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2010 | IMAGESSOUTHERNIDAHO.COM ®

SOUTHERN IDAHO

READY, WILLING AND STABLE Central location, eager workforce form diverse, solid economy

CELLAR’S MARKET Local vineyards produce wonderful wines

What’s Online ine ne See a BASE jumper leap from the Perrine Bridge into the Snake River Canyon.

Panoramic Playground Magic Valley overflows with recreation outlets SPONSORED BY THE TWIN FALLS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


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Digital Magazine 2010 | IMAGESSOUTHERNIDAHO.COM ®

SOUTHERN IDAHO

READY, WILLING AND STABLE Central location, eager workforce form diverse, solid economy

CELLAR’S MARKET Local vineyards produce wonderful wines

What’s Online ine ne ne See a BASE jumper leap from the Perrine Bridge into the Snake River Canyon.

Panoramic Playground Magic Valley overflows with recreation outlets SPONSORED BY THE TWIN FALLS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

LIVE LINKS Hot links allow users to quickly link to other sites for additional information, and an ad index allows you to easily locate local advertisers in the magazine.

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th anniversary issue

2010 EDITION | VOLUME 5 ®

SOUTHERN IDAHO

CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S

SOUTHERN IDAHO BUSINESS

10 KIDDING AROUND

30 Ready, Willing and Stable

Activities and educational opportunities make Southern Idaho an ideal place to raise a family.

14 FEASTING ON SUCCESS Food-based companies cultivate Southern Idaho’s economy.

18 PANORAMIC PLAYGROUND Few places can lay claim to as many wide-ranging natural attractions as the Magic Valley.

22 CELLAR’S MARKET Stock up on wonderful wines from the vineyards of Southern Idaho.

25 THE GRAND CANYON CREST Fine dining restaurant doubles as a much-needed events center.

ON THE COVER Wakeboarding at Thousand Springs State Park Photo by Brian McCord

Inside: Southern Idaho Tourism Special Section

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Central location and eager workforce form a diverse, solid business climate.

34 Biz Briefs 36 Chamber Report 37 Economic Profile

D E PA R TM E NT S 6 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Southern Idaho’s culture

39 41 43 45 46 49

Health & Wellness Sports & Recreation Education Arts & Culture Image Gallery Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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imagessouthernidaho.com THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

SOUTHERN IDAHO

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SENIOR EDITOR JESSY YANCEY COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITOR LISA BATTLES STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS DANNY BONVISSUTO, LAURA GALLAGHER, ANNE GILLEM, MICHAELA JACKSON, JESSICA WALKER DATA MANAGER CHANDRA BRADSHAW INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER BRYAN BAIRD SALES SUPPORT MANAGER CINDY HALL SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN McCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, J. KYLE KEENER PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT MANAGER ANNE WHITLOW CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS MELISSA BRACEWELL, KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER CANDICE SWEET GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, JESSICA MANNER, JANINE MARYLAND, MARCUS SNYDER WEB IMPLEMENTATION DIRECTOR ANDY HARTLEY WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR FRANCO SCARAMUZZA WEB CONTENT MANAGER JOHN HOOD WEB PROJECT MANAGER YAMEL RUIZ WEB DESIGN LEAD LEIGH GUARIN

PICTURE PERFECT

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We’ve added even more of our prize-winning photography to the online gallery. To see these photos, click on Photo Gallery.

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN

RELOCATION

SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN

Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./SALES TODD POTTER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS V.P./CUSTOM PUBLISHING KIM NEWSOM MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS BILL McMEEKIN MANAGING EDITOR/COMMUNITY KIM MADLOM MANAGING EDITOR/TRAVEL SUSAN CHAPPELL PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY SIMPSON DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR YANCEY TURTURICE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE SALES SUPPORT RACHAEL GOLDSBERRY SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR RACHEL MATHEIS EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN

VIDEOS In our Interactive section, watch quick videos by our editors and photographers featuring people, places and events.

OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

FACTS & STATS CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

Images Southern Idaho is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Twin Falls Area Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Twin Falls Area Chamber of Commerce 858 Blue Lakes Blvd. N. • Twin Falls, ID 83301 Phone: (208) 733-3974 • Fax: (208) 733-9216 www.twinfallschamber.com

Go online to learn even more about: • Schools • Health care • Utilities • Parks • Taxes

LOCAL FLAVOR From the simple to the sublime, the delicious offerings here are guaranteed to satisfy every appetite.

VISIT IMAGES SOUTHERN IDAHO ONLINE AT IMAGESSOUTHERNIDAHO.COM ©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

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ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Images gives readers a taste of what makes Southern Idaho tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts. “Find the good – and praise it.”

– Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

Member Twin Falls Area Chamber of Commerce

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Almanac

Preserving the Past Talk about flour power. The longabandoned grain elevators, or silos, of an old Twin Falls flour mill have found new life, thanks to a nonprofit group of preservationists. Preservation Twin Falls and its volunteers have refurbished the early 1900s structures, and today visitors can climb their spiral staircases to a spectacular view overlooking the Magic Valley. Beautification efforts to the landscape, including a botanical garden, are also taking root in the new park, a welcoming spot for visitors arriving from the south, where the airport is located.

Go With the Flow While they may not be as famous as the canals in Venice, the canals in Twin Falls play a pivotal role in the area’s economy. Born of the 1894 Carey Act, which allowed the setting aside of federal land for private investors, the irrigation system has been operated by the Twin Falls Canal Co. since 1909. The canals solidified Southern Idaho’s pivotal role in the agricultural industry by providing a steady stream of water, drawn from the Snake River, Deep Creek and Cedar Draw. Today, in addition to providing a consistent supply of water to the area’s municipal areas, Southern Idaho’s thriving agriculturebased economy still reaps the benefits of these century-old canals.

Luck of the Draw Feel lucky? If you play your cards – or slot machines – right, you could hit the jackpot in Jackpot, Nev., a gaming destination located less than one mile from the Idaho border. The city, about a 45-minute drive from Twin Falls, is home to many casinos including Cactus Petes Resort, with more than 26,000 square feet of gaming space, and Barton’s Club 93, which offers hotel rooms and a 24-hour restaurant along with its fully equipped casino. Other gaming hot spots in Jackpot include Four Jacks Hotel & Casino and the West Star Hotel & Casino.

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Fast Facts Q Twin Falls County was named for the falls of the Snake River. The surrounding area is known as the Magic Valley. Q The National Pioneer Hall of Fame in Burley features a garden and museum. Q The Gooding Basque Cultural Center serves a multi-course Basque supper the first Friday of each month.

Power to the Students Get wind of this: Students at the College of Southern Idaho have a powerful new tool to help them learn about wind power. A 150-foot-tall wind turbine was bestowed upon the Twin Falls school for its new wind energy technology program. “That [the turbine] will be used to train a highly skilled workforce for the wind industry is a fitting legacy for Bob Lewandowski, who in some ways is Idaho’s wind energy pioneer,” says instructional dean Todd Schwarz. Between 2002 and his 2005 death, Lewandowski bought and restored several turbines from California, brokering a deal with Idaho Power Co. to create the state’s first commercial wind farm.

Evel Knievel Leapt Here In his heyday, nothing seemed to intimidate notorious motorcycle daredevil Evel Knievel – not even the 500-foot-deep, quarter-mile-wide Snake River Canyon. On Sept. 8, 1974, Knievel attempted to jump the canyon using a steam-powered “skycycle.” He zoomed up the ramp on the south rim, but upon takeoff, the parachute accidentally opened and the bike drifted down into the canyon. Knievel survived with only a broken nose – barely a scrape for a man who, throughout his risk-taking years, broke nearly 40 bones, including his back seven times. The ramp at Snake River Canyon rim is still visible today, and a monument at the Buzz Langdon Visitor’s Center immortalizes the daredevil, who passed away in 2007.

Q The Skandi Dag Scandinavian Festival is held each June in Freedom Park in Burley. Q The entire community of Oakley is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Founded in 1878, many of the city’s Victorian buildings date to the 1880s. Q Twin Falls is located between the towns of Bliss and Eden, Idaho.

What’s Online ne e Visit imagessouthernidaho.com to read one of the last interviews granted by Evel Knievel prior to his death.

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Now Showing in Our Video Gallery

Sit back and enjoy a preview of Southern Idaho amenities. Explore its landscapes, cultural offerings, food and fun. See its downtowns, neighborhoods, parks and attractions. Experience the history, hot spots and local happenings. Southern Idaho is rated L for Livability

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No matter your musical taste, the Snake River Canyon Jam will be music to your ears. The annual event, slated for June 18-20, 2010, features a variety of musical styles, from world rock and gypsy jazz to folk and bluegrass. Musicians play at several Twin Falls venues during this cultural weekend, which includes outdoor performances along the streets of downtown and the showcase event on Saturday at Centennial Waterfront Park in the Snake River Canyon. For more information or to order tickets, visit www.snakerivercanyonjam.com.

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Southern Idaho At A Glance POPULATION (2008 ESTIMATE) Cities: Twin Falls: 42,197, Jerome: 9,157, Burley: 9,105, Hailey: 7,883, Rupert: 5,082, Buhl: 4,077, Gooding: 3,200, Kimberly: 3,148, Heyburn: 2,696, Wendell: 2,418, Filer: 2,141, Shoshone: 1,564, Hansen: 1,022, Paul: 919, Hagerman: 791, Hazelton: 742, Oakley: 707, Minidoka: 118 Counties: Twin Falls: 74,284, Blaine: 21,731, Cassia: 21,348, Jerome: 20,468, Minidoka: 18,645, Gooding: 14,295, Lincoln: 4,503 LOCATION The largest city in south-central Idaho, Twin Falls, is about 30 miles north of the Idaho-Nevada state line and roughly midway between Boise and Pocatello. FOR MORE INFORMATION Twin Falls Area Chamber of Commerce 858 Blue Lakes Blvd. N. Twin Falls, ID 83301 Phone: (208) 733-3974 Fax: (208) 733-9216 www.twinfallschamber.com

Venue in the Valley The Sun Valley Pavilion sets the stage for entertainment in Southern Idaho. In its short lifetime, the venue, which opened in August 2008, has already seen the likes of Sara Evans, Kenny Loggins and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. But regardless of who is on stage, the facility itself is one of the stars. The open-air amphitheater features a towering proscenium arch connecting the copper-covered stage roof and the tensile fabric over the 1,500-seat audience area. The picnic area, a grassy knoll outside the venue, seats an additional 2,500 attendees without sacrificing the sound. Sun Valley Pavilion is located at Sun Valley Resort in Blaine County, about two hours north of Twin Falls.

What’s Online e Take a virtual tour of Southern Idaho, courtesy of our award-winning photographers, at imagessouthernidaho.com.

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Kidding

Around ACTIVITIES, EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES MAKE REGION AN IDEAL PLACE TO RAISE A FAMILY

STORY BY DANNY BONVISSUTO

Go Fish Karee Conner and her kids enjoy these familyfriendly fishing holes: Balanced Rock near Buhl Dierkes Lake near Twin Falls Rock Creek Park in Twin Falls Salmon Dam near Jackpot, Nevada

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or Marilyn Tarkalson, mother of three boys, ages 6, 4 and 2, Southern Idaho is an even better place to live the second time around. The stay-at-home mom, who has another baby on the way, was raised in nearby Kimberly and lived in Twin Falls, but moved away 15 years ago with her family. They resided in North Carolina and Nebraska, but they recently returned home for good. “We have family in the area, and it’s just beautiful here,” Tarkalson says. “It’s a well-kept, growing city and so close to so many activities. In 30 minutes you can be in the mountains for skiing or hiking. Or you can visit the hot springs. This summer we picked areas nearby for mini vacations because of the economy, and we found so much to do without having to go very far.” With the benefit of four full seasons, Southern Idaho makes the most of its natural

Jeremy, Clayton, Sophia and Karee Conner

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resources for families from pools and parks for hiking, biking and fishing to the programs offered by community resources like the Herrett Center for Arts & Science, Boys & Girls Clubs of Magic Valley and the YMCA. Tarkalson’s sons take advantage of recreational activities offered in the community, including T-ball, soccer and swim lessons. “The best part,” she says, “is that we can have the boys in a number of activities, and they’re so inexpensive it doesn’t cause a financial burden on the family.” Karee Conner, a PTA mom by day and waitress/ bartender by night, also spends a lot of time outside with her kids, 8-year-old Sophia and 1-year-old Clayton. “We go fishing all the time,” she says. “It’s our favorite thing to do.” After 25 years in the Las Vegas area, Conner packed up and moved to the area about three years ago on the recommendation of a friend.

PHOTO BY BRIAN MCCORD

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What’s Online e See some of the Magic Valley’s family-friendly sites in a short video at imagessouthernidaho.com.

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Clockwise from top left: The College of Southern Idaho offers dozens of camps and classes for kids, such as the Crime Scene Investigation camp; the Tarkalson family; the canyon rim trail appeals to families of all ages.

“He told me it was a great place to raise a family, and I came here and loved it,” she says. “The people here are really nice, there’s no traffic and it’s so family oriented. I was used to living in an adult playground, but here it’s really about family, and I love it.” In addition to the indoor and outdoor activities in the area, Conner is most excited about the school system. “The teachers are great, the school district is great and it’s really inspired me to be involved with the school.” Education is priority No. 1 in Southern Idaho. In 2006, a levy was passed to fund construction projects such as the new Canyon Ridge High School. “We have over 7,600 students at 13 total schools,” says Beth Pendergrass, community relations specialist for the Twin Falls School District. “Our graduation rate is over 90 percent, which is quite high. In our high schools, we offer academies that give students the opportunity to earn college credit and explore or specialize in the curriculum they’re interested so they’re more prepared for college.” The school system also offers dual credit classes that give students high school and college credits at the College of Southern Idaho. And younger students can benefit from CSI’s College for Kids summer camps and classes, where they can learn about a broad range of subjects such as cooking, music, crime scene investigation, judo or Spanish. Students are also able to experience various cultures without leaving Southern Idaho. “We have a refugee center in our community, and our schools house students from all over the world,” Pendergrass says. “Over 26 languages at a time are being spoken in our district and our students integrate with these cultures and get exposed to new languages as well.”

PHOTOS BY BRIAN M C CORD

“The people here are really nice, there’s no traffic and it’s so family oriented. I was used to living in an adult playground, but here it’s really about family.” 12

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Feasting on SUCCESS FOOD-BASED COMPANIES CULTIVATE SOUTHERN IDAHO’S ECONOMY

STORY BY JESSICA WALKER

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t’s no surprise that the bag of frozen french fries in your freezer has a good chance of coming from Idaho. But the trout filets right beside it might have originated here in the Magic Valley, too, along with the block of cheddar in your fridge and the sugar in your pantry. All substantiate the fact that southcentral Idaho thrives with the help of the regional agribusiness sector, which boasts a full menu of foodbased companies. Milking It for Profits “Agriculture and food processing have long been the dominant sectors in our regional economy,” says Melinda Anderson, economic development director for Twin Falls. “I have heard the two together with their up- and downstream providers is close to 50 percent of the economy.” In smaller cities such as nearby Burley, the industry is even more of a boon to workers. “I believe that about 65 percent of our businesses are directly tied to agriculture,” says Doug Manning, the city’s economic development director. S O U T H E R N I DA H O

He estimates that as much as 25 percent of the economy is indirectly tied to agribusiness. Burley received a boost when one of the nation’s largest producers of Swiss cheese, Gossner Foods, opened a $25 million cheese production plant there in 2005, along with a retail store selling locally made dairy products. Manning says the burgeoning dairy industry and the increase in cheese production facilities also led Glanbia Foods to choose Idaho for its U.S. headquarters in the 1990s (then under the name Avonmore West). Glanbia, which is Irish for “pure food,” employs more than 4,400 around the globe with locations in Brazil, China, Germany, Ireland and other countries. The world’s largest American-style cheddar cheese manufacturer has two additional plants in the region located in Gooding and Richfield. Business Moves Swimmingly Other companies have a natural reason for settling in the region – Mother Nature. Producing fresh and frozen trout

By the Numbers EMPLOYEE TOTALS OF SOME OF THE REGION’S FOODBASED COMPANIES

650 Glanbia Foods

350 Clear Springs Foods

180 Jerome Cheese Co.

44 Gossner Foods

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Digging Deeper One of Twin Falls’ largest food processors is ConAgra Foods, a potatoprocessing company that produces a whopping 72 billion fries each year. Amalgamated Sugar Co., producing White Satin granulated sugar, grows 110,000 acres or 63 percent of its sugar beet crops in the Mini-Cassia area. Jerome also prospers when it comes to the food industry; the city is home to cheese-and-whey manufacturer Jerome Cheese Co., potato processor Rite Stuff Foods and dairy producers Idaho Milk Products and Darigold. Anderson believes the region has Glanbia to thank for the upturn in food processing companies. “Of course Glanbia attracts and helps grow supplier companies due to their needs,” she says. “Their presence also shows corporations outside the region how well their operations work for them here due to the skilled workforce, excellent transportation options, low cost of doing business and high quality of life.”

JEFF ADKINS

products, Clear Springs Foods located in Buhl because of an underground aquifer, says Cally Parrott, director of corporate relations for Clear Springs Foods. “That’s a natural resource we have,” she says. “The water temperature is a constant 58 degrees – winter, summer, spring and fall.” Clear Springs primarily produces rainbow trout, an effort that began in 1966 with one of the company’s founders, Ted Eastman. “Eastman loved raising rainbow trout,” says Parrott. “Once he started Clear Springs, he thought another company would process [the fish] for him. That company refused, so he had to scramble to learn more about the processing side and marketing side of the business.” Since then, Clear Springs has grown to produce 20 million pounds of trout each year. They also process organic fish fertilizer and have plans to turn fish manure into organically certified compost.

From left: Splash Pecan Crusted Trout from Clear Springs Foods in Buhl; calves at Stouder Holsteins dairy farm in Jerome

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Panoramic

Playground OUTDOOR RECREATION IN THE MAGIC VALLEY IS SOMETHING TO SEE

What’s Online e Paddle up the Snake River with local canoeists in a quick video at imagessouthernidaho.com.

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN M C CORD

From left: Micah Devaney wakeboards at Thousand Springs State Park; anglers fish at Sawtooth National Forest.

STORY BY CAROL COWAN

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ew places can lay claim to as many diverse natural attractions as the Magic Valley. In addition to offering top-notch recreation, this adventure playground is stunning to behold, with views ranging from vast, eerie moonscapes and miles of jutting rock formations to thundering waterfalls, snow-capped mountain peaks, meandering rivers, wooded wilderness trails and idyllic fields of wildflowers. “We have the variety,” says Debbie Dane, executive director of Southern S O U T H E R N I DA H O

Idaho Tourism. “Trails to ride, canyons to climb, or rivers and streams to play in – the choices are endless, and the landscapes are truly amazing.” Onlookers invariably stand amazed by the majesty of Shoshone Falls, aka the Niagara Falls of the West. Located just east of the city of Twin Falls, Shoshone Falls spans 1,500 feet across the Snake River and tumbles 212 feet in a straight drop – compared to Niagara’s 176-foot fall. Shoshone Falls can be viewed from several scenic overlooks in Shoshone Falls Park, where there’s

plenty of parking, restrooms, picnic tables and hiking trails that lead to the rim of the falls. Fishing is another popular activity that takes full advantage of the region’s spectacular setting. In the scenic Snake River Canyon, some sturgeon catches have measured up to nine feet long. Anglers also reel in hefty steelhead and salmon, as well as rainbow trout, brown trout and record-breaking walleye from the Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir. In the pristine Sawtooth National Forest, cold mountain lakes yield prize catches, and I M AG E S S O U T H E R N I DA H O . C O M

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BRIAN M C CORD BRIAN M C CORD

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“Trails to ride, canyons to climb, or rivers and streams to play in – the choices are endless, and the

STAFF PHOTO

landscapes are truly amazing.” the fast-flowing alpine waters of Silver Creek and Wood River are premier spots for fly-fishing. Southern Idaho also offers plenty of eye-popping options for those who’d rather get wet than wet their fishing lines. Rafters, canoeists and kayakers in search of extreme whitewater put in at the harrowing Murtaugh section of the Snake River, while serene-scenery seekers venture further downriver for calm waters and breathtaking views of Shoshone, Star, Pillar and Auger waterfalls. In the Mini-Cassia area, the wide-open, smooth-as-glass waters of the Snake draw watersports enthusiasts by the boatload. Wakeboarding and jetskiing are some of the thrills to be had at public access points on the river and area lakes. Watersports also make a big splash at Thousand Springs State Park, which comprises five separate units along the 68-mile Thousand Springs Scenic Byway. The byway loosely follows the Snake River Canyon from Bliss to Twin Falls.

Highlights include trails that lead to stunning canyon vistas, burbling glacial springs and abundant wildlife. In contrast to the blue and green hues of the woods and waters, Craters of the Moon National Monument & Preserve displays a stark and striking landscape formed by volcanic lava flows. Hiking, camping and exploring lava tube caves are among the activities visitors enjoy here. In the spring, tiny pink wildflowers dot the park’s cinder slopes. The City of Rocks National Reserve near Almo is a singular sight and a mecca for rock climbers. Its granite spires and monoliths reach heights up to 600 feet, but climbing routes and hiking trails exist for all skill levels. Visitors to the reserve engage in other activities as well, such as horseback riding, cross-country skiing, wildlife viewing and photography. Southern Idaho provides ample scenic recreation for mountain-bikers, too, whether it’s along the miles of stellar developed trails or rough, backcountry single-tracks.

Southern Idaho residents enjoy a plethora of opportunities for outdoor recreation right outside their back door, including mountain biking, sightseeing at Shoshone Falls and jet-skiing on the Snake River.

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What’s Online e Stroll the vineyards and gardens at Snyder Winery in Buhl in a quick video at imagessouthernidaho.com.

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Cellar’s Market STOCK UP ON WONDERFUL WINES FROM THE VINEYARDS OF SOUTHERN IDAHO

STORY BY DANNY BONVISSUTO PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN McCORD

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ove over, Napa Valley; vineyards in the Magic Valley are producing some of the greatest grapes around. Southern Idaho is home to two outstanding wineries, including Holesinsky Vineyard, the only certified organic and biodynamic vineyard in the state, and Snyder Winery, formerly known as Blue Rock. “It was just a dirty old farm when we purchased it 10 years ago,” owner Claudia Snyder says of the sprawling hilltop space in Buhl located near the bottom of the Snake River Valley. “We transformed it into four and a half acres of grapes and an acre and a half of grounds for tastings, tours, weddings and events.” The winery and vineyard also has a cabin for overnight visits and a steakhouse run by Claudia’s husband, Russ, who cooks New York ribeyes and porterhouses to perfection on Friday and Saturday nights. In a previous life, Claudia was an interior designer and Russ was the director of sales for a lumber company. Today they produce beautiful bottles of Riesling, Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc. “Grapes do well in rocky soil, and we have a lot of that here,” Snyder says. “We also have first-run spring water, and The grounds of Snyder Winery in Buhl include a scenic garden, a tasting room and an on-site restaurant.

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The award-winning Holesinsky Vineyard & Winery is the only certified organic and biodynamic vineyard in Idaho.

Find Fine Wines Here Holesinsky Certified Organic Vineyard & Winery 4477 Valley Steppe Drive Buhl, ID 83316 (208) 543-6940 www.holesinsky.com Snyder Winery 4060 N. 1200 E. Buhl, ID 83316 (208) 944-0633

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our climate is great with hot days and cool nights. We’re on the end of what they call the ‘banana belt’ because we don’t get frozen out in the winter.” The Snyders harvest every fall from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, depending on the varietal, and spend the next 10-14 days doing the primary fermentation. “Then we rack off the skins, put them into barrels and age it for a year and a half to two years,” Snyder says. Whereas the Snyders started a vineyard to occupy themselves during retirement, James Holesinsky at Holesinsky Certified Organic Vineyard & Winery, also in Buhl, wanted to put his education to work. “I do chemistry work as a trade, and we had a perfect setting for a vineyard on a canyon rim that creates good air drainage to protect us from the frost and provide great conditions for ripening a grape,” he says. “But what sets us apart is that we are certified biodynamic organic.” Holesinsky took winemaking and viticulture classes at UC Davis and started the vineyard in

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2001. Today he has four acres of Syrah grapes, two acres of Cabernet Sauvignon, two of Muscat, three and a half of Riesling, and an acre and a half of Chardonnay, plus a few Port varietals. Open for tours and tastings by appointment, the winery has a natural artesian pond on its grounds. Holesinsky is preparing to host weddings and events in the coming year, as well as bands in the natural amphitheater. And the awards have started to roll in: In 2006, Holesinsky’s Riesling won the silver medal for Idaho white wine and the People’s Choice at the State of Idaho Wine Competition. He won the silver again in 2007 for his Riesling. In 2008, the Holesinsky Rosé won double gold at the Idaho Wine Festival and the 2008 Riesling brought home the silver. “We are an old world French-style winery, which means we age in French oak and don’t overprocess the wine or add any chemical additives whatsoever,” Holesinsky says. “We pride ourselves on our organic properties and really feel like we’re pushing the envelope of progressive winemaking in the area.” S O U T H E R N I DA H O


Stay& Play In Southern Idaho Natural Attractions EXPERIENCE THE MAGNIFICENCE OF THE MAGIC VALLEY

Spring Into Action

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Stay & Play In Southern Idaho

Spring

Into Action GO-TO GUIDE FOR VISITORS TO THE HAGERMAN VALLEY

TODD BENNETT

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BRIAN M C CORD

GO It’s a September to remember in the Hagerman Valley. In the middle of the month, music lovers can enjoy Blues in the Park in Hagerman. Throughout the three-day weekend, Billingsley Creek State Park is hopping with live music, dancing, and a beer and wine garden. Two weeks later, the annual Thousand Springs Festival features music as well, along with the works of dozens of talented artisans. The festival on Ritter Island benefits the Southern Idaho Land Trust. Earlier in the year on July 3-4, Buhl Sagebrush Days activities include children’s rides, a fun run, bull-riding rodeo and the longest parade in Southern Idaho. The event, which is free to the public, is capped off with a dazzling fireworks display.

PLAY Ready to raft? The portion of the Snake River that runs from Burley to Glenns Ferry includes the Hagerman stretch, which is popular among families for rafting, fishing and natural springs. “The middle section of the Snake River is incredibly diverse, from radical rapids for rafting to the mellowest waters for paddling,” says Olin Gardner, who owns and operates Idaho Guide Service with his wife, Shelley. The guide service’s half-day and day trips provide access to both widely visited and lesser-known areas, such as the Murtaugh section, open only in the spring as snow runoff flows into the river. “It’s one of the premier day trips in the Northwest for people in the know,” says Gardner, the first outfitter licensed to conduct trips here. “There’s also a considerable amount of wildlife and birding because of the seclusion.” Wildlife draws many to Thousand Springs State Park, which includes Ritter Island, Niagara Springs, Malad Gorge and Crystal Springs Lake. The lake also attracts anglers, as do Hagerman National Fish Hatchery and Idaho Fish and Game Hatchery, which draw families fishing for rainbow trout and other species. In the wintertime, birdwatchers flock to the

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hatchery’s lakes and the Hagerman Wildlife Management Area, a waterfowl rest area for migrating ducks and geese. Other seasonal visitors include bald eagles, ospreys and falcons.

STAY The region’s natural hot springs bring thousands to area resorts such as Miracle Hot Springs in Buhl, which has 19 private pools and two outdoor pools of the high-pH water. “The water has a special feel,” explains Nathan Olsen, who co-owns the resort with his brother. The warm water is great for just about anyone but also has a therapeutic appeal. “There’s nothing like soaking in the water and then getting a massage,” says Olsen, who has four massage therapists on staff. Miracle Hot Springs also offers RV camping, creekside tent camping and geodesic camping domes heated with the natural hot water to provide a comfortable place to stay no matter what the time of year. The resort also features live alligators, first brought to the hot springs by Olsen’s grandfather, who opened the hot springs to the public in 1954. 1000 Springs Resort takes advantage of the hot springs, too, but Hagerman also has traditional bed-and-breakfasts, such as Hagerman Valley Inn on Frogs Landing.

EAT Spring for a good meal at the Snake River Grill, located next door to Hagerman Valley Inn. A third-generation cook, Kirt Martin opened the restaurant in 1995 and specializes in preparing local wild game. “Most of our products are produced here in Idaho, whether it’s Kurobuta pork, Kobe beef, sturgeon or trout. And we get our seasonal fruits and vegetables from the local farmers market,” Martin says. The restaurant thrives with the support of hungry patrons looking for cuisine that’s refreshingly different, locally produced and impeccably prepared. “We put a lot of love into this place,” Martin says. “It’s my passion.”

Left to right: Guests relax in one of the warm-water pools at Miracle Hot Springs in Buhl; Thousand Springs State Park’s many waterfalls erupt from rocky canyon walls and gush into the river below; rafters enjoy the Hagerman stretch of the Snake River.

Get events, lodging information and more at visitsouthidaho.com


Stay & Play In Southern Idaho

Natural

Attractions EAST REGION ROCKS WITH RACES, RESORTS AND CAREFULLY PRESERVED HISTORY

GO If water racing floats your boat, visit Burley in June, when the city serves as the setting for the Idaho Regatta. “The Idaho Regatta is one of the most popular events on the American Powerboat Association racing circuit,” says organizer Mark Moyle. “Sixty competitors from all four corners of the United States compete for $40,000 in prizes.” The 2010 regatta, slated for June 25-27, is expected to draw 5,000 spectators. Burley also hosts another popular race. The annual Spudman Triathlon, sponsored by the Burley Lions Club, consists of a one-mile swim, 25-mile bike ride and 6.2-mile run. Only 1,600 triathletes may compete, so a lottery opens in January for participants to register – months before the event takes place on the last Saturday in July. Dancing takes center stage at the King Fine Arts Center in Burley at the Idaho International Dance and Music Festival. The 25th annual event will take place in July 2010, bringing more than 300 dancers and musicians from around the world to perform.

PLAY With snowfalls by Halloween and lasting until early spring, the Albion Valley provides plenty to do when the weather turns cool. The popular Pomerelle Mountain Resort has slopes ideal for skiers and snowboarders of all skill levels and gets 5,000 inches of powdery snow every year – more than any other Idaho ski area. Pomerelle as well as Bald, Soldier and Magic mountains are located within Sawtooth National Forest, which is a scenic spot in any season. “Sawtooth National Forest has 71 developed campgrounds and 22 picnic sites, as well as many dispersed camping sites,” says Julie Thomas, public affairs officer. The forest is divided into three ranger districts – Fairfield, Ketchum and Minidoka. “It’s visited by visitors from all over the world who come for camping, hiking, fishing, hunting, sightseeing and birdwatching,” Thomas says. Located near Almo, City of Rocks National Reserve is a

unique geological area with granite pinnacles and monoliths. Activities include rock climbing, hiking, birding and snowshoeing, and visitors can also see sections of the historic California Trail. Up near Burley, ruts made by Oregon Trail pioneers are visible at Milner Historic Recreation Area. History also prevails in the Rupert Town Square, which features hometown shops such as Hoggan’s Custom Canvas and Leather, a fourth-generation mom-and-pop business specializing in handcrafted camping gear. However, Rupert’s centerpiece is the 1920s-era Wilson Building and Theatre, which is undergoing a $3.2 million restoration. Tours are currently offered, and the historic structure will feature a theater, community center and retail space when completed.

STAY For anyone who doesn’t wish to enjoy the East Region’s many campgrounds, Almo Inn provides a convenient place to spend the night. The facility opened as three one-room cabins but has since added eight additional Western-themed rooms. The former Albion State Normal School, which closed more than 60 years ago, has been remodeled into a state-ofthe-art conference and retreat center called Campus Grove at Albion. The campus, located just 20 minutes from Pomerelle and 40 minutes from City of Rocks, is also transformed into a popular spook alley each October, featuring haunted mansions filled with fall frights.

EAT At Gossner’s Magic Valley Chalet in Heyburn, visitors can stock up on ice cream, cheese and other items from Gossner’s plant just down the road. Upstairs, the Upper Crust Bakery and Grill serves a variety of dishes complemented by locally made dairy products. Chow down on cedar-plank salmon and other specialties at the Sage Mountain Grill in Albion, which is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Additional East Region eateries include the Outpost next to the Almo Inn, the Albion Café in Albion and Henry’s at the Drift Inn on the historic Rupert square.

Clockwise from top left: Wilson Building and Theatre is the centerpiece of historic downtown Rupert; a snowboarder catches air at Pomerelle Mountain Resort in the Albion Valley; a family casts their lines at one of the many lakes in Sawtooth National Forest.

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BRIAN M C CORD

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Stay & Play In Southern Idaho

Fair Thee WHEN TO GO, WHAT TO SEE AND WHERE TO STAY ON THE NORTHSIDE

Well JEFF ADKINS

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(800) 255-8946

GO It’s fair to say that fairs are among the top events in the Magic Valley. One family favorite is the Gooding County Fair and Gooding Pro Rodeo, slated for Aug. 19-21, 2010. The rodeo, with 360 contestants, is the fair weekend’s biggest attraction. “It has a lot of entertainment value,” says Don Gill, fair manager. “The rodeo sold out all three nights.” Tickets can be purchased in advance online, which might be a wise idea – sales at the gate were up 30 percent in 2009. Jerome has its own county fair, held earlier in August, the month that also features Joe Mama’s Car Show, which draws as many as 15,000 people to Jerome City Park. In Shoshone, music is in the air in July at the annual Art in the Park & Fiddlers Jamboree on the courthouse lawn. Meanwhile, Fairfield blooms with excitement for spring during the annual Camas Lily Days Celebration each May, which features family-friendly events such as a kids’ fishing derby, arts and crafts show, and fun run.

PLAY Southern Idaho experiences the best of all four seasons, with plenty to do no matter the time of year. Springtime brings wildflower hikes at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve, where visitors can see the

incredible effects of volcanic activity. The lava fields are home to hundreds of plant and animal species, making it a haven for wildlife watchers – as well as hikers, bikers, anglers and hunters – when the weather warms up and as it cools off for fall. Part of Craters of the Moon, Gooding County Snow Park provides a winter wonderland for visitors to crosscountry ski, snowmobile or snowshoe. Or, cool off from May to September with a visit to Shoshone Ice Caves, which are actually lava tubes that remain 28-33 degrees Fahrenheit even when it’s 100 degrees outside.

STAY Visitors in large groups will appreciate Sawtooth Best Western in Jerome, which provides state-of-the-art meeting accommodations for a hotel of its size, along with a 24-hour indoor pool and a plethora of other amenities. Hunters and anglers on their way into the wilderness often choose the Wingate by Wyndham, also in Jerome, thanks to its convenient location near the intersection of Interstate 84 and U.S. Route 93. For something off the beaten path, the Get Inn in Gooding is housed in the former Gooding College, which operated from 1917-1938. Today, it has been transformed into a bed-and-breakfast and events center. Springtime guests

can also visit Woodford Gardens, a greenhouse and nursery on the grounds. Over on Main Street, the century-old Gooding Hotel Bed and Breakfast is older than the town itself and now operated by descendents of the city’s founders. The antique furnishings, home-cooked breakfasts and welcoming owners add to the establishment’s appeal.

EAT Gooding’s Main Street offers a sure crowd-pleaser, Zeppes Pizza & Subs, as well as Sweet Inspiration, which will satisfy anyone’s sweet tooth with its specialty bakery items and homemade candies. Shoshone knows a thing or two about desserts, too. The locally owned Shoshone Drive Inn offers mile-high ice cream cones, old-fashioned floats and malts, along with amazing burgers, burritos and breakfast. Down in Jerome, try the slow-smoked brisket at Smokin’ Cowboys or Choate’s Family Diner, a staple here for 13 years and counting. “We’re one of the only local American cuisine restaurants left in Jerome,” says owner Ron Choate. The eatery serves classic Americana fare such as burgers, BLTs, dinner and breakfast, and sees a fair share of tourists who receive recommendations for the diner from the local hotels where they’re staying – a good sign of truly good eats.

Left to right: Visitors walk along the top of Inferno Cone at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve; hundreds of cowboys and cowgirls compete at the Gooding Pro Rodeo, a sellout event at the Gooding County Fair, held each August.

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Stay & Play In Southern Idaho

Hello, Gorge-ous SHOP, DINE AND EXPLORE IN THE SCENIC TWIN FALLS AREA GO Diving into the depths of the Snake River Canyon with only a parachute strapped to their back may not be most people’s idea of fun, but that doesn’t mean they won’t enjoy the Perrine Bridge Festival, held each September in Twin Falls. The fundraiser for children with special needs features fun runs, a carnival and many other activities to see and do – all while remaining on solid ground. The famous gorge is also the namesake of the Snake River Canyon Jam, an annual music festival scheduled for June 18-20, 2010. The event embraces the area’s natural attractions as a backdrop for the music, which includes world rock, gypsy jazz, folk and more.

PLAY The canyon and its BASE-jumping, kayaking, trailblazing and other activities are just one of the many facets

STAY

of attractions here. Visitors can travel a portion of the Oregon Trail at the Stricker Homesite, the oldest home still standing in Twin Falls. The carefully preserved grounds also include Rock Creek Station, Magic Valley’s first trading post, which dates to 1865. In Kimberly, the Main Street shopping district includes The Quilt Barn, which is quickly becoming a tourist attraction. “The designer names that we carry and our wide variety of fabrics draw them in,” says owner Heather Cartwright, who opened the business in 2008. “We’re also growing in popularity with the younger generation who sew clothing items, bags and aprons – as well as the quilters, from novice to expert.” In addition to classes and holiday specials, The Quilt Barn hosts monthly Friday Night Quilt Parties. “We’ve had such a great first year,” Cartwright says. “I hope to have many more.”

Check in to one of dozens of hotels in Twin Falls, including the Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites, the familyfriendly and newly remodeled Comfort Inn & Suites, and the dog-friendly Shilo Inn Suites, each of which is half a mile or less from the scenic Snake River Canyon.

EAT Highway 30 in Hansen is home to Foothill Café and its award-winning avocado-and-bacon-topped cheeseburger. If that doesn’t tantalize the taste buds, the café also serves up diverse Americana fare, from eggplant Parmesan to shepherd’s pie. Twin Falls’ smorgasbord of eateries includes Rock Creek Restaurant, known for its fresh seafood, and Jakers Bar and Grill, with sizzling steaks and a salad bar as well as vegetarian and glutenfree selections. On Main Street, O’Dunken’s Draught House has more than food and drinks on the menu – the pub doubles as a hot spot for the city’s live music scene. For additional information on Idaho, call 1-800-VISIT-ID. 09-IV-1 12.5

This special section is published for Southern Idaho Tourism by Journal Communications Inc.

For more information, contact: Southern Idaho Tourism P.O. Box 5155 • Twin Falls, ID 83303-0443 Phone: (405) 744-500 • Fax: (405) 744-8445 www.visitsouthidaho.com

JEFF ADKINS

©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080.

The Snake River Canyon provides countless outdoor recreation opportunities.

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All rights reserved. No portion of this special advertising section may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. On the cover: City of Rocks National Reserve Photo by Jeff Adkins


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The Grand Canyon Crest FINE DINING RESTAURANT DOUBLES AS MUCH-NEEDED EVENTS CENTER

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people is also equipped with an allinclusive outdoor deck. Twin Falls residents Dan and Sonja Willie poured millions of dollars into constructing the spacious 21,800-square-foot facility. The Willies decided to build an events center when they organized a fundraiser for the local Boys & Girls Club, but there wasn’t a building large enough in the Twin Falls area that could accommodate the crowd expected for the event. Now that the much-needed facility is open to the public, the events center portion of the facility can comfortably host 400 guests, with round tables for eight people each.

The first group to use the events area was the Twin Falls Area Chamber of Commerce, which scheduled a 350-person function only three days after Canyon Crest opened – and that was just the beginning. More than a dozen weddings were booked at Canyon Crest during 2009. “The ambience is very, very nice,” says owner Dan Willie. “It’s a really beautiful spot.” Canyon Crest overlooks two golf courses and the Perrine Bridge. “There’s nothing like it in Southern Idaho for sure,” Willie says. “I don’t know where you’d have to go to find something as pretty.”

BRIAN M C CORD

lanning an event for 225 or more people? That’s no longer a problem in Twin Falls. The Canyon Crest Dining and Event Center opened in April 2008, perched on the south rim of the Snake River Canyon in Twin Falls. The Canyon Crest Restaurant anchors the facility, offering casual steak-and-seafood fine dining and seating for 100 customers in the lounge, another 144 diners in the restaurant and an additional 104 on the outdoor deck. One of the tables in the restaurant is a rotating table for eight, which must be reserved. In addition, an upstairs private meeting room for up to 20

Diners enjoy meals with a view at Canyon Crest Dining and Event Center, which overlooks the Snake River Canyon.

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Quite a Performance

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The Twins by David Clemons

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he curtain will soon be raised on a brand new performing arts center in Twin Falls. Twin Falls Center for the Arts, currently under construction, is scheduled to open in August 2010 inside The Pinnacle, which will house several business offices, a restaurant and space for the center, which will be operated by the Magic Valley Arts Council. The council’s current headquarters are in a rented building at 132 Main Ave. S. “We have needed to move for a while and were initially looking at a couple of historic sites that are available throughout the Twin Falls community,” says Stacy Madsen, executive director of the arts council. “But the people affiliated with The Pinnacle offered us a very reasonable deal at the new site.” The new site at River Vista Place looks out over the picturesque Snake River Canyon. “We will have 5,000 square feet of space as well as access to much more space when needed,” Madsen says. “The center will feature a theater that can accommodate either row-seating or tables for dinner performances, plus we can host band concerts, art classes, literary workshops and anything else related to the arts. We can’t wait to move to our new location.” That location will be just down the road from an outdoor sculpture called The Twins, which the Magic Valley Arts Council helped bring to fruition in Twin Falls. Coeur d’Alene artist David Clemmons was commissioned to sculpt the artwork and unveiled his masterpiece in April 2008. The sculpture, which shows two women seemingly soaring out of the canyon rock and heading skyward, is at the Perrine Bridge Trail View Point, just a short walk from where the new arts center will be situated. “A lot is happening with regard to the arts in the Twin Falls region these days,” Madsen says. “A big reason is that this community appreciates the important role that the arts can play in everyday life.” S O U T H E R N I DA H O


To Opera, or Not to Opera? C

assia County Judge B.P. Howells constructed the Howells Opera House in Oakley in 1907, but as far as anyone can figure, the first opera didn’t actually take place there until 80 years later in 1986. Howells built the impressive building to provide entertainment to residents when there were no movies, television or radios. Traveling troupes of actors were the only sources of outside entertainment for small-town residents. However, theaters and playhouses in those days were considered risqué because burlesque acts were performed in them. But Howells wanted to own a high-class theater that only would present wholesome plays such as melodramas and farces, so he named his building Howells Opera House to show a touch of class. A one-act production entitled Amahi and the Night Visitors by Gian Carlo Menotti was the first opera ever staged there, in December 1986. The Oakley Valley Arts Council, current owner of

Experience

the historic building, sponsored that initial operatic event. And it was the arts council who saved the building in the 1970s when its thenowner – the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints – was faced with demolishing the landmark due to financial woes. The council purchased and renovated the facility, and today it once again serves as a popular venue for the performing arts. The city of Oakley has a population of only 700, so audiences for the performance season come from throughout the Southern Idaho region. The building on North Blaine Street has seating for 300, and its high dome ceiling, sloped stage and ideal seating arrangements ensure that each spectator can hear every word that the performers speak and see all of the action. The nonprofit Oakley Valley Arts Council schedules 4-5 plays each year, and annually contributes two scholarships to local high school seniors who have participated in the arts.

the excitement of Rudy’s

WE OFFER A STUNNING ASSORTMENT OF … Cookware Cutlery Gadgets Wine, Beer & Cheese Specialty Foods Cooking Classes Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m-7 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

BRIAN M C CORD

147 Main Ave. W. (208) 733-5477 www.cooksparadise.com

Howells Opera House in Oakley

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Portfolio

Plenty To Root For

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Peppers grow in a community garden plot at the College of Southern Idaho.

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he plots thicken during every growing season at the College of Southern Idaho in Twin Falls. The college’s agriculture department sponsors an annual program that allows residents to rent one of 46 on-campus plots of dirt to grow their own gardenfresh produce. The 25-by-50-foot plots, which cost $40 apiece, are located directly across North College Road from the college’s Expo Center. CSI tills all of the ground prior to the growing season, which begins in May and runs through October. The college also provides all of the needed water free of charge, but gardeners must responsibly control the usage with their own sprinklers, soaker hoses or drip systems, and they must also be responsible for controlling all weeds that pop up. CSI officials say that individuals are not told how or what to garden, but the college’s agricultural department is always available for advice and troubleshooting. Crops grown in the community gardens include the usual tomatoes, cucumbers and potatoes along with a wide variety of produce and herbs such as Swiss chard, patty-pan squash, kohlrabi, purple beans, hot peppers and dill. Meanwhile, CSI is also home to the Twin Falls Farmers’ Market, which celebrated its 20th year in 2009. The market convenes each Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. from May through October at the Breckenridge Agricultural Endowment Farm. Anywhere from 25 to 55 vendors sell their fresh produce, depending on the time of year and the weather. Besides fruits and vegetables, items for sale at the farmers market can include baked goods, seasonings and condiments, meats, quilts and hand-sewn items, crafts, kitchen items, mixes, garden art and beauty-and-bath products. In addition, local artists are welcome to showcase their paintings, sculpture and photography during the warm-weather months, while musicians provide live entertainment virtually every Saturday. S O U T H E R N I DA H O


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a lot of action that occurs at Rudy’s, plus it’s a nice way to help market what downtown Twin Falls has to offer.” Since Ashenbrener first started the program, other businesses along Main Avenue have also gotten involved. Artwork, live entertainment and food are now available at First Friday in places like Full Moon Gallery, Galeria Pequeña, Hands On, Jensen Ringmakers and the Magic Valley Arts Council. First Friday takes place each month with the exception of July, due to the city’s Fourth of July celebration falling so close to the first of the month. “This whole activity gives people a chance to enjoy a little different culture than what is normally available in Twin Falls,” Ashenbrener says. “It’s not a shopping event – it’s a party that is getting bigger and bigger. First Friday is a great way to meet new people every month.” – Stories by Kevin Litwin

JEFF ADKINS

om Ashenbrener has been cooking up plenty of fun on Friday nights in Twin Falls for quite a few years. The owner of Rudy’s - A Cook’s Paradise initiated a program in 2002 that involved keeping his store open from 6-9 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. During that time, people would visit to eat, drink and enjoy live music – all for free. “I started First Friday as a fun activity that would give my employees and the community a good start to the weekend, and now we are packed to capacity on those particular Friday nights,” Ashenbrener says. “I own a cooking store, so we have a chef on site who cooks and prepares three different dishes, and patrons get to sample all the food. Plus beer and wine that we stock at our store is available to the public and served by the glass, and then I eventually added a live band to the festivities. There’s

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Ready,

Willing

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&Stable CENTRAL LOCATION, EAGER WORKFORCE FORM A DIVERSE, SOLID ECONOMY

STORY BY MICHAELA JACKSON

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JEFF ADKINS

ariety is the spice of life – and it’s also the perfect formula for economic success. Just ask the business leaders in Southern Idaho. In a region long dependent on agriculture, today a broad swath of companies form the nucleus of a steadfast, well-diversified economy. “The business climate in this region of Idaho has historically been very stable, mainly due to the agricultural base. And from that base, this region has grown and diversified into food processors, plastic manufacturers, recreational vehicle manufacturing – just a multitude of different industries that may or may not be tied to the agricultural base,” says Con Paulos, a board member with the Southern Idaho Economic Development Organization.

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CSI students get hands-on experience in worker training programs that the college tailors for local companies.

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BRIAN M C CORD

Business

Hilex Poly, an environmentally friendly plastic bag and agricultural film products manufacturer, has a plant in Jerome.

“It’s a very vibrant economy.” A natural outgrowth of agribusiness, the food processing industry has been an anchor for the Southern Idaho economy. But beyond food, industries ranging from technology to distribution to customer support have operations here, including RV maker Dutchmen Manufacturing, warehousing and distribution center WOW Logistics, and plastics manufacturer Hilex Poly, a company that is growing its green initiatives. Packaging Specialties, a flexible packaging printer, located their newest plant in Burley because of the region’s accessible proximity to their western markets. Cities from Phoenix to Seattle are within a day’s drive, which significantly reduces freight costs. In addition to its central location, Southern Idaho provides opportunities for steady growth as companies develop customer relationships within their own cities. Packaging Specialties’ plant manager Jeff Winkles, who relocated to the area from the eastern United States, looks forward to the company growing right along with the community. In many opinions, Southern Idaho’s most powerful asset is its people. The hard-working, well-trained workforce provides a valuable resource for employers expanding in or S O U T H E R N I DA H O

relocating to the region. “The people out here are great,” Winkles says. “The turnover rate is very low. Everybody that I hired back in March 2008 is still with me today [18 months later].” The College of Southern Idaho offers a variety of worker training programs, many of which are customized for employers in the area. “I’ve been on many college campuses and talked about workforce development, and they’ll pull out a catalog. Companies might find something in the catalog that’s related to what they need, but it’s not tailored to their company, their culture, work ethics, time of day and that kind of thing,” says Jerry Beck, president of CSI. “When we meet with a company, we take a blank sheet of paper and listen very carefully to what it is they’re trying to accomplish, the time frames in which they’re trying to do it and how they’re trying to do it, and then try to mold an educational activity that will fit.” Beyond a central location and a strong workforce, the region boasts a standard of livability that is second to none. “People here are still friendly, and they’re happy to see you,” says Paulos. “If anyone is considering moving a company, they really ought to consider south-central Idaho. It’s the best-kept secret in America.”

More Insight Southern Idaho’s diverse economic base includes: Dutchmen Manufacturing, recreational vehicle manufacturer in Burley Hilex Poly, eco-friendly bag and film product maker in Jerome Packaging Specialties, flexible packaging printer in Burley WOW Logistics, refrigerated warehousing and distribution center in Jerome

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Business

Biz Briefs BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE SOUTHERN IDAHO’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

$873,941 Retail sales ($1,000)

$13,351 Retail sales per capita

$83,347 Accommodations and food service sales ($1,000)

6,416 Total number of firms Source: U.S. Census QuickFacts

THE FILLMORE INN Biz: Twin Falls’ first bed and breakfast Buzz: This quaint brick Tudor house has been extensively renovated to become the first B&B in Twin Falls. Located in a picturesque setting with rose bushes and honeysuckle vines, the Fillmore Inn features four rooms styled with period furniture and antiques combined with modern conveniences. Other offerings include a dining room and special occasion accommodations. www.thefillmoreinn.com 34

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BALLARD FAMILY DAIRY & CHEESE Biz: handmade specialty cheese producer Buzz: The Ballard family runs this Goodingbased dairy using milk from their Jersey cows. Available by wholesale, through their Web site, and at retailers and restaurants throughout the region, their products include award-winning pepper cheddar, Havarti-style Danish Pearl and Halloumi-style Greek Grillin’ Cheese. www.ballardcheese.com S O U T H E R N I DA H O


HERITAGE MAKERS Biz: digital scrapbook publisher Buzz: Heritage Makers is the scrapbook of the 21st century. Users upload photos and stories, such as family histories, to create both a digital scrapbook and a custom print version. Customers can choose from template galleries or start from scratch, using the company’s more than 30,000 pieces of digital art. www.heritagemakers.com

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SMOKIN’ COWBOYS Biz: barbecue restaurant and caterer Buzz: Smokin’ Cowboys got its start perfecting true smoked brisket. The owners built a rotisserie smoker in 2005 and after serving at county fairs and catering events, they opened their Jerome restaurant in 2007 and one in Twin Falls in 2009. The menus feature brisket, pulled pork, ribs and more. www.smokincowboys.com

CAMPUS GROVE AT ALBION Biz: historical retreat Buzz: Campus Grove at Albion is a retreat and events center located on the former Albion State Normal School campus, which closed in 1969. The renovated Miller Hall offers lodging for events such as weddings and family reunions. The 35-acre campus also boasts a variety of amenities. www.albioncampusgrove.com

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Business | Chamber Report

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Virtually Unstoppable TWIN FALLS CHAMBER USES TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT BUSINESS COMMUNITY

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<]eWaOU`SOb bW[Sb]PSO PcaW\Saa]e\S` W\7ROV] Whether you are interested in buying or selling a business or simply require a fresh approach to your current business.

â&#x20AC;˘ Wholesale/Distribution â&#x20AC;˘ Retail â&#x20AC;˘ Service (all types) â&#x20AC;˘ Manufacturing â&#x20AC;˘ Gas stations/C stores Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let an opportunity pass you by, call or visit our Web site today!

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etworking opportunities have long been a benefit of chamber membership. But the Twin Falls Area Chamber of Commerce has turned to a new kind of networking for members. Move over, business after-hours. Say hello to Internet marketing and social media. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As times change, we have to be nimble as an organization to find new ways to meet the needs of our members,â&#x20AC;? says Shawn Barigar, president and CEO. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The chamber today isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the chamber of even 10 years ago.â&#x20AC;? The forward-thinking organization is harnessing the power of technology to better serve its members in an age of telecommuting and virtual networking. The chamber has embarked on a two-year project to produce one-minute video profiles of each member business â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all 864 of them. The videos will be housed on the chamberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web site with each companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directory listing, a slick promotional piece provided at no cost to the businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our members are just tickled, particularly with the economic conditions weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re living in these days,â&#x20AC;? Barigar says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being able to add additional value for our members without charging them extra really is a benefit to them.â&#x20AC;? m ersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mb While enhancing their membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on, as â&#x20AC;&#x153;business-to-worldâ&#x20AC;? connection, Barigar calls it, is a priority forr the llsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chamber, developing Twin Fallsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; business-to-business networkk is crucial on created too. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the organization w. an online social network, www. mytwinfallschamber.com, akin to rum Facebook or LinkedIn, as a forum where members can connect and collaborate. Business owners and sharre employees can create profiles and share iscounts information such as special discounts ils about for chamber members or details

upcoming events. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the online network, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able to make those connections on their own time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; without having to come to meetings, without having to come to social functions,â&#x20AC;? Barigar says. The chamber hopes to someday expand the social network concept to include a tourism bent, which would give users the ability to post comments and reviews about their vacation experiences in the area, similar to forums on TripAdvisor or Travelocity. Ultimately, the chamberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forays into the World Wide Web are just one more way the organization is seeking to support its members. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Folks are busy,â&#x20AC;? Barigar says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all doing more with less, it seems, and you just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the time to go to luncheons and meetings and those types of things, and if we can provide additional tools to supplement that â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not saying weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing away with our face-to-face networking opportunities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but if we can find new ways and use better technology, to meet those needs for the broad spectrum of our membership, then I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to best serve them and best serve our community.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Michaela Jackson

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Business | Economic Profile

SOUTHERN IDAHO BUSINESS CLIMATE Job creation here has made Twin Falls one of the state’s most robust economic engines in recent years. Good work prospects for job seekers and a moderate climate for retirees have helped keep Twin Falls County’s population on a steady growth.

ECONOMIC RESOURCES

TAXES

6%

Twin Falls Area Chamber of Commerce 858 Blue Lakes Blvd. N. Twin Falls, ID 83301 (208) 733-3974 www.twinfallschamber.com

State Sales Tax

6% Total Sales Tax

1.741% Residential Property Tax

TRANSPORTATION Twin Falls Airport 492 Airport Loop Twin Falls, ID 83301 (208) 733-5215 Trans IV Bus P.O. Box 1238 Twin Falls, ID 83307 (208) 736-2133

INDUSTRIAL SITES www.southernidaho.org/ realestate

1 Number of Community Colleges

8,363 Community College Student Total

Jerome Chamber of Commerce 104 W. Main St. Jerome, ID 83338 (208) 324-2711 www.visitjeromeidaho.com Mini-Cassia Chamber of Commerce 1177 Seventh St. Heyburn, ID 83336 (208) 679-4793 www.minicassiachamber.com Southern Idaho Economic Development P.O. Box 1238 Twin Falls, ID 83303 (208) 324-7408 www.southernidaho.org Twin Falls Economic Development P.O. Box 1907 Twin Falls, ID 83303 (208) 735-7240 www.southernidaho.org

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

GOVERNMENT OFFICES

Per capita income has increased from $19,365 to $26,196, or 35 percent. Twin Falls ranks 13th out of Idaho’s 44 counties for per capita income.

City of Twin Falls 321 Second Ave. E. Twin Falls, ID 83301 (208) 735-7281 www.tfid.org

New industrial areas being developed on the south and east areas of town will add to the easy transportation access for local businesses.

Twin Falls County 425 Shoshone St. N. Twin Falls, ID 83303 (208) 733-2499 www.twinfallscounty.org

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EDUCATION

MORE EO ONLINE imagessouthernidaho.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

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Health & Wellness

New Building on Campus HEALTH SCIENCES AND HUMAN SERVICES BUILDING PROVIDES MORE SPACE, OPPORTUNITIES

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The 72,000-square-foot building houses current programs but also allows room for growth. CSI offers three nursing programs and 12 other courses of study in the health-care field, including radiological technology, surgical technology and dental assisting, Sugden says. Moving into the new space allows for growth in the medical coding course and anticipated addition of a dental hygienist program. More than 700 students are currently enrolled in the programs and another 700 enrolled in classes anticipate starting health-carerelated programs in the future. “We’ve learned that in order to be reactive, we need a building that has some flexibility built into it,” Sugden says. “In the new building, we have all of the classrooms that are going to be

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he prognosis is positive at the College of Southern Idaho, home to a sparkling new $21 million Health Sciences and Human Services building. Completed in December 2009 and open for classes in January 2010, the building allows CSI in Twin Falls to continue to grow in its ability to provide training for health-care workers, says Dr. Mark Sugden, dean of biology, health sciences and human services at the college. “The reason we were awarded this building is because CSI was doing what it’s expected to do in terms of trying to meet the health-care needs of the state,” Sugden says. “Our current facility was maxed out. In order for us to continue expanding and helping to meet this need for health-care workers, we needed a new facility.”

used right from the start, but if we need a new program, all of our classrooms have been designed so that there’s plumbing and electrical that would allow us to convert a classroom into a laboratory. We’ve tried to build flexibility into this building to allow us to change from one function to another function as we identify those needs.” In addition to meeting functional needs, the building was constructed to LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, specifications and was designed to be welcoming for all. “We wanted a building that students would want to come to and study and learn; a building faculty and staff wanted to be in; a building connected to the outside; a building that was easy to maintain, energy efficient and water efficient,” Sugden says. CSI students and their educators are both interested in the future, he adds, and the facility was built with forwardthinking concepts in mind. “We’re trying to get the most out of this. It’s very exciting to me to see this happening,” Sugden says. “Everything about this building really is about learning and about students.” – Anne Gillem

The College of Southern Idaho opened its new Health Sciences and Human Services building in January 2010.

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Health & Wellness

ST. BENEDICTS Family Medical Center â&#x20AC;¢ 24-Hour E.R. â&#x20AC;¢ Specialty Services â&#x20AC;¢ Full-Scope Family Practice â&#x20AC;¢ Obstetrical Care â&#x20AC;¢ Gynecology â&#x20AC;¢ Orthopedics â&#x20AC;¢ Home Oxygen â&#x20AC;¢ Occupational Health â&#x20AC;¢ Geriatric & Long-Term Care â&#x20AC;¢ Diabetes Management â&#x20AC;¢ Childbirth & Breast Feeding Education

Health Care for the Entire Family Call: (208) 324-4301 or visit www.stbenshospital.com for more information

709 N. Lincoln Avenue â&#x20AC;¢ Jerome, ID 83338

Where your vision is precious beyond measure.

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BRIAN M C CORD

Sports & Recreation

Twin Falls entrepreneur Mark Kissner BASE jumps from the Perrine Bridge into the Snake River Canyon.

Ace of BASE Jumping EXTREME SPORT ENTHUSIASTS FLOCK TO TWIN FALLS’ PERRINE BRIDGE

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n the space between the Perrine Bridge and the scenic Snake River Canyon below, time stands still – if you’re in freefall after leaping from atop the 486-foot-tall bridge. “From that point until you see a canopy open over your head is almost impossible to describe, that short period of time,” says Mark Kissner, a local BASE jumper and one of the sport’s rare veterans. “That’s usually the time that people like most about it: It takes short little seconds of time and turns them into something that is considerably longer.” BASE jumpers strap parachutes on their backs and hurl themselves off fixed objects such as bridges and cliffs (the acronym stands for buildings, antennas, spans and earth). These thrill-seekers converge on Twin Falls from around the world, a pilgrimage of sorts, to the only place in America where they can legally jump off a bridge with no permit required year round. “If you mention Idaho and the Perrine, they know exactly what bridge you mean,” Kissner says. “It’s certainly some place newer jumpers are all going to come visit. If you’ve gotten into jumping in the last five or six years, chances are you’ve come out here at least a few times.” During any given weekend, the Perrine swarms with jump traffic, but once a year, the bridge becomes a BASE-jumping mecca. Thousands gather to watch those who put great faith in their parachutes make the jump for the Perrine Bridge Festival each September. The 6th annual event, which raises funds for children with special needs through the St. Luke’s

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Magic Valley Health Foundation, is set for Sept. 10-11, 2010. Although the festival and other activities bring BASE jumping to the public eye, the sport remains relatively small with high turnover. Kissner compares the sport to whitewater rafting, which was started by just a small core group but has evolved greatly over the years. “It’s definitely expanding, but it’s still a really tiny sport,” he says. “Probably at any given time, I doubt there are even a thousand active jumpers in the country.” At nearly a decade of jumping, Kissner’s longevity in the sport is unusual. In 2006, he moved from Washington, D.C., to Twin Falls, where he owns the AAMCO Car Care Center, builds BASE gear and has another venture on the horizon. Kissner now BASE jumps once or twice a week, including in a commercial for his AAMCO shop. But when asked the obvious question, “Why BASE jumping?” he is momentarily speechless. “From the point that you’ve left the object, you can’t turn back. You’re on your way,” Kissner says. “You’re certainly not worrying about anything else. It’s going to take away any other thoughts that you might have. It’s a pretty awesome thing.” – Michaela Jackson

What’s Online e See BASE jumpers leap from the Perrine Bridge into the Snake River Canyon in a quick video at imagessouthernidaho.com.

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Education

Two High Schools Are Better Than One NEW SCHOOL EASES CROWDING THROUGHOUT DISTRICT

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lass is now in session at both Canyon Ridge High School and Twin Falls High School, and students, teachers and other residents of this Southern Idaho community couldn’t be happier. Canyon Ridge, finished in time for the start of the 2009-10 school year, has some 875 students enrolled, including 150 seniors who will comprise the Riverhawks’ first graduating class, says Principal Brady Dickinson. Completion of the new school relieves crowded elementary school conditions and allows for the expansion of Twin Falls School District’s secondary programs, which encompass grades 9-12. “We started this process probably two years ago as far as how we were going to go about splitting a one high school town into two,” Dickinson says. “We’ve had numerous committees exploring different issues. It’s really been a very smooth process and very well received by the community.” Area voters approved a $49.7 million school bond issue in 2006 to pay for the construction of Canyon Ridge and improvements at other district schools, says Beth Pendergrass, community relations specialist for the 7,600-student school district. In 2008, voters approved a $33 million, 10-year plant facilities levy, which will fund additional needed upgrades. “I think people are excited about the new school,” Dickinson says. “And they’re excited about the opportunities it’s going to provide our students, who are going from a very large high school to two smaller high schools – so you’re doubling the opportunities that you have for kids.” With the addition of Canyon Ridge, grades were reconfigured at all schools, Dickinson says. Ninth graders were

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moved to the high schools from two junior highs, which became middle schools. Sixth graders were moved from the seven elementary schools to the two middle schools, which now comprise grades 6-8. Other projects funded by the levy money include adding multipurpose gymnasiums at the elementary schools, remodeling the chemistry lab and football stadium and building a new west entrance at the 1,200-student Twin Falls High School. The 55-acre Canyon Ridge campus in western Twin Falls has two baseball fields, two softball fields, a football stadium, two practice football fields, seven tennis courts and two soccer fields, Dickinson says. The

220,000-square-foot school building includes an auditorium, gymnasium, practice gymnasium, weight room, cardio room and locker rooms. Six specialty academies in areas such as health occupations, automated manufacturing, business, agriculture and digital imaging are available for students at both high schools. “The facilities are fantastic,” Dickinson says. “I want them [students] to take pride in the school and the building and feel like it’s a home for them. … One of my primary goals is to get kids active and involved in an extracurricular activity – something that gives them that extra connection to the school.” – Anne Gillem

Canyon Ridge High School

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Arts & Culture

Seeing Stars and Much More MUSEUM AT CSI SHOWCASES ASTRONOMY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND ART

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or hands-on learning about everything from ancient history to outer space, visit the Herrett Center for Arts & Science. The nonprofit museum, located on the main campus of the College of Southern Idaho in Twin Falls, features astronomy, anthropology and art through a collection of interactive offerings. Home to the state’s largest planetarium, a popular observatory, art galleries and a variety of natural history exhibits, the center hosts programs for students of all ages, from kindergarten through college, as well as for the general public. The Faulkner Planetarium, lauded as one of the best equipped in the northwestern United States, features a theater with advanced digital projection technology that seats up to 144 people under a 50-foot dome. More than 20 different educational shows run throughout the school year, from Larry Cat in Space for kindergarteners to Journey to the Edge of Space and Time for older students. The planetarium also hosts entertainment shows on weekends, with lights displays set to the music of bands Herrett Center for Arts & Science

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such as Lynyrd Skynyrd and Pink Floyd. The Centennial Observatory, another element of the center’s astronomy department, features one of the world’s largest fully handicapped-accessible public telescopes. Numerous public events are held year round at the observatory. “Many are family oriented, and a few are very technical for the more scientific-savvy visitors,” says Jim Woods, director of the Herrett Center. Anthropology is also an integral part of the center. The natural history museum is composed of five galleries that house a total of more than 18,500 artifacts. “We have some really neat artifacts on display, including our quartz crystal skull (somewhat like the one on the Indiana Jones movie), a pair of Inca silver ear spools, an Aztec jade necklace and a clay water pot from Peru that whistles when you pour water from it,” Woods says. The Jungle Archaeology exhibit combines ancient Mayan artifacts with live tropical reptiles, hands-on displays and computer workstations to provide a

truly interactive experience. Another popular feature is the bimonthly Mingle in the Jungle, in which the museum staff shows numerous live animals to visitors. Visual art is also a key component of the Herrett Center. The Jean B. King Gallery of Contemporary Art displays national and international exhibitions that expand community awareness of the visual arts and promote the work of local artists and CSI students. “I think the perfect visit would be to come with a family on a Tuesday evening, enjoy the museum exhibits, go to Mingle in the Jungle, watch a planetarium show and then stay until after dark to look through our telescope,” Woods says. “Anyone interested can call and find out the best opportunity for an unforgettable evening like this.” – Laura Gallagher

What’s Online e Tour the Herrett Center for Arts & Science in a quick video at imagessouthernidaho.com.

PHOTO BY BRIAN MCCORD

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Image Gallery

Shoshone Falls

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN McCORD

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Online e Visit imagessouthernidaho.com to see more award-winning photography highlighting the places and people of Southern Idaho. Snake River sunset

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visit our

advertisers Canyon Crest Dining Event Center www.canyoncrestdining.com

Magic Valley Arts Council www.magicvalleyartscouncil.org

College of Southern Idaho www.csi.edu

Magic Valley Bank www.magicvalleybank.com

Cooper Norman Business Brokers & Advisors www.cnbba.com

Precision Aviation Inc. www.paviation.com

DL Evans Bank www.dlevans.com

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Rudy’s A Cook’s Paradise www.cooksparadise.com

Eye Center www.eyecenterdoctors.com

Southern Idaho Tourism www.visitsouthidaho.com

First Federal www.firstfd.com

St. Benedicts Medical Center www.stbenshospital.com

Herrett Center www.csi.edu/herrett

St. Luke’s Health System www.stlukesonline.org

Hilex Poly Company LLC www.hilexpoly.com

Stevens Pierce & Associates CPAs www.twinfallscpa.com

Land Title & Escrow Inc. www.landtitleandescrow.com

Twin Falls Area Chamber of Commerce www.twinfallschamber.com

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Community Profile

SOUTHERN IDAHO SNAPSHOT Twin Falls County is the most populous of the seven Southern Idaho counties and has grown steadily over the past decade. The population has increased from 63,020 in 1998 to 74,284 in 2008, an increase of 17.8 percent. The area has swiftly become a regional retail hub for Southern Idaho, and the population has increased accordingly. The area has abundant natural resources and numerous recreational opportunities.

CLIMATE The Southern Idaho area is a vacationer’s paradise, with mild spring and summer seasons coupled with plenty of snowfall for wintertime activities.

(208) 678-4444 www.intermountain healthcare.org St. Luke’s Wood River Medical Center 100 Hospital Drive Ketchum, ID 83340 (208) 727-8800 www.stlukesonline.org

January Low Temperature 21 F

AVERAGE HOME PRICE

January High Temperature 37.8 F

$135,000

July Low Temperature 56.3 F

HOME TURNOVER PERCENTAGE

July High Temperature 88.6 F

21.24%

MEDICAL FACILITIES St. Luke’s Magic Valley Medical Center 650 Addison Ave. W. Twin Falls, ID 83301 (208) 737-2000 www.mvrmc.org St. Benedict’s Family Medical Center 709 N. Lincoln Ave. Jerome, ID 83338 (208) 324-4301 www.stbenshospital.com Minidoka Memorial Hospital 1224 Eighth St. Rupert, ID 83350 (208) 436-0481 www.minidokamemorial.com Cassia Regional Medical Center 1501 Hiland Ave. Burley, ID 83318

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ARTS AND CULTURE Herrett Center for Arts & Science 315 Falls Ave. Twin Falls, ID 83303 (208) 732-6655 www.csi.edu/herrett Full Moon Gallery of Fine Art and Contemporary Craft 132 Main Ave. S. Twin Falls, ID 83303 (208) 734-2787 Magic Valley Arts Council 132 Main Ave. S. Twin Falls, ID 83303 (208) 734-2787 www.magicvalley artscouncil.org

EDUCATION Each community in the Magic Valley offers quality K-12 education through its local school district. The College of Southern Idaho offers community college courses and degrees on the main campus in Twin Falls, as well as through outreach centers in Hailey, Gooding and Burley. Idaho’s public universities – the University of Idaho, Boise State University and Idaho State University – and the private Northwest Nazarene University each offer programs on the College of Southern Idaho campus in Twin Falls, allowing students to achieve a bachelor’s or master’s degree without leaving the Magic Valley.

MORE ONLINE NE E imagessouthernidaho.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

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Images Southern Idaho: 2010  

Twin Falls and the South-central Idaho area are not for couch potatoes. The diverse outdoor recreation opportunities range from mountains to...