Issuu on Google+

tnconnections fall 2010

An Official Publication of Your Locally Owned Municipal Electric System

tnconnections.com

It’s Easy To Go Green Brentwood mom’s business provides simple tips

Brimming With Joy

Local fish catches on as dinner delight

The Choice Is Chattanooga Visitors laud eco-friendly river city for aquarium, arts and activities


tn almanac

Travel, tips and tidbits at a glance Historical B&B As the oldest house in the state’s oldest town, the Hawley House Bed & Breakfast is a Tennessee treasure. The house, built in 1793 in Jonesborough, offers colorful rooms with antiques and American folk art, as well as a wraparound porch and a cozy fireplace. A candlelit breakfast, which guests can enjoy while taking in a view of the town, is provided. Room rates range from $105 to $150, with breakfast and refreshments included. Those visiting in the fall can attend the National Storytelling Festival – which takes place in downtown Jonesborough the first weekend in October every year. The festival began in 1973 and is now considered one of the Top 100 Events in North America. For more information on the Hawley House B&B, visit www.bbonline.com/tn/hawley or call (423) 753-8869.

Click It, Learn It

Pig Perfection This eatery may be small, but it offers big tastes. Carl’s Perfect Pig Bar-B-Que & Grill, located in White Bluff, serves up pulled pork, ribs, burgers and more delicious fare. The wise diner saves room for dessert, with tempting options such as banana pudding and peach and blackberry cobbler on the menu. Owner Carl Teitloff promises real, old-fashioned pit barbecue. He founded the business when he realized many restaurants were using ovens – not an open pit – to cook and prepare barbecue. He decided to open his own restaurant, offering this favorite Southern food the way he feels it ought to be. Carl’s Perfect Pig is located about 30 minutes west of Nashville, off of Highway 70. It is open five days a week, Wednesday through Sunday. Call (615) 797-4020 for more information or to place an order.

Bill Carey may have discovered the way to get kids interested in history. No, he didn’t write a textbook; he created a website devoted to Tennessee history. The site, www.tnhistoryforkids.org, offers information on all 95 counties that make up the state. In addition, it includes pages discussing notable people, civics and geography. Not only is Carey’s solution fresh, it’s also green. He knew he would be unable to create a single book that could be used by kindergartners as well as high school students, so he decided to use a more eco-friendly tool: the Internet. His site enables students to click on their grade and dig into information compiled and written specifically for them. This website not only saves countless trees – it also allows Carey to offer more than a traditional textbook can. With videos, virtual tours and quizzes just a click away, students are engaged in a whole new way.


contents

tnconnections Fall 2010 Edition Managing Editor Jessy Yancey Contributing Writers Rebecca Denton, Carol Cowan, Roben Mounger Marketing Creative Director Keith Harris Photography Director Jeffrey S. Otto Media Technology Director Christina Carden Senior Photographers Jeff Adkins, Brian McCord Staff Photographers Todd Bennett, Antony Boshier Senior Graphic Designers Janine Maryland, Vikki Williams Proofreading Manager Raven Petty Content Coordinators Jennifer Graves, Erica Hines Ad Production Manager Katie Middendorf Ad Traffic Assistants Marcia Millar, Patricia Moisan Chairman Greg Thurman President/Publisher Bob Schwartzman Executive Vice President Ray Langen Sr. V.P./Sales Todd Potter, Carla H. Thurman Sr. V.P./Operations Casey E. Hester V.P./Editorial Director Teree Caruthers V.P./Visual Content Mark Forester V.P./Custom Publishing Kim Newsom V.P./Content Operations Natasha Lorens Controller Chris Dudley Advertising Sales Manager, Custom Division Tori Hughes Integrated Media Manager Robin Robertson Distribution Director Gary Smith Custom/Travel Sales Support Rachael Goldsberry Office Manager Shelly Grissom Receptionist Linda Bishop Tennessee Connections is published quarterly by Journal Communications Inc. for participating members of the Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association. TMEPA represents 61 municipal power distributors in Tennessee, which serve more than 2 million customers. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067. Phone: 615-771-0080.E-mail: info@jnlcom.com. For information about TMEPA, contact: Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association Paddock 1, Suite C-13, 229 Ward Circle Brentwood, TN 37027 Phone 615-373-5738, Fax 615-373-1901 tmepa.org

4 Features 4 The Choice Is Chattanooga

Chattanooga ranks among top picks for a green vacation

Look for this logo that identifies green articles, tips and fun facts.

Executive Director Mike Vinson

9 The Pumpkin Process ©Copyright 2010 Journal Communications Inc. and Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent.

10 It’s Easy To Go Green

ON THE COVER: An American Alligator at the Tennessee Aquarium in downtown Chattanooga by Jeff Adkins

12 Brimming With Joy

tnconnections.com contents

tnconnections Digital Magazine

tnconnections

Fall 2010 Edition Managing Editor Jessy Yancey Contributing Writers Rebecca Denton, Carol Cowan, Roben Mounger Marketing Creative Director Keith Harris Photography Director Jeffrey S. Otto Media Technology Director Christina Carden Senior Photographers Jeff Adkins, Brian McCord Staff Photographers Todd Bennett, Antony Boshier Senior Graphic Designers Janine Maryland, Vikki Williams Proofreading Manager Raven Petty Content Coordinators Jennifer Graves, Erica Hines Ad Production Manager Katie Middendorf Ad Traffic Assistants Marcia Millar, Patricia Moisan

fall 2010

An Official Publication of Your Locally Owned Municipal Electric System

tnconnections.com

Chairman Greg Thurman President/Publisher Bob Schwartzman Executive Vice President Ray Langen Sr. V.P./Sales Todd Potter, Carla H. Thurman Sr. V.P./Operations Casey E. Hester V.P./Editorial Director Teree Caruthers V.P./Visual Content Mark Forester V.P./Custom Publishing Kim Newsom V.P./Content Operations Natasha Lorens Controller Chris Dudley Advertising Sales Manager, Custom Division Tori Hughes Integrated Media Manager Robin Robertson Distribution Director Gary Smith Custom/Travel Sales Support Rachael Goldsberry Office Manager Shelly Grissom Receptionist Linda Bishop Tennessee Connections is published quarterly by Journal Communications Inc. for participating members of the Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association. TMEPA represents 61 municipal power distributors in Tennessee, which serve more than 2 million customers. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067. Phone: 615-771-0080.E-mail: info@jnlcom.com. For information about TMEPA, contact: Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association Paddock 1, Suite C-13, 229 Ward Circle Brentwood, TN 37027 Phone 615-373-5738, Fax 615-373-1901 tmepa.org

It’s Easy To Go Green Brentwood mom’s business provides simple tips

Brimming With4Joy

Local fish catches onLook asfordinner delight this logo

Features 4 The Choice Is Chattanooga Chattanooga ranks among top picks for a green vacation

that identifies green articles, tips and fun facts.

Executive Director Mike Vinson

9 The Pumpkin Process How to find, use and discard this fall favorite ©Copyright 2010 Journal Communications Inc. and Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent.

10 It’s Easy To Go Green

ON THE COVER: An American Alligator at the Tennessee Aquarium in downtown Chattanooga by Jeff Adkins

12 Brimming With Joy

tnconnections.com tnconnections Digital Magazine

tnconnections

table of contents FEATuRES

Summer 2009 Edition

Editor Rebecca Denton

Raise Your Glass

Editorial Assistant Jessy Yancey Contributing Writers ?

fall 2010

4

Crown Winery goes solar, and Beachaven Winery garners awards.

Creative Director Keith Harris

Photography Director Jeffrey S. Otto Senior Photographer Brian McCord

Staff Photographers Jeff Adkins, Todd Bennett, Antony Boshier, Ian Curcio, J. Kyle Keener

Spanning the Years

6

An Official Publication of Your Locally Owned Municipal Electric System Covered bridges evoke nostalgia, history.

Production Project Managers Melissa Bracewell, Jill Wyatt

tnconnections.com 9

Sold on Solar Power Architecture firm takes its own green advice.

Sr. Graphic Designers Laura Gallagher, Candice Sweet, Vikki Williams Graphic Designers Jessica Manner, Amy Nelson

Simple and Satisfying

10

It’s Easy To Go Green

Ad Traffic Jessica Childs, Marcia Millar, Patricia Moisan, Raven Petty

Fresh flavors combine for a tasty summer supper.

Additional photography courtesy of Tennessee State Photo Services

DEPARTMENTS

Sr. V.P./Sales Carla H. Thurman Sr. V.P./Operations Casey E. Hester

Municipal Power Perspective

V.P./Editorial Director Teree Caruthers V.P./Visual Content Mark Forester

Brentwood mom’s business provides simple 3 tips

Vistas

Production Director Natasha Lorens

12

Summer Activities in Tennessee

Associate Production Director Christina Carden Controller Chris Dudley

Connect to Tennessee Products

Advertising Sales Manager, Custom Division Beth Murphy Integrated Media Manager Robin Robertson Distribution Director Gary Smith Accounting Moriah Domby, Diana Guzman, Maria McFarland, Lisa Owens Custom/Travel Sales Support Rachael Goldsberry

Brimming With Joy 14

17

Local fish catches

online contents | tnconnections.com on as dinner delight

Tennessee Connections is published quarterly by Journal Communications Inc. for participating members of the Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association. TMEPA represents 61 municipal power distributors in Tennessee, which serve more than 2 million customers. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067. Phone: 615-771-0080. E-mail: info@jnlcom.com.

Watch a Video Check out Uncle Lester and his dancing shoes or take a virtual ride on a miniature train in our online video gallery.

Find a Recipe Print or e-mail a recipe from our online recipe file.

For information about TMEPA, contact: Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association Paddock 1, Suite C-13 229 Ward Circle Brentwood, TN 37027 Phone 615-373-5738 Fax 615-373-1901 tmepa.org

The Choice Is Chattanooga Enter a Contest

Find entry forms and rules for contests, sweepstakes and other special promotions.

Executive Director Mike Vinson

Browse the Archives

View past stories, photos and magazine covers in our online archives.

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

Virtual MagazineVisitors

Update

©Copyright 2008 Journal Communications Inc. and Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent.

tnconnections summer 2009

with 1st

ON THE COVER:

Raise Your Glass

TOC

Tennessee wineries innovate, win awards

page

Cover description here by Jeffrey S. Otto

How to find, use and discard this fall favorite

Flip through the pages of the magazine without leaving your laptop. Print and e-mail articles and instantly link to advertisers.

Get started with these eco-friendly tips

The Choice Is Chattanooga

Learn to fish for your supper

Departments

2 Municipal Power Perspective 3 Tennessee in Focus

14 Fall Activities in Tennessee

Flip through the pages of the magazine without leaving your laptop. Print and e-mail articles and instantly link to advertisers.

Get started with these eco-friendly tips Learn to fish for your supper

Departments 2 Municipal Power Perspective 3 Tennessee in Focus 14 Fall Activities in Tennessee 17 Connect to Tennessee Products

17 Connect to Tennessee Products Visitors

laud eco-friendly river city for aquarium, arts and activities

laud eco-friendly river city activities

Flip through the pagesfor of the magazine without leaving aquarium, arts and your laptop. Print and e-mail articles and instantly link to advertisers.

Simple and Satisfying Take summer supper to the grill

Summer 2009

Sold on Solar Power

tnconnections.com

tnconnections.com

|

1

Fall 2010

tnconnections.com

Fall 2010

|

1

tnconnections.com

|

1


municipal power perspective

Wants, Needs and Desires Mike Vinson Executive Director Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association

I finally pulled the trigger back in late May and bought a new pickup truck. I’ve wanted one for many years, but with the ongoing costs of raising a family (four children) and meeting all their needs – including college – it was a tough decision. Now they’re all on their own, so the truck is finally a reality. I’ve taught all my children and grandchildren that buying “things” should be a thoughtful decision. Our family categorizes “things” as needs, wants or desires. Needs always come first and includes food, housing, utilities, clothes, etc. After all the needs are met, if there is disposable income left over we move to wants. Now, wants are those things you really don’t need to have a good life. It could be a new iPod, CD player or designer jeans. Desires come last in the priority and include such things as a new widescreen TV, a leather recliner, zero-turn lawn mowers or that new pickup truck. On top of this, we strive to save and pay cash if at all possible and to avoid using credit cards. That takes care of most everything with the exception of houses and vehicles. But by the time we save enough to buy a Want, it’s no longer wanted. Kinda makes you wonder why you wanted something in the first place and definitely takes care of those impulse purchases that can get you in trouble. My hope for a new truck over the past 15 years was a minor Need, a great Want and a far-reaching Desire. I really could have bought one earlier, 2

|

tnconnections.com

but that basic parent thing about being a good example kept me from pulling the trigger for several years. I can’t believe I finally did it. It’s as pretty as my first granddaughter and much more functional. It has all the bells and whistles an old man wants, while missing a few I couldn’t justify. I’ve earned it – or at least I’ve finally convinced myself. My wife agrees, which is not only important but gave me the final strength to get my truck. By now you’re probably wondering what all this has to do with the municipal electric systems of Tennessee. The 60 municipal systems in our state have been in business for (in some cases) over 100 years. Like all good not-for-profit organizations, they’ve had to make tough decisions over the years about what their customers really need, very much want and irrationally desire. The bottom line is to provide a very high-quality electricity product at a competitive price with outstanding customer service. That is the need, and I’m proud that all have achieved this difficult goal. Public power customers often want things that may be a little difficult to provide, and we strive to give them their wants also. Things like underground service, street and yard lights, energy efficiency programs, guidance on heating, cooling, refrigeration, water heating and other appliances to save energy and lower the bill. Some have even asked us to provide telephone, Internet and television services, and a growing number are doing this also. The one basic fact you can rest easy with is that before any want or desire is met, all the needs are in place. After all, we live in the same town you do and use the same electricity.

Membership Alcoa Electric Department Athens Utilities Board Benton County Electric System Bolivar Energy Authority Bristol Tennessee Essential Services Brownsville Utility Department Carroll County Electrical Department Electric Power Board of Chattanooga CDE Lightband – Clarksville Cleveland Utilities Clinton Utilities Board Columbia Power & Water System Cookeville Department of Electricity Covington Electric System Dayton Electric Department Dickson Electric System Dyersburg Electric System Elizabethton Electric Department Erwin Utilities Etowah Utilities Department Gallatin Department of Electricity Greeneville Light & Power System Harriman Utility Board Humboldt Utilities Jackson Energy Authority Jellico Electric & Water Systems Johnson City Power Board Knoxville Utilities Board LaFollette Utilities Lawrenceburg Utility Systems Lenoir City Utilities Board Lewisburg Electric System Lexington Electric System Loudon Utilities City of Maryville Electric Department McMinnville Electric System Memphis Light, Gas & Water Division Milan Department of Public Utilities Morristown Utility Systems Mount Pleasant Power System Murfreesboro Electric Department Nashville Electric Service Newbern Electric Department Newport Utilities City of Oak Ridge Electric Department Paris Board of Public Utilities Pulaski Electric System Ripley Power and Light Company Rockwood Electric Utility Sevier County Electric System Shelbyville Power System Smithville Electric System Sparta Electric System Springfield Electric Department Sweetwater Utilities Board Trenton Light & Water Department Tullahoma Utilities Board Union City Electric System Weakley County Municipal Electric System

Tennessee Connections


tn in focus

Photo by Antony Boshier

Leaves at Middle Tennessee State University Fall 2010

tnconnections.com

|

3


4

|

tnconnections.com

Staff photo

Tennessee Aquarium on the Chattanooga Riverfront

Tennessee Connections


cover story

Emerald

City

Chattanooga ranks among top picks for a green vacation

story by Carol Cowan

Y

ou don’t have to follow the yellow brick road to get there, but Chattanooga is widely hailed as a gem of a city for a green vacation. CBS’s The Early Show named the progressive river city among four green-destination picks worldwide, calling it a “model eco town and tourist hot spot.” And the eco-lades keep coming. Bicycling magazine and the League of American Cyclists laud Chattanooga as one of the country’s best cycling cities. Runner’s World calls it “one cool city,” while Southern Living praises its sustainability and revitalization efforts, saying, “It just keeps getting better and better.” The New York Times extols Chattanooga as “the undiscovered gem of Tennessee.” Whether your ideal green vacation involves outdoor recreation amidst natural beauty or discovering quirky urban charm in a walkable downtown district, you’ll find plenty of earth-friendly adventure in Chattanooga.

Landmark Attractions

For starters, ditch the car and head downtown to the Tennessee Aquarium, Trip Advisor’s highest-rated aquarium in the U.S. and a top10 tourist attraction in terms of guest satisfaction. See 10,000-plus animals as you explore fresh- and salt-water exhibits, birds, reptiles, and an entertaining group of penguins. Hands-on educational programs at the aquarium highlight the ecological diversity of the Southeast

Fall 2010

and promote conservation of habitats and natural resources. Learn about cool creatures the world over at the nearby IMAX 3D theater. The downtown setting for the Tennessee Aquarium is at Ross’s Landing, an expansive public gathering space adorned with art, architecture and landscaping that highlight the city’s history and geography. Ross’s Landing also marks the trailhead for the Tennessee RiverWalk, a 13-mile walking and bike trail that follows the Tennessee River all the way to Chickamauga Dam. The trail provides access to Walnut Street Bridge, an 1890s steel truss structure and the world’s longest pedestrian bridge. Other stops along the RiverWalk include Coolidge Park, which features an antique carousel and interactive water fountains; 23-acre Renaissance Park; glassbottomed Ruth Holmberg Bridge; and the Bluff View Art District, which boasts museums, galleries, restaurants and a sculpture garden. The RiverWalk is suitable for anyone, and numerous green spaces and picnic areas are scattered along the paved, landscaped trail. Just minutes from downtown, renowned Lookout Mountain offers spectacular scenery and distinctive attractions. Atop the mountain, Rock City features massive, ancient rock formations, native gardens and breathtaking panoramic views.  The Incline Railway is the world’s steepest passenger rail and carries riders to the top of the mountain where they can explore tnconnections.com

|

5


6

|

tnconnections.com

Staff photo

The Chattanooga North Shore

Tennessee Connections


numerous Civil War points of interest. Some 1,100 feet below the mountain’s surface, Ruby Falls, a massive underground waterfall located in America’s deepest commercial cave, is the first U.S. attraction to successfully complete Green Globe International’s environmental certification process.

Outdoor Recreation

Cycling enthusiasts will love the plethora of trails and bike-friendly roadways that crisscross Lookout Mountain and beyond. One that Bicycling magazine recommends as a must-ride is Tiftonia-Burkhalter Gap, which runs more than 27 miles. The Outdoor Chattanooga Mobile Bicycle Fleet facilitates local bike transport and offers guided bicycle tours of area attractions such as Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park. Mountain bikers should check out Camp Jordan/ Brainerd Levee or TVA’s Raccoon Mountain, which features 16 miles of trails with difficulty levels ranging from beginner to expert. Another way to go green is by paddling the Tennessee River Blueway, a river trail that winds from Chickamauga Dam past Chattanooga and Moccasin Bend National Park, through the Tennessee River Gorge and on to points west in neighboring Marion County. Wildlife sanctuaries, scenic vistas, historic landmarks and hydro-power generation marvels are just some of the sights blueway travelers will encounter. Additional outdoor activities abound, from rock climbing and disc golf to hang gliding at Lookout Mountain Flight Park.

Shop, Dine, Stay

If your favorite recreational activity is shopping, take heart. You can shop sustainably at the Chattanooga Market, which features locally grown foods and handmade arts and crafts by local artists. The market is held every Sunday from late April through early December at the First Tennessee Pavilion. The trendy NorthShore neighborhood is home to an eclectic assortment of boutiques, restaurants, coffee shops and one-of-a-kind small businesses. When it comes time to dine, independent Chattanooga restaurants from sandwich shops to haute cuisine establishments serve local, seasonal foods. You can even lodge responsibly, thanks to Chattanooga’s Green Lodging Program. Certified properties promote recycling and employ water and energy conservation practices, as well as maintain written plans for continued environmental improvement. Visit www.chattanoogafun.com to find out more and plan your trip.

Fall 2010

Tips for Trips Just because you’re on vacation doesn’t mean you should take a break from the eco-friendly habits you practice every day. Here are some ideas for keeping it green away from home. • Look for the specially marked cans. Please recycle. • Bring your own bottle. Always travel with your own refillable water bottle to help keep plastic bottles out of landfills. • Hotel etiquette. Hang up your towels and reuse them, and notify hotel staff not to change your sheets every day to reduce water consumption and chemical usage. • Omit emissions. Use the green transportation options available in many cities, and walk whenever you can. • Put your money where the green is. Patronize those businesses that have green certification or use sustainable practices, and buy local products. • Plug in here. Portable solar chargers enable you to charge the batteries of handheld devices like cell phones and iPods by simply turning toward the sun rather than by consuming electricity. • Offset to compensate. Some travel companies sell carbon offsets to compensate for the impact of travel on the environment. For example, through Travelocity, $25 will negate the impact of air travel, four nights in a hotel, and car rental for two people. Offset monies fund projects such as wind and solar energy and tree planting. 

tnconnections.com

|

7


feature

The

Pumpkin Process

How to find, use and discard this fall favorite

I

t’s that time of year again – the leaves are falling, the weather is cooling, the days are getting shorter and porches across the state are aglow with the crooked smile of a jack-o’-lantern. But how to choose that perfect pumpkin, and what to do with it after Halloween? Here are some simple steps on how to find, use and dispose of your pumpkin.

Selecting

Great pumpkins are mature, feel firm to the touch and have a vibrant orange color. To test the maturity, push on the pumpkin with your fingernail; a mature pumpkin should not scratch with the pressure.

If you want to carve your pumpkin but still get some nutritional benefits, you can still toast the seeds. Another idea is to use non-toxic paint as decoration so you can still pop it in the oven afterward.

Discarding

Wondering what to do with your jack-o’lantern after Halloween? Your pumpkin can make a great start or addition to a compost pile. Remove any waxy residue from the candle, plop it in a compost bin in an area that receives sunshine and cover it with leaves. Keep adding vegetable peels, fruit cores and other organic materials, and Mother Nature will do the rest!

Storing

After the pumpkin is purchased, it can be stored in a cool, dry place for about a month. Looking to make it last longer for pies, soups or other dishes? You can freeze, dry or can the pumpkin flesh.

Using

They are good to eat, fun as jack-o-lanterns and festive as fall décor. But did you know pumpkins also pack a nutritional punch? Chock-full of vitamins A, B and E, as well as minerals such as potassium and magnesium, just one cup of pumpkin also contains more than 10 percent of the recommended daily value of fiber.

Fall 2010

The Great Pumpkins Looking for a pumpkin patch near you? We highly recommend Myers Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze in Bulls Gap for East Tennessee residents, Gentry’s Farm in Franklin for Middle Tennesseans and Donnell Century Farm in Jackson for our readers in West Tennessee. Find more information on pumpkin patches at these websites: www.myerspumpkinpatch.com www.gentryfarm.com www.donnellcenturyfarm.com www.picktnproducts.org tnconnections.com

|

9


It’s Easy To Go

Green Get started with these eco-friendly tips

Tara Biller owns Green Proof Your Home, a residential consulting service designed to outline the simple steps of going green. 10

|

tnconnections.com

Tennessee Connections


feature

story by Rebecca Denton photography by Antony Boshier

W

hen Tara Biller set out to make some eco-friendly changes to her home a few years ago, she wasn’t sure where to start. The information seemed complicated and confusing – even contradictory. “There’s so much information out there, and millions of lists on ways to get started,” she says. “I started to look for somebody to green-proof my house. It became a passion of mine, and I decided to do it myself.” That’s how Biller’s Nashville business, Green Proof Your Home, began. Since 2008, Biller has provided residential consulting services in which she meets with homeowners, takes stock of their house, current practices and goals, and provides them with a starter kit and a detailed plan to get a little – or a lot – greener. The key, she says, is to start small. “Some people who contact me have already started, and they just need me to bring them to that next level of green, to help make their homes more energy efficient and improve indoor air quality,” says Biller, who can provide comprehensive energy and water consumption audits. “But most people just feel very overwhelmed. They’ve wanted to go green but didn’t know how to get started. Maybe they’ve changed out a few light bulbs (with compact fluorescent bulbs), but that’s about it. I try to be a guide for them to take that next step.” Amanda Schwartz, a mother of two toddlers who owns her own business, was part of that camp. “I’m the least green person you’ve ever met in your life,” Schwartz says. “I’m very stuck in my ways. But Tara showed me different things that were so simple. I need convenience, and it helps to save

money in this economy. It was a no-brainer.” Here are five of Biller’s basic tips for getting started on a greener path. Use reusable bags. “The reusable shopping bag is one of the easiest things people can start with,” Biller says. As a bonus, many major retailers give a discount of 5 or 10 cents per bag. The key is to remember to bring them into the store. Switch from paper to cloth. Instead of buying paper towels, buy dish towels that can be washed and reused. This saves money, trees and trash. If you must buy paper towels, choose the recycled kind. Buy recycled products. Recycling is important, but it’s also important to buy products made from recycled goods. “If you’re not closing that loop and buying recycled products, the benefit is not as great as it could be,” Biller says. “With every purchasing decision I make, I’m thinking, ‘Is there a green option to this, or do I even need this?’” Clean green. Many household cleaners contain hazardous chemicals that can be harmful if ingested or inhaled, so Biller recommends switching to green cleaners. “A lot of the conventional cleaning products are starting to go green, but overall, they aren’t green companies. Look and see if the label tells you exactly what’s in the product.”Or you can make your own cleaners using ingredients such as vinegar, water, baking soda and lemon juice. Reduce recycling. Reduce the amount you recycle in the first place. A good way to start is to forgo the individual packs of snacks and other items. Buy bigger sizes and dole out portions into reusable containers.

Want to make your own green cleaners? Check out these easy, inexpensive recipes. All-purpose cleaner: Mix 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/4 cup baking soda (or 2 teaspoons borax) into 1/2 gallon water. Store and keep. Use for removal of water deposit stains on shower stall panels, bathroom chrome fixtures, windows, bathroom mirrors and more.

Gentle Window Cleaner: Combine 3 teaspoons liquid soap, 3/4 cup white vinegar and 1/2 teaspoon baking soda in a spray bottle. Shake well before using.

Pour into basin and let it set for a few minutes. Scrub with a brush and rinse. A mixture of two parts borax and one part lemon juice also will work.

Hardwood floor wash:

11/2 cups water, 11/2 cups vinegar, 20 drops peppermint essential oil Combine all ingredients in a spray bottle. Use sparingly, working on small sections of the floor. Dry mop after using.

Toilet bowl cleaner:

Sources: www.eartheasy.com and www.akaction.org

Mix 1/4 cup baking soda, 1 cup vinegar and 10 drops tea tree essential oil (optional).

For more information about Green Proof Your Home, visit www.greenproofyourhome.com.

Fall 2010

tnconnections.com

|

11


taste of tn

Brimming With Joy Learn to fish for your supper

story by Roben Mounger

O

About the Author Roben Mounger, known as Ms. Cook, has a penchant for searching out locally produced ingredients for her family’s meals. For some 15 years, she has eaten locally by way of CSAs and farmers markets. In 2009, she began an organic farm internship with Arugula’s Star of Neal Family Farms. Roben writes a weekly column about food and people for The Columbia Daily Herald and blogs about eating locally at www.mscookstable.com. 12

|

tnconnections.com

ften when my preoccupation with sustainable food throws a line, a memory surfaces and the answer appears. For me, my grandmother, a shiny tackle box and rod, chirping crickets, my grandmother’s old Cadillac, flip-flops and a supper of brim was heaven on earth. I wanted to make similar memories with my granddaughter, so why not learn to fish? With countless fishing destinations in the Volunteer State, a novice can be overwhelmed and never claim the worthwhile results. Though landlocked, Tennessee has a wide variety of fish , and expert companions are a natural ticket for instruction. I found such a task to be as easy as proclaiming yourself an eager beginner and appreciator of a local fish dinner. Such confessions to Maury County renaissance men Roger Witherow and Travis Jones escalated, and I was invited into a first-rate classroom. Though public lakes and rivers abound, a well-conserved private lake is a dandy start. Witherow was a generous host, providing a tour in his boat outfitted with a jet motor that propelled us into mysterious shallow waters where bluegill, shellcrackers and bass bed. Fishing for my supper took on a spiritual

component when that fly rod with lure was placed in my hands. I knew then that I’d be fishing for my supper a few times each year. Even the fish-cleaning tutorial bestowed a gift in “things I can do for myself.” Jones spoke of a salad and rice dish being prepared as we worked. “ I’ve done this before,” he said while grinning. With thoughts of the recent delivery of colorful lettuces, radishes, beets and garlic onions in my CSA basket, I dreamed of a fresh salad to complement what were soon to be sizzling fillets. Later that afternoon, a bluish haze enveloped the tidy green paradise. My grandmother, Edwina “Wee,” always laughed at what I said following an afternoon of fishing: “It’s wonder, Wee.” Tennessee living can provide a luxurious bounty for the table. While good food is a tangible prize, time with a friend or two might enrich the story of your life beyond measure. Recounting the experience, Witherow promised a delicious dinner at the end of the day. Heading home, I hummed to myself, “It’s wonder.” The design of my inaugural fish fry was already in the works. Tennessee Connections


Fish Fry Bluegill fillets A mixture of cornmeal, flour and fish seasonings Fresh eggs, whisked Heat corn oil about 1 inch deep. Dip fillets into eggs and dredge with cornmeal mixture. Fry on both sides until crusts are light brown.

Fall Slaw 6 cups sliced cabbage ¾ cup shredded carrots ¾ cups shredded beets 2 shredded apples 6 tablespoons mayonnaise ¼ cup plain yogurt 3 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 ½ tablespoons honey Salt, pepper to taste In a bowl, combine cabbage, carrots, beets, and apples. In another bowl, whisk mayonnaise, yogurt, vinegar and honey. Pour dressing over vegetables and toss. Salt and pepper to taste.

Sublime Sweet Potatoes Four sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into wedges ¼ cup olive oil Juice of 2 limes 2 teaspoons chili powder 2 tablespoons fresh parsley Salt, pepper to taste Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a bowl, combine oil, juice, chili powder, parsley, salt and pepper. Toss with sweet potatoes. Spread coated potatoes onto heated baking sheet. Roast for 25 minutes. Fall 2010

tnconnections.com

|

13


events

Fall in Tennessee

children’s events and more. CONTACT: 901-465-8690, cottonfestivaltn.com

Arts & Crafts Festival – Sept. 11-12, Paris Landing State Park, Buchanan

Festivals, celebrations, activities and more

Annual arts and crafts festival. CONTACT: 731-641-0269

Wings Over Halls Air Show – Sept. 11-12, Dyersburg Army Air Base, Halls See magnificent warbirds fly in formation, maneuver through bombing and staffing runs, and aerobatics. Tribute to 65th anniversary of WWII and 9/11 victims. CONTACT: Pat Higdon, 731-836-7400

Pittman Center Heritage Day – Sept. 18, Sevierville Clogging, bluegrass and gospel music, crafts, a benefit auction, genealogy records, and authentic Southern cooking will be available at the heritage celebration. CONTACT: 865-436-5499, pittmancenter.com

12th Annual Buck Creek – Sept. 24-26, Weaver Farms, Alamo

Jeffrey S. OTTO

St. Jude Trail Ride benefits St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. CONTACT: Kathy Moore, 731-617-1225, pantdrosran@crockettnet.com, www.buckcreektrailride.com

Fall Squash & Sausage Soup This listing includes a selection of events of statewide interest scheduled in September, October and November as provided by the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development. Events are subject to date change or cancellation; please call the contact listed before traveling long distances to attend. Due to space limitations, additional information and events can be found online through the department’s Web site, www.tnvacation.com.

SEPTEMBER

Baxter Annual Labor Day Street Fair – Sept. 4, Baxter

Come early and join the parade. Celebration will include music, food, games, rides, crafts and more. CONTACT: Lana Faye, 931 858-2613

Riverfest – Sept. 10-11, Clarksville The city celebrates its river heritage with a festival featuring musical entertainment, children’s activities, arts & crafts, boat races and more. CONTACT: 866-557-9006 14

|

tnconnections.com

National Rolley Hole Marbles Championship & Festival – Sept. 11, Hilham This event features games for children, marble making, swap meet, tournament play, demonstrations, music and food. CONTACT: 800-713-5157

11th Annual Fayette County Cotton Festival – Sept. 11, Historic Square, Somerville Features demonstrations, vendors, music, car show, 5K run/walk,

Pace 27th Anniversary Antique Car Show – Sept. 25, Martin Methodist College, Pulaski The car show features 38 classes under 1985. CONTACT: Brenda Edwards, 931-363-2585, pacecarclub.com

Birds of Prey Program – Sept. 26, Tim Ford State Park, Winchester Experience an incredible interaction with bald eagles, hawks, owls, falcons and even a very fun black vulture. Many of the birds are free-flying for an unforgettable “close encounter.” Enjoy a fun-filled day that includes a nature hike and exhibits. CONTACT: 931- 312-9174, tfeea.org

25th Annual Roller Coaster Yard Sale – Sept. 30-Oct. 2, Celina More than 150 miles of yard sales, crafts, antiques, handcrafted quilts, produce, Southern foods, entertainment, parks and recreation areas, historic sites and more. CONTACT: Ike Bonecutter, 931-243-3974, dalehollowlake.org

Unicoi County Apple Festival – Oct. 1-2, Erwin The two-day event offers handmade crafts, entertainment, children’s area and the Tennessee Connections


Blue Ridge Pottery show. The festival features more than 300 vendors highlighting arts, crafts and foods. CONTACT: 423-743-3000, unicoicounty.org

5th Annual Heritage Festival & Antique Tractor Display – Oct. 2, Maynardville Event features a quilt and art competition, demonstrations of traditional blacksmithing, woodworking, soap making, food vendors, a cooking competition and gospel/ bluegrass bands featuring Dove Award nominee Cody Shuler and Pine Mountain Railroad. CONTACT: 865-992-2811, comeherecomehome.com

Nillie Bipper Arts & Crafts Festival – Oct. 2-3, Cleveland This outdoor arts & crafts show features more than 75 exhibits, with food booths, entertainment and handcrafted arts & crafts items. CONTACT: John Simmons, 423-614-8690

Tennessee Fall Homecoming – Oct 8-10, Museum of Appalachia, Norris Fall Homecoming is one of the nation’s largest and most authentic music, craft, and folk festivals. More than 400 musicians perform on five stages. Features storytelling, old time crafts, pioneer activities, country cooking and more. CONTACT: 865-494-7680, museumofappalachia.org

Goats, Music & More Festival – Oct. 8-10, Rock Creek Park, Lewisburg Features concerts, fainting goat shows, barbecue cook-off, games, food, entertainment and more. CONTACT: Lisa Jackson, 931-359-1544, goatsmusicandmore.com

Webb School Arts & Crafts Festival – Oct. 16-17, Bell Buckle A juried art and craft show featuring clay, metal, basket weaving and more. Includes food from around the world, storytellers and musical entertainment. CONTACT: 931-389-9663, bellbucklechamber.com

Fall 2010

October Sky Fall Festival – Oct. 16, Oliver Springs This free festival showcases the making of the movie October Sky. Features a guided tour of the film sites, a rocket launch, living history demonstrations, antique tractor show, live music, children’s activities, storytelling, craft and food vendors, quilt show and more. CONTACT: 865-435-0384, oshistorical.com

Bean Station Harvest Pride Days – Oct. 16, Bean Station Celebrates the life and culture of the area. Crafts, food, entertainment and exhibits create a festive event. CONTACT: Chamber of Commerce, 866-577-4222, graingerchamber.com

Belvidere Fireman’s Fish Fry – Oct. 23, Belvidere Lot of great food and delicious homemade desserts. Live bluegrass music featuring

tnconnections.com

|

15


Tom Brantley and Friends, Rough Cut, Just Thrown Together, Golden Holler and The Belvidere Pickers. CONTACT: 615-580-0708.

2nd Annual Upper Cumberland Gospel Music Spectacular – Oct. 28-29, Cookeville Community Center, Cookeville The Musical Spectacular features The Inspirations and The Primitive Quartet. CONTACT: 931-256-0777

Pumpkinfest – Oct. 31, Franklin This fall festival has arts & crafts, a children’s costume contest and activities, chili cook-off, and music. CONTACT: 615-591-8500, historicfranklin.com

NOVEMBER Host of Christmas Past – Nov. 12-14, Fayetteville

Festivities include storytelling, craft demonstrations, musical performances, activities for children and more. CONTACT: 888-433-1234, hostofchristmaspast.com

Foothills Craft Guild Fine Crafts Marketplace – Nov. 12-14, Knoxville Fine crafts by Tennessee artisans. CONTACT: 865-691-6083, foothillscraftguild.org

Centennial Holiday Show – Nov. 20-21, Franklin Features more than 170 artists and craftsmen from a dozen states. The show’s emphasis is on handmade crafts. CONTACT: 615-472-4271, ext. 2335, wcs.edu/chs/holidayshow

North Pole Family Fun Day – Nov. 25, Square, Paris Don’t miss Santa rolling in on the big red fire truck. Crafts, face painting, live music and more fill the court square with fun. CONTACT: 731-642-9271, leachsmusic@bellsouth.net

Green Travel Tips

1

Carpool whenever possible to reduce your carbon footprint – and you’ll also spend less money on gas.

2

Staying overnight? Unplug major appliances to save energy and lower your electric bill.

3

Support Tennessee’s sustainable tourism. Find green lodging, dining and attractions at tnvacation.com/green. 16

|

tnconnections.com

Tennessee Connections


connect to tn products

Statewide roundup of favorite finds Cook Like a Farmer

Say Cheese Straws!

A new book of recipes gives anyone the chance to whip up a farm-to-table meal. But the Farmers Market Cookbook, published by Southern Living, features much more than dinner ideas. The perfect companion for your next farmers market visit, the book organizes its recipes by season, so you can make sure you’re eating locally year-round. It also offers dozens of related tidbits to farmers market shopping, such as how to choose, store and prepare fresh produce, and even provides a list of farmers markets and food festivals in Tennessee. Recipes from the Autumn Harvest section include Pecan-Beet Salad, Beef Brisket With Fall Vegetables and Triple Nut Tart. Hungry for more? You can order the book online via Amazon or look for it at your local bookstore.

Serving up gourmet Southern snacks, Memphis-based Aunt Lizzie’s offers all-natural cheese straws made with sharp cheddar cheese. The cheese straws have no artificial flavors, colors or preservatives and are available in two flavors: Original and Jalapeño, with a Zero Carb option offered in both flavors as well. Sun-Dried Tomato Straws and Lemon Shortbread Bites are among Aunt Lizzie’s other products, which not only serve as delicious snacks but also make great appetizers and gifts. These edible straws can be purchased in bags or tins by visiting www.auntlizzie.com, though you might even see them on the shelves at your local grocery store. For more information or to place an order, call (800) 993-7788.

Look Good, Feel Good, Do Good Founded by three sisters seeking natural, sustainable clothing, ASK Apparel offers fashion you can look – and feel – good in. The clothing is naturally dyed, organic, handcrafted and made with no toxic or poisonous chemicals. ASK Apparel was created when the sisters, Alesandra, Sarah and Kate Bellos, began asking questions about the clothing industry. The answers they found weren’t the ones they wanted, so they decided to create their own socially responsible business, reducing their impact and encouraging others to do the same. The sisters also support the effort by donating at least 10 percent of their profits to local, national and global charities that focus on social and environmental issues. ASK Apparel is based in Nashville, with clothing available for purchase at The Green Wagon, Twist Art Gallery and Whole Foods Market on Hillsboro Pike. To learn more, visit www.askapparel.com or call (615) 306-3154. Fall 2010

tnconnections.com

|

17


Journal Communications 725 Cool springs Blvd., suite 400 franklin, tn 37067

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Lebanon Junction, KY 40150 Permit No. 222

Fall Energy-Saving Tips

Keep Costs Down This Fall With These Tips ■ Insulate:

Wrap a water-heater blanket around your water heater and insulate water pipes. This keeps your hot water hot, which can add up to big savings as it takes about 14 percent of your overall utility bill to provide hot water.

Check your attic. Since warm air rises, you want to be sure it is adequately insulated. You’ll know it needs more insulation if you can see your ceiling joists.

Bundle up! Lower the temperature in your home and put on an extra layer. You save about 2 percent off your heating bill for every degree you lower your thermostat.

■ Minimize heat loss:

• Seal leaks around doors, windows and electrical outlets to ensure that your warm air is staying in and the cool air is keeping out. • Install foam gaskets behind electrical outlets, light switches and lighting fixtures to reduce heat loss, or install plastic security caps. • For those with single-pane windows, add storm windows and slice your heat loss by as much as 50 percent. ■ Save in the kitchen:

• Use glass or ceramic pans when cooking in an oven. Your food cooks just as quickly and

you can reduce the cooking temperature by 25 degrees. •

Make sure your refrigerator door closes tightly. To check, put a dollar bill in the door as you close it. If it doesn’t hold securely, replace the seal.

• Compost instead of using the garbage disposal and save gallons of water – and money!


Fall 2010, Tennessee Connections