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2009 | IMAGESMAURY.COM

VISIONS FOR

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MAURY COUNTY TENNESSEE

What’s s e Online Video of tiny trains at Maury County Park

CUISINE WITH CHARACTER One-of-a-kind restaurants serve fare with flair

MULE MANIA

Echoes of a Bygone Era Revisit the past at Rippavilla Plantation

SPONSORED BY THE MAURY ALLIANCE


Always Looking Ahead It’s important to choose a good partner for your future. Bostelman Enterprises is ready to help you find the right location for your business venture.

INVESTED IN THE FUTURE OF MAURY COUNTY 225 E. James Campbell Blvd. Columbia, TN 38401 931. 3 8 8 . 5155


We’re always thinking of

WAYS TO HELP our members

save electricity. And then we thought, why stop there?

To help our members save money on goods and services of all kinds, including prescription medications, we started the Co-op Connections program. Just take your Co-op Connections card wherever you go, pull it out anywhere you see a Co-op Connections door or window sign, as well as your local pharmacy, and say hello to savings. The card is yours. The savings are yours. All because you’re a member of a Touchstone Energy cooperative. We’re always looking out for you. To learn more, visit www.dremc.com.

(931) 388-3131

Looking out for you


2009 EDITION | VOLUME 13

VISIONS FOR

MAURY COUNTY TENNESSEE

14 CO NTE NT S

MAURY BUSINESS

F E AT U R E S

22 Fasten Your Seatbelts Spring Hill plant takes changes in stride.

8 MULE MANIA Columbia’s signature celebration boosts economy and unites community.

24 Biz Briefs 25 Chamber Report 26 Economic Profile

12 CUISINE WITH CHARACTER Local restaurants offer food and ambiance that’s one of a kind.

14 INTO THE OUTDOORS Maury County overflows with scenic parks and green spaces.

D E PA R TM E NT S 6 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Maury County’s culture

17 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Maury County

17 ECHOES OF A BYGONE ERA Rippavilla Plantation offers a glimpse of life in the 19th-century South.

27 Education 28 Health & Wellness 30 Sports & Recreation

29 PRYOR ACHIEVEMENTS Art gallery at Columbia State Community College showcases local and regional work.

31 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

32 Business Guide All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

ON THE COVER Rippavilla Plantation Photo by Jeffrey S. Otto

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PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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Now Showing in Our Video Gallery

Sit back and enjoy a preview of Maury County amenities. Explore its landscapes, cultural offerings, food and fun. See its downtown, neighborhoods, parks and attractions. Experience the history, hot spots and local happenings. Maury County is rated L for Livability

imagesmaury.com


VISIONS FOR

imagesmaury.com

MAURY COUNTY

THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

TENNESSEE

What’s On Online nl

SENIOR EDITOR REBECCA DENTON COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, SUSAN CHAPPELL, JESSY YANCEY ONLINE CONTENT MANAGER MATT BIGELOW STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JOE MORRIS, JESSICA MOZO DATA MANAGER CHANDRA BRADSHAW REGIONAL SALES MANAGER MIKE ARNOLD SALES SUPPORT MANAGER SARA SARTIN SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN McCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, IAN CURCIO, J. KYLE KEENER PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT ANNE WHITLOW CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS WEB DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR BRIAN SMITH ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS MELISSA BRACEWELL, KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, CANDICE SWEET, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER JESSICA MANNER GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, ALISON HUNTER, JANINE MARYLAND, AMY NELSON, MARCUS SNYDER WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR FRANCO SCARAMUZZA WEB PROJECT MANAGERS ANDY HARTLEY, YAMEL RUIZ WEB DESIGN CARL SCHULZ WEB PRODUCTION JENNIFER GRAVES COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN TWILA ALLEN AD TRAFFIC JESSICA CHILDS, MARCIA MILLAR, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN

HISTORY WORTH REVISITING Take a virtual tour of the historic Rippavilla Plantation in Spring Hill. Watch this and other quick videos in the Interactive section.

PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER

RELOCATION

SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER

Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./SALES TODD POTTER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING SYBIL STEWART V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS BILL McMEEKIN MANAGING EDITOR/COMMUNITY KIM MADLOM MANAGING EDITOR/CUSTOM KIM NEWSOM PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS

PHOTOS

RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY WALDRIP DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR YANCEY TURTURICE NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR JAMES SCOLLARD IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE CUSTOM/TRAVEL SALES SUPPORT RACHAEL GOLDSBERRY SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR RACHEL MATHEIS EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN

We’ve added even more prize-winning photography to our online gallery. To see these spectacular photos, click on Photo Gallery.

OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

FACTS & STATS CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

Visions for Maury County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Maury Alliance and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Maury Alliance 106 West 6th Street • Columbia, TN 38401 Phone: (931) 388-2155 • Fax: (931) 380-0335 www.mauryalliance.com

Go online to learn even more about: • Schools • Health care • Utilities • Parks • Taxes

LOCAL FLAVOR Craving some cuisine with character? Maury County is home to many one-ofa-kind restaurants. Get a taste of local flavor in our food section.

VISIT VISIONS FOR MAURY COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESMAURY.COM ©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

Magazine Publishers of America

Member

Custom Publishing Council

ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Visions for Maury County gives readers a taste of what makes the region tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts. “Find the good – and praise it.”

– Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

Member Maury Alliance

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Almanac

Presidential Progress Since 1929, the James K. Polk Ancestral Home in Columbia has been the main historic site for the 11th president of the United States. So it seems fitting that the former home of Polk – called the “expansionist president” for adding about a third of our country to the map – recently expanded. The James K. Polk Memorial Association acquired an 1882 church building near the Polk home, and renovations were completed in spring 2009. Called Polk Presidential Hall, the renovated space is a premier place that hosts temporary exhibitions and educational programming. Visit www.jameskpolk.com for information about events and exhibits.

No Boys Allowed Girls learning physics in the 1800s? Only at the Columbia Athenaeum, a girlsonly school that flourished from 1852 to 1904. The school taught young women subjects including world history, physics, calculus and English literature. The site hosts an annual week when young girls dress in 1861 period costumes and take classes that would have been offered when the Athenaeum was in full operation.

What’s Online e Attend a garden tea at the 1861 girls school in our quick video at imagesmaury.com.

Overflowing With Fountains Columbia is awash with water features. At least seven fountains have sprung up around the county in the past few years, including two fountains downtown on the public square in Columbia. There’s one across from the James K. Polk Ancestral Home, one in front of Maury Regional Medical Center, and fountains in front of a church, a bank and private businesses. This wave of fountains is not part of a formal beautification effort, says Janet Earwood, vice president of membership and leadership programs at the Maury Alliance. But she says the waterworks are welcome additions, creating visual interest and helping to beautify the community.

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Fast Facts A-Haunting We Will Go Thrill seekers take note: Columbia’s ghost walking tours are back by popular demand. The tours make about 10 stops in downtown Columbia, with a guide detailing the stories of haunted happenings. “We have a literary ghost at the Maury County Library,” says Adam Southern, research librarian and co-founder of the walking tours. “And there’s one I like to call Columbia’s Delta Dawn, because this spirit supposedly is still waiting for a man who was supposed to come and take her to live happily ever after.” Legend has it that the man never came, and the spirit’s reflection can still be seen at night – at just the right time – in a drug store window. The 2009 tours will start in the summer and run through Oct. 31. Proceeds will benefit the Maury County Public Library. Call the library at 931-375-6508 for more information.

Maury At A Glance POPULATION (2007 ESTIMATE) Maury County: 79,966 Columbia: 33,983 Mount Pleasant: 4,448 Spring Hill: 21,168

Maury County

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FOR MORE INFORMATION Maury Alliance 106 W. 6th St. P.O. Box 1076 Columbia, TN 38402-1076 Phone: (931) 388-2155 Fax: (931) 380-0335 www.mauryalliance.com

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BEGINNINGS Maury County was named for Revolutionary War veteran Abram Maury, a prominent surveyor and politician of the region. The county was officially established in 1807.

Spring Hill

Williamsport

Q Southport Saltpeter Cave in Culleoka is one of the largest caves in Middle Tennessee. Q The Mid-South Live Steamers group offers free public miniature train rides to the public twice a year at Maury County Park. Q The Tennessee Museum of Early Farm Life displays more than 500 artifacts in two salvaged barns behind Rippavilla Plantation in Spring Hill.

Nashville

LOCATION Maury County is in Middle Tennessee, 45 miles south of Nashville.

Q Columbia State Community College offers more than 50 programs of study, with day, evening and online classes. The two-year college has five convenient campuses.

Culleoka

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Q The two-day Southern Fried Festival draws around 10,000 people to Columbia each fall.

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Q The Spring Hill Battlefield was home to one of the most controversial events of the Civil War.

Take a virtual tour of Maury County at imagesmaury.com, courtesy of our award-winning photographers.

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Making of

ANTONY BOSHIER

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Mule Mania SIGNATURE EVENT BOOSTS ECONOMY, UNITES COMMUNITY

STORY BY CAROL COWAN

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exington raises racehorses, and Shelbyville turns out Tennessee Walking Horses, but Columbia and Maury County have been majoring in mules for nearly 200 years. In fact, the area has been called the Mule Capital of the World, thanks to its rich history as a mule-trading center and Mule Day, its signature celebration of the hard-working farm animal. An annual springtime mule show and sale that started here in the early 1800s – formerly called First Monday and Breeders Day – became for a time one of the largest livestock markets in the world. In 1934, the addition of a Mule Day parade lent the sale a festive atmosphere. The original Mule Day eventually went away for a time, but the Maury County Bridle and Saddle Club brought it back to life in 1974. “Mule Day has since grown from a small-town festival to one of the premier events in the Southeast,” says Harvey Spann, who has been bringing his own Harvey Spann with his team of mules

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What’s Online e

ANTONY BOSHIER

Hear mule owner Harvey Spann talk about mules and Mule Day in our quick online video at imagesmaury.com.

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“Mule Day has since grown from a small-town festival to one of the premier events in the Southeast. ” mules to the show since its revival 35 years ago. Spann also serves as Mule Day office manager and camping director. “People come from all over,” he says. Mules come from all over, too, to take part in a range of competitive events and exhibitions throughout the four-day festival. “There are a lot of good animals – really well trained. We have different shows, including a mule-pulling championship and a gaited mule show. We have a parade that’s geared to mule- and horsepower. A couple hundred wagons and teams from all over the country participate.” Additional festival attractions include arts and crafts, a liars’ contest, a beauty pageant, square dancing and plenty of children’s activities. “But it’s not a county fair,” Spann says. “It’s all about the mule. It’s one of the few places where you can have this kind of fun.” Or experience this kind of community pride. “I think people take pride in it because it puts us on the map,” Spann continues. “We’ve been raising mules here since before World War I, and we’ve supplied animals to every war effort in modern history. Because of their pack ability and agility in rough terrain, there are mules from here being used by the

military in Afghanistan today.” Festival attendance estimates range from 150,000 to 300,000 people annually. Visitors come from almost every state and several countries, and they pump more than $15 million into the local economy. It’s hard to pinpoint the exact numbers, says Louise Mills, Mule Day’s publicity director. “I just know it’s a bunch of people – and a bunch of mules.” Mule Day takes place Thursday through Sunday the weekend preceding the first Monday in April each year and is held at Maury County Park. Festival proceeds have enabled the Bridle and Saddle Club to pour some $400,000 into improving the park over the past 15 years, Mills says. In the fall, the focus turns to food at the Southern Fried Festival in downtown Columbia. Visitors to this late-September food fest can sample fried chicken, fried green tomatoes and even fried Twinkies. They also can hear top-notch recording artists, see an antique tractor show, enjoy carnival rides and much more. Visit www.muleday.com for more information about the annual Mule Day event. Visit www.southernfriedfest.com for more information about the Southern Fried Festival.

Left: Harvey Spann’s mules Above: Events include a parade and contests.

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Cuisine With

Character RESTAURANTS DRAW CROWDS FROM MILES AROUND

Joey Martin, left, and Marcy Gary serve comfort food and fresh-baked goods at Marcy Jo’s Mealhouse & Bakery.

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STORY BY JESSICA MOZO | PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANTONY BOSHIER

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rom Columbia’s downtown square to places way out in the country, local restaurants are serving up cuisine that can’t be found anywhere else. And diners are trekking from miles around to get in on the action. Carlene Landers opened her restaurant, Campbell Station Country Store, five years ago in a 100-year-old grocery store. She runs the restaurant and prepares all the food with the help of her daughters, 16-year-old Carly and 14-year-old Precinda. “I didn’t know if people would drive way out in the boonies, but I’ve found people will drive anywhere for good food,” Landers says. “We get them from Chattanooga, Bell Buckle … all over.” Campbell Station’s forté is Southern home-cooking, which includes hand-cut rib-eyes, fried chicken, meatloaf, cornbread, turnip greens, soups and mouthwatering desserts such as peach cobbler, fudge pie and fried pies. The general store-turned-restaurant is a throwback to an earlier era, with the original ceiling, floor, countertops and gas pumps. Authentic old pictures and signs decorate the walls. “People love the atmosphere because it lets them relive their childhood, when you could get a soda for a nickel,” Landers says. “And we still sell gas and candy bars.” Papa Boudreaux’s Cajun Café in Santa Fe (just 15 minutes north of Columbia) serves authentic Cajun cuisine in a modest yellow building that’s big on atmosphere. Gumbo, crawfish etoufeé, red beans and rice, shrimp creole, chicken and Andouille jambalaya – it’s all here and much more, along with made-from-scratch desserts such as Louisiana chocolate bread pudding and flourless Cajun chocolate cake. Diners can enjoy live music Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. The square in downtown Columbia is home to restaurants with a more modern feel. Killions Coffee & Creamery is a great spot to have lunch. “Our most popular items are our homemade chicken salad – with grapes and pecans or without – and our slow-cooked

ham sandwiches,” says Chuck Killion, who owns and operates Killion’s Coffee & Creamery with his wife, Terri. “We cook our hams for 10 to 12 hours and then pull the meat like barbecue to retain the flavor and moisture. We serve the ham on a bun, and we recommend you don’t put anything on it until you try it just like that. It tastes so good, most people don’t even want mayonnaise or mustard.” Killion’s Coffee and Creamery also serves hot and cold coffee drinks, fruit smoothies, gourmet hot chocolate, desserts, ice cream and its own homemade soft-serve vanilla made with 14 percent butterfat. Also on the square is the popular Square Market & Café, famous for steaks, fresh fish, pasta and Tennessee Hot Browns, a rich concoction of sliced ham, turkey and bacon on white toast, smothered with white sauce and cheddar cheese. In the small community of Pottsville, between Chapel Hill and Columbia, is Marcy Jo’s Mealhouse & Bakery – a country café that draws crowds from miles around. Owned by husband-and-wife team Rory Feek and Joey Martin, and Rory’s younger sister Marcy, Marcy Jo’s is a charming eatery housed in a refurbished 1890s mercantile store. And if the owners’ names sound familiar, they should. The couple performed as a duo on CMT’s series “Can You Duet” in 2008, and Rory is a successful songwriter with hits like Blake Shelton’s “Some Beach.” Marcy Jo’s, however, is famous for its food. Fresh breads and bakery items emerge from the ovens each morning, and the menu features homey favorites such as meatloaf, honeyglazed carrots, and pork chops with mushroom gravy.

What’s Online e Check out Killion’s Coffee & Creamery in our quick online video at imagesmaury.com.

Above left: Fried chicken, mashed potatoes, cornbread and fried pies are top sellers at the Campbell Station Country Store, a former general store. Above right: Killion’s Coffee & Creamery in Columbia offers desserts, coffee drinks and more.

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Into the

Outdoors MAURY COUNTY OVERFLOWS WITH SCENIC PARKS, GREEN SPACES

JEFFREY S. OTTO

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ANTONY BOSHIER

STORY BY JESSICA MOZO

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ust about any day of the year you can find retired high school teacher William Lee Barron tending to some 50 wooden bluebird houses scattered around Columbia’s 242-acre Maury County Park. “I started some of the birdhouses 20 years ago when I was still teaching at Central High School,” recalls Barron, who makes birdhouses from oak, pine and cedar. “A Boy Scout troop had put up six of them, and, when I retired, I started repairing them and adding more birdhouses. I got to 20, then 30, then 40. Last year, I got to 50.” Providing homes for nesting bluebirds is just one of the ways Barron enjoys the outdoors. He also walks between three and five miles a day at Maury County Park, often checking on his birdhouses along the way. Along with places to walk and bird-watch, Maury County Park offers playgrounds, picnic shelters, a softball complex and a football stadium. A unique and popular feature is the miniature train tracks, which are used by the Mid-South Live Steamers – a group of train enthusiasts – to run miniature trains. The organization offers free train rides twice a year at its spring and fall gatherings. “Maury County Park is within walking distance of the county courthouse, and you feel like you’re in the wilderness,” says Sonjalyn Rine, recreation specialist for Maury County Parks & Recreation. “At any given time, you can see wild turkey, fox, groundhogs and deer – and that’s not something you find in every county seat.” Children of all ages love Maury County Park’s playgrounds. “You’ve got great choices,” Rine says. “There are toddler

playgrounds on up to Kids Kingdom, a huge wooden playground that looks like a medieval fort.” For residents who want to hike, pitch a tent, fish in a creek or fly a kite, the 300-acre Chickasaw Trace Park is an ideal spot. Chickasaw Trace has hiking and biking trails, mountain bike trails, campsites, the Derryberry Log Cabin, picnic shelters, restrooms and access to the Duck River. There’s also a remote-control airplane field and a remote-control car track. Just south of Mount Pleasant, Stillhouse Hollow Falls is a state natural area whose star attraction is a cascading 75-foot waterfall surrounded by greenery and wildflowers. “It is without a doubt one of the most beautiful spots in the county,” Rine says. “You can hear rushing water and birds chirping. It’s peaceful, but also powerful – a real treasure for people to enjoy.” In downtown Columbia, the Duck River Walk features a two-mile urban greenway. The walk has a mini-amphitheater and pavilion for interpretive programs and interpretive signage about the Duck River’s natural and cultural history. Spring Hill’s new Bark Park opened in November 2008 at Evans Park, and Spring Hill is also home to Jerry Erwin Park, which joins with Spring Hill’s Battlefield Park and attracts history buffs. Jerry Erwin Park is also a great park for moms pushing strollers, Rine says, because the trail is an easy grade, and it’s just under one mile. Other outdoor attractions in Maury County include Woodland Park and Fairview Park in Columbia; Williams Spring Park in Mount Pleasant; Hampshire Park in Hampshire; and Southport Saltpeter Cave in Culleoka.

Left: A kayaker makes his way up the Duck River. Above: Cub Scouts put up a birdhouse in Maury County Park.

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Portfolio

Echoes of a Bygone Era RIPPAVILLA PLANTATION OFFERS VISITORS A GLIMPSE OF 19TH-CENTURY SOUTH

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What’s Online e Take a look at Rippavilla Plantation in our quick online video at imagesmaury.com.

ANTONY BOSHIER

nown as the Antebellum Homes Capital of Tennessee, Maury County has more antebellum homes than nearly every other county in the United States. The historic Rippavilla Plantation in Spring Hill, which was completed in 1855 by Nathaniel Cheairs, is one of the largest antebellum homes in the state. This landmark offers visitors a glimpse of life in the 19th-century South. In its heyday, the 1,100-acre plantation raised wheat, corn, hay, cotton, tobacco, cattle, sheep and mules. In modern terminology, explains docent Amy Batton, “they diversified.” The mansion features Greek Revival architecture, and 70 percent of the furnishings are original Cheairs family pieces. A museum room houses a collection of Civil War artifacts. “There’s a lot of Civil War history here,” says Andrew Sherriff, docent and house supervisor at Rippavilla Plantation. “It is most famous for General Hood’s breakfast meeting with a group of generals and other officers on Nov. 30, 1864 – the day of the Battle of Franklin.” About 75 slaves worked the plantation, and one of the original slave cabins still stands on the property. Special black history tours in February each year are well attended, says Executive Director Pam Perdue, and information about the slaves at Rippavilla is an important part of the overall interpretation of life here. Visitors to Rippavilla have come from as far away as Russia, Saudi Arabia and Australia. “It’s great to have this attraction to bring people into our community,” Sherriff says. “They come to see the historic sites, the antiques, the architecture. There are so many aspects and so much to learn.” People also travel long distances just to get lost in Rippavilla’s famous corn maze. The fall fundraiser draws about 20,000 visitors each year and also features concessions, stargazing, movies and a haunted house.

Rippavilla Plantation is one of Tennessee’s largest antebellum homes.

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Portfolio

Living a Lifetime on the Airways

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Save Money. Smell the Flowers.

Looking for ways to save money on gas and help the environment? Be aware of your speed ... did you know that for every 5 miles you go over 65 mph, you’re spending about 20 cents more per gallon of gas? For more tips and to compare cleaner, more efficient vehicles, visit

www.epa.gov/greenvehicles.

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o say that radio has changed since Robert M. McKay Jr. founded WKRM 1340 AM in Columbia in 1946 is putting it mildly. But one thing that hasn’t changed is McKay’s dedication. Although his son is now the station’s general manager, McKay, who is in his late 80s, still comes to work every day. Born in 1920, McKay began applying for an FCC license right after President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared war in 1941. But McKay’s dream of a local radio station would have to wait. “When I found out the FCC would not be granting any more licenses at that time, I put all the papers in a shoebox and told my dad not to throw them away because I was going to join the service, and I would start the radio station when I got back,” McKay says. While McKay was serving overseas, his father filed the application on McKay’s behalf. He got word that he had received his license while on duty in the Philippines. “That’s what got me through World War II – knowing I was going to have a radio station when I got home,” McKay says. Once WKRM was up and running, McKay started a local news broadcast – and his was one of the first Tennessee stations to do so. “After that, I got invited all over the place to give talks on how you do it,” McKay recalls. “At one time, we had more awards for local news than any other station in the state.” The most significant local news he ever covered? “The flood of ’48,” McKay says. “The town was cut off north from south because the bridge was out on Highway 31. We moved our headquarters to the Red Cross building and broadcast day and night.” The station doesn’t play his favorite big-band music anymore, but the venerable station still emphasizes local news and public service. And that, McKay says, is a dream come true. M AU R Y C O U N T Y


Maury County Public Library offers a range of reading-based activities, especially during the summer.

Keeping Kids Connected to Books hen it comes to keeping kids excited about reading, the Maury County Public Library knows its business. The library offers an array of fun, reading-based activities for children, from toddlers to teens. “We have a great children’s librarian, Mecca Caron, and she does various programs throughout the year,� says Adam Southern, reference librarian. “The biggest is the summer reading program.� The program kicks off with a carnival outdoors and continues with Wacky Wednesdays, when different performers entertain children in the library basement. “We’ll have up to 300 kids,� Southern says. “It gets pretty cramped down there, but it’s a great way to keep kids involved with reading while they’re out of school.� Loyal Harry Potter fans have their own club that meets at the library once a month. The Harry Potter Club’s activities are based on events depicted in the popular book series, such as a Sorting Hat Ceremony and a Yule Ball. The Shakespeare Community Club provides an opportunity for children and adults to explore Shakespeare’s works through discussion, readers’ theater – even the occasional mock sword fight. The youngest library patrons enjoy stories, crafts and games while developing a love for books during Preschool Story Time, a popular program that takes place at 10 a.m. every weekday except Wednesday. About once a quarter, the library hosts princess parties, when little girls get to dress up, have tea and cupcakes, and do crafts and activities. “There’s always something going on,� Southern says. Visit www.maurycountylibrary. org for more information. M AU R Y C O U N T Y

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Portfolio

Calling Coffee Connoisseurs

JEFF ADKINS

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efore she opened Buckhead Coffeehouse, Debbie Cooper’s job was pretty uneventful. But she had a lifechanging epiphany while sitting at work one day. “I had worked at a bank for 15 years,” Cooper recalls. “And one day I just realized, ‘I am bored to death.’” Not long afterward, she started managing the coffee and doughnut shop that soon was to become Buckhead Coffeehouse – now a favorite hangout among Columbia’s coffee connoisseurs. “I had always wanted to do something like this,” she says. Two months after starting a job there, she bought it from the owner. “What I like best about the atmosphere is that it’s so diverse,” Cooper says. “We have customers of every age, from every background.” And a good gender balance, too, which was important to Cooper. In fact, she thought long and hard before settling on a name for the place for that very reason. “I named it ‘Buckhead’ so that men wouldn’t be afraid to come in,” she explains. “I think it has a nice, masculine ring to it.” Cooper has 12 employees, and she buys her coffee locally – some from a small-batch roaster in Hermitage who creates Buckhead’s exclusive signature roasts, and some from a flavored-coffee roaster who has honed his craft for more than 20 years. Buckhead serves lattés, cappuccinos and espresso, as well as seasonal specialties developed by Cooper and her staff. The menu also features fruit, salads, sandwiches and a popular selection of vegetarian and vegan items. The works of local artists adorn the interior of the recently renovated Trotwood Avenue location, and outdoor seating also is available. Cooper has opened a second Buckhead Coffeehouse at the MidTennessee Bone and Joint Clinic in The Medical Plaza at Creekside Place. Cooper says her customers have become like family in the seven years since Buckhead opened. “Everybody feels at home here,” she says. “And that’s the way we want it to be.” M AU R Y C O U N T Y


A farmers market at City Hall is one of Mount Pleasant’s many community-oriented activities.

Promoting Pride in Mount Pleasant ife in the town of Mount Pleasant is downright ‌ well, pleasant. There’s plenty to be proud of in this city of 4,500, not the least of which are its welcoming Mayberry vibe and friendly residents. The city, with the help of many community members, has launched some events and programs aimed at bringing folks together and calling attention to all that’s praiseworthy in Mount Pleasant. One of the most important programs is the Mount Pleasant Citizen of the Month award. This designation is given to someone who has contributed to the town over time or who has recently accomplished something outstanding. Each recipient is honored with a certificate at a regularly scheduled Board of Commissioners meeting, where the mayor presents the award. The first Citizen of the Month award went to an 89-year-old woman who has lived here all her life. The most recent winner was a 12-year-old girl who collected soft-drink tabs for Ronald McDonald House. A popular community gathering spot is the farmers market, which takes place on Saturdays from May through October in the City Hall parking lot. The farmers market was a great success in 2008 – its first year – and is back by popular demand. Vendors typically sell out of their fresh fruits and vegetables, which are snapped up by residents in search of locally grown produce. Officials say these programs and events are simple ways for people to get to know their neighbors and reconnect with the town they live in. – Stories by Carol Cowan M AU R Y C O U N T Y

BRIAN McCORD

L

PROUDLY SERVING EDUCATIONAL PROFESSIONALS THROUGHOUT MAURY COUNTY

4ROTWOOD!VE "s   .ASHVILLE(WYs   (ATCHER,Ns   Columbia, TN 38401

Maury County Public Schools 501 W. 8th St. Columbia, TN 38401

WWWFCCUUS

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Business

Fasten Your

Seatbelts SPRING HILL PLANT TAKES CHANGES IN STRIDE

STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN

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aturn Corp. changed Spring Hill when the automaker started manufacturing cars in 1990. And now in 2009, more change has arrived. The Spring Hill automotive manufacturing facility no longer produces Saturns. Instead, the plant is now known as General Motors-Spring Hill Manufacturing, and 2009 Chevrolet Traverse SUVs are rolling off the assembly line. “Yes, times have certainly changed and continue to change for the auto industry, including in Spring Hill and Maury County,” says Frank Tamberrino, president of Maury Alliance. “At one time, there were 8,000 employees at the Spring Hill plant. Even though that number is now around 3,500, General Motors still remains a major player in this community.” Several suppliers to GM are also located in Maury County to assist in the Chevy Traverse manufacturing process. Some of the larger suppliers include Johnson Controls, Penske and Premier. “In all, nearly 50 percent of the workers who build the Traverse are living in Maury County,” Tamberrino says. “For many years, General Motors has had a big economic impact in this community, and it still does.” The Spring Hill assembly plant has recently become one of the most advanced and efficient in the automotive world. In 2007 and 2008, General Motors poured $690 million into the plant in order to completely revamp and retool the production 22

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line operations. Spring Hill can now manufacture virtually any vehicle in GM’s product lineup. “The plant has always been advanced, but now it is the most modern that General Motors has in its entire system,” Tamberrino says. “The retooling included installation of a flex line, which means that the Spring Hill plant can produce just about anything – with very little notice or turnover time.” In other words, because the Traverse actually sits on a car body, it would not take much time and effort to have the Spring Hill plant produce bodies for other GM models such as Buicks, Saabs and other Chevrolets. “We see the Traverse as just the beginning of many more additional products coming to Maury County,” Tamberrino says. “The Spring Hill site is a very flexible facility that has positioned itself as well as it can be, given today’s economic circumstances in the automotive industry.” The Chevrolet Traverse has a base price of $29,900 and is equipped with just about every advanced mechanism available in the industry. “I took a ride in a Traverse before they became available to the public and I was thoroughly impressed,” Tamberrino says. “The one I rode in had all the bells and whistles. It even had seats that quickly warm or cool to ideal temperatures for every passenger. The Traverse is an incredible vehicle.” M AU R Y C O U N T Y


General Motors-Spring Hill Manufacturing produces the Chevrolet Traverse, but the plant can switch gears if needed.

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Business

Biz Briefs A SAMPLING OF BUSINESSES – LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE MAURY COUNTY’S STRONG AND WELL-BALANCED ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

4,208 Total number of firms

$661,917 Retail sales ($1,000)

$9,257 Retail sales per capita

$75,664 Accommodations and food service sales ($1,000)

YIP YAP PET SALON Biz: Pet grooming, pet day care and boarding Buzz: Offering everything from full-scale grooming services to doggie daycare and boarding, Yip Yap Pet Salon and owner Angie Baker Rosson have become hits with Columbia and Maury County pet owners since opening in July 2008. Custom spa services include tooth brushing, facials, hot-oil treatments and more than 20 nail color choices for “Paw-Di-Cures.” www.yipyappetsalon.com

ITTY BITTY CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE Biz: Children’s clothing and unique accessories Buzz: After owning Ye Peddler in downtown Columbia for 10 years, Rachel Hughes and new business partner Elizabeth Miller took the space next door and opened Itty Bitty in August 2008. Miller is a former department-store buyer, and her experience shows in the wide selection of children’s items. www.shop8th.com/id6.html

INTEGRITY NUTRACEUTICALS Biz: Supplier of health-care herbs and more Buzz: Founded in 1999, Integrity works to provide the best raw materials to producers of nutraceuticals, including amino acids, joint- and health-care items, specialty items and herbs. Integrity can provide just the raw ingredients, or it can also provide custom formulations, manufacturing and packaging. www.integritynut.com

THE CROSSINGS OF SPRING HILL Biz: Retail and dining destination Buzz: Located at the southern edge of Spring Hill, where Highway 31 crosses Main Street and Saturn Parkway, The Crossings of Spring Hill is becoming the area’s premier dining destination as well as a stop for serious shoppers. Anchored by Super Target, The Crossings also houses other major retailers and restaurants. www.thecrossingsofspringhill.com

Source: U.S. Census QuickFacts

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ANTONY BOSHIER

Business | Chamber Report

From left: Doug Venable, 2009 chairman of the board, and Frank Tamberrino, Maury Alliance president

Taking Care of Their Own MAURY ALLIANCE WORKS TO HELP SMALL BUSINESSES GROW

A

uto giant General Motors is Maury County’s largest employer with nearly 3,500 employees, but small, locally owned businesses are the backbone of the area’s economy. And Maury Alliance officials strive to support those entrepreneurs every way they can. “Beyond General Motors, we’ve got some 600 small businesses and small stores. It’s been that way for years, and it will continue to be that way in the future, thanks to the startup companies we’re seeing with all the new people moving to this area,” says Frank Tamberrino, president of the Maury Alliance. “We’re already seeing small businesses mushroom up in Spring Hill with the fast growth of that area, and we’ve got lots of little companies that have been here 100 years. Every community wants new big industry, but the reality in this economy is much smaller operations. We’re working on ways to help our small businesses grow, because we all know it’s important to take care of what we’ve got.” Some of Maury County’s small businesses do some pretty amazing things. “There’s a company called Froggy’s Fog that makes fog for shows and skating rinks and sells it all over the country,” Tamberrino says. “Another company, Artisan Industry, consists of four guys who can design, draw and build anything you can think of, and they make treehouses and décor for M AU R Y C O U N T Y

restaurants and playhouses for parks.” Doug Venable, 2009 chairman of the board for the Maury Alliance, knows firsthand the struggles and triumphs small business owners experience. Before moving to Columbia and purchasing Porter-Walker LLC seven years ago, Venable owned two doughnut shops in Michigan. He worked 16 hours a day, six days a week. “I learned a lot, and then I got into the industrial and safety supply industry 10 years ago,” he says. Porter-Walker is a 102-year-old industry and safety supply distributor that provides everything from cutting tools and eye protection to hearing protection and medical supplies for companies all over the Tennessee Valley. The company has 45 employees. As chairman of the board for the Maury Alliance, Venable plans to continue recruiting new industry and jobs, but also to “really appreciate the base we already have here.” “There are a lot of local entrepreneurs who have invested in this area for the long term, and those are the ones we should be helping in this economy,” Venable says. “We want to look at ways to help them expand and market their businesses, and that will help our employment base as well as our city and county tax revenue.” – Jessica Mozo I M AG E S M AU R Y. C O M

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Business | Economic Profile

MAURY COUNTY BUSINESS CLIMATE Maury County has a diverse economic climate, with a mix of large companies and about 600 small businesses. The Maury Alliance is dedicated to helping existing businesses thrive while bringing new businesses to the community.

ECONOMIC RESOURCES Maury Alliance 106 W. Sixth St. Columbia, TN 38402 (931) 388-2155 www.mauryalliance.com The Maury Alliance serves as both a chamber of commerce and an economic development initiative for the county.

TAXES

2.25%

Tennessee Department of Economic & Community Development 312 Rosa Parks Ave., 11th Floor Nashville, TN 37243 (615) 741-1888 www.tennessee.gov/ecd/

City Sales and Use Tax

7% State Sales Tax

9.25%

INDUSTRIAL SITES Industrial Sites www.mauryalliance.com/ available_industrial_ buildings_land

Total Sales Tax

TRANSPORTATION Maury Regional Airport 1200 N. Main St. Mt. Pleasant, TN 38474 (931) 379-5511 www.maurywebpages.com/ airport.htm

GOVERNMENT OFFICES City of Columbia City Hall (931) 560-1500 City of Mt. Pleasant City Hall (931) 379-7717 City of Spring Hill City Hall (931) 486-2252

MORE EO ONLINE imagesmaury.com

MAJOR INDUSTRIAL MANUFACTURERS GM Spring Hill Manufacturing Johnson Control

450

Penske Logistics

320

Premier Manufacturing Support Services

200

Mapa Spontex Inc.

153

American Banknote Co.

149

Tennessee Aluminum Processors

142

Cytec Industries

138

Interco Print/Trader Publishing

115

Numatics Inc.

104

Smelter Service

104

WireMasters Inc.

90

ITW Shippers Products

84

Tegrant Corp.

82

Kasbar National Industries

80

INDUSTRIAL SUPPORT SERVICES Service

More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

3,485

Town

Abrasives Foundry

Columbia Mt. Pleasant

Heat treating

Columbia

Heavy hardware

Columbia

Lubricants

Mt. Pleasant, Spring Hill

Sheet metal

Columbia, Mt. Pleasant, Spring Hill

Tool & die

Mt. Pleasant

Welding supplies

Columbia

Maury County Clerk’s Office (931) 375-1307

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ANTONY BOSHIER

Education

Making Healthy Choices HOUND DOG MASCOT BOOSTS ENTHUSIASM FOR EXERCISE, EATING RIGHT

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hildhood obesity and poor physical health are growing problems across Tennessee and the nation, but officials at Maury County Public Schools are tackling the problems head on. “We rank fourth and fifth in childhood and adult obesity in Tennessee, so part of our goal is to empower kids to make better choices in the lunch line,” says Tori Weiss, school health coordinator for Maury County Public Schools. “For example, we serve our pizza on whole wheat crust. And new vending laws don’t allow sodas to be sold in schools anymore – only water and low-fat snacks.” But there’s more. To create an atmosphere of excitement about making healthy choices, Weiss created a school health mascot named Victor E. “He’s a great big hound dog who wears a big football jersey, and his seven favorite words all start with E – Energy, Exercise, Education, Excellence, Enthusiasm, Earth and Eating healthy,” Weiss explains. Victor E. visits students during lunchtime at the county’s 13 elementary schools, and he talks to them about the importance of exercise, eating right and all the other E words. “The response has been fantastic. The kids see him and get really excited,” Weiss says. “They all want to know when he’s coming back to their school.” Students even encounter Victor E. outside of school. “We had stuffed animals made of Victor E., and we put

them around the community – at the YMCA and in all our school offices,” Weiss says. “I’m a member of the Y, and I went in one day and saw a little girl point to Victor E. and tell her mom, ‘That’s Victor E., and he comes to my school.’ ” Victor E. is part of Maury County’s Coordinated School Health program, which was mandated by the state in 2006 to be initiated in every school. The Coordinated School Health Improvement Act of 2000 provided funding for the CSH program to be established in 10 pilot sites. In 2006, the initiative and funding was established to expand CSH statewide. “The overall goal is to improve the health of our students, especially because recess time and physical education have been cut in many schools,” Weiss says. “We want to help our children become physically, emotionally and socially healthy. And that’s the motivation behind Victor E. Once we teach children to respect themselves and others, all the E’s fall into place.” The Coordinated School Health program also recognizes the connection between healthy choices and academic achievement. Together, they create a strong foundation for preparing students for challenges they’ll face both academically and personally. “We’ve got a hugely supportive community that’s willing to help our kids get the resources they need,” Weiss says. “So we can identify needs and go from there. The only limit is our own imaginations.” – Jessica Mozo

Mascot Victor E. talks about the importance of exercise with students at McDowell Elementary School in Columbia.

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Health & Wellness

Changing With the Times MAURY REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER’S NEW NAME REFLECTS ITS GROWING ROLE

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ith a fresh slate of accomplishments, new services and a brand-new name, Maury Regional Medical Center is becoming a one-stop source for the region’s health-care needs. The medical center’s recent awards and upgrades speak to its growing mission and focus. Maury Regional was named a Thomson Reuters 100 Top Hospital in March 2008, and the facility received accreditation as a chest pain center in July 2008. The facility also has wrapped up a three-year renovation and expansion of its surgical services, opened a wound care center and added digital mammography technology to its women’s center. By mid-2009, the facility will offer 14 more private rooms.

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“It’s part of an ongoing process we have here of prioritizing our growth based on input from our constituents on the medical staff and in the community,” says Robert Otwell, chief executive officer. It is advancements such as these and others over the past 20 years that led to the name change in October 2008 to reflect the facility’s growing presence. “Our management team, physicians and board look at our vision and values every year during our planning process, and in those discussions, our name change came up,” Otwell says. “The new name conveys the scope and depth of services that we truly have. ‘Hospital’ connotes inpatient services that may be somewhat limited, and so much of what we do now is much more comprehensive, and more than half of it is from an

outpatient perspective.” Growth is a key component of the organization’s plan, utilizing the medical center’s resources to meet the healthcare needs of patients close to home. “In many cases, we know our clinical outcomes and service are superior to hospitals to the north of us,” Otwell says. “As we grow and develop, we’re hoping more people in our eight-county service area will utilize Maury Regional.” Maury Regional Medical Center is a 275-bed not-for-profit facility with a medical staff of more than 170 physicians representing more than 30 specialties. The medical center operates affiliate facilities in Spring Hill, Hohenwald, Lewisburg and Waynesboro. Visit www.mauryregional.com for more information. – Joe Morris

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Arts & Culture

PHOTO COURTESY OF TTU PHOTO / JOHN LUCAS

Pottery by Timothy Weber, a renowned Tennessee potter, has been featured at Pryor Art Gallery.

Pryor Achievements GALLERY SHOWCASES LOCAL AND REGIONAL ARTWORK

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h, the humanities – and the art. Columbia State Community College is now home to the Pryor Art Gallery, which is housed in the Waymon L. Hickman Building. The gallery is directed by Lucy Scott Kuykendall, an adjunct instructor of humanities and art at Columbia State. “I am certainly a devoted fan of art, and we have been lucky enough to schedule quite a few excellent exhibits here at Columbia State,” says Kuykendall, who has a master’s degree in art history M AU R Y C O U N T Y

from Vanderbilt University. “The Hickman Building opened six years ago, and the gallery is a beautiful space for visual art. It has a nice bank of windows to let in plenty of natural light, which makes it even more attractive.” The gallery is named for Harold Pryor, who in the late 1960s became the first president of Columbia State. His wife, Larue, was an elementary school art teacher, and the Pryors donated money to build the gallery and fund the running of it.

Besides showcasing paintings, the gallery also welcomes displays of drawings, photography, sculpture, woodworking, stained glass, quilts, pottery and other media. “As soon as a visitor enters the main doors of the Hickman Building, the gallery is immediately to the left,” Kuykendall says. “We look to display the art of talent from Middle Tennessee, but we have also been branching out.” Exhibits have included some recent displays from the Tennessee State Museum as well as from private collections. “In 2008, we welcomed the work of Andy Currie, a travel photographer from Atlanta whose wife grew up in Columbia,” Kuykendall says. “At the same time, we had the work of David Andrews on display. David is a photographer from Chattanooga whose brother, Dr. Bill Andrews, is head of the history department here at Columbia State.” The college also has exhibited the work of Timothy Weber, a renowned Tennessee potter who once headed the Appalachia Crafts Center. “We schedule eight to 10 rotating exhibits each year, and admission to the gallery is free,” Kuykendall says. “The gallery is open whenever the Hickman Building is open.” Several of the works on display can be purchased, with the artists keeping all the money from every sale. “We are just appreciative that these excellent artists choose the Pryor Gallery to showcase their work,” she says. “Some of these artists have actually contributed pieces of their work to Columbia State, so the college has started putting together a permanent art collection. Pieces are located on campus in places such as the president’s office and main conference rooms.” – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S M AU R Y. C O M

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Sports & Recreation

Courses Way Above Par GOLFERS CAN CHOOSE FROM PRIVATE, SEMIPRIVATE AND PUBLIC VENUES

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green fees are $17 both on weekdays and weekends. At Kings Creek Golf Club in Spring Hill, the 18-hole, par 70 attraction saw Arnold Palmer himself visit the course in June 2006 to participate in the official opening ceremonies. “The King” drove the ceremonial first ball about 275 yards off the first tee to the delight of those in attendance. In its short history, Kings Creek has already been lauded for its scenic layout. Five sets of tees allow golfers the choice to play the 18 holes from different distances, from 5,078 yards up to 6,807 yards. Graymere Country Club – Maury County’s only fully private course – opened in 1924 and is home to 240 members who enjoy the 18-hole, par 72 layout. “We just completed a renovation project in 2008 that included enlarging our pond as well as installing cart paths throughout the course,” says Rita Smith, controller at Graymere Country Club. “Our pond was enlarged to further support our irrigation system, which will help make our facility even better than it already is.” Smith says that in addition to golf, Graymere has an excellent clubhouse. “Members can enjoy the golf course whenever they want, then stop in the clubhouse and have a cocktail with lunch or dinner,” she says. “Graymere is simply a beautiful place, indoors and out.” – Kevin Litwin

STAFF PHOTO

olf courses in Maury County are as nice as a 100-yard chip shot sailing directly into the cup. Columbia is lucky enough to have two venues – the private membership Graymere Country Club and the public 18-hole Stoneybrook Golf Course. Meanwhile, Mount Pleasant is home to the semi-private Mount Pleasant Country Club, and Spring Hill features the semi-private King’s Creek Golf Club that was designed by Arnold Palmer. “We have been Columbia’s home for public golf since 1961 in a country setting along the banks of Little Bigby Creek,” says Carroll Strange, general manager of Stoneybrook Golf Course. “In January 2007, new owners purchased the course and began a major renovation. The new layout includes 45 additional acres of land that has expanded the course from a par 70 to a par 72.” The extensive improvements at Stoneybrook include an upgraded irrigation system, new greens, new holes, new bridges crossing the creek and a larger fleet of new golf carts. “Changes have also been made in the clubhouse, with a fresh look that includes an upgraded bar and expanded grill service,” Strange says. “We also offer professional swing training and club fitting, and the course is open year round.” As for the semi-private courses, Mount Pleasant Country Club is a nine-hole venue that has been around since 1968. It stretches 3,033 yards from the longest tees for a par of 36, and

Golfers in Maury County can choose from four top-notch courses in Columbia, Mount Pleasant and Spring Hill.

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Community Profile

MAURY COUNTY SNAPSHOT Maury County has a wealth of scenic green spaces, shops, antebellum homes and historic sites, and it’s just about an hour’s drive from downtown Nashville.

HOUSING

EDUCATIONAL OVERVIEW

$107,800 CLIMATE OVERVIEW

Average Home Price

Maury County enjoys a temperate, four-season climate that is typical for the Southeast, with mild winters and July highs in the 90s.

19.56%

25 F January Low Temperature

46 F

Home Turnover Percentage

MORE EO ONLINE imagesmaury.com

January High Temperature

61 F July Low Temperature

More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

85 F July High Temperature

MEDICAL SERVICES OVERVIEW Maury County residents enjoy first-rate health and medical services, including the care available at the top-ranked Maury Regional Medical Center.

Maury County has an excellent public school system and several private schools. Higher education is available at Columbia State Community College, and an array of other colleges and universities can be found in nearby Nashville.

ARTS AND CULTURE The Athenaeum Rectory 808 Athenaeum St. Columbia, TN 38401 (931) 381-4822 www.athenaeumrectory.com James K. Polk Ancestral Home 301 W. Seventh St. Columbia, TN 38402 (931) 388-2354 www.jameskpolk.com Rippavilla Plantation 5700 Main St. Columbia, TN 38402 (931) 486-9037 www.rippavilla.org For a complete Arts and Culture list, visit imagesmaury.com THIS SECTION IS SPONSORED BY

REDMAN-DAVIS INSURANCE AGENCY

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INSURANCE

Auto &Home &Business M AU R Y C O U N T Y

410 W. Seventh St. Columbia, TN (931) 388-5387

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Maury Alliance

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Maury Alliance

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Maury Alliance

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Maury Alliance

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Maury Alliance Glorifying God Through Academic Excellence Since 1979

ZION CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Fully Accredited Pre-K to 12th Grade Member of TSSAA

6901 Old Zion Rd. Columbia, TN 38401 (931) 388-5731

www.zioneagles.org

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Maury Alliance visit our

advertisers Ascend Federal Credit Union www.ascendfcu.org

Community First Bank & Trust www.cfbk.com

Life Care Center of Columbia www.lcca.com

Battle Ground Academy www.battlegroundacademy.org

Cowley Container www.cowleycontainer.com

Maury Regional Medical Center www.mauryregional.com

BCS Lighting LLC www.bcslighting.com

Crye Leike Realtors www.crye-leike.com

Mid-Tennessee Bone & Joint Clinic PC www.mtbj.net

Bostelman Enterprises www.bostelmaninc.com

Cytec Industries Inc. www.cytec.com

Mt. Pleasant Power System

Charter Communications www.charter.com

Duck River Electric Membership Corporation Muletown Family Network www.muletownfamily.org www.dremc.com Oakes & Nichols Inc. First Community Credit Union www.funeralplan.com/oaksandnichols www.fccu.us

Columbia Academy www.columbia-academy.net

First Farmers & Merchants Bank www.fandmbank.com

Redman-Davis Insurance Agency www.redmandavis.com

Columbia Machine Works Inc. www.columbiamachineworks.com

Get-Covered www.get-covered.com

Tennessee Farm Bureau www.tnfarmbureau.org

Columbia Main Street www.colmainst@maurycounty-tn.gov

Haulers Insurance Company

The Bridge Assisted Living www.centurypa.com

Brian D. Fann DDS www.thesmilesofcolumbia.com

Columbia Power & Water Systems www.cpws.com Columbia State Community College www.columbiastate.edu

Heritage Bank & Trust www.heritagebankandtrust.com Kraft CPAs PLLC www.kraftcpas.com Ledford Insurance Agency

Vanderbilt Medical Center www.vanderbiltwilliamson.com Zion Christian Academy www.zioneagles.com

FUNERAL DIRECTORS

Maury County’s Oldest Continuing Business Serving with Dignity and Consideration – Since 1856

Saving Watts Makes Cents! • Interior/Exterior Lighting Maintenance • Power Efficiency Solutions • Energy Efficient Lighting Upgrades • Parking Lot Lighting

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• Electrical Maintenance • Sign Maintenance • Group Relamping

Office: (866) 552-7839 • Fax: (615) 469-5318 www.bcslighting.com • bcarroll@bcslighting.com

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Ad Index C4 ASCEND FEDER AL CREDIT U NION

C 3 COWLE Y CONTAINER

33 BAT TLE GROU ND ACADEMY

C 3 CY TEC INDUSTRIES INC .

37 BC S LIGHTING LLC C2 BOSTELMAN ENTERPRISES 19 BRIAN D. FANN DDS 16 CHARTER COMM U NICATIONS C 3 COLU MBIA ACADEMY C 3 COLU MBIA MACHINE WORKS INC . C 3 COLU MBIA MAIN STREET

16 CRYE LEIKE RE ALTORS

2 DUCK RIVER ELEC TRIC MEMBERSHIP CORPOR ATION 21 FIRST COMM U NIT Y CREDIT U NION 1 8 FIRST FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANK 34 GET- COVERED C 3 HAU LERS INSU R ANCE COMPANY 37 HERITAGE BANK & TRUST

37 COLU MBIA POWER & WATER SYSTEMS

35 KR AF T CPAS PLLC

36 COLU MBIA STATE COMM U NIT Y COLLEGE

C 3 LEDFORD INSU R ANCE AGENCY

1 COMM U NIT Y FIRST BANK & TRUST

35 LIFE CARE CENTER OF COLU MBIA


Ad Index (cont.) 32 MAU RY REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 33 MID -TENNESSEE BONE & JOINT CLINIC PC C 3 MT. PLE ASANT POWER SYSTEM 28 M U LETOWN FAMILY NET WORK 37 OAKES & NICHOLS INC . 3 1 REDMAN -DAVIS INSU R ANCE AGENCY 34 TENNESSEE FARM BU RE AU 20 THE BRIDGE ASSISTED LIVING 28 VANDERBILT MEDICAL CENTER 36 ZION CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

questions answers

©2002 American Cancer Society, Inc.

8 0 0 . A C S . 2 3 4 5 / c a n c e r. o r g


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Supporting the Community for Over 50 Years

Cytec Industries Inc. Mt. Pleasant, Tennessee

Proudly serving Maury County for 81 years

MACHINING Contract Machining 7iÂ?`ˆ˜}ĂŠUĂŠ>LĂ€ÂˆV>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜

MAINTENANCE >V…ˆ˜iĂŠ,iLĂ•ÂˆÂ?` ,iÂŤ>ÂˆĂ€ĂŠUĂŠ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŒi˜>˜Vi

ENGINEERING

Ă•ĂƒĂŒÂœÂ“ĂŠ ˜}ˆ˜iiĂ€i`ĂŠ-ĂžĂƒĂŒiÂ“ĂƒĂŠ EĂŠ-ÂŤiVˆ>Â?ĂŠ>V…ˆ˜iĂƒ

Est.1927 £™{äÊ">ÂŽÂ?>˜`ĂŠ*ÂŽĂœĂžÂ° *°"°Ê ÂœĂ?Ê£ä£n

ÂœÂ?ՓLˆ>]ĂŠ/ ĂŠĂŽn{äӇ£ä£n ­™Î£ŽÊÎnnÂ‡ĂˆĂ“Ă¤Ă“ >Ă?\Ê­™Î£ŽÊÎnn‡nÂŁĂ“n >ĂƒÂ…Ă›ÂˆÂ?Â?i\ĂŠÂ­ĂˆÂŁxÂŽĂŠĂ“x{Â‡ĂˆĂ¤Ă¤x

www.columbiamachineworks.com

M AU R Y C O U N T Y

I M AG E S M AU R Y. C O M

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Visions for Maury County, TN: 2009