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IMAGESPRATTVILLE.COM THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE VIDEO Enjoy a quick tour of downtown Prattville in the video gallery.

PHOTOS See more community images from our prize-winning photographers.

FACTS & STATS Find schools, an interactive map, and important facts and ďŹ gures.

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PRATTVILLE, ALABAMA

PATRIOTISM TAKES FLIGHT

Way To Grow!

Group sends area veterans to visit national war memorials

Charm and livability dra draw new residents, businesses an and visitors

SPONSORED BY THE PRATTVILLE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE | 2009


Interstate Business Park Prattville, Alabama Spec building 50,000 sq. ft.

32 ft. eaves/35‘ center

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Interstate Business Park Prattville, Alabama œœÀÊUÊ"vvˆViÊUÊ œVŽÃÊUÊ >ÞÊ`œœÀà 6 ÊUʈ}…̈˜}Êvˆ˜ˆÃ…i`Ê̜ÊÃՈÌ

215-acre mixed use development 55 acres dedicated to light industrial/retail Fully infrastructured Less than a mile from Interstate 65 Direct interstate access to all major automotive manufacturing factories in Alabama

(334) 358-0047 www.allsouthcorp.com

Five miles to the Prattville residential and commercial market

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2009 EDITION | VOLUME 6 T TM

PRATTVILLE, ALABAMA

14 CO NTE NT S

PRATTVILLE BUSINESS

F E AT U R E S

18 Biz Briefs

10 WAY TO GROW! Steadily increasing population, retail and tourism numbers are proof of Prattville’s historic charm and excellent livability.

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GOING GLOBAL WITH GOLF It’s possible that people all over the world now know about Prattville – thanks to the Navistar LPGA Classic at Capitol Hill.

16 PATRIOTISM TAKES FLIGHT Community support of the local Honor Flight chapter ensures that area veterans can visit the nation’s war memorials.

23 SHARING WAR EAGLE WISDOM

20 Chamber Report

D E PA R TM E NT S 7 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Prattville culture

25 Arts & Culture 29 Health & Wellness 30 Sports & Recreation 31 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

33 Membership Directory 40 Business Guide

Auburn Montgomery’s growing list of local continuing education classes include Spanish, computer skills and more.

This magazine is printed entirely or in part on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

ON THE COVER Prattaugan Museum Photo by J. Kyle Keener

P R AT T V I L L E

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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A Touch of New York (334) 491-8669

“Shopping Above the Ordinary.�

Fun, fashion, accessories and specialty gifts by Alabama artists. 135 E. Main St.

Avon Beauty Center (334) 358-1800 Located in historic downtown Prattville at the corner of Chestnut and Main St. 243 S. Chestnut St.

BankTrust   sWWWBANKTRUSTALNET Our interest is you. Located at 148 E. Main St.

#AROL"ROOKS(OME(OLIDAY   sWWWCAROLBROOKSSHOPPECOM Creekside gift shopping at its best. Including: Arthor Court, VIETRI, Wood Wick Candles, Crabtree & Evelyn, Mark Roberts fairies and so much more. 167 W. Main St.

Shop Prattville Downtown Unlimited

0ARAVICINIS(OME&URNISHINGSAND$ECOR   sWWWPARAVICINISNET Professional decorating staff, custom upholstery and area rugs, custom window treatments and blinds. 170 Tichnor St.

3MITH "YRD(OUSE"ED "REAKFASTAND4EA2OOM   sWWWSMITHBYRDHOUSECOM Step back in time as you enjoy afternoon tea or an overnight stay in the only B&B and tea room in the historic district. 137 N. Washington St.

4HE4URTLE3HELL   sWWWTHETURTLESHELLCOM

Unique shopping and

From home to school and back again. Games and toys for the young and young at heart, educational materials and supplies, Christian products, books and much more. 160 W. Main St.

eateries in the historic district

0RATTVILLE$OWNTOWN5NLIMITED WWWVISITHISTORICPRATTVILLECOM

4URTLE4OO   sWWWTHETURTLESHELLCOM Serving infants to grandparents with gift items, accessories, dancewear and Webkinz. 154 W. Main St.

5NCLE-ICKS#AJUN-ARKET#AFE Cajun market selling cooked and uncooked Cajun food-to-go. Featuring Cajun-marinated deboned chicken stuffed with shrimp and rice, shrimp and corn bread dressing. Etouffe. Sit-down cafe. 136 W. Main St.


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imagesprattville.com THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

PR ATT VILLE SENIOR EDITOR LISA BATTLES COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITOR JESSY YANCEY ONLINE CONTENT MANAGER MATT BIGELOW STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MELANIE HILL, DAN MARKHAM, JOE MORRIS DATA MANAGER RANETTA SMITH REGIONAL SALES MANAGER CHARLES FITZGIBBON INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER ANDREA JOINER SALES SUPPORT MANAGER SARA SARTIN SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN M CCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, IAN CURCIO, J. KYLE KEENER PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT ANNE WHITLOW CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS WEB DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR BRIAN SMITH PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS ASST. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR HAZEL RISNER PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS MELISSA BRACEWELL, KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER CANDICE SWEET GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, ALISON HUNTER, JESSICA MANNER, JANINE MARYLAND, AMY NELSON, MARCUS SNYDER WEB PROJECT MANAGERS ANDY HARTLEY, YAMEL RUIZ WEB DESIGN RYAN DUNLAP, CARL SCHULZ COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN TWILA ALLEN AD TRAFFIC MARCIA MILLAR, SARAH MILLER, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./SALES TODD POTTER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING SYBIL STEWART V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS MANAGING EDITORS/BUSINESS MAURICE FLIESS, BILL McMEEKIN MANAGING EDITOR/COMMUNITY KIM MADLOM MANAGING EDITOR/CUSTOM KIM NEWSOM MANAGING EDITOR/TRAVEL SUSAN CHAPPELL PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, RICHIE FITZPATRICK, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY WALDRIP COMMUNITY PROMOTION DIRECTOR CINDY COMPERRY DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR YANCEY TURTURICE NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR JAMES SCOLLARD IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE CUSTOM/TRAVEL SALES SUPPORT RACHAEL GOLDSBERRY SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR RACHEL MATHEIS SALES COORDINATOR JENNIFER ALEXANDER

What’s On Online nllin

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN PRATTVILLE Enjoy this tour of sights around Prattville’s historic city center, which abounds with interesting shops, architecture and visitor attractions. Watch this and other quick videos in the Interactive section.

RELOCATION Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

PHOTOS We’ve added even more prize-winning photography to our online gallery. To see these spectacular photos, click on Photo Gallery.

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

Images Prattville is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce 131 N. Court St. • Prattville, Alabama 36067 Phone: (334) 365-7392 • Fax: (334) 361-1314 www.prattvillechamber.com

FACTS & STATS Go online to learn even more about: • Schools • Health care • Utilities • Parks • Taxes

LOCAL FLAVOR Out of leeks and shallots? Find a bounty of farm-fresh goods at the PrattvilleAutauga Farmer’s Market. Get a taste of local flavor in our food section.

VISIT IMAGES PRATTVILLE ONLINE AT IMAGESPRATTVILLE.COM ©Copyright 2008 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

Magazine Publishers of America

Member

Custom Publishing Council

ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Images gives readers a taste of what makes Prattville tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts. “Find the good – and praise it.”

– Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

Member Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce

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STAFF

Sunday Evening

Discipleship Training 5:00 p.m. Worship 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening

Prayer Service 6:00 p.m.

Third Row L to R: Dr. Travis Coleman Jr., Senior Minister Rev. Dave Burns, Minister to Senior Adult/Pastoral Care Fourth Row L to R: Rev. Larry Jenkins, Minister to Students Rev. Ron Prevatte, Minister of Administration Mr. Carter Reeves, Music Associate Fifth Row L to R: Rev. Mitch Loftin, Minister of Music & Worship Dr. John Johnston, Minister of Education/Associate Pastor

First Baptist Third Street

138 S. Washington St. | Prattville, AL 36067 (334) 365-0606 | www.fbcprattville.org Kindergarten: (334) 361-9481 Mom’s Day Out: (334) 361-9497 E-mail: mail@fbcprattville.org

Main Street

I-65

Sunday School 8:30 a.m. & 9:45 a.m. Worship 8:30 a.m. & 9:45 a.m. Praise & Worship Service 11:00 a.m.

Second Row L to R: Mrs. Kelli Reeves, Children’s Ministry Associate Mrs. Thea Langley, Mom’s Day Out Director Ms. Allison Wilks, Director of College & Young Singles

Street

Sunday Morning

Washington

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Front Row L to R: Mrs. Jamie Robinson, Kindergarten Director Mrs. Debbie Conway, Director of Preschool/Children’s Ministries

Exit 179

Cobbs Ford


Almanac

Fast Facts Q Autauga County was established in 1818, an entire year before Alabama became a state. Q Autauga County takes its name from Atagi – the American Indian word for pure water. Q The late Wilson Pickett, a legendary R&B, soul and pop musician, grew up in Prattville.

A Is for Autauga, and Abbott, and Alabama … Believe it or not, there are a lot of firsts in the tiny town of Autaugaville. At least that’s what Robert Ripley wrote in 1935 in his “Believe It or Not” column, when he chronicled the alphabetical firsts of the area. Seems that a gentleman named C.D. Abbott lived on Academy Street in Autaugaville, Autauga County, Alabama. All those A’s conspired to make Mr. Abbott’s home the site of the first Alphabetical Crossroads, according to Ripley, and now a marker commemorating that fact stands at the site. Former president of the Autauga County Heritage Association Bob Lee worked with Mayor F.B. Ward, the heritage association, the Autauga Area Community Foundation and many other partners, to raise funds to get the sign into place. “This has tremendous potential, and we hope to put something together with all the historical markers in the county,” Lee says.

Salute to Maxwell-Gunter

Q International Paper Co. recently marked 40 years of manufacturing in Prattville. The company produces unbleached linerboard for corrugated boxes and employs 650 people. Q Kids looking to develop their soccer skills should check out the rapidly growing River Region Rapids Soccer Club.

Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base means a lot to the citizens of Prattville – much more than national security. The base is 10 miles southeast of Prattville and creates an impact in terms of population diversity, retail sales and real estate growth. Maxwell-Gunter AFB is home to Air University and the 42nd Air Base Wing. Air University trains its graduates to develop, employ, command, research and champion all levels of air, space and cyberspace power.

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Almanac

Ten Minutes, That’s All And the winner is: Express Oil Change at Larry Puckett Chevrolet. The oil change facility was recognized by Express Oil as one of the company’s top five franchises in terms of sales for 2007, with more than $1 million in customer business. Express Lube is known for providing oil changes, checking fluids and tire pressure – all within 10 minutes. Express Oil Change has more than 160 franchises in eight states, but Puckett Chevrolet is the only dealership where a franchise is located. The oil change business was at Puckett prior to General Motors Corp.’s establishing its own Quik Lube Plus service at dealerships, so Express Oil has remained at Puckett.

Way To Go, Lynn Lynn Carter, owner of Southeast Cherokee Construction Inc., now has a nice new award sitting on her desk. She was named 2008 Alabama Small-Business Person of the Year. Carter’s business is technically based in Wetumpka, but it has many job sites in Prattville. Plus, the construction company is a member of the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce. Southeast Cherokee Construction Inc. incorporated in December 1983 and has grown from 12 original employees to 75 today. The company tackles construction projects such as golf courses, runway expansions, wastewater treatment facilities, solid waste landfills and subdivisions.

Prattville | At A Glance POPULATION (2007 estimate) Prattville: 32,034 Autauga County: 49,960 LOCATION Prattville is in the central part of Alabama, about 13 miles across the Alabama River from Montgomery, the state capital. In the heart of the River Region, the town stands at the convergence of the Coosa and Alabama rivers. BEGINNINGS Prattville is named for Daniel Pratt, known as Alabama’s first industrialist. He arrived in the early 1830s and purchased land along Autauga Creek. There, Pratt built facilities known today as Continental Eagle Gin Corp. FOR MORE INFORMATION Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce 131 N. Court St., Prattville, AL 36067 Phone: (334) 365-7392 Fax: (334) 361-1314 www.prattvillechamber.com

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Prattville Billingsley

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Au t a u g a

65 14

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Prattville

Autaugaville

Montgomery

WATCH MORE ONLINE | Take a virtual tour of Prattville at imagesprattville.com, courtesy of our awardwinning photographers.

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WayTo

Grow! NEW RESIDENTS AND BUSINESSES KEEP SHOWING PREFERENCE FOR PRATTVILLE

STORY BY JOE MORRIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY J. KYLE KEENER

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t’s no secret that Prattville’s retail offerings have been growing by leaps and bounds in recent years, and now the number of people who are choosing to visit, or relocate to, the city also is climbing rapidly. But whichever positive economic indicator you look at, one thing is clear: Prattville has become a destination city. “The quality of life, or the livability of our community, is a main reason Prattville is growing,” says Mayor Jim Byard Jr. “Our citizens enjoy premier city services, like police, fire, public works and leisure services, and our residents have a tremendous amount of community pride. We have much to offer residents and tourists alike. Thousands of tourists, and our residents, are history buffs, play golf, fish, or take part in the many parades, sports events and leisure activities available.” The numbers bear out local officials’ optimism. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, from April 2000 to July 2007 Autauga County was the fifth-fastest growing county in Alabama, at 14.4 percent, while Prattville’s population has grown by 22.86 percent. With so many people putting down permanent roots, the business community has found not only new workers but also

Mayor Jim Byard Jr. poses at historic Hunt’s Alley, which consists of former homes of cotton-gin factory workers. Left: A neighborly atmosphere is just one component of the Fountain City’s superior quality of life.

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From left, Autauga County Engineer David Bufkin, District 2 Commissioner Danny Chavers and County Administrator Steve Golsan work to ensure that booming countywide growth is met with diligent planning.

new sources of revenue, and has grown accordingly, says Connie Bainbridge, president and director of economic development for the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce. “Our commercial growth is good,” Bainbridge says. “When Bass Pro Shops came here, it gave us credibility as a retail destination, but we’ve also seen a lot of growth downtown, both in retail and in other businesses. People follow jobs, and retail follows people, so we’ve been seeing growth across all these sectors.” The chamber showcases the entire city and county, so if retail is picking up in one area, manufacturing or white-collar employers might be positioned in another, she adds. “Because we’re showing property all over to commercial and retail establishments that either need to expand or are looking at coming in with new investment, we’re seeing growth citywide and countywide,” she says. “And now that we have the growth in retail and commercial, we’re focusing on whitecollar jobs to fill up some office space opportunities we have.” Long known for such interesting and diverse sites as Heritage Park and the Daniel Pratt Cemetery, the city has been adding to its roster of tourism destination sites with great success, says Jeremy Arthur, executive vice president of the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce. “Our strategy used to be, if we could get you to stop on your way to either Montgomery or the beach, that was good,” P R AT T V I L L E

Arthur says. “Now we can market ourselves as a destination, promoting our historic sites and our downtown, and also capitalize on the success we’ve had with being a stop on the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail. More people are stopping here, and staying here, than ever before.” Prattville’s central location to the various golfing opportunities in Alabama has allowed the city to promote itself in the sports world as well, along with having the first Bass Pro Shops in the state. “We have a lot here that’s a draw,” Arthur says. “We are getting the sporting people, but also the people that are lured in by the unique boutiques and eateries that we have downtown. And a lot of history buffs come because of the Daniel Pratt Historic District and the Heritage Association’s museum. And it’s all just a few miles apart.” All those visitors are leading to a boom in hotel/motel construction in the area, which in turn will help fuel even more destination marketing, commercial and residential growth. And that’s just fine over at city hall, where the desire for growth is always balanced with the need to ensure Prattville maintains its charming civic character. “We at the city staff level work extremely hard planning for our future infrastructure,” says Mayor Byard. “As the leader of a growing city, I must always keep our city’s livability first and foremost in my thoughts and in my actions.” I M AG E S P R AT T V I L L E . C O M

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Going

Global

Golf With

NAVISTAR LPGA CLASSIC ENHANCES PRATTVILLE’S PROFILE WORLDWIDE

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The clubhouse at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Capitol Hill Left: The Senator is one of three 18-hole championship courses at Capitol Hill.

STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN PHOTOGRAPHY BY J. KYLE KEENER

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t is entirely possible that several people in Ireland, Greece and China now know about Prattville – thanks to golf. The Golf Channel cable television network beamed the prestigious 2008 Navistar LPGA Classic held here to a worldwide audience in late September 2008. And now, Prattville will host the tournament in 2009, with the Golf Channel again providing live coverage. “Being live on the Golf Channel worldwide – that is truly valuable to us here in Prattville as well as all of Alabama,” says Jonathan Romeo, tournament director for the Navistar LPGA Classic. “It will undoubtedly bring more people into the state, especially golf enthusiasts who have now seen the beautiful golf course where these women compete.” That particular course is called The Senator, located at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Capitol Hill. The Capitol Hill complex actually has three 18-hole championship courses named The Senator, The Legislator and The Judge, with The Senator featuring a European links-style layout complete P R AT T V I L L E

with 150 pothole bunkers. Capitol Hill is one of 11 specific golf venues throughout Alabama that are part of the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, which has made the state a golfing destination. “The Senator course is so nice and so unusual with its links setup that we attracted 28 of the world’s top 30 women golfers to Prattville for the 2008 tourney,” says Mike Beverly, director of golf at Capitol Hill. “Big names such as [winner] Lorena Ochoa, Paula Creamer, Karrie Webb, Natalie Gulbis and Suzann Pettersen were here, and we accommodated about 40,000 spectators for the week’s festivities. By the way, the tournament provides an estimated $8 million in economic impact to the local economy.” Romeo says that staging such a professional event involves a 12-month preparation process. “The tournament starts with 144 golfers, so volunteers must be lined up to transport all of these players to and from the airport, and to and from their hotels,” he says. “Then there are vol-

unteers who marshal the golf course to keep crowds inside the roped boundaries, and volunteers to help in dozens of other areas.” One of those areas is assistance with language translation. “The LPGA presents an interesting challenge these days because many of the players are Korean, so Korean translators are needed to help these women golfers during their time in Prattville,” Romeo says. “In all, about 650 overall volunteers help to make the Navistar LPGA Classic such a successful endeavor.” Romeo adds that engineers are also hired six weeks prior to the tournament. Their task is to turn The Senator course into a safe and secure environment for the entire September golf week week. “Structural engineers construct temporary bleachers and must make sure that crowds won’t damage parts of the course, specifically where underground pipes and wires exist,” he says. “Crowd weight can really destroy parts of a golf course, so that is one of many, many factors we address prior to the first tee shot of the tournament ever being hit.” I M AG E S P R AT T V I L L E . C O M

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Patriotism Takes

Flight

COMMUNITY BANDS TOGETHER TO SUPPORT VETERANS’ VISITS TO WAR MEMORIALS

STORY BY MELANIE HILL PHOTOGRAPHY BY J. KYLE KEENER

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ore than a half-century since the end of World War II, the Prattville community is going to new heights to say “thank you” to the men and women of America’s greatest generation. Through a heartfelt show of support, more than 200 local veterans are once again taking to the skies, thanks to the River Region Chapter of Honor Flight, a nonprofit organization that flies World War II veterans to Washington D.C. to visit the nation’s war memorials. “I can’t put into words how grateful these guys were,” says Roscoe Williams, co-founder of the local chapter. In May 2008, Williams joined 87 veterans from Autauga, Elmore and Montgomery counties aboard a chartered U.S. Airways flight for the chapter’s inaugural trip. Bagpipers, uniformed troops, bands and members of Congress were on hand to greet the military 16

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Co-founders of the River Region Chapter of Honor Flight are, from left, Dr. Ed Mullins, Roscoe Williams and Joe Mathis. Left: World War II veteran John Roy Carter was among those flown to Washington by Honor Flight.

heroes in a long-overdue welcome ceremony at Reagan National Airport. “When the guys came in that morning we had 87 little old men and women,” Williams says. “When we walked into that memorial behind the bagpipers, they stood tall, threw their shoulders back and were ready to go to war again.” A second flight took place in October 2008, and Williams hopes to make a third flight in 2009. He says the organization’s mission is a time-sensitive one, as more than 1,200 World War II veterans pass away each day. That sobering statistic helped Williams and chapter cofounders Joe Mathis and Dr. Ed Mullins rally the community for an overwhelming show of support. While each Honor Flight comes with a price tag of nearly $60,000, contributions quickly came pouring in from indiP R AT T V I L L E

viduals, churches and schools. Millbrook resident James Traylor was among those who boarded that inaugural flight to the nation’s capitol. A former Air Force B-17 ball turret gunner, Traylor was shot down on his 11th mission and held as a prisoner of war until the conflict ended nearly two years later. “It was a mind-boggling experience,” Traylor says of his much-anticipated visit to the war memorials. “What got me was watching these guys get off the bus so slowly and seeing their eyes popping and mouths opening. It brought chill bumps on chill bumps.” Among those fellow veterans was Prattville resident Lonnie H. Boyett, who served as a motorcycle escort during the war, at one time accompanying Gen. George Patton. In describing that time of his life, Boyett conveys some memories

of the war, including once being captured when he was mistaken for a German soldier and arriving at Omaha Beach on D-Day just after the battle had ended. While visiting the World War II Memorial brought back some of those memories, seeing it in person was a significant experience, he says. “I had never been to see the memorial, and really wanted to go,” Boyett says. “I will never forget it. It was really something to see.” Mathis, a Prattville businessman and retired Air Force colonel, says the trip is a very small way to recognize the brave men and women of World War II. “What if we had never won that war?” Mathis says. “All our successes go directly back to the efforts these men and women made years ago, and this trip finally said ‘thank you.’ ” I M AG E S P R AT T V I L L E . C O M

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J. KYLE KEENER

Business | Biz Briefs

Carol Brooks Home & Holiday Shoppe carries a wide inventory of gifts, candles, home and holiday décor, and more.

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Chance and a willingness to adapt helped create Carol Brooks Home & Holiday Shoppe, located at 167 W. Main St. in historic downtown Prattville. Upon retirement, Carol Brooks and her husband, Stephen, relocated to Alabama in order to live closer to their son and his family. A visit to a mechanic brought them to Prattville, where they saw a sign in a shop window advertising for antique dealers. When the couple inquired about the sign, the antiques shop owner recommended that the Brooks consider going into business for themselves. Following that advice, they did, though their antiques business has morphed into its present operation, which features antiques, designer gifts, home décor and holiday items. “As the customers came in, we listened to what they wanted,” says Stephen Brooks. “From there, we just evolved into Carol Brooks Home & Holiday Shoppe.” Popular items on the shelves of the store include several lines of candles, bath-and-body products and f loral arrangements. 18

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And it’s always festive inside, with Christmas items on display throughout the year in the balcony area. GIPSONS ACHIEVE PERFECT ALIGNMENT The facility Bob and Hootie Gipson’s father built in the 1960s served the brothers’ tire business, Gipson’s Tire Pros, well for years. A second site on Memorial Drive also helped grow the enterprise. Still, the brothers knew it was time to put the operation under one roof. So the Gipsons opened a new facility in 2007, a perfect, central place for handling all of the tire work and auto repairs. The 10,000-square-foot building at McQueen Smith Road has a 10-bay shop, state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment and an appealing appearance. “It’s a very clean environment,” says Bob Gipson. “You can only get a building so clean after 40 years of automotive work.” The environment also is improved for customers. The large waiting room offers a plasma television, men’s and women’s bathrooms and a children’s nook complete with a Playstation.

REGIFTING ENDS HERE Hitting the road for designer gifts is no longer a necessity for Prattville residents with the opening of Silk Road Fine China & Gifts. “We wanted to provide hometown convenience, so people didn’t have to drive to Montgomery or Birmingham for these gifts,” says owner Tricia Ahrendt. Silk Road Fine China & Gifts, the name taken from ancient trade routes in China, opened in October 2007. The shop specializes in tableware, including fine china from a number of designer lines and Tervis Tumblers, plus a handful of other popular gift items. The shop also provides the opportunity to customize each gift, as Silk Road can add a name or initials to just about everything it sells. It also provides a bridal registry, to take some of the uncertainty out of gift giving. Ahrendt focuses on providing a wide selection of high-quality goods so customers can feel confident that their gifts will be treasured for years to come. “Our motto is ‘Regifting Ends Here,’” Ahrendt says. P R AT T V I L L E


SERVING UP EXCELLENT COMMUNITY RELATIONS Prattville’s Chick-fil-A staff and management believe in treating their customers well, inside the restaurant and outside in the community. The business is one of the most honored franchises in the chain, regularly rating at the top in quality and customer service among the 1,300-plus Chick-fil-A restaurants nationwide. Store owner Wayne Grier credits that reputation for doing “things most fastfood restaurants don’t do.� Those services include taking drink refills and trays to the tables and picking up trash when diners have finished. It also rewards its employees with scholarships for dependable service, which creates a motivated workforce. That service-focused attitude extends outside the doors of its Cobbs Ford Road location. The franchise participates in programs with schools, churches and the library, often sending its cow mascot for visits. Spirit nights are held with a portion of proceeds going to local schools, while coupons and other rewards are doled out for special accomplishments. NUTS, BOLTS AND KNOW-HOW The Mills family knows that for its hardware store to compete with the bigbox stores, it has to put service first. Fortunately, Autauga Home Supply has the personnel to do just that. The downtown Prattville fixture provides unparalleled know-how for the local do-it-yourselfers, with a certified electrician, master plumber and retired maintenance man on staff. Lewis and Melissa Mills bought the store, founded in 1973, in 2002. Though they installed a new computer system and introduced more home and garden materials to their inventory, most of their work is simply maintaining the store’s good name. “We just wanted to keep the business an old-fashioned hardware store,� says Melissa Mills. “We have a fairly loyal customer base.� The customers are enticed by the knowledgeable staff, competitive prices and convenient, accessible location. “People can park in front of the door and come in and get what they need,� she says. – Dan Markham P R AT T V I L L E

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Business | Chamber Report

Expertly Balancing Growth CHAMBER EXPANDS MEMBER SERVICES TO AID BUSINESSES LARGE AND SMALL

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while anglers enjoy the region’s many fishing tournaments and the state’s first and only Bass Pro Shops location. Success from these and other attractions has helped lay a solid foundation for business here. “We’re seeing growth in all segments of society in the community – not just heavy residential, retail or commercial growth, but a mix of all three and in all areas of the city and county,” Arthur says. “Prattville is fast becoming a onestop-shop city. Families can live, work, play, worship, recreate – all the things you need to do.” While the area has opened its doors to a large number of national retailers, small business remains the backbone of chamber membership. The chamber works hard to maintain that balance, Arthur says. It recently published a Small City Guidebook to help new business owners with startup,

sustainability and planning. Meanwhile, a quarterly chamber breakfast and memberto-member discounts provide network opportunities for all members. The chamber also has partnered with Auburn Montgomery to offer professional business training that might otherwise be unaffordable to many small business owners. The partnership also provides member discounts on more than 26 community courses. In addition, the chamber’s industry-specific work committees identify innovative ways to help business work together toward the benefit of all. Small business, tourism and military affairs are among the chamber’s most active committees, Arthur says. “I see membership in the chamber as an investment,” Arthur says. “We make sure members get the best results they can, and we outline ways they can benefit from our partnership.” – Melanie Hill

J. KYLE KEENER

usiness is booming in Prattville, and it’s no surprise. A high quality of life and a diverse mix of retail and recreational attractions have helped transform this quaint Alabama community into a destination for newcomers and visitors alike. That growth is perhaps most evident at the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce, where membership has expanded by nearly 30 percent in the past four years, bringing the membership to 900. “If you look at that number in comparison to our population [approximately 30,000], it’s very viable,” says Jeremy Arthur, executive vice president of the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce. Prattville’s appeal is due partly to its nationally recognized status as a familyfriendly place to relax and play. Golf enthusiasts head to Prattville for the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Capitol Hill and the Navistar LPGA Classic,

The Prattville Chamber of Commerce staff serves a base that has grown to include 900 members.

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Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce 2009 OFFICERS Chairman of the Board Ginger Henry, Prattville Baptist Hospital Chair Elect Richard Ray, Alagasco Past Chair James Sanders, F & E Sportswear Treasurer Diane Steinhilber, Jackson Thornton

Superintendent Greg Faulkner Autauga County Board of Education Lt. Gen. Allen Peck, Maxwell Air Force Base

CHAMBER STAFF Connie Bainbridge, President, Director of Economic Development Jeremy Arthur, Executive Vice President Patty VanderWal,

Financial/Office Manager Melanie Cleveland, Membership Director Jennie Prochazka, Administrative Assistant Sheila Morrissette, Economic Development Assistant Annette Ray, Special Events Coordinator Gwen Babston, Membership Assistant Payton Haisten, Office Assistant

Vice President Economic Development, Robert Faulk, McDowell Faulk & McDowell Vice President Membership Services, Edward Clinton, City of Prattville Vice President Special Events, Rendi Tallmage, Alabama Business Furnishings Preferred Way Campaign, Diane Steinhilber, Jackson Thornton

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Randy Grissett, Sterling Bank Mitch Devers, State Farm Insurance Mike Lamar, River Bank & Trust Mike Miller, Knology Albert Striplin, Key Finance Mike Beverly, Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Capitol Hill Dave Burns, First Baptist Church Bo Evans, Bo Evans Realty Clay McConnell, Alabama Power Company Terry Mullins, Central Alabama Electric Cooperative Wade Seamon, BankTrust Chris Day, WalMart of Prattville Mike Hammett, LoneStar Plastics Steve Steele, BankTrust

EX OFFICIO Mayor Jim Byard, City of Prattville Mayor F. B. Ward, Town of Autaugaville Mayor Greg Davis, Town of Billingsley Chairman Danny Chavers Autauga County Commission

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Education

J. KYLE KEENER

Auburn Montgomery’s continuing education program classes have been well received in Prattville.

War Eagle Wisdom AUBURN MONTGOMERY OFFERS WIDE VARIETY OF LOCAL NON-CREDIT CONTINUING EDUCATION CLASSES

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he War Eagle has landed in Prattville. Auburn Montgomery is now offering several non-credit courses at various sites throughout the city. Anyone is welcome to enroll in classes such as ballroom dancing, Spanish, computer instruction, cake decorating and photography. “Photography is actually our most popular class already; it is filled every time it’s offered,” says Kathy Gunter, director of continuing education at Auburn Montgomery. “Another course that we’ve found to be in high demand is our ACT review for high school students. Our continuing education program is only about a year old in Prattville and P R AT T V I L L E

already it is quite popular.” Gunter says Prattville was chosen for the program because it is one of the fastestgrowing small cities in central Alabama. “It is growing with industry, business and residents, so we saw an opportunity to start presenting interesting courses for professional and personal enrichment,” she says. “Other classes we feature include golf, wine appreciation and acoustic guitar, as well as several other leisure-time offerings. The list is quite long.” Residents from throughout the River Region can attend these courses at several Prattville locations. “The university has partnered with the City of Prattville to offer classes

at the Cultural Arts Center and the Performing Arts Center,” says Brenda Ward, senior program associate for continuing education at Auburn Montgomery. “In addition, the Autauga County School District has allowed us to use Prattville High School and the Chapter One Reading Center at night.” Meanwhile, Auburn Montgomery has become even more involved with Prattville, above and beyond the continuing education program. The university and the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce are now co-hosting the Auburn Montgomery-Prattville Business Breakfast Series. The series features national, state and local speakers who headline a keynote breakfast that occurs three times a year. “The university has been offering this program on our Montgomery campus for 23 years, so we thought we’d bring it to Prattville as well,” Ward says. “The first breakfast featured LPGA Commissioner Carolyn Bivens, who spoke in August 2008 about the Navistar LPGA Classic women’s professional golf tournament that would take place in Prattville a month later.” Ward says future breakfast series gettogethers will occur at the Montgomery Marriott Prattville Hotel and Conference Center at Capitol Hill, and anyone is welcome to attend. Tickets are $25 per individual, or a corporate table of eight can be reserved for $250 – with the company’s name listed in the event program. “Exciting things are happening at Auburn Montgomery these days, and we are glad to have a larger presence in Prattville,” Ward says. “It’s a win-win situation for everyone involved.” – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S P R AT T V I L L E . C O M

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Three 18-hole championship courses Complete practice facilities Pro-shop club rentals/lessons Lockers and showers Restaurant banquet facilities Meeting rooms

Golf Wor ld M agazine r ates Capitol Hill “ď™?ď™… Best Public Course in the Nation â€?

Home of the Navistar LPGA Classic

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Arts & Culture

Overflowing With Art CREATIVITY ABOUNDS AT EVERY LEVEL DURING FOUNTAIN CITY ARTS FESTIVAL

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f you like entertainment, mark your calendar for March 28, 2009. That’s when the fourth annual Fountain City Arts Festival will arrive in Prattville, specifically at Pratt Park. The one-day extravaganza continues to gain popularity, with 3,000 people at the inaugural festival in 2006, and 15,000 in attendance in 2008. “This festival is when we take time to slow down and take a look at art found everywhere in Prattville,” says Barbara Simpson, coordinator for the Fountain City Arts Festival. “The beauty of art is truly in the eye of the beholder, and we feature art that can be appreciated by everyone at some level.” Simpson says many hands-on activities are available during the event. “For example, people can sit down at a pottery wheel and try raku, which is an old and very expensive method of lowfiring pottery after it has been glazed,” she says. “Pieces pick up great colors of copper, gold, silver and jade green, and pots sell for only $10 to people who want to try this method. Normally anywhere else, pots would sell for $100 and up.” Also on site is a Children’s Creative Canopy Area, sponsored by the Prattauga Art Guild. The guild pays accomplished regional artists to come in and provide tips to children throughout the day. “In 2008, art therapist Nancy Raia was here working with children who were involved with the tornado in 2007,” Simpson says. “Nancy had the children create fun artwork called Tornado Hair, and all of the giggling and revelry connected with making those whimsical art projects helped the kids get over some of the bad memories from the storm.” The Fountain City Arts Festival is also no stranger to awards recognition. In 2007, the Alabama Bureau of Tourism & Travel named the festival a Top 10 Event in the state for March. “Also always in attendance each year is Charlie Lucas, who is world renowned for creating sculptures out of everyday objects and materials,” Simpson says. “He makes wonderful, fun-loving, freeform pieces, is originally from Autauga County and always comes home for the P R AT T V I L L E

festival each March.” The Fountain City celebration also highlights music, dance, literature and theater. There is live musical entertainment throughout the day, and the evening is highlighted by a free outdoor movie geared toward families. “The festival is important to the entire

River Region simply because the arts add to a community’s quality of life,” Simpson says. “There are many activities that people can enjoy while in attendance during the day and evening, and the festival is growing more and more each year – in participation and stature.” – Kevin Litwin

WATCH MORE ONLINE | Learn more about artist Charlie “Tinman” Lucas at imagesprattville.com. The Fountain City Arts Festival encourages hands-on creative activities.

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Health & Wellness

PRATTVILLE HEALTH & REHABILITATION

Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy Dementia Unit Medicare/Medicaid Hospice/HMO

Our Family Caring for Yours +BTNJOF5SBJMt1SBUUWJMMF "-t   Call Ted Bugay to schedule your personal tour today!

Prattville Memorial Chapel and Memory Gardens 841 Fairview Ave. U Prattville, AL 36066 (334) 365-7147 U www.prattvillememorial.com

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GENERAL SURGERY Prattville-Based General Surgeon Serving Tri-County Area Since 1996

Mora Surgical Clinic, P.C. Dr. P. Mora Certified American Board of Surgery Member: Medical Association of the State of Alabama American Medical Association Autauga County Medical Association The Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons

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STAFF PHOTO

Health & Wellness

Prattville Baptist Hospital’s Live Well program aims to educate residents primarily on diabetes, obesity and asthma.

Building a Healthy Community BAPTIST HEALTH FOCUSES ON EDUCATION TO PROMOTE RESIDENTS’ WELLNESS

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rattville Baptist Hospital is helping the community live healthier and longer lives through its new Live Well healthy lifestyles program. Established in 2007 through a grant from the Montgomery Area Community Wellness Coalition and Steps to a HealthierAL-River Region, the program aims to educate residents on three chronic medical issues sweeping the nation – diabetes, obesity and asthma. “There is a need for this program in our community to educate residents in Autauga and Elmore counties on how to limit the adverse effects of three health concerns that are prevalent in our community,” says Ginger Henry, administrator at Prattville Baptist Hospital. “As the community hospital, Prattville Baptist Hospital knows how important it is that we communicate the risks of these concerns.” Every day, those risks become a startling reality for families in Alabama and throughout the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 20 million Americans suffer from diabetes, while

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nearly 35 percent of adults and 16 percent of children are considered obese. It is estimated that an additional 32 percent of Americans will suffer from asthma during their lifetime. The Live Well program is designed to cut those numbers through education, screenings and ongoing awareness. Through the Baptist Health Speakers Bureau, health-care professionals are available free of charge to address business, school, church or community groups. Meanwhile, community health screenings provide participants with blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol checks. The program also provides health information to area schools and is reaching out to individuals through local businesses, health fairs and other community events. Businesses also can take advantage of the Live Well Workplace Wellness Starter Kit, which is available free of charge to any business in Autauga and Elmore counties. “Baptist Health is interested in preventive health,” says Ben Kelley, vice president and executive director of the

Baptist Health Care Foundation, which helps support Live Well. “This program encourages a healthier lifestyle.” It is Henry’s hope that individuals affected by the program will walk away with a new level of awareness and education. Feedback has been extremely positive, she says, and the hospital already has received many personal success stories from those touched by Live Well’s message. “Often times, we can make specific lifestyle changes that will help decrease our risks of diabetes, obesity and asthma,” Henry says. “For those already diagnosed by their physicians, we hope our education regarding living well with these conditions will help improve their quality of life. A program such as Live Well is one way that we are able to offer an added benefit for the well-being of the residents of Autauga and Elmore counties. They are our neighbors, friends, church members and family. We want them to live healthy lives, so we can continue making our community better.” – Melanie Hill I M AG E S P R AT T V I L L E . C O M

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Sports & Recreation

Hook, Line & Sinker COOTERS POND PARK LURES GROWING NUMBERS OF ANGLERS AND NATURE LOVERS

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ith an increasingly high profile, thanks to visits from ESPN and nationally recognized fishing tournaments, Prattville’s stretch of the Alabama River is fast becoming an angler’s paradise. The river always has been a popular spot for local fishermen, but when Bass Pro Shops opened its doors in Prattville, a whole new set of enthusiasts came to town. Add in the city’s successful efforts to market the river as a tournament and tourism destination, as well as its ongoing work in sprucing up and expanding Cooters Pond Park, and the recipe for success is easy to see. “The river really sells itself,” says Drew Peterson, director of leisure services for the city. “We work with the chamber to bring the big tournaments in, but we’ve also got a lot of smaller tournaments going on all the time. We’ve got a sign out at Cooters Pond: ‘If you’re interested in a bass tournament, call us.’ We’ve got to keep a calendar, because otherwise we’d have five or six at once some months.” The city has a strong working relationship with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which operates the Robert F. Henry Lock and Dam, which in turn created R.E. “Bob” Woodruff Lake and the various fishing spots on and around the water. Largemouth and Alabama spotted bass are the primary targets here, although crappie, shad, striped and white bass, as well as channel, blue and flathead catfish can be lured onto a patient hook, as well. Prattville’s willingness to host large-scale events, coupled

with the river’s variety of fish, began bringing in large tournaments a few years ago, and each success expands the area’s drawing power a little more, says Terry Mullins, chairperson of the Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce’s tourism committee. “The river is enjoying more and more tournaments, and it’s exciting for us to see them come into town,” Mullins says. “The local people always knew what a good park and fishing spot Cooters Pond was, and then the city took it over, cleaned it up and made it so attractive that we were able to host the Bassmasters Elite 50 Series Fishing Tournament there in 2004. That got a good response and so we hosted the Bassmaster Open Championship in 2005. And every time we have one of these, more people want to come in here and fish, so it keeps growing.” The city also has hosted the Alabama Bass Federation Tournament and a regional Fishers of Men event, adds Peterson, who notes that if this level of use keeps up, Cooters Pond and other high-traffic areas may soon need a makeover. “Anything we want to do, we have to go through the Corps of Engineers, but we have a good relationship with them,” he says. “We’ve already added a dog park up there. We’re adding a third boat ramp and changing the route to the docks so we can eliminate some traffic problems. We’ve had a model airplane exhibition up there and are coordinating with cycling and lacrosse groups so we can make it a full family park with a lot of activities besides the fishing.” – Joe Morris

Cooters Pond is a favorite of local anglers and also serves as the site for fishing tournaments of all sizes.

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Community Profile

PRATTVILLE SNAPSHOT Although ranked as one of the fastest-growing areas in Alabama, Prattville maintains a quaint charm. Flowing fountains, classic older homes and numerous new, upscale and affordable neighborhoods are all part of an eclectic blend linking Prattville’s past to its future.

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES

Community Christian Academy 216 Walnut St. Prattville, AL 36067 (334) 531-0534

AVERAGE HOME PRICE

All Prattville schools are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), and offer a variety of subject matter and extracurricular activities to suit the needs of each student.

$109,300

Autauga County Schools 153 W. Fourth St. Prattville, AL 36067 (334) 365-5706

MEDICAL FACILITIES

Autauga Academy 497 Golson Road Prattville, AL 36067 (334) 365-4343 East Memorial Christian Academy 1320 Old Ridge Road Prattville, AL 36066 (334) 358-4085 Prattville Christian Academy 322 Old Farm Lane N. Prattville, AL 36067 (334) 285-0077

HOME TURNOVER PERCENTAGE 19.98 %

Prattville Baptist Hospital 124 S. Memorial Drive Prattville, AL 36067 (334) 365-0651

COMMUNITY OVERVIEW With sports events, first-class golf, boating and fishing and a strong heritage, Prattville offers residents and guests a variety of avenues for fun, relaxation and learning. The meaning of the name Autauga is lost to history, but several interpretations range from “clear water” to “land of plenty,” definitions that accurately define our area today. We are a community of abundant natural and human resources. We are proud of our heritage and eagerly anticipate an even greater future. We invite you to share our enthusiasm.

MORE EO ON ONLINE imagesprattville.com rattv More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

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Montgomery Advertiser Reader’s Choice

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2007 1st Place Winner Agent

“We Know Prattville Best”

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Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce

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IF YOU ENJOY the quiet country life, you will love Country Hideaway Bed and Breakfast north of Prattville at Pine Level just off US Route 31. Hidden away on 68 acres in the Autauga county hills lies a hotel alternative where you can see turkey and deer at play. You can choose to take a short woodland hike, ďŹ sh for bass and bluegill in the stocked pond, or just relax beside the swimming pool. John and Shirley Wachtel welcome you to spend some time at this relaxing country retreat. A LSO CALL US ABOUT: Bridal showers Weddings & receptions Luncheons & dinners Family & class reunions Catering (on or off-site)

WONDERFUL ACCOMMODATIONS FOR : Club meetings Company off-sites Scrapbooking weekends Quilting bees

SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY COUNTRY STYLE

Lunch specials every day Pizza: large, medium or small Large oven-baked sub: any fresh baked sub on the menu Baked pasta: spaghetti or lasagna with Howie Bread Large salad: chef salad with your choice of dressings Cheese bread: three-cheezer and Howie Bread

FREE flavored crust: /RIGINALs"UTTER Buttercheese Garlic herb 3ESAMEs2ANCH /NIONs#AJUN Delivery available 717 E. Main St. Prattville, AL 36067 (334) 361-6669

169 Ball-Enwright Rd. Deatsville, AL 36022 (334) 358-2677 countryhideaway@bellsouth.net www.countryhideawaybb.com

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Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce

Creating an event that is

Uniquely Yours U

niquely Yours XJMMXPSL

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3MITH "YRD(OUSE "ED"REAKFAST AND4EA2OOM

Located in the Daniel Pratt Historic District, within walking distance of downtown shops and restaurants.

Two bedrooms, each with king-size bed and private bath. The Royal Tea Room bath features a claw-foot tub.

The Smith-Byrd House is open for afternoon tea Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. and can be reserved for group events at other times. Please call for details. Beth and David Melling Innkeepers and tea hosts 137 N. Washington St. Prattville, AL 36067 (334) 365-1459 www.smithbyrdhouse.com

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Prattville Area Chamber of Commerce

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B`]gC\WdS`aWbg eeeb`]gSRc B`cZ]dS>Sb`c\WQ =`bV]R]\bWQa>1 eeeXcabP`OQSa\Sb





C\W_cSZgG]c`a1OYSa 1ObS`W\U::1 G;1/

I M AG E S P R AT T V I L L E . C O M

39


Ad Index 3 8 A L A BA M A GA S CO M PA N Y

32 C A R O L L E M O N R E A LT Y

3 3 A L A BA M A P OW E R

C 2 C E N T R A L A L A BA M A E L EC T R I C CO O P E R ATI V E

C 4 A L FA R E A LT Y 3 4 CO U N T RY H I D E AWAY B E D 1 A L L S O U T H CO R P O R ATI O N 3 8 A R R OW P E S T CO N T R O L I N C . 3 7 AU B U R N M O N TG O M E RY 2 6 AU TAU GA P R AT T V I L L E P U B LI C LI B R A R I E S 2 8 BA P TI S T H E A LTH C 3 B LU EC ROS S B LU E S H I E L D O F A L A BA M A

& B R E A K FA S T 12 EAST MEMORIAL BA P TI S T C H U RC H 6 FI R S T BA P TI S T C H U RC H P R AT T V I L L E 2 1 H O M E P L AC E 3 4 H U N G RY H OW I E ’ S P IZ Z A & S U B S


Ad Index (cont.) 8 I N T E R N ATI O N A L PA P E R

3 3 T R OY U N I V E R S IT Y

2 JAC K S O N T H O R N TO N

27 T R U LOV E & P E T R U N I C

3 1 K E L LY S E RV I C E S 32 M A X CO M M U N IT Y C R E D IT U N I O N 2 2 MCCLINTON & COMPANY INC. 1 9 M E M O R I E S FL E A A N TI Q U E M A L L 2 6 M O N TG O M E RY E Y E P H YS I C I A N S 27 M O R A S U RG I C A L C LI N I C 34 PRATTVILLE AREA CHAMBER O F CO M M E RC E 3 6 P R AT T V I L L E C H R I S TI A N AC A D E M Y 4 P R AT T V I L L E D OW N TOW N U N LI M IT E D 2 6 P R AT T V I L L E H E A LT H & R E H A B I LITATI O N L LC 2 6 P R AT T V I L L E MEMORIAL CHAPEL & M E M O RY GA R D E N S 1 9 S TAT E FA R M – LI N DA B U C K N E R 24 S U N B E LT G O L F CO R P O R ATI O N

O RT H O D O N TI C S P C

3 5 U N I Q U E LY YO U R S C A K E S & C AT E R I N G L LC

26 YMCA



Images Prattville, AL: 2009