 272-2186 rogersville.us/coc hawkinschamber@chartertn.net

HAYWOOD Brownsville-Haywood County Chamber of Commerce 121 W. Main St., Brownsville, TN 38012, (731) 772-2193 Fax: (731) 772-2195 haywoodcountybrownsville. com/chamber brownsvillechamber@ newwavecomm.net

HENDERSON Henderson County

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resource guide Chamber of Commerce 149 Eastern Shores Dr., P.O. Box 737 Lexington, TN 38351 (731) 968-2126, Fax: (731) 968-7006 hendersoncountychamber.com vickibunch@ hendersoncountychamber.com Paris-Henry County Tennessee Economic Development 2508 E. Wood St., P.O. Box 8 Paris, TN 38242, (731) 642-3431 Fax: (731) 642-6454 parishenrycoedc.com jcmahan@charterinternet.com

HICKMAN Hickman County Economic & Community Development Association/Vision 21 130 Progress Center Plaza, P.O. Box 204, Centerville, TN 37033-0204, (931) 729-5953 Fax: (931) 729-9319 hickmanco.com vision21@hickmanco.com

HOUSTON Houston County Area Chamber of Commerce 68 S. Spring St., P.O. Box 603, Erin, TN 37061-0603 (931) 289-5100 Fax: (931) 289-5600 houstoncochamber.com irish@peoplestel.net

HUMPHREYS Humphreys County Economic Development Council 305 N. Church St., P.O. Box 218 Waverly, TN 37185 (931) 296-5199 Fax: (931) 296-2135 Humphreys County Area Chamber of Commerce 124 E. Main St., P.O. Box 733 Waverly, TN 37185, (931) 296-4865 Fax: (931) 296-2285 waverly.net/hcchamber hccchamber@bellsouth.net

JACKSON Gainesboro & Jackson County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 827, Gainesboro, TN 38562, (931) 268-0971 gainesboro-jcchamber.com

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LAKE

JEFFERSON Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 890, Dandridge, TN 37725, (865) 397-9642 Fax: (865) 397-0164 jefferson-tn-chamber.org jeffinfo@jefferson-tn-chamber.org

Reelfoot Area Chamber of Commerce 130 S. Court St., Tiptonville, TN 38079, (731) 253-8144 Fax: (731) 253-9923 reelfootareachamber.com info@reelfootareachamber.com

LAUDERDALE

JOHNSON Johnson County Tennessee Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 66, Mountain City, TN 37683, (423) 727-1700 (423) 727-5800 johnsoncountychamber.org info@johnsoncountychamber.org Johnson County Economic Development 222 W. Main St., Mountain City, TN 37683, (423) 727-9696 Fax: (423) 727-7255 Johnsoncountychamber.org/ EconDev, countymayor@ earthlink.net

KNOX East Tennessee Economic Development Agency 10215 Technology Dr., Suite 202 Knoxville, TN 37932 (865) 777-3833 Fax: (865) 777-5233 knoxvilleoakridge.org aneel@eteda.org Farragut/West Knox Chamber of Commerce 11826 Kingston Pike, Ste. 110 P.O. Box 22461, Farragut, TN 37933, (865) 675-7057 Fax: (865) 671-2409 farragutchamber.com info@farragutchamber.com Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of East TN 17 Market Sq., #201, P.O. Box 31552, Knoxville, TN 37902-1405 (865) 246-2628 Fax: (865) 523-2071 hccet.org Knoxville Area Chamber Partnership 17 Market Sq., #201, Knoxville, TN 37902, (865) 637-4550 Fax: (865) 523-2071 knoxvillechamber.com partnership@kacp.com, dlawyer@knoxvillechamber.com

Lauderdale Chamber/Economic & Community Development 123 S. Jefferson St., Ripley, TN 38063, (731) 635-9541 (731) 635-8463 Fax: (731) 635-9064 lauderdalecountytn.org lhankins@lauderdalecounty.org

LAWRENCE Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce 1609 N. Locust Ave., P.O. Box 86 Lawrenceburg, TN 38464 (931) 762-4911, (877) 388-4911 Fax: (931) 762-3153 chamberofcommerce.lawrence. tn.us, info@chamberofcommerce. lawrence.tn.us

LEWIS Lewis County Chamber of Commerce 106 N. Court, Hohenwald, TN 38462, (931) 796-4084 lewiscountychamber.com president@lewiscounty chamber.com

LINCOLN Fayetteville/Lincoln County Chamber of Commerce 208 S. Elk Ave., P.O. Box 515 Fayetteville, TN 37334 (888) 433-1238, (931) 433-1234 Fax: (931) 433-9087 vallnet.com/chamberofcommerce fayettevilletn.com cofc@vallnet.com

LOUDON Loudon County Chamber of Commerce 318 Angel Row, P.O. Box 87 Loudon, TN 37774 (865) 458-2067 Fax: (865) 458-1206 loudoncountychamber.com lccc@loudoncountychamber.com

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


Loudon County Economic Development Agency 274 Blair Bend Dr., Loudon, TN 37774, (865) 458-8889 Fax: (865) 458-3792 loudoncountycommercial.com lceda@loudoncountyeda.org

MACON Macon County Chamber of Commerce 208 Church St., Lafayette, TN 37083, (615) 666-5885 Fax: (615) 666-6969 maconcountytn.com maconcountytninddev.com mchamber@nctc.com

MADISON Jackson Area Chamber of Commerce 197 Auditorium St., P.O. Box 1904 Jackson, TN 38302 (731) 423-2200 Fax: (731) 424-4860 jacksontn.com chamber@jacksontn.com

MARION Marion County Chamber of Commerce 302 Betsy Pack Dr., Jasper, TN 37347, (423) 942-5103 Fax: (423) 942-0098 marioncountychamber.com marioncoc@bellsouth.net

MARSHALL Marshall County Chamber of Commerce 227 Second Ave. N., Lewisburg, TN 37091, (931) 359-3863 Fax: (931) 359-8411 marshallchamber.org director@marshallchamber.org

MAURY Maury Alliance 106 W. Sixth St., P.O. Box 1076 Columbia, TN 38402 (931) 388-2155 Fax: (931) 380-0335 mauryalliance.com City of Mt. Pleasant P.O. Box 426, Mt. Pleasant, TN 38474, (931) 379-7717 Fax: (931) 379-5418 mtpleasant-tn.com

Spring Hill Chamber of Commerce 199 Town Center Pkwy. P.O. Box 789, Spring Hill, TN 37174, (931) 486-2252 Fax: (931) 486-0516 springhilltn.org ken@springhilltn.org

M C MINN McMinn County Economic Development Authority P.O. Box 767, Athens, TN 37371-0767, (423) 745-1506 Fax: (423) 745-1507 mcminncoeda.org mcminncoeda@mcminncoeda.org Etowah Area Chamber of Commerce L&N Railroad Depot, 727 Tennessee Ave., P.O. Box 458, Etowah, TN 37331, (423) 263-2228 Fax: (423) 263-1670 etowahcoc.org info@etowahcoc.org

103 College St., Ste. 6 Madisonville, TN 37354 (423) 442-3652 Fax: (423) 442-7933 monroegovernment.org shaneb@monroegoverment.org Tellico Reservoir Development Agency 59 Excellence Way, Vonore, TN 37885-9641, (865) 673-8599 (800) 562-8732 Fax: (423) 884-6869 tellico.com, rhammontree@tds.net

MONTGOMERY Clarksville-Montgomery County Economic Development Council/Chamber of Commerce 25 Jefferson St., Ste. 300 P.O. Box 883, Clarksville, TN 37040, (800) 530-2487 (931) 647-2331 clarksville.tn.us clarksvillechamber.com cacc@clarksville.tn.us cmcedc@clarksville.tn.us

M C NAIRY McNairy County Chamber of Commerce 144 Cypress St., P.O. Box 7, Selmer, TN 38375, (731) 645-6360 Fax: (731) 645-7663 mcnairy.com mcnairy@charterinternet.com McNairy County Economic Development Commission 144 W. Cypress, P.O. Box 7, Selmer, TN 38375, (731) 645-7476 Fax: (731) 645-7663 mcnairy.com mcnairy@charterinternet.com

MEIGS Meigs County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 1301, Decatur, TN 37322 (423) 334-5496 meigscountytnchamber.org

MONROE Monroe County Chamber of Commerce 520 Cook St., Ste. A, P.O. Box 68 Madisonville, TN 37354 (423) 442-4588 Fax: (423) 442-9016 monroecountychamber.org info@monroecountychamber.org Monroe County Economic Development

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

MOORE Lynchburg Moore County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 421, Lynchburg, TN 37352, (931) 759-4111 lynchburgtenn.com info@lynchburgtenn.com

MORGAN Morgan County Chamber of Commerce 415 N. Kingston St., P.O. Box 539 Wartburg, TN 37887 (423) 346-5740 Fax: (423) 346-3609 morgancountychamber.com morgancotn@yahoo.com

OBION Obion County Joint Economic Development Council 214 E. Church St., Union City, TN 38261, (731) 885-0211 Fax: (731) 885-7155 obioncounty.org jcooper@obioncounty.org

OVERTON Livingston-Overton County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 354, Livingston, TN 38570, (931) 823-6421 (800) 876-7393

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resource guide overtonco.com chamber@twlakes.net

info@roanealliance.org

sevieredc@bellsouth.net

ROBERTSON PERRY Perry County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 177, Linden, TN 37096 (931) 589-2453 perrycountytennessee.com

PICKETT Byrdstown/Pickett County Chamber of Commerce 109 W. Main St., P.O. Box 447 Byrdstown, TN 38549 (888) 406-4704, (931) 864-7195 dalehollow.com byrdstown@tnaccess.com

POLK Polk County/Copper Basin Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 560, Benton, TN 37307 (800) 633-7655, (423) 338-5040 ocoeetn.org westoffice@ocoeetn.org (Benton) eastoffice@ocoeetn.org (Copperhill)

PUTNAM Cookeville Area-Putnam County Chamber of Commerce One W. First St., Cookeville, TN 38501, (931) 526-2211 (800) 264-5541 Fax: (931) 526-4023 cookevillechamber.com chamber@cookeville.com The Highlands Initiative One W. First St., Cookeville, TN 38501, (931) 526-2211 Fax: (931) 526-4023 cookevillechamber.com dcallahan@cookevillechamber.com

RHEA Rhea Economic and Tourism Council 107 Main St., Dayton, TN 37321 (423) 775-6171, Fax: (423) 570-0105 rheacountyetc.com director@rheacountyetc.com

ROANE The Roane Alliance 1209 N. Kentucky St., Kingston, TN 37763, (865) 376-5547 (800) 386-4686 Fax: (865) 376-4978 roanealliance.org

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Springfield/Robertson County Tennessee Chamber of Commerce 100 Fifth Ave. W., Springfield, TN 37172, (615) 384-3800 spchamber.org info@sprobchamber.org GreenRidge Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 611, Greenbrier, TN 37073, (615) 643-6300 White House Area Chamber of Commerce 414 Hwy. 76, P.O. Box 521 White House, TN 37188 (615) 672-3937 Fax: (615) 672-2828 whitehousechamber.org whcoc@bellsouth.net

RUTHERFORD Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce 501 Memorial Blvd., P.O. Box 864 Murfreesboro, TN 37133 (800) 716-7560, (615) 893-6565 Fax: (615) 890-7600 rutherfordchamber.org info@rutherfordchamber.org City of LaVergne 5093 Murfreesboro Rd., LaVergne, TN 37086 (615) 287-8690, lavergne.org

SCOTT Scott County Chamber of Commerce 19422 Alberta St., P.O. Box 4442 Oneida, TN 37841, (800) 645-6905 (423) 569-6900 www.scottcounty.com/chamber

SEQUATCHIE Sequatchie County-Dunlap Chamber of Commerce 13 Rankin Ave. N., P.O. Box 1653 Dunlap, TN 37327, (423) 949-7608 sequatchie.com sequatchie@bledsoe.net

SEVIER Sevier County Economic Development Council 100 E. Main St., Ste. 302, P.O. Box 4066, Sevierville, TN 37864 (800) 874-9422, (865) 428-2212 Fax: (865) 453-2312, scedc.com

Gatlinburg Chamber of Commerce 811 E. Parkway, P.O. Box 527 Gatlinburg, TN 37738 (865) 436-4178, (800) 588-1817 Fax: (865) 430-3876 gatlinburg.com info@gatlinburg.com Pigeon Forge Chamber of Commerce 2713 Parkway, Pigeon Forge, TN 37863, (800) 221-9858 (865) 453-5700 pigeonforgechamber.com pifchamber@kmsfia.com Sevierville Chamber of Commerce 110 Gary Wade Blvd., Sevierville, TN 37862, (888) SEVIERVILLE (865) 453-6411 Fax: (865) 453-9649 seviervillechamber.com info@seviervillechamber.org

SHELBY Memphis Regional Chamber of Commerce 22 N. Front St., Ste. 200 P.O. Box 224, Memphis, TN 38101 (901) 543-3516 Fax: (901) 543-3510 memphischamber.com mherbison@memphis chamber.com Memphis & Shelby County Department of Economic Development (901) 576-7107 dobizinmemphis.com Arlington Chamber of Commerce 12015 Brown St., P.O. Box 545, Arlington, TN 38002 (901) 867-0545, Fax: (901) 8674066 arlingtontnchamber.com arlngtnchamber@aol.com Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce 2969 Elmore Park Rd. Bartlett, TN 38134-8309 (901) 372-9457 Fax: (901) 372-9488 bartlettchamber.org info@bartlettchamber.org Collierville Chamber of Commerce

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


485 Halle Park Dr., Collierville, TN 38017, (901) 853-1949 (888) 853-1949 Fax: (901) 853-2399 colliervillechamber.com tourcollierville.com info@colliervillechamber.com Germantown Area Chamber of Commerce 2195 Germantown Rd. S. Germantown, TN 38138 (901) 755-1200 Fax: (901) 755-9168 germantownchamber.com info@germantownchamber.com Millington Area Chamber of Commerce 7743 Church St., Millington, TN 38053, (901) 872-1486 Fax: (901) 872-0727 millingtonchamber.com info@millingtonchamber.com Millington Industrial Development Board 7965 Veterans Pkwy., Ste. 101 Millington, TN 38053 (901) 872-8700 tnindustrialdevelopment.com info@tnindustrialdevelopment.com miltnidb@bigriver.net

SMITH Smith County Chamber of Commerce & Industrial Board 939 Upper Ferry Rd., P.O. Box 70 Carthage, TN 37030 (615) 735-2093 smithcountychamber.org info@smithcountychamber.org

STEWART Stewart County Chamber of Commerce 1008 Moore Rd., P.O. Box 147, Dover, TN 37058, (931) 232-8290 Fax: (931) 232-4973 stewartcountyvacation.com stewartcountycha@bellsouth.net

SULLIVAN Sullivan Partnership P.O. Box 1157, Blountville, TN 37617 (423) 279-7681, Fax: (423) 279-7683 networkstn.com campbell@networkstn.com Kingsport Chamber of Commerce 151 E. Main St. Kingsport, TN 37660, (423) 392-8800

kingsportchamber.org Bristol Chamber of Commerce 20 Volunteer Pkwy. Bristol, TN 37620 (423) 989-4850 bristolchamber.org

SUMNER City of Gallatin Economic Development Agency 132 W. Main St., P.O. Box 773 Gallatin, TN 37066 (615) 451-5940, Fax: (615) 451-5941 gallatintn-eda.com Gallatin Chamber of Commerce 118 W. Main St., Gallatin, TN 37066 (615) 452-4000 gallatintn.org info@gallatintn.org Goodlettsville Chamber of Commerce 117 N. Main St., Ste. A Goodlettsville, TN 37072 (615) 859-7979, Fax: (615) 859-1480 goodlettsvillechamber.com Hendersonville Area Chamber of Commerce 101 Wessington Pl. Hendersonville, TN 37075 (615) 824-2818, Fax: (615) 822-7498 hendersonvillechamber.com info@hendersonvillechamber.com Portland Chamber of Commerce 106 Main St., P.O. Box 387 Portland, TN 37148 (615) 325-9032, Fax: (615) 325-8399 portlandtn.com portcofc@bellsouth.net Sumner County Office of the County Executive 355 N. Belvedere Dr., Room 102 Gallatin, TN 37066 (615) 452-3604, Fax: (615) 451-6066 sumnertn.org Forward Sumner Economic Council 353 New Shackle Island Rd., Ste. 248 P.O. Box 1071, Hendersonville, TN 37077, (615) 822-7610 Fax: (615) 822-1825 forwardsumner.org info@forwardsumner.org White House Area Chamber of Commerce 414 Hwy. 76, White House, TN 37188, (615) 672-3937 Fax: (615) 672-2828 whitehousechamber.org whcoc@bellsouth.net

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE

TIPTON Covington/Tipton County Chamber of Commerce 106 W. Liberty Ave., P.O. Box 683 Covington, TN 38019 (901) 476-9727 Fax: (901) 476-0056 covington-tiptoncochamber.com South Tipton County Chamber of Commerce 1461 Munford Ave., P.O. Box 1198 Munford, TN 38058 (901) 837-4600 Fax: (901) 837-4602 southtipton.com chamber@southtipton.com

TROUSDALE Hartsville-Trousdale County Chamber of Commerce 240 Broadway, Hartsville, TN 37074, (615) 374-9243 Fax: (615) 374-0068 hartsvilletrousdale.com eford@hartsvilletrousdale.com

UNICOI Joint Economic Development Board of Unicoi County 204 Gay St., Ste. 3, P.O. Box 628 Erwin, TN 37650, (423) 743-9555 Fax: (423) 743-6717 unicoicounty.org ddh6090@earthlink.net Unicoi County Chamber of Commerce 100 S. Main Ave., P.O. Box 713 Erwin, TN 37650, (423) 7433000, Fax: (423) 743-0942 unicoicounty.org info@unicoicounty.org

UNION Union County Chamber of Commerce 4369 Maynardville Hwy. P.O. Box 848, Maynardville, TN 37807, (865) 992-2811, unioncochamber.com

VAN BUREN Van Buren Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 814, Spencer, TN 38585 (931) 946-7033 vanburenchamber.com htdinc@bledsoe.net

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resource guide

VISIT OUR ADVERTISERS Bellsouth www.bellsouth.com Belz Enterprises www.belz.com Blount Partnership www.blountindustry.com Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce www.chattanoogachamber.com City of Brownsville City of Franklin www.franklin-gov.com City of Gallatin www.gallatin-tn.gov City of Goodlettsville www.cityofgoodlettsville.com City of Hohenwald www.lewisedc.org City of La Vergne www.lavergne.org City of Lewisburg www.lewisburgtn.com City of Mt. Juliet www.cityofmtjuliet.org Clarksville-Montgomery County www.clarksville.tn.us Cleveland/Bradley County www.clevelandchamber.com Cookeville Area-Putnam County Chamber of Commerce www.cookevillechamber.com Crossville-Cumberland County Chamber of Commerce www.crossville-chamber.com Dyersburg/Dyer County Chamber www.dyerchamber.com East TN Economic Development www.knoxvilleoakridge.org Forklift Systems www.forkliftsystems.com Franklin County www.franklincountychamber.com Governor’s Books From Birth Foundation www.governorsfoundation.org Hickman County Economic & Community Development www.hickmanco.com/vision21 JC/J/WC Economic Development Board www.jcedb.org Lauderdale Chamber/ECD www.lauderdalecountytn.org McMinnville & Warren County www.warrentnedb.com Memphis Chamber www.memphischamber.com Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority www.flynashville.com Mid TN Industrial Development Association www.mtida.org Middle TN Natural Gas www.mtng.com Monroe County Economic Development www.monroegovernment.org Networks Sullivan Partnership www.networkstn.com Northeast TN Valley Regional Industrial Development Association www.netvaly.org Oak Ridge National Laboratory www.ornl.gov Peerless Pinnacle Company www.peerlesspinnacle.com Rhea County Economic & Tourism Rutherford County Chamber www.rutherfordchamber.org Southeast Industrial Development Association www.seida.info/www Springfield-Robertson County www.spchamber.org T.W. Frierson Contractor, Inc. www.twfrierson.com Tellico Reservoir www.tellico.com The Regional Alliance for Economic Development www.alliancetnva.com Williamson Works www.williamsonworks.com

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WARREN Industrial Development Board of McMinnville-Warren County Inc. 110 S. Court Sq., P.O. Box 574 McMinnville, TN 37111 (931) 474-4769 Fax: (931) 473-4741 warrentnedb.com

WASHINGTON Johnson City-JonesboroughWashington County Economic Development Board Inc. 603 E. Market St., Ste. 200 Johnson City, TN 37601 (423) 975-2380 Fax: (423) 975-2385 jcedb.org Johnson City Development Authority 207 E. Main St., Ste. 1-B P.O. Box 419, Johnson City, TN 37605, (423) 928-2988 Fax: (423) 928-2425 jcdevelopment.org Johnson City/Jonesborough/ Washington County Chamber of Commerce 603 E. Market St., Ste. 100, Johnson City, TN 37601 (423) 461-8000, (800) 852-3392 johnsoncitytnchamber.com

Weakley County Economic Development Board P.O. Box 106, Martin, TN 38237 (731) 587-2992 Fax: (731) 587-7334 rprice@wcedb.com

WHITE Sparta-White County Chamber of Commerce 16 W. Bockman Way, Sparta, TN 38583, (931) 836-3552 Fax: (931) 836-2216 sparta-chamber.net sparta-chamber@charter.net

WILLIAMSON Williamson County Economic Development Council 389 Nichol Mill Ln., Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 261-2880 Fax: (615) 261-2885 williamsonworks.com info@williamsonworks.com Williamson County-Franklin Chamber of Commerce City Hall, P.O. Box 156, Franklin, TN 37065-0156 (615) 794-1225 Fax: (615) 790-5337 williamson-franklinchamber.com

WILSON Lebanon/Wilson County Chamber of Commerce 149 Public Sq., Lebanon, TN 37087, (800) 789-1327 (615) 444-5503 Fax: (615) 453-9655 lebanonwilsontnchamber.org lebchamb@bellsouth.net

The Regional Alliance for Economic Development P.O. Box 1119, Blountville, TN 37617, (423) 323-8102 Fax: (423) 323-8115 alliancetnva.com info@alliancetnva.com

WAYNE Wayne County Chamber of Commerce 219 E. Broadway (Hwy. 13) Collinwood, TN 38450 (931) 724-4337 Fax: (931) 724-4347 waynecountychamber.org chamber@netease.net

WEAKLEY Weakley County Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 67, Dresden, TN 38225 (731) 364-3787 Fax: (731) 364-2099 www.weakleycountychamber.com wccc@crunet.com

Joint Economic & Community Development Board of Wilson County 115 Castle Heights Ave. N. Ste. 102, Lebanon, TN 37087, (615) 443-1210, Fax: (615) 443-0277 doingbiz.org Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce 46 W. Caldwell St. Mt. Juliet, TN 37122 (615) 758-3478 Fax: (615) 754-8595 mtjulietchamber.com City of Mt. Juliet 2425 N. Mt. Juliet Road Mt. Juliet, TN 37122 (615) 754-2552 Fax: (615) 754-5742 cityofmtjuliet.org

TENNESSEE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE


Tennessee Economic Development Guide: 2007-08  

Tennessee offers a wide array of advantages to businesses considering a startup or relocation within its borders. The following section offe...

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