Page 1

VISIT IMAGESGILLETTE.COM FOR MORE COMMUNITY INFORMATION AND A VIDEO TOUR

IMAGES

TM

O F G I L L E T T E - C A M P B E L L C O U N T Y, W YO M I N G

THE POWER OF POWER Energy industry pads region’s bottom line

WE’RE HIRING! Low unemployment lures workers, both in-state and out

Appetite for

Growth Restaurant owners prosper as residential population booms

SPONSORED BY THE C AMPBELL COUNT Y CHAMBER OF COMMERCE • 2007


I M A G E S

O F

Gillette-Campbell County 2007 EDITION, VOLUME 6

TABLE OF CONTENT S

Features

EXECUTIVE EDITOR T E R E E C A RU T HE R S COPY EDITOR J O Y C E C A RU T HE R S ASSOCIATE EDITORS DI A NE B A R T L E Y, L I S A B AT T L E S , SUSAN CHAPPELL ASSISTANT EDITOR R E BE C C A D E N T O N STAFF WRITERS K E V I N L I T W I N, JE S S IC A M O Z O EDITORIAL ASSISTANT JE S S Y YA N C E Y DIRECTORIES EDITORS C A R O L C O WA N, A M A NDA K I N G, KRIST Y WISE

14

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS C R I S TA L C O D Y, J I M E L L IO T T, DA N N Y M c K E N Z IE , J O E M O R R I S, G A R Y P E R IL L O U X ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER T O D D P O T T E R

APPE T I T E FOR GROW T H Gillette boasts a number of top-flight restaurants that please even the most finicky of palates.

AD PROJECT MANAGER JA R E K S W E KO S K Y ADVERTISING SALES ASSISTANT S A R A S A R T I N CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER G R E G E ME N S STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS WE S ALDR IDGE, ANTON Y BOSHIER, MICHAEL W. BUNCH, I AN C URC IO, BR I AN M C CORD CREATIVE DIRECTOR K E I T H H A R R I S WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR S H AW N DA N I E L PRODUCTION DIRECTOR N ATA S H A L O R E N S ASSISTANT PRODUCTION DIRECTOR C HR I S T I N A C A R D E N PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR H A Z E L R I S NE R SENIOR PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGER TA DA R A S M I T H SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BR I T TANY SCHLE ICHER, KR I S SE X TON, L AUR A TAYLOR, V IK K I W IL L I A M S

22

LEAD DESIGNER C ANDICE HUL SE Y GRAPHIC DESIGN JE SSIC A BR AGONIER, L INDA MORE IR A S, AMY NEL SON

A CHANGE OF AR T Avenues of Art allows local, national and international sculptors to display their work in Gillette for a year. WE ’ R E HIR ING! The local economic development office lured out-of-towners when it needed to beef up the workforce.

WEB PRODUCTION J I L L T O W N S E ND DIGITAL ASSET MANAGER A L I S O N HU N T E R AD TRAFFIC M I ND Y A R B O U R , S A R A H M IL L E R , PAT R IC I A M OI S A N, J IL L W YAT T

T HE P OWER OF P OWER Leaders have not only learned to deal with the ups and downs of the energ y industry, but also have learned to thrive.

CHAIRMAN G R E G T HU R M A N PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER B O B S C H WA R T Z M A N EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT R AY L A N GE N SENIOR V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JE F F HE E F N E R

18 26

SENIOR V.P./SALES C A R L A HE N R Y SENIOR V.P./PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS C A S E Y E . HE S T E R V.P./SALES HE R B H A R P E R V.P./VISUAL CONTENT M A R K F O R E S T E R V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING S Y BIL S T E WA R T MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS M AU R IC E F L IE S S CONTROLLER C HR I S D UD L E Y ACCOUNTING M O R I A H D O MB Y, DI A N A GU Z M A N, M A R I A M C FA R L A ND, L I S A O W E N S, S H A N N O N R IG S B Y MARKETING MANAGER T R AC Y R O GE R S RETAIL PRODUCTS MANAGER B R YA N C HI N E L L A DIRECTOR OF RECRUITING S U Z Y WA L D R IP DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR G A R Y S M I T H IT SYSTEMS DIRECTOR M AT T L O C K E IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN R YA N S W E E N E Y HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER P E G G Y B L A K E BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT N IC O L E W IL L I A M S CLIENT & SALES SERVICES MANAGER/CUSTOM MAGAZINES PAT T I C O R NE L I U S

Images of Gillette-Campbell County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N , C O N TA C T:

Campbell County Chamber of Commerce 314 S. Gillette Ave • Gillette, WY 82716 (307) 682-3673 • Fax: (307) 682-0538 gillettechamber.com VISIT IMAGES OF GILLETTE-CAMPBELL COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

©Copyright 2007 Journal Communications Inc., 361 Mallory Station Road, Ste. 102, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Magazine Publishers of America Member Member

26 GILLETTE-CAMPBELL COUNTY BUSINESS M AK ING RO OMS

. . . . . . . . .

40

Hotel construction is booming in Gillette, with major hotel chains adding properties to the lodging landscape. BIZ BRIEFS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

CHAMBER REPORT

. . . . . . . . . . . 49

Custom Publishing Council

Member Campbell County Chamber of Commerce

On the Cover P H O T O B Y B R I A N M C O R D Campbell County Scenic Beauty

ECONOMIC PROFILE

. . . . . . . . . . 51

C

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

5


34

YOUR

SUCCESS

IS OUR

GOAL!

30 64

NO PL ACE L IK E HOME … ON T HE R ANGE Young couples and retirees are embracing the recreation, cultural and business opportunities offered here. HAV E T HE AT ER , W ILL T R AV EL The Gillette Community Theatre provides great entertainment all around town.

62

GILLE T T E ’ S GOAL- OR IEN T ED K ID S About 170 youths participate in hockey programs offered by the county and the Gillette Hockey Association.

Departments 10 | AL M ANAC

4th & Gillette 686-3300 24-Hour Banking 682-9184 Bookkeeping 686-3340 Loan Departments: Business 686-3325 Personal 686-3315 Home Loans 686-3330

THREE ATM LOCATIONS Corner of 4th & Kendrick (Drive-Up) 106 N. Hwy. 14-16 10800 S. Hwy. 59 (Shell Food Marts) All First National Bank ATM, Debit & Credit Cards – Surcharge Free

34 | P O R T F OL IO 56 | IM AG E G ALLERY

Member FDIC

67 | ED UC AT ION 69 | HE ALT H/ W ELL NE S S

30 GILLETTE

73 | COMMUNIT Y PROFILE

Campbell County’s Only Hometown Bank fnbgillette.com

82 | E V EN T S C AL ENDA R IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

7


ACTION! ADVENTURE! “IT KEPT ME ON THE EDGE OF MY LAPTOP!”

“ GILLETTE LIKE IT’S NEVER BEEN SEEN BEFORE!” Images of Gillette-Campbell County

THE MOVIE

STARTS TODAY!

WORLD WIDE WEB SHOWTIMES VALID MONDAY-SUNDAY 24/7

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT ANY RESEMBLANCE TO PLACES, EVENTS OR QUALITY OF LIFE IN GILLETTE IS PURELY INTENTIONAL!

AT IM AGESGILLET TE.COM


R E A D M O R E ON L I N E

I M A G E S G I L L E T T E . com EDUCAT ION AND SCHOOL L I S T ING S Check out school districts, colleges and universities in the GilletteCampbell County area. >Read More

GARDENING How does your garden grow? Get the dirt on regional gardening. >Read More

FOOD What’s cookin’? Get a taste of regional cuisine. >Read More

REALTOR.COM Search for a new home, get moving tips and more at the National Association of Realtors’ Web site. >Read More

THE MOVIE Take a virtual tour of Gillette-Campbell County as seen through the eyes of our photographers. See for yourself what sets this community apart. >IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

A B O U T T HI S M AG A Z IN E I M A G E S

O F

Gillette-Campbell County 2007 EDITION, VOLUME 6

Images of Gillette-Campbell County is pub lished annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is sponsored by the Gillette-Campbell County Chamber of Commerce. In print and online, Images gives readers a taste of what makes Gillette-Campbell County tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts.

“Find the good – and praise it.” – Alex Haley (1921-1992), co-founder

jnlcom.com

GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

9


Almanac This Place Rocks The Campbell County Rockpile Museum is filled with artifacts from the Old and New West and is fittingly located next to a sizable natural rockpile formation. The western history museum is on West 2nd Street near the railhead of the old Burlington and Missouri line. Besides the sheep wagon, artifacts on site include firearms, pioneer and American Indian clothing and a restored rural schoolhouse. The museum is open seven days a week from June 1-Aug. 31, and closed only on Sundays during the remainder of the year. Admission is free.

Things You Should Know  The

cattle ranchers who settled the town in the late 1800s originally referred to Gillette as Donkey Town.

 Oil

exploration began in Gillette in the 1940s, and the first commercial oil field discovery was made in 1948.

 It

is estimated that there will be more than 20,000 natural gas wells in northeast Wyoming by 2010.

 About

65 percent of the state of Wyoming’s tax revenues come from energy-rich Campbell County.

 Hunters

have a wide selection of game to hunt in Campbell County, including elk, deer, antelope, grouse and turkey.

 Wildlife

officials estimate more than 50,000 pronghorn antelope live among the rolling plains of Campbell County, outnumbering the county’s human population by more than 10,000.

10

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

That’s a Big Canvas Artist Harvey Jackson is as famous in Gillette as Picasso, Renoir and Van Gogh. Jackson is known for a series of outdoor murals he has painted on several buildings throughout the city. His paintings include what is believed to be the world’s largest mural, a 220-foot-by-56-foot painting that depicts Gillette’s major industries. Most of Jackson’s work is supported by the public. He often employs community “assistants,” and local businesses and residents have donated money and supplies.

GILLETTE


Mountain Brewed Coffee drinkers in Gillette are never at a loss for a steaming cup of joe. Nearly 10 coffee shops exist in this city alone, with a couple of additional locations tentatively scheduled to open in 2007. Coffee venues include Coffee Friends, Brothers Coffee, City Brew, Lula Belle Coffee Shop, Mountain Mudd, Powder River Express, the Coffee Bean and Starbucks.

Two Sports in One The Energy Rotary Club Disc Golf Course opened in 2004, and its popularity has been soaring ever since. The 18-hole disc course is behind the CAM-PLEX facility in Gillette, and the club even began hosting regional tournaments in 2006. Disc golf is played much like traditional golf except that players use a Frisbee instead of a ball and clubs.

GILLETTE At A Glance P O P UL AT ION (20 05 E S T IM AT E ) Campbell County: 37,405 Gillette: 22,685 Wright: 1,425

L O C AT IO N Campbell County is in northeastern Wyoming, between the Big Horn Mountains and the Black Hills of South Dakota.

BEG INNING S Campbell County was established in 1911. It is home to the cities of Gillette and Wright, along with the unincorporated communities of Recluse and Rozet. The county seat of Gillette is named for 1890s railroad surveyor Edward Gillette.

F O R MO R E INF O R M AT IO N Campbell County Chamber of Commerce 314 S. Gillette Ave. Gillette, WY 82716 (307) 682-3673 • Fax: (307) 682-0538 gillettechamber.com

GILLETTE

Gillette

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

11


Almanac Fight, Camels, Fight

Where the Buffalo Roam More than 4,000 big game animals make up the population at Durham Buffalo Ranch. The 55,000-acre, family-operated ranch is rated one of the best in the country for its quality and standards of raising buffalo. It is also one of the oldest buffalo operations in North America, with the gene pool dating back to the 1890s. Durham Ranch has a store that sells a full variety of buffalo meats, including dry aged meat and game meats, along with several wild birds, as well as seafood. Most of the company’s sales occur via the Internet.

Hail to the champions – from Gillette. The Campbell County Fighting Camels won the Class 5A Wyoming high school football championship when they defeated Cheyenne East, 16-14, at Camel Stadium Nov. 11, 2006. Campbell County finished its season with a 10-1 record, while a determined Cheyenne East squad ended their 2006 season at 5-6. This was the third state championship for the Campbell County football team. Fun Things To Do  Hit

‘em long and straight at Bell Nob, Gillette or Haycreek golf courses.

 Lace

up your skates and enjoy an afternoon of exercise and fun at the Campbell County Ice Arena.

 Enjoy

From Rodeos to Rodin CAM-PLEX continues to be the state’s premier multi-use facility, with concert halls, pavilions, conference center and a performing arts theater. The facility also has rodeo grounds, RV campgrounds, a horse race track and a 21-acre park and picnic area. Events there include conventions, Broadway plays, art exhibits and sporting events. Open dates and available facilities are already scarce for promoters who are looking to book events. More than 100 events each year are turned away, so discussions began in 2005 to expand the overall center. As a result, CAM-PLEX is expanding by 122,000 square feet and will open its new building addition to the public in 2008.

GILLETTE

some of the exciting action on the 3/8-mile clay oval at Gillette Thunder Speedway.

 Take a stroll along Gillette Avenue and learn about 67 historic sites from First through Seventh streets.  Take

some baseball or softball swings at SportZone, even during the coldest months.

 Attend

a free concert during the summer months at Gillette City Park.

 Take

an unusual look into Einstein’s theories at the Science Center, which is open September through June. IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

13


Appetite for Growth R e st au r a nt choice s keep even t he most d i scer n i n g d i ner s sat i s f ied

S TORY BY

Cristal Cody

✦ PHOTOGR APHY BY

Wes Aldridge

R

ic and Carolyn Schuyler hadn’t owned a full-scale restaurant before they opened Pokey’s Smokehouse & Barbeque in May 2006. Now the couple is swimming in ribs and sauce and couldn’t be happier. “None of this stuff is coming out of a can or a box,” Ric Schuyler says. All the meats are smoked with a homemade dry rub in “Elvis,” a whopper of a smoker that holds 1,800 pounds of meat. Freshly made sauce comes on the side. “I barbecue some of it in there for 14 hours, and some for 12 hours, and some of it is in for four hours,” he says. “There’s no gas or electricity going to this thing. It’s all wood. This is the good stuff.” Lip smacking is free of charge! The couple also owns The Main Bagel Co. and operates Pokey’s Airport Café. “I have a full plate,” Schuyler jokes. “We’re the only bagel shop in town that makes its own bagels. I make all the bagels from scratch, and

Ribeye, mashed potatoes and veggies – hearty helpings that stick to your bones – are dished up daily at Gillette area restaurants, such as the Olde Post Office Grill.

14

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

15


16

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


With its larger-than-life outdoor mural and art-decked walls, the Chophouse Restaurant is a feast for the eyes.

she bakes them every morning.” Gillette’s downtown also got a lot friendlier to the lunch crowd with the Olde Post Office Grill. Karla Fiebelkorn breathed life back into an empty building that once had been the town’s post office with the restaurant that opened in June 2006. Now the business employs about 25 and is attracting plenty of attention for lunch and dinner. The Campbell County Chamber of Commerce named Fiebelkorn as Entrepreneur of the Year in 2006 for refurbishing and opening a business inside the 1930s building. “I totally redid the inside,” Fiebelkorn says. “It still has the peepholes where the postmaster could go down and look over his workers. So there’s a lot of history there.” The restaurant seats 100 and serves up sandwiches and salads for lunch and steaks and duck for dinner. “Lunch is our busiest time of day because we’re downtown,” Fiebelkorn says. “There’s about 2,000 people that work within walking distance of here, so it makes a convenient place for business people to have lunch.” Other restaurant owners also are finding success as Gillette’s GILLETTE

population booms. The city’s population grew by almost 2,000 people to more than 27,500 thanks to the vibrant energy economy, city officials reported. The Chophouse Restaurant wows residents with its steaks, seafood and pasta dishes. “The only beef we buy is certified Angus, and we age it here,” says Executive Chef Ray Marini. “We have certain specs for each cut of meat that we won’t cut until it reaches a certain age, and we stick to it.” Rib eye steaks are aged four weeks, while sirloins are aged six weeks. No rubs or marinades are added to the beef either. “We don’t believe in doing that,” Marini says. “We let the meat speak for itself.” Marini should know. He cooked in restaurants around the world, including Moscow, Russia, before settling in Gillette. “We think the whole thing should be an experience,” he says. “The idea isn’t to ram a ton of food down people’s throat. We like people to be able to sit down, relax, have a bottle of wine.” The restaurant is open for lunch Monday-Friday and dinner Monday-Saturday. IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

17


A

Change of Art 18

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


S TEPHEN CHERRY

Peck by Linda Raynolds Left: statue of bald eagle at Lasting Legacy Park P H O T O B Y B R I A N M C O R D C

Public sculptures add interes t and beaut y to Gillet te S TORY BY

W

hen Gillette Mayor Duane Evenson was elected in 2002, one of his goals was to spice up the look of the city. “Part of my plan was to help with community beautification. I wanted to add something visually appealing to the community,” Evenson says. “We already had people planting trees and the like. So I asked the city council to allocate funding for an arts project, and they agreed.” The result was the Mayor’s Art Council, formed in 2003 to oversee and implement a program for the placement of public art in the Gillette community. In its first

GILLETTE

Jessica Mozo

year, the Mayor’s Art Council developed Avenues of Art, a juried art show that allows local, national and international sculptors to display their work in Gillette for one year. “Artists submit applications and photos of their work, and a committee determines whether to accept it,” says Kim Silbaugh, a glass artist and art teacher at Twin Spruce Junior High School who has had two sculptures in the Avenues of Art program. “If they do, area businesses sponsor the cost of transporting and mounting the piece, and it’s on display in Gillette for one year. The city or members of the

community may choose to buy it during that time.” If a piece sells, the artist receives 75 percent of the selling price, and the Mayor’s Art Council retains 25 percent to continue purchasing art for the city. For the 2005 Avenue of Arts program, Silbaugh teamed up with steel sculptor Susan Hladky to create Children’s Play, a sculpture with a glass umbrella mounted on a bed of concrete made to look like a beach with a steel chaise longue, a book and flip-flops. “Susan and I met through a local art guild, and we were both intrigued by combining strong steel with something IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

19


as fragile as glass,” Silbaugh says. “I was a glass artist, and she was a steel artist, so we started working together.” The pair entered another piece in Avenue of Arts in 2006 called Singing Tree, a large steel tree-like sculpture with circles of colored glass hanging from its “branches.” Now in its fourth year, Avenue of Arts has made a name for itself, attracting artists from other states and even other countries. “An artist from Israel heard about our program and asked to enter her project,” Evenson says. “The city bought her sculpture, and it’s a permanent part of our city now.” The sculpture, named Flight, is by Ana Lazovsky and is on display on the east side of 4-J Road near the library. It depicts the upward spiral path of a turquoise bird taking flight. “Avenue of Arts turned out to be absolutely wonderful for local artists and our community,” Evenson says. “It’s added a whole new dimension to our city. We have about 36 pieces of art on

display right now.” The program is especially important, Silbaugh adds, because it brings art into the public eye. “Not having an art museum here, our families and kids who don’t travel much aren’t exposed to art,” she says. “This brings in art from all over, and the public can view it without even visiting a museum.” The sculpture series changes every June with a weekend kick-off that includes an artist’s reception on Friday and installation of all the pieces on Saturday. The 2007 artist’s reception is slated for June 29. “The city staff plays a huge role in the logistics of installing all the new pieces and taking down the old ones,” Evenson says. “Several local businesses also donate their services.” Greg’s Welding Inc. builds all the temporary pedestals for the sculptures, Radix Construction pours the concrete for them, and Van Ewing Construction builds permanent pedestals for citypurchased pieces at no charge. “It’s been a tremendous benefit for everybody,” Evenson says.

Polar Bear and Cubs by Dollores B. Shelledy and Defiant (above) by Jon Hair are two of the pieces of art on display in Gillette.

20

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


PHOTOS BY BRIAN MCCORD

Lasting Legacy Park is home to a number of sculptures commissioned by the Mayor’s Art Council. GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

21


We’re

Hiring! The county’s low unemployment rates lure out-of-state workers

S TORY BY

W

hen the Campbell County Economic Development Corp. took on the task of beefing up the area’s workforce, they began in an unlikely place – Michigan. The CCEDC joined with other agencies to recruit displaced workers in Michigan. They hosted job fairs in 2006 in the cities of Flint, Lansing and Jackson, and later in the Saginaw and Grand Rapids areas, which have successfully recruited at least 200 skilled workers. Why Michigan? “We targeted Michigan because of its high unemployment rate,” CCEDC Executive Director Ruth Benson says. “We had even planned it before the auto industry made their layoff announcements. A lot of these people have similar skill sets to what we need, and the

Jim Elliott weather is similar to ours.” Benson says many Michigan residents consider the quality of life available in Gillette. “We have shortages for diesel mechanics, industrial electricians, welders, machinists, auto mechanics, heavy equipment operators, engineers and health-care workers,” Benson says. “There is also a need for service industry employees to staff restaurants, motels and other businesses. One Michiganian taking advantage of job availability in Gillette is Roy Lowell, who retired from General Motors in 1988 and then took an administrative post with Baker College in Flint. “I was listening to the local news and they were talking about these Wyoming people recruiting in Flint,” Lowell recalls. “Just out of curiosity I went to the job

From welders to auto mechanics, skilled workers in neighboring states, such as Michigan, find a welcome wagon in Gillette and Campbell County.

22

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


WES ALDRIDGE

GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

23


WE S ALDRIDGE

Industrial workers find more than good-paying jobs in Gillette; they find a stellar quality of life.

24

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


WE S ALDRIDGE

Ruth Benson, executive director of the Campbell County Economic Development Corp., says the CCEDC has managed to recruit some 200 new employees.

fair, not even looking for a job, but I got to talking with some people, including Ruth, and the next thing you know a lady says the college is looking for someone like you. My goal at that point in my life was to seek a boat and salt water, but the interest of the community and the need for a person with my background rekindled the fire in me.” The Lowells moved to Gillette March 2006, and “we just fell in love with the town. The people are just so friendly, and GILLETTE

we love the restaurants and the antelope that are all over the place,” says Lowell. Lowell grew up on a farm and attended a one-room school, and considers it “a unique privilege to be able to view the country almost undisturbed and picture what it was like in the frontier days.” To find more service workers, CCEDC is promoting a “Recreation Vo-cation” to recreational vehicle enthusiasts. Susan Jerke, the agency’s marketing director, says CCEDC attended a huge RV conven-

tion in Arizona to promote Wyoming as a fun place to spend the summer and make some money doing part-time seasonal work. “Many RVers think it’s fun to try out different places and get to see the flavor of local communities,” she explains. In Gillette they’ll have access to discounted hook-ups and perks. One of the golf courses offering positions, for example, will throw in free rounds of golf and carts. IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

25


The

Power

26

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


of

Power

Grow t h in t he ener g y indus t r y pads re g ion’s bot tom line

S TORY BY

Danny McKenzie

F

iguring out what’s going to happen next in the energy industry is a lot like trying to determine the hypotenuse of a circle; it’s pretty much an exercise in futility. The only thing for certain is that there will always be a demand for affordable energy, and that’s where Campbell County comes in. With at least one-third of the nation’s coal supply coming from Campbell County, industry leaders have not only figured out how to deal with the ups and downs of the industry, they’ve learned to thrive. “We’re continually working on making the process cleaner and more affordable,” says Julie Simon, president of the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce. “Certainly, when things happen across the nation as they relate to

Black Hills Power P H O T O B Y W E S A L D R I D G E GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

27


energy, they affect us. The energy industry does have a history of highs and lows, but, hopefully, we’ve learned from the booms to busts throughout our history.” Vern Schild, director of power for Black Hills Power, says the demand for energy, along with Campbell County’s abundant supply of coal, will keep things jumping for years to come. His company’s brand, spanking new 90-megawatt plant could be up and running by the end of the third quarter of 2007. “Many of the power plants built in the ’60s are nearly

28

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

50 years old now, and there have been tremendous changes in the way we produce power in the last 20 or 30 years,” Schild says. “We’ve been adding emission-control equipment over the years, but many of those plants won’t be able to handle much more. That means as the demand for energy grows that there will be a demand for more and more efficient power plants. The plant we’re now building is the first new coal-fired power plant with mercury control. It’s exciting.” Schild says while plans are not yet chiseled in stone, the

GILLETTE


says the chamber’s Simon. “It’s not just in coal mining, either; it’s also natural gas.” Jeff Wandler is vice president of L&H Industrial, a 40-yearold global machine and welding firm based in Gillette. He says the impact of the energy industry can be seen all around Campbell County. “It’s definitely good for the community,” Wandler says. “It’s certainly good for us. If we’re busy that means the economy is growing, and that’s good news for everybody.

WE S ALDRIDGE

S TA F F P H O T O

WE S ALDRIDGE

company hopes to follow up with a sister plant one day soon. “I can’t say for certain,” he says, “but we could start construction by the fall.” While this is certainly good news for the construction industry, it’s also a shot in the arm for supporting companies. A strong building cycle means business for other industries – housing, restaurants, retail, transportation and many others, especially support services. “We’re definitely growing because we’re the energy capital,”

Growth in the power industry has induced growth in other sectors. Top left: Wyodak Mine Top right: Black Hills Power Plant GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

29


No

Place Like Home

30

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


… on the Range Ca mpbel l Cou nt y at t r a ct s you n g profe s sion a l s a nd ret i ree s

S TORY BY

Gary Perilloux

A

WE S ALDRIDGE

sojourn in the Scottish highlands, travels on German autobahns and dances with Denver traffic animated the life of graphic designer and publisher Harvey Jackson. But when it came time for Jackson to raise a family, there was little doubt where his internal compass would point. Harvey headed home. “In a smaller city, people know you,” says the 30-year-old Jackson, who grew up in Gillette and returned with his wife, Megan, in 2001. “It has a smalltown feeling. In Denver, it seems like you got lost in it. Nobody knew your name. And there’s a lot better community feeling here for raising kids.” Others know that feeling. Trevor Matson left the Black Hills of South Dakota to launch a Blue Ribbon Mortgage office in Gillette. Eight years later, he’s happily immersed in Campbell County life. “Gillette has that smaller-town atmosphere but with more people. They’re friendly, and they’ll go out of their way to help each other,” says the 33-yearold Matson. Young professionals like Jackson and Matson embrace the recreation, cultural and business opportunities afforded by Gillette. And retirees like Delmar Seymour and wife Carolynn choose Gillette for similar reasons. The Seymours are born-and-bred “Okies,” as Delmar describes their Oklahoma upbringings near Tulsa and

GILLETTE

Harvey and Megan Jackson, and their daughters, Hayley, 6, and Sydney, 3, play a round of mini-golf at SportZone. IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

31


Oklahoma City, where they were married 55 years ago. But since Delmar transferred to Gillette with an oil field service company 33 years ago, the Seymours haven’t looked back. Delmar ran his own oil field drilling pipe business for a decade, auctioned his equipment during the mid-1980s oil slump, and maintained condominiums for seven years. After a brief retirement, he returned to work as a caretaker at a regional school for special-needs children. “I’ve always said that except for two or three of these 33 years, anyone that wanted to work, could work here,” says Seymour, who’s 78. “And it’s just been better and better.” Wyoming’s stunning vistas captivate the Seymours on camping trips, and recreational opportunities abound at home with indoor tracks and swimming at the county-operated fitness center they frequent. “We have a tremendous recreation center. It’s really a healthy atmosphere,” says Delmar, whose two daughters and six grandchildren also live in the region. Jackson, whose wife is a registered nurse expecting their third child, moved back for such an atmosphere. That the economy roared to life was a happy coincidence. “I didn’t plan on that,” he says. “I just liked the area because I knew it was a safe place to live, with good school systems. But just about everybody I know in business now is making money – just thriving.” Matson’s mortgage business has taken off, too. He’s grown from one to four employees and finds life away from work fulfilling. Outdoor sports – from snowmobiling to boating are endless – and his 4-year-old daughter has activities nearly every day. “The schools are great, and it’s home now,” Matson says. “So we don’t have plans to go anywhere else.”

The walkways weaving through Lasting Legacy Park are part of more than 37 miles of recreational paths in Gillette.

32

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


D AV I D M U D D

GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

33


Portfolio / J O E M O R R I S

In the Saddle Again TA K E A W ILD WE S T ERN R ID E W I T H T HE P OWD ER BA S IN EQUE S T R I AN A S S O C I AT IO N

I

t’s no surprise that there’s plenty of horse riding to be found in cowboy country, but the sheer variety of offerings in Gillette might come as a surprise. “Our roots are agricultural, and there’s an amazing amount of Western riding, just about anything you can imagine,” says Ruth Benson, executive director of the Campbell County Economic Development Corp. and a member of the Powder Basin Equestrian Association. “But there’s a lot of opportunity for English riding as well.” With an 80-acre equestrian park with five skill levels of jumping, as well as a stadium arena and two dressage arenas, the area is packed with horse-friendly venues. The rodeos and other Westernriding events are well known within the community and elsewhere, but the English events are quickly elevating their own profile. The PBEA was formed in 1988 and has since grown to offer its own crosscountry and other competitions. From the very beginning, response has been overwhelming, and the membership has grown accordingly, Benson says. There are two major English competitions scheduled for summer 2007, each with three events under its umbrella: stadium jumping, dressage and crosscountry jumping. The local event will be in July, with a regional championship to follow in early September, Benson says. “We really do have excellent facilities, and with the high school rodeo team and the college rodeo team, which is starting this fall, we’re very well-known for our Western riding. But with the parks and indoor facilities, the English riders are starting to do a lot more around here. We just have amazing facilities and events for all kinds of riders.”

The CAM-PLEX multipurpose facility hosts a number of equestrian events.

34

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


PHOTOS BY WES ALDRIDGE

GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

35


Portfolio Durham Buffalo Ranch, Thunder Basin National Grassland

Beauty and the Beasts PHOTOS BY WES ALDRIDGE

G

WHITE-DAVIS MOTORS Northeast Wyoming’s Largest Vehicle & Parts Inventory

Our friendly staff is here to help you with all your sales, service, parts & body shop needs. 444 Skyline Dr. • 307-682-8851 • Toll-free: 800-793-8851 www.white-davis.com 46 years & still growing to serve you

36

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

illette isn’t lacking in scenic vistas, but even in such beautiful country the Thunder Basin National Grassland stands out. As part of the Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests, the grassland is a portion of almost 3 million acres of national forest stretching from north central Colorado to central Wyoming. Mountain ranges include the Gore Range, Flat Tops, Parks Range, Medicine Bow Mountains, Sierra Madre and Laramie Range. Thunder Basin is found in the Powder River Basin between the Big Horn Mountains and the Black Hills. It ranges in elevation from 3,600 feet to 5,200 feet. While there are no developed campgrounds, camping is allowed. In addition to hiking and sightseeing, there are plentiful opportunities for hunting and fishing, with a broad range of wildlife found within the grassland’s confines. The area also is a mecca for birdwatchers, with golden and bald eagles among the many species found there. For those who don’t want to rough it too much, in addition to the unspoiled areas of the grasslands region, the national forest complex also features ski areas and eight mountain lakes with boating facilities. There also are special recreational areas designed for those with disabilities. The U.S. Forest Service’s Douglas Ranger District manages the grassland, which is comprised of 572,000 acres of federal, state and privately owned lands, says Robert Sprentall, district ranger. “That’s one of our biggest concerns here,” Sprentall says. “People see all this open space and like to bring their ATVs here, and they think all this open space is OK to drive on.” Keeping visitors to the public areas of the grasslands is also a concern during hunting season, when the area’s antelope, mule deer and elk can be harvested. “People want to get out and enjoy this beautiful open space, so we just work to make sure they don’t venture onto private property while they’re doing so,” he says. GILLETTE


Higher Ed Aims Even Higher A

ny business owner will tell you that a well-rounded workforce is central to success. With that in mind, Gillette College is always working to make sure its course offerings keep the best and brightest close to home. “We’ve done a lot of things in terms of new courses,” says Wendy Smith, marketing/public relations director at the college. “We’ve added a surveying program, industrial electricity, what we call the I-TEC training and education center. The energy industry is booming here, so they need trained workers.” The college also has expanded its nursing department, doubling class size to address the needs in an industry with an ever-expanding need for skilled workers. It also has developed degree tracks for pharmacy technology and engineering technology.

“Those are all areas that have been identified as necessary for us to better serve the citizens of Campbell County,” Smith says. “We also have lots of partnerships with institutions that grant higher degrees. We offer associate degrees and certificates in the arts and applied sciences, but many of our graduates want to go on to get a bachelor’s or master’s degree.” Several of those graduates have come back, walking across the college’s stage

to get those higher-degree diplomas, which Smith says “is really neat, and it also shows the commitment of our people to this community.” The college also is addressing the needs of the immigrant population, boosting its ESL programs. “We want to be proactive and not reactive,” Smith says. “We want to offer the programs that people are looking for, so we can be the higher-education provider of choice around here.”

Largest selection of clocks, watches, gold chains, crystal giftware and gemstone jewelry in N.E. Wyoming. New merchandise arriving daily. All fi ne jewelry repaired.

Study area at Gillette College GILLETTE

Holiday Plaza | 2007 South Douglas Highway | Suite D Gillette, Wyoming 82718 | 307.682.1264

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

37


Portfolio Look Who’s Cookin allows families to prepare meals to take home and cook.

PHOTOS BY WES ALDRIDGE

Ready, Set, Cook! W LITTLE COMPANY

BIG RESULTS

Let Us Help You Find Your Wyoming Dream Home

308 S. Douglas Hwy. • Gillette, WY 82716 • (307) 687-0440 • wesellwy.com 38

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

hat’s for dinner? It’s an age-old question, and now Gillette residents can get home-cooked meals – without the bother of cooking at home. Look Who’s Cookin has a meal-prep service, offering meats and vegetables that can be assembled in any number of ways, taken home and cooked. In other words, it’s the perfect mix of grocery story and home kitchen, where shoppers can assemble a meal without doing all the prep work. “People come in here, make entrees, then take it home and pop it in the oven or freezer, whatever they need to do,” says Debbie McWilliams, owner. “Each one serves between four and six people, so it gives people a lot more options when they’re planning meals.” McWilliams opened her doors in May 2006 and has seen a steady increase in business as people realize just how convenient her service is. “I just thought this would work great in Gillette, because this is such a working community,” she says. “The lines at fastfood places are just unbelievable, the restaurants are packed, because nobody has the time to do a lot of cooking here.” While desserts aren’t on the menu yet at Look Who’s Cookin, it’s only a matter of time. There also are training sessions several times a week so people can learn exactly how to put their meals together, or they can call ahead and have everything ready for pickup. Whatever the reason, it’s working. McWilliams took over a former beauty shop and remodeled it to suit her needs, including sinks and prep tables, and then watched as the business began to walk in. “I think this really fills a niche,” she says. GILLETTE


Say Cheese & Crackers T

hey say necessity is the mother of invention. In the case of Mike and Geri Jambretz, it was also the catalyst to start a new business. The Jambretzes hail from Wisconsin and, naturally, are very fond of cheese. When they relocated to Gillette, they found that the local supply was, well, lacking delicious Wisconsin cheese. “I made cheese for 33 years, and her family had a small factory, so we had a pretty good idea of what good cheese tasted like,” Jambretz says. “So when we couldn’t find what we wanted, we began exploring the idea of opening our own business.” From those brainstorms the Gillette Cheese House was born. With more than 50 varieties on hand, as well as smoked beef and bison sausages, crackers and

other items, it has become Gillette’s onestop shop for cheeseheads. “We’re selling a lot of Wisconsin cheeses and have already had to expand to take care of increased business,” he says. “That’s just been since March 2006, so we think we’re doing pretty good for a couple of country kids with no retail experience.” Having connections back home has helped out as well. Jambretz says that he was able to get his former employer

on board with products and over time has reached out and connected with many other family-owned businesses back in Wisconsin. “We found a good, small German outfit, so we knew they’d have good sausage,” he says. “And we also have jams, jellies and maple syrup from another family-owned outfit. It seems like small businesses like ours really reach out to each other, and it’s worked out very nicely for us.”

Assorted goods at Gillette Cheese House GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

39


Business G I L L E T T E

S TORY BY

Gary Perilloux

• PHOTOGR APHY BY

Wes Aldridge

Making

Rooms Hotel con st r u ct ion heat s up i n Ca mpbel l Cou nt y

W

hen 9,000 motorcyclists thunder into Gillette for the BMW rally, Dan Barks will roll out a Wyoming welcome. But he’ll need some help. As the summer sun sets on CAM-PLEX, the Campbell County multipurpose center Barks manages, many of the bikers will park RVs or pitch a tent at the center’s more than 1,800 overnight camping sites. Others will seek a respite in one of Gillette’s 18 hotels, which boast an inventory of almost 1,400 rooms. “Many of the events at CAM-PLEX bring people to town who spend anywhere from one night to a week of nights,” Barks says. “We’ll have some events that will need four or five rooms and some that will need 800 rooms.” The BMW rally will require 1,000 or

Best Western Tower West Lodge

40

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


Comfort Inn & Suites offers travelers a cozy home away from home while adding to the city’s booming economy.

more rooms, lighting no vacancy signs citywide and pushing reservations into Sundance, Buffalo and other neighboring communities. In 2008, CAM-PLEX will open an event center with seating for 9,000 that will put further pressure on local hotels. Imagine, then, Barks’ pleasure at the GILLETTE

prospect of three new hotels in the planning stages – a Fairfield Inn & Suites and Country Inn & Suites flanking a new water park on Gillette’s South Douglas Highway off Interstate 90, and a Holiday Inn Express in Buffalo an hour west. The developer launching the hotel expansion is Aftab Khan, who for eight

years has operated Gillette’s largest hotel, the chalet-style Best Western Tower West Lodge. Khan also owns a 60-room Comfort Inn near the 189-room Tower West. But a booming Campbell County economy, egged on by nearly 10,000 coal and oil extraction jobs, has Khan IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

41


Business expanding his hotel horizons. “We feel pretty strongly about the economy and the future here,” Khan says. “We think that while there may be ups and downs, that overall it will be a solid growth. There’s a lot of pentup demand that is not being met by the current number of rooms in town. “Along with that we believe there needs to be an upgrade of the types of rooms available. We feel that there are a limited number of high-quality rooms in town, and we think that we can add significantly to that.” The Fairfield Inn and Country Inn properties will add 80 high-quality business and leisure travel rooms, each with high-speed Internet. Between the inns, an indoor water park will complete the multimillion-dollar project. With beam girders and lots of glass panes, the water park structure will enclose two slides, a lazy river system and other water features in an 8,000to 9,000-square-foot building. Khan’s also breaking ground on a 70room Holiday Inn Express in Buffalo, while eyeing yet another Gillette hotel project. His Tower West Holdings firm has acquired land across from the Best Western with a goal of serving the increasing volume of business travelers and contract workers required by the energy industry. “Marriott and other brands have expressed interest in us constructing an extended-stay hotel here in town as well,” Khan says. “That’s something with great potential in Gillette. You just need the right location and the right brand to make it work. But right now, we’d like to get these other two [hotels] completed first.

Best Western Tower West Lodge Above: Comfort Inn & Suites GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

43


Business G I L L E T T E

B I Z

B R I E F S

S TEPHEN CHERRY

“We’re a pretty sizable bank,” says Faron Ferguson, “but we run each of our banks like it’s a hometown bank.” Ferguson is branch manager of the Pinnacle branches in Moorcroft and Newcastle and of the Pinnacle loan office in Gillette. “We run each of our branches differently, and our owners encourage that,” he says. “They’re always asking us if we have the flexibility we need to give our customers the service they want.” Ferguson said while the Gillette branch is now only a loan office, a full-service branch could be in the near future. “This is our way of getting into a booming market,” he said of Gillette. “If things continue to go like they’re going now, I really believe we’ll be expanding our Gillette offices. The people here have really been good to Pinnacle.”

John Henry’s Country Kennel makes man’s best friend feel right at home.

PA MP ER ED P O O CHE S Pets deserve pampering, the way Sherryl Hardy sees it, and the patrons of her John Henry’s Country Kennel couldn’t agree more. Hardy, a certified veterinary technician, bought the former veterinary clinic in November 2005 and has turned it into a popular – and successful – boarding facility for dogs, cats and exotics. “We’ve got 40 runs and two indoor suites – one for dogs and one for cats,” says the personable Hardy. “Some pets, like house pets or older pets, just need a little more care. The regular kennel is a little hectic for them, and they need a little more attention.” Then there are the pet owners who

46

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

just want their pets to be in a homelike atmosphere. “We have several clients who bring in their pets’ pillows or blankets,” Hardy says. “They might just need an armchair to sleep in or a window to look out. We try to provide what they need.” “What I try to do is really personalize the care they get,” she says. “The owners appreciate it, and so do the pets.” BANK ING ON SERVICE With more than 100 locations in eight states, Pinnacle Bancorp is large enough to handle the needs of any and every customer. Its remarkable growth, however, has been based on individual customer service.

HER WORK IS C H I L D ’ S P L AY When Jane Burbank says her business, Teacher’s Corner / Kid’s Mart, has play stations, she’s not referring to the video games. She means there are areas in the store at 201 South Gillette where, as she says, “kids can be kids.” Burbank’s store specializes in toys and education supplies for children of all ages. “We have a lot of things that require children to use their imagination,” she says. “We’ve got many things for pretend play among younger children, great science experiment equipment for ages 7 and up, and a really nice selection of games and puzzles.” Teacher’s Corner / Kid’s Mart also keeps in stock nearly every item a teacher could need for the classroom. “And we’ve got a great selection of arts and crafts supplies for kids. “It’s a great place to bring the family and discover what children can do when they use their imaginations,” Burbank says. “Plus, we offer free gift-wrapping.” ART OF DEFENSE At Powder River Academy of Taekwondo, students often learn more than self-defense; they also learn about GILLETTE


Powder River Academy of Taekwondo teaches kids self-defense and self-respect.

WE S ALDRIDGE

self-esteem and self-respect. Cristy Blanthorn, owner and practitioner, says her academy has more than 100 students ranging in ages from 3 to 57, and that her taekwondo lessons are as much about respect as they are physical fitness. “We focus a lot on respect and how to show respect,” Blanthorn says. “We try to teach true respect, the kind that comes from the heart. We teach a lot of virtues and values, and we also work closely with the school system to help students with their grades.” Now well into its third year, Powder River Academy is proudest of the impact it’s had on families in the area. “We have a lot of parents who join because their kids pressure them into it,” Blanthorn says. “It’s fun to watch them because they seem to be the ones that wind up enjoying it the most. ADVENTURE FOR SALE Whether it’s the long-anticipated hunt with a group of buddies, an extended family camping trip or just a stay at a working Western ranch, the Wyoming Outfitters and Guides Association is dedicated to making its patrons’ trips memorable. “What we offer,” says Marion Scott, a longtime member of WYOGA, “is a fully guided and equipped service. We handle all the lodging, meals, equipment and guides. It’s the total package.” Scott and his wife, Mary, and their children own and operate the P Cross Bar Ranch, cattle ranch, hunting and outfitting operation of more than 200,000 acres. The P Cross Bar Ranch is one of more than 125 members of the WYOGA. The organization does more than just promote specific areas of the tourist industry – it’s also at the front of such important issues as protection of hunting and fishing rights, use of our public lands, access to big game and trophy game licenses by nonresident sportsmen, and predator management. “People come from literally all over the world to enjoy our country,” Scott says, “and we want to make sure they get their money’s worth.” – Danny McKenzie GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

47


Campbell County School District has been ranked in the top 15% of school districts nationwide by SchoolMatch.

Te a c h i n g E f f e c t i v e l y L E A R N I N G S U C C E S S F U L LY

Contact us at: 307.682.5171 • ccsd.k12.wy.us


Business G I L L E T T E

C H A M B E R

R E P O R T

About the Business of Business Chamber adds new member incentives to long roster of services he Campbell County Chamber of Commerce is offering several new initiatives to fulfill its mission of helping member businesses succeed. Chief among the new offerings is a health insurance trust for members of the Campbell County and Sheridan chambers, according to Campbell County Chamber President Julie Simon. “The Health Care Trust Association is a self-insured program that our members will be able to join to help them with their health-care costs. Together with the Sheridan chamber, it will provide a larger pool to spread out the risk.” The program is scheduled to begin in June 2007. The chamber also recently launched a new Web site, which includes a community-wide calendar of events and offers members the convenience of registering online for chamber events. “The other thing we’ve really been working on is the launch of a new retail committee which is working on bringing businesses in, including possibly a mall,” Simon says. The committee is starting a “mystery shopper” program for service companies and retail stores, in which a supposed shopper visits to see what level of service is provided and gives feedback GILLETTE

to the owner. “We’re also working on a membership investment structure with packages to better cater to what our members really need from us,” Simon says. One of these tailored membership packages might focus on advertising to other members, while another might be more event-oriented and still others might provide more corporate VIP benefits, such as restaurant and golf deals for visitors. The packages are being phased in, and members will have an opportunity to provide feedback on them. Besides the new initiatives, the chamber remains a busy place due to the nature of Gillette’s booming economy. “We send out an enormous amount of relocation packets, and we have a lot of walk-in traffic and phone calls,” she says. “We’re looking at what other businesses we need because we have a lot of people looking to move here and they’re looking for things like malls, big-name stores and restaurants.” The closest mall is still about two hours away, which is nothing to people who are used to Wyoming’s vastness, but the city still needs to overcome some misperceptions. “We have changed so much since the

1970s and ’80s,” Simon says. “Our look has really changed. We have so much more community pride, and the people who lead our city have put forth a lot of effort in beautification. “And we have things a lot of communities our size don’t have, like a multi-events center we’re adding onto, our own symphony, traveling Broadway plays and a lot of high school sporting events. We’re a real familyoriented and volunteer-oriented city.” – Jim Elliott

WE S ALDRIDGE

T

Julie Simon, president of the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

49


Business G I L L E T T E

E C O N O M I C

BUSINESS CLIMATE

P R O F I L E



Campbell County’s economy is mineral-based, with more than 25 percent of jobs directly attributed to mining of coal and extraction of oil and gas. Ranching is also important in the rural county, which is transitioning toward a more diversified economy.

TAXES

TRANSPORTATION Airport Gillette-Campbell County Airport (307) 686-1042 Railroad Burlington Northern Santa Fe (800) 795-2673

Wyoming has received a “most favorable” ranking for business from the Washington, D.C.-based Tax Foundation, which ranks states for fair and equitable tax systems for all business sectors. Wyoming and Campbell County have no state income tax, corporate or individual, and low sales taxes. The county also has low property taxes.

HOUSEHOLD STATISTICS Number of households in county (2005) 13,541 Persons per household (2000)

Sales Tax 4% states sales/use tax 1% general purposes county optional tax .25% capital facilities tax (started October 2005) Property Tax Property tax is determined at 100% of assessed fair market value. 11.5% industrial property tax 9.5% personal property tax

INDUSTRY Industry Description

Number of Establishments

Accommodation and food services

82

Median household income (2005) $66,380

Administrative, support, waste management and remediation service

55

Per capita income (2003)

Arts, entertainment and recreation

13

2.73

$23,918

Educational services

LABOR FORCE Total labor force • 23,267 Employment • 22,807 Unemployed • 509 Unemployment Rate • 2.9%

4

Information

16

Other services (except public administration)

115

Professional, scientific and technical services

94

Real estate and rental leasing

41

Retail trade

187

Wholesale trade

85

Campbell County is known as the Energy Capital of the Nation because of its vast coal reserves, natural gas production and electric power plants. Its many open-pit coal mines produce 30 percent of the nation’s coal for generating electricity. GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

51


We’re Building the Future For Campbell County

Complete Design & Build Service The Cost-Effective Delivery System With A Guaranteed Price Serving Northeast Wyoming Since 1981

52

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

S&S

Builders, LLC Quality, Dependable Contracting

686.5659

GILLETTE


FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Deposits in Millions

ECONOMIC DRIVERS

Prairieview Subdivision 119 acres, industrial

Largely driven by natural resources, Campbell County’s economy continued to surge in 2005.

Interstate Industrial 90 acres, light industrial

First Interstate Bank of Commerce

$194.2

Bank of the West

$92.5

Wells Fargo Bank of Gillette

$38.9

Campco Federal Credit Union

$25.1

Security State Bank

$32

U.S. Bank

$12.2

First National Bank of Gillette

$185.9

(June 2003)

INDUSTRIAL PARKS Campbell County has 16 industrial parks. The largest parks and their zoning: Energy Park 330 acres, heavy and light industrial, commercial Gillette Tech Center 180 acres, office or light industrial Southern Drive Park 109 acres, industrial 4-J Business Park 5.5 acres, office and industrial Mohan Subdivision 122 acres, industrial

Hay Creek Subdivision 66 acres, light industrial and commercial Gillette Business Park 50 acres, heavy and light industrial Wright Industrial 24 acres, heavy industrial

AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE Accommodations

$226

Administrative

$562

Agriculture

$737

Arts, entertainment

$186

Construction

$868

Finance

$940

Government

$686

Health care

$1,074

Information

$567

Manufacturing

$1,053

Mining

$1,275

Other services

$684

Real estate

$546

Retail

$474

Transportation

$698

Utilities

$1,355

Wholesale

$1,194

Average weekly wage

$898

MAJOR EMPLOYERS Company Campbell County School District

Type of Business

Employees

Education

1,453

Powder River Coal Co.

Coal mining

1,084

Rio Tinto Energy America

Coal mining

1,032

Campbell County Memorial Hospital

Medical

603

Thunder Basin Coal Co.

Coal mining

590

Campbell County

Government

538

Foundation Coal

Coal mining

491

GILLETTE

Coal Coal production in the calendar year 2006 for Campbell County’s operating surface coal mines was 430 million tons, an increase of 40 million tons over the year 2005. The average unit value or price per ton nearly tripled to more than $18 per ton and was the 14th consecutive year of production increases. Oil and Coalbed Methane Crude oil prices hit record highs in the summer of 2005, surging more than $70 per barrel several times. In line with this are record-breaking gasoline prices. Like crude oil, for most years between 1969 and 2005, Wyoming’s natural gas production did not move with gas prices. Only from 2000 to 2004 (except 2002), did the gas production level move in the same direction as the price. Unlike crude oil, Wyoming’s natural gas production has steadily increased over the last 28 years. In 1976, production for Wyoming was 336,833 MMcf (million cubic feet). By 2004 it rose to 1.9 million MMcf. The production increase indicates that the focus of Wyoming’s oil and gas industry has shifted from crude oil to natural gas. Oil production in Campbell County continued to decline in fiscal year 2005, with a total of 8.3 million barrels pumped from local wells. Coalbed methane and gas production increased in 2005 to 456,391,388 thousand cubic feet, a 30 percent increase over 2004 production. (Source: Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission) Source: ccedc.net

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

53


Donald W. Parker M.D. Board Certified in Obstetrics & Gynecology Specializing in Complete Women’s Health Care • Pregnancy Care • Infertility • Urine Loss

WANTED GREAT EMPLOYEES

Part-time • Full-time • Temporary • Permanent

Let Adecco Help You Find Your Next Career 511 E. 4th St., Ste. 2 • Gillette • 307-686-1124

• Gynecology • Menopause • Outpatient Hysterectomy • Minimally Invasive Surgery and INTRODUCING 3D/4D Ultrasound

New Patients Welcome For an appointment, please call:

(307) 682-4664 1307 West Third Street Gillette, WY 82716 dr-parker.medem.com

54

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


HOUSING

three-bedroom home • $220,000

The Census Bureau estimates that total housing units saw an increase of 6.00 percent in Campbell County between 2000 and 2005, from 13,288 to 14,085. This compares to a 5.3 percent estimated increase statewide. Average apartment rent in Campbell County increased by 11.13 percent, from $584 in the second quarter of 2005 to $649 in the second quarter of 2006. Detached single-family home rents increased by 18.77 percent.

Rents for mobile homes on a lot increased by 27.60 percent, and rents for mobile-home lots increased by 10.83 percent. Campbell County rental prices have experienced average annualized increases of 4.72 percent for apartments, 3.66 percent for houses, 5.19 percent for mobile homes plus a lot, and 2.12

percent for mobile-home lots since the second quarter of 1987. These figures compare to state average annualized increases in rental prices of 3.40 percent for apartments, 3.79 percent for houses, 3.30 percent for mobile homes plus a lot and 2.33 percent for mobile-home lots. Source: Wyoming Department of Administration and Information, Economic Analysis Division

Home Prices Average price of a new

DISTANCE TO MAJOR CITIES Cheyenne

244 miles

Denver

344 miles

Salt Lake City

532 miles

Chicago

1,049 miles

Dallas

1,126 miles

Phoenix

1,262 miles

FOR MORE INFORMATION Campbell County Economic Development Corp. 201 W. Lakeway Road Ste. 1004 P.O. Box 3948 Gillette, WY 82717 Phone: (307) 686-2603, (800) 376-0848 ccedc.net

Helping you find your way home …

Northeast Wyoming Economic Development Coalition P.O. Box 3948 Gillette, WY 82717 Phone: (307) 686-2603, (800) 376-0848 newedc.net

Sources: ccedc.net; newedc.net; Labor Market Information, 4th quarter 2003; U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2002 Economic Census

GILLETTE

Here to Serve All Your Real Estate Needs 601 S. Gillette Ave. • Gillette, WY 82716 Office: 307-687-7070 • Toll-free: 877-899-7070 Fax: 307-687-7072 • gillettehometeam.com

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

55


WES ALDRIDGE

I M A G E gallery

Scenic prairie land

56

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM


BR IAN McCORD

Pronghorns on the plains

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

57


I M A G E gallery

58

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM


PHOTOGR APHY BY

Brian McCord

Devil’s Tower National Monument

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

59


I M A G E gallery

Country State of Mind by Linda Raynolds

60

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM


PHOTOGR APHY BY

Wes Aldridge

Durham Buffalo Ranch

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

61


ARTS/CULTURE

Have Theater, Will Travel T HI S COMMI T T ED COMMUNI T Y ORG ANI Z AT ION TA K E S T HE SHOW S ON T HE ROAD

W

hether it’s getting laughs for charities or puzzling the audience with a whodunit, the Gillette Community Theatre provides great entertainment all around town. “We do our shows in a variety of places,” says Phyllis Krogman, the group’s secretary. “We perform in school auditoriums, camps, Gillette’s multi-event center, the WPA building – wherever there’s space.” The group works with the area’s arts organizations, as well as Gillette’s arts council and several local charities, so there’s almost always something being planned or performed. Big events include a murder-mystery performance with the Gillette Community College, musicals and other shows at the CAMPLEX Heritage Center and at least one melodrama yearly. Yes, a melodrama. “It’s a show with your typical villain, hero, heroine,” Krogman says. “It involves booing, hissing and the throwing of popcorn. We do one for the entire month of July, every weekend, and it’s always sold out. The room we use at the WPA only holds about 65 people, so it’s an intimate setting. People really, really get into it – it’s a really good time.” Another of the troupe’s most popular offerings is the murder mystery, which it performs at least once a year. “I don’t know why it is, but people really seem to like those,” Krogman says. “They’re fun, as well, because it’s something that the audience gets to kind of join in on.” With around 80 active members, the theater has a strong

base of performers to pull from. That’s important when you’re trying to mount three or four shows a year, plus appearances at area fundraisers and other events. “We’re really lucky,” Krogman says. “We have people who are very good at costumes, and we call on them constantly. And we have people who are great at building sets. Our membership is terrific about getting involved, pitching in and doing their part. Going forward, Krogman says the Gillette Community Theatre will continue to perform whenever and wherever they can, but a permanent home would be nice. To that end, there’s a movement afoot to find and buy an appropriate building. “We have kind of a building drive going on now; a committee’s working on that,” she says. “We’ve identified a few properties, visited some of them, to start getting an idea of what’s out there and what we’re going to need. It’s a tough market here in that there’s not a lot of buildings available, but we’re going to keep at it.” But for now, if you’re in the mood to sing along at a musical, solve a whodunit or hurl popcorn at a mustache-twirling bad guy, look for the Gillette Community Theatre in, well, just about any open space in town. “We’re pretty liberal in terms of what we’ll do and where we’ll do it,” Krogman says. “If someone wants us to come in, and they’ve got room to put on a show, we’ll probably get in there and do something.” – Joe Morris

For these actors, performing with the Gillette Community Theatre troupe can be murder.

62

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


Gillette Is Smart About Art Locals benefit from this community’s colorful palette of arts offerings A D V O C AC Y F O R V I S UA L A R T S CO MMUNI T Y ART CENTER The Advocacy for Visual Arts Inc. is a nonprofit corporation dedicated to the promotion of the visual arts in the region by working in partnership with the community to support a place for inspiration, expression, and education. The center is home to a gallery featuring the work of local artists and hosts weekly arts classes for all ages, beginning with prekindergarten. avacenter.org P OW D E R R I V E R S Y M P H O N Y The symphony celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2007 and welcomes its new conductor Steven Trinkle. The symphony, which is funded and staffed by community volunteers,

TOU R A VID EO TION AND

performs several concerts during each season. The organization also sponsors a scholarship for local students. prs.vcn.com C A M - PL E X The CAM-PLEX multi-events facility includes a performing arts theatre, a convention center and an outdoor grandstand to host a series of staged events. The Heritage Center, a performing arts theatre, opened in 1989 and became one of the first in the nation to receive the designation of John F. Kennedy Center of the Performing Arts partner. Since then, the Heritage Center has played host to such performers and artists as Jay Leno, Harry Belefonte, Roy Clark, REO Speedwagon and Richard Marx. cam-plex.com

? C 7=;I

GES VISI T IMA

GILL ETTE

MUN MO RE COM .CO M FOR

LE OF GIL

MPBE TTE-CA

RMA ITY INFO

NT LL COU

M Y, W YO

TM

ING

WER THE POWER OF PO ry pads ust Energy ind tom line region’s bot

HIRING! WE’RE ment lures mp loy

M AYOR ’ S A R T CO UNC IL The Mayor’s Art Council, established in 2003 by the city of Gillette, oversees the city’s public art campaign. The goal is “to create a more visually pleasing environment and expand the opportunities for residents and visitors to experience quality works of art in public places.” Dubbed Avenues of Art, the program has seen the purchase or placement of more than 30 sculptures by regional and local artists. ci.gillette.wy.us/mac

Now there’s another way to read Images of Gillette-Campbell County magazine online!

Low une te and out both in-sta workers,

Appetit

e

for

Grow th sper as owners pro Resta ura nt pu lation booms po residential SPO NSO RED

C AMP BEL BY THE

Y L COU NT

CHA MBE

MER R OF COM

7 CE • 200

Use ActiveMagazine™ technology, to flip through the actual pages of Images on your computer screen. • Instantly link to advertisers’ Web sites • Quickly search for specific articles or topics • Save the magazine to your desktop for off-line reading

imagesgillette.com

GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

63


SPORTS/RECREAT ION

Gillette’s Goal-Oriented Kids CHILDREN GE T A BIG K ICK OUT OF CAMPBELL COUNT Y ’S HOCKE Y PROGR AM

I

f hockey becomes a high school sport in Gillette, the school will have plenty of talent to draw from. About 170 youths from age 5 and up participate in organized hockey programs offered for six months each year by the county and the Gillette Hockey Association. At least two boys have moved on to junior development programs in other states, and a few are playing college hockey at the Division II and III level. That’s not bad for a program just 12 years old but already bursting at the seams at the Campbell County Ice Arena in the old fairgrounds. Fortunately, a new regulation size rink will be available in 2008 at the CAM-PLEX multi-event center. “We’ll keep using the old facility, but the new rink will really open it up for us,” says Dave McCormick, director of the Campbell County Parks and Recreation Department that runs all recreation programs in Gillette. In addition to six age levels of hockey, the rink serves a figure skating club with about 35 members, hosts birthday parties and other events, and is open to public skating four times per week.

Forget baseball, hockey is the favored pastime for kids in Campbell County.

64

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


Once a week, a group of 10 or so adults also gathers for some informal drop-in hockey. Indoor refrigerated rinks are the only option in Gillette, where winter temperatures can fluctuate wildly from below zero to above 50 degrees, McCormick says. Although there have been discussions about making hockey a high school sport in Wyoming, the vast distances between communities has kept that from happening. Hockey can also be expensive because of all the equipment needed, so two years ago the private Gillette Hockey Association asked the county to take over the two youngest levels, for kids aged 5 to 8. “That has broadened the base we can draw from because it has made hockey really affordable,” says Chad Hooker, president of the association and parent of a 9-year-old player in the Squirt division. The county can provide free equipment and charge just $100 for the entire year, compared to $240 for the association. The expenditure is well worth it, Hooker says. “It’s a great activity. Kids can get good exercise, fun and recreation, along with a little competition,” he says. “It’s a fast-paced and amazing sport and helps these kids with their balance and agility, and hand-eye coordination that they are able to apply to any other sport they want to do.” – Jim Elliott

SERVING WYOMING

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE LOWEST RATES IN THE AREA! FREE AND QUICK PRE-APPROVALS ON: Residential Mortgages • Refinancing • Home Improvement Loans New Construction Loans • Investment Properties VA Loans • FHA Loans Call us about no money down financing! LOCAL: 307-685-3414 or TOLL-FREE: 877-685-3414 TREVOR MATSON Manager, Loan Officer

801 E. 4th St., Ste. 14 • Gillette, WY 82716 Fax: 307-685-4391 • trevor@brmwy.com • brmwy.com

TITLE INSURANCE • COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

G illette

PHOTOS BY WES ALDRIDGE

TITLE SERVICES, INC.

GILLETTE

Cheryl A. Ernst • Crystal L. Terry • Margaret E. Suedekum Experienced • Locally Owned & Operated 511 E. 4th St., Ste. 1 • Gillette, WY 82716 (307) 686-7278 • Fax: (307) 686-7493

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

65


Women’s Healthcare

David A. Beck, M.D. Board Certified

Adult & Children’s Art Classes Art & Cultural Events Art Exhibitions Gift Shop

Business Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. avacenter.org 509 W. 2nd St. • P.O. Box 7145 • 307.682.9133

Angela Biggs, M.D. Board Certified

Toby Marshall, M.D. Board Certified Mon.-Thu.: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. • Fri: 9 a.m.-Noon Pregnancy Care Annual Pap Exams Urinary Incontinence Birth Control PMS Therapy Infertility Pelvic Pain 3-D Ultrasound Outpatient Hysterectomy and Minimally Invasive Surgery Experienced in Outpatient Vaginal Tape Procedure for Incontinence High Success Rates with Roller-Ball Endometrial-Ablation Technique

FOR APPOINTMENTS, PLEASE CALL:

307-682-2233 1402 W. FOURTH ST. • GILLETTE, WY 82716

66

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

Knecht Home Center provides all product services for residential and commercial construction. Our outside sales staff provides complete take off and pricing of materials for residential and commercial building projects. Complete drafting and blueprint service is available. The retail store provides all products for residential and commercial construction, plumbing, electrical, hardware, tools, paint, bath fixtures and several lines of cabinets.

KNECHT HOME CENTER OF GILLETTE, LLC 110 West LakeWay Gillette, WY 82718 307-687-7978 • 307-687-7641 FAX knechthc.com

GILLETTE


WE S ALDRIDGE

EDUCAT ION

The Kiddy Country Club and Montessori School plans to feature an observatory, a computer lab and a Challenger Center.

A Smart Start to Child Care P A R E N T S T R A D E B A R N E Y F O R D AY C A R E , M O N T E S S O R I S C H O O L F O R B R A I N - B U I L D I N G

S

ara Maisel had worked in day-care centers for years, but ironically, when it was time to enroll her own children, ages 2 and 3, she discovered finding quality care was more difficult than she imagined. Lucky for Maisel, she didn’t have to look long – or far. The Kiddy Country Club and Montessori School, for which Maisel serves as executive director, opens in Dec. 07/Jan. 08. “Most [other day-care centers] have adults sitting there and watching children,” Maisel says. “We’re looking for people willing to get up and do activities with the children. We have time set aside every day to do art and dance activities. We want to get children involved so they’re not just being babysat.” The Kiddy Country Club and Montessori School can instruct about 200 children, and plenty of spots are available for children ages six months to 6 years, Maisel says. Anthony Ciocchetti Jr., who’s creating and building the day care and school at 470 S. Highway 50, says the center plans to operate 24 hours a day, based on the need of Gillette parents. “The average family has two to three kids in Gillette,” he says. “We’re going to try to keep the costs down for the parents as well, and get subsidies and grants to cover the difference. So it will be user-friendly for all parents.” Ciocchetti got the idea after learning that the community lacked a day care that provides instruction for toddlers and preschoolers. GILLETTE

The 21,000-square-foot center and school will include an observatory with telescopes, a computer room and a nurse’s office. Children also will eat yummy but nutritious meals prepared by a dietician, “so each little kid gets the right meal,” he says. Ciocchetti says he’s thrilled with the reception by the community. “There’s been tremendous support,” he says. “It’s going to be a beautiful center.” Ciocchetti says he’s planning to build a second center by Gillette’s CAM-PLEX, a 1,000-acre spread that includes a fine arts theater, convention hall and rodeo grounds. The second day care and school will include a Challenger Center, which will have an astronaut space assimilator booth. “We’re going to put it in so kids can fly a space machine,” he says. Ciocchetti plans to break ground on the second day-care center and school in summer 2008. Maisel says the Kiddy Country Club and Montessori School will make sure children are learning through fun activities. “We want to make the center so children are comfortable playing with each other,” she says. “We schedule time where there is never any time that adults are just sitting there and watching them.” – Cristal Cody IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

67


Big Horn Pediatrics, P.C. Infants • Children • Adolescents David R. Fall, M.D., F.A.A.P. Julie S. Fall, M.D., F.A.A.P. Jennifer M. Peterson, M.D., F.A.A.P. Janette Yardley, PA-C

New Patients Welcome!

OFFICE HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Available 24 hours for emergencies

687.1300 1308 W. 4th St. • Gillette

Providing Comprehensive Vision Care with the Latest Technology Offering Honest, Caring, Personalized Service

R.L. Mills, O.D. | R.L. Jordan, O.D., F.A.A.O. | D.M. McDermott, O.D. | J.C. Maycock, O.D.

Eye Exams for All Ages

Lasik Co-Management

Vision Therapy

Visual Training

Contact Lens Fittings

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-6 p.m.

Emergency Eye Problems

609 4-J Court | Gillette, WY 82716 | 307.682.2020 | Fax: 307.682.5656

68

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


HEALTH/WELLNESS

Keeping Cancer at Bay NE W T R E AT MEN T S AND T ECHNOLOG Y HELP C ANCER CEN T ER PROLONG L I V E S

N

WE S ALDRIDGE

ot so long ago, cancer patients in the Gillette region faced two obstacles – sparse local treatment options and an uncertain outcome in terms of managing their disease. Now, with advances in technology and a full, comprehensive cancer treatment center at Campbell County Memorial Hospital, those obstacles are close to being removed. “This is an exciting time to be involved in cancer care,” says Anne Raga, manager of cancer care and clinical outpatient services at The Cancer Center at CCMH. “With all the changes in the way we treat people and having the center here, our patients have a lot more options.” As recently as the early 1990s, area patients had to make do with visiting

Campbell County Memorial Hospital

Why an outpatient service in Gillette?

Quality Services | Private Atmosphere | Cost Effective Care

A sister’s promise couldn’t save Suzy Komen from breast cancer. But one day it might save you.

NORTH EAST WYOMING SURGERY CENTER Outpatient Surgery for Men, Women and Children

In 1982, Nancy Brinker promised her dying sister, Suzy, she’d find a cure for breast cancer. That promise led to research and treatment innovations, education

Anesthesiology | Urology | Gynecology Gastro-Intestinal | General | Podiatry

and screening. Join the effort at www.komen.org or 1.800 I’M AWARE®. This space provided as a public service. ©2004, The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

GILLETTE

1307 W. Third St.

GILLETTE 307.686.8283 IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

69


TO FINANCE YOUR NEW HOME OR TO RE-FINANCE YOUR EXISTING HOME, WE’LL FIND THE HOME MORTGAGE THAT IS RIGHT FOR YOU.

Rhae Jean Magnuson Home Financing Direct Line 307-687-7400 E-mail: rhaejean@vcn.com Conventional • WCDA • FHA • VA Rural Development Loans Construction Loans • Pre-Qualification Same Day Approval

FREE checking & savings FREE debit & ATM cards FREE bill pay FREE Internet & telephone banking Overdraft protection (with approved credit)

2124 S. Douglas Hwy. • P.O. Box 489 Gillette, WY 82717-0489 307-686-8080 • Fax: 307-686-0890 24-Hour Banking: 866-411-8080 E-mail: ssbank@vcn.com Member FDIC

SECURITYSTATEBK.COM

70

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


HEALTH/WELLNESS oncologists, with some chemotherapy infusion offered at the hospital’s outpatient surgery area. As the need grew, hospital administrators decided to recruit an on-staff oncologist and then to start developing a center within the hospital that would be devoted to oncology. “Then in 2002, we developed a radiation oncology center to complement the medical oncology side and recruited a radiation oncologist,” Raga says. “We’ve also added a state-of-the-art linear accelerator and are upgrading to IMRT with that.” The Heptner Radiation Oncology Center has been so successful that a second medical oncologist is being recruited. Patients come not only from in and around Gillette, but as far away as Utah and California, Raga says. “We’re doing some really good things; our doctors are very progressive with their treatments,” she says. “We really have an outstanding facility for a community our size, and the high-quality cancer care we have to offer reaches our region and beyond.” Currently the center can perform infusions on eight patients at a time, with others who are hospitalized receiving inpatient chemotherapy. All of the nurses who administer chemotherapy are certified for the procedure, and more than half of them hold national certification from the Oncology Nursing Society as well. Looking to the future, Raga says that the center is likely to grow beyond its current expansion plans. Advances in treatment, plus the recognized need in the community, will see to that. “We’re developing plans right now to expand the medical oncology side,” she says. “We’ll probably double the space that we occupy. I think we’re going to continue to do more infusions, but with the changes in treatment people are staying alive longer. We’re seeing cancer treatment become more of a chronic therapy than the acute therapy it used to be, and that’s really exciting.” – Joe Morris

State-of-the-art health-care services attract patients from across the region. GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

71


Share Your CREDIT UNION With Friends

You know the benefits of being a credit union member. You’ve probably taken advantage of our low-cost loans, attractive dividends, plus protective insurance plans from the companies within the CUNA Mutual Insurance Group. BUT DO YOUR FRIENDS KNOW? Have you told them about the advantages of credit union membership? WHY NOT SPREAD THE WORD? Tell your friends, neighbors and co-workers. Share the rewards. www.campcofcu.com

902 East Third • Gillette, Wyo. 82716 • 682-6105

Membership Eligibility Required

101 Ranch Dr. • Wright, Wyo. 82732 • 464-0864


THIS SEC T ION IS SPONSORED BY CAMPCO FEDER AL CREDIT UNION

Gillette C O M M U N I T Y SNAPSHOT

P R O F I L E



Located in northeastern Wyoming, midway between the Black Hills and the Big Horn Mountains, Campbell County is nestled in the rolling plains of the Powder River Basin. The area is rich with history and Western tradition, including 1800s railroad expansion, pioneering homesteaders, and cattle and sheep ranching. Lakeview Elementary

682-7293

Little Powder Elementary 682-2725 Meadowlark Elementary 682-4740

CLIMATE

Paintbrush Elementary

686-1778

Average annual temperature • 57 F January average temperature • 31 F July average temperature • 85 F Average annual rainfall • 7.9 inches Average annual snowfall 64.7 inches

Pronghorn Elementary

682-1676

Rawhide Elementary

682-0774

Recluse Elementary

682-9612

Rozet Elementary

682-3133

Stocktrail Elementary

682-7289

Sunflower Elementary

686-0631

Wagonwheel Elementary 686-1060

EDUCATION Campbell County has the thirdlargest school district in Wyoming. The district serves more than 7,000 students. The student teacher ratio is 19.2-to-1. Elementary Schools (Gillette and Wright) Conestoga Elementary

Secondary (Gillette and Wright) Campbell County High School North Campus 682-7247 South Campus 687-7733 Sage Valley Junior High School

682-2225

Special Schools Northeast Wyoming Board of Cooperative Educational Services

682-0231

Heritage Christian School

686-1392

Higher Education Northern Wyoming Community College District – Gillette College 686-0254

2003 ACCRA COST OF LIVING INDEX Fresno, Calif.

115.6

Minneapolis, MN

111.0

Cheyenne

106.0

Denver

104.0

Albuquerque, NM

102.4

Spokane. WA

100.4

Twin Spruce Junior High School

682-3144

Salt Lake City, UT

99.8

Cottonwood Elementary 464-0584

Westwood High School

682-9809

Gillette

99.7

4-J School

682-3076

98.5

682-7291

Wright Junior-Senior High School

Phoenix

Hillcrest Elementary

464-0140

Dallas

96.8

686-2373

YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE. Every Step of the Way.

“Your Hometown Answer to Affordable Mortgages” Financing for: Manufactured Homes • Home Improvements • Refi nancing Land Packages • Purchasing Existing/New • 30/15 Fixed www.campcofcu.com

T h e a r e a c o d e f o r G i l l e t t e i s 3 0 7.

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

73


NUMBERS TO KNOW Building Codes Appeals Board 682-1970 County Sheriff 687-6160 Children’s Developmental Services 682-2392 Cooperative Extension Service 682-7281 Corrections Board 682-2440 County Fair 687-0200 Crime Stoppers 686-0400 Emergency Management Agency 686-7477 Health Department 682-7275 Human Resources/ Risk Management 687-6355 Information Technology Services 682-7860 Northeast Wyoming Economic Development Board 682-1366 Parks and Recreation 682-7050 Planning Commission 682-1970 Public Library (Gillette) 682-3223 Public Library (Wright) 464-0500 Public Works/Engineers’ Department 682-5319 Road and Bridge 682-4411 Senior Center 686-0804 Weed & Pest Board 682-4369

MEDIA Newspapers The News-Record, Gillette 682-9306 Casper Star-Tribune 266-0500, (800) 442-6916 Wyoming Business Report 638-3200 Radio and Television Basin Radio Network (KGWY-FM, KAML-FM, KIML-AM) 686-2242 Wyoming Public Radio 766-2439 K2 Television (ABC) 237-3711 Gillette Public Access (Channel 36) 686-5745 Keyhole Broadcasting (KOAL 103.9) 687-1003

T h e a r e a c o d e f o r G i l l e t t e i s 3 0 7.

Peregrine Leadership Institute WHAT DO THE PEREGRINE FALCON AND LEADERSHIP HAVE IN COMMON? The Peregrine Falcon is the premier champion of the skies and the fastest animal in the world. The Peregrine was threatened with extinction in the late 1960s. Once the threat was eliminated, the Peregrine Falcon recovered to the level where today, the species is no longer considered endangered. WE BELIEVE THAT LIKE THE PEREGRINE FALCON, LEADERSHIP COMPETENCY IS ALSO THREATENED UNLESS WE TAKE DIRECT MEASURES TO IMPROVE LEADERSHIP SKILLS, ABILITIES AND EFFECTIVENESS. We are the Peregrine Leadership Institute providing Leadership Development and Business Improvement through training and consulting!

Contact us at 307-685-1555 or visit us online at peregrineleadership.com.

Are your company’s leadership skills endangered?

P.O. Box 741 Gillette, WY 82717

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

75


Leadership Development • Coaching • Team Building Retreats • Training • Personal • Executive Coaching

Save Money. Smell the Flowers.

Leslie Flocchini, CPCC

7835 Hwy. 59 • Gillee, WY 82718 • 307.660.1271 • Fax: 307.464.1271 holisticcoachingcenter.com • leslie@holisticcoachingcenter.com

Looking for ways to save money on gas and help the environment? The EPA wants to share some smart driving tips that could give you more miles per gallon of gas and reduce air pollution. Tips like making sure your tires are properly inflated and replacing your air filter regularly. And where possible, accelerate and brake slowly. Be aware of your speed ... did you know that for every 5 miles you go over 65 mph, you’re spending about 20 cents more per gallon of gas? If you’re shopping for a new car, choose the cleanest, most efficient vehicle that meets your needs. If we each adopt just one of these tips, we’d get more miles for our money and it would be a little easier to smell the flowers. For more tips and to compare cleaner, more efficient vehicles, visit

www.epa.gov/greenvehicles.

76

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


UTILITIES City of Gillette Gillette Utilities • 686-5206 The city provides residents and businesses with electricity, water, sewer and trash pickup. Town of Wright Wright Utilities • 464-1666 The town provides water, sewer and trash pickup. Electricity Powder River Energy Corp. 682-8091 The company provides electricity to the county outside Gillette. Natural Gas Kinder Morgan Inc. (800) 563-0012 MGTC • 682-9710 Cable Bresnan Communications Gillette • 682-4303 Wright • (800) 788-9457

RECREATION Aquatic Center Warlow Drive 686-3757 Camelanes 1005 W. 2nd St. 682-4811 Campbell County Ice Arena 121 S. 4J Road 687-1555 Campbell County Recreation Center 1000 S. Douglas Highway 682-5470

T h e a r e a c o d e f o r G i l l e t t e i s 3 0 7.

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

77


LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR, STATE FARM IS THERE.® For Your Insurance and Financial Needs, See State Farm Agent:

Ida Snead, Agent Ida Snead Insurance Agency, Inc. 601 E. 4th St. 307-682-3481 Office located at the corner of 4th and Brooks

Toll-free: 877-682-3481 E-mail: ida.snead.ceva@ statefarm.com

At St. Jude Children·s Research Hospital, we can·t. LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR

STATE FARM IS THERE.®

Providing Insurance and Financial Service statefarm.com State Farm Insurance Companies Home Office: Bloomington, Illinois

78

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

That·s why we are working every day to find cures for lifethreatening diseases that strike children everywhere. Diseases like cancer, pediatric AIDS, and sickle cell. And we won·t stop until every child is cured and every disease is defeated.

Because we can·t imagine a world without children … can you? Call 1-800-996-4100 or log onto www.stjude.org to learn how you can help.

Finding cures. Saving children. GILLETTE


Foothills Theaters 650 N. Highway 14-16 682-6766 Frontier Lanes 5700 Highway 59 687-0261 Gillette Thunder Speedway Highway 51 682-7290 Keyhole State Park 45 miles east of Gillette 756-3596 Razor City Skateland 885 Hannum Road 682-3529 Roller Blade/Skateboard Park 1000 S. Douglas Highway 682-7050 Sky Hi Theater 2201 S. Douglas Highway 686-7144 Sport Zone 718 N. Highway 14-16 682-8989 In addition, 26 parks offer a variety of outdoor activities. Call the Parks Division at 686-5275 for more information.

T h e a r e a c o d e f o r G i l l e t t e i s 3 0 7.

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

79


Heating & Cooling

More than just your natural gas company Fireplaces & Inserts

Home Appliances

High-efficiency heating. Beautiful fireplaces & inserts. Variety of cooking & laundry appliances. Worry-free Customer Appliance Protection Plan. Sales, installation & repair services. Free estimates!

1-800-563-0012 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

Water Heaters

Proud to be part of the community

Growing Leaders with a Christian Worldview

“Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” ~ Proverbs 22:6

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre-K through 12th grade Brent Potthoff, Administrator 510 Wall Street Court • Gillette, WY 82718 Tel: 307-686-1392 • Fax: 307-682-6515 Visit our Web site: hcsgillette.org A Positive Investment for Your Child’s Future

Spanish Collection | E-mail | Internet Public Fax | Notary Services | Meeting Rooms

Gillette (307) 682-8581 • Fax: (307) 686-8406

80

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

2101 S. 4J Rd. Gillette, WY 82718 307.682.3223 tel 307.686.4009 fax

305 Wright Blvd. Wright, WY 82732 307.464.0500 tel 307.464.0502 fax

CCPLS.ORG GILLETTE


CAMPBELL COUNTY

Parks & Recreation

Healthy Lifestyles. Livable Communities. It Starts in Parks! • Pool/Waterslide • Racquetball/ Squash Courts • 1/10-Mile Indoor Track

• Cybex & Free Weights

• Basketball Courts

• 18-Hole Golf Course

• Locker Rooms

• 9-Hole Jr. Golf Course • Picnic Facilities • Cardio Room

• Indoor Ice Rink

From I-90 take exit 126 and go north 1/2 mile. 1000 Douglas Hwy. • Gillette, WY 82716 • 307.682.8527 or visit our facility in Wright: Wright Recreation Center • 307.464.0198

GOLF Bell Nob Golf Course 1316 Overdale 686-7069 Gillette Golf Course 1800 Country Club Rd. 682-4774 Haycreek Golf Course 1229 E. Elkhorn Dr., Wright 464-0747

questions

answers

FOR MORE INFORMATION Campbell County Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Center 314 S. Gillette Ave. Gillette, WY 82716 Phone: 682-3673 gillettechamber.com Seasonal Location: Visitor Center 1810 S. Douglas Highway #A Gillette, WY 82718 Phone: (800) 544-6136, 686-0040 gillettechamber.com Open May 1 through Oct. 31 M-F 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Sat. 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

©2002 American Cancer Society, Inc.

8 0 0 . A C S . 2 3 4 5 / c a n c e r. o r g Sources: gillettechamber.com, ccedc.net, newedc.net,

T h e a r e a c o d e f o r G i l l e t t e i s 3 0 7.

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

81


ANNUAL EVENTS

Mark Your Calendar for These Annual Events M AY 1, 8, 15, 22

RCM SPRING BARREL RACE CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 687-2017 4-6

WYOMING USTRC CHAMPIONSHIPS

11-12

5, 12, 19, 26

POWER SPORTS SHOW

RAZOR CITY RODEO SERIES

CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 660-2537

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-9872

12-13

7, 14, 21, 28

NORTH AMERICAN DOG AGILITY COUNCIL TRIALS

CAMPBELL COUNTY COWGIRLS/COWBOYS

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion (208) 863-4310

CAM-PLEX Barn 3 682-0552

4-6

12

WORLD-CLASS DEER DISPLAY & GUN SHOW

ROTARY BALL

CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 682-4668 7, 14, 21

ROBINSON BARREL RACING EVENT CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 682-4334 7-9

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-0971 8

RAZOR CITY RUMBLE DEMOLITION DERBY

CAM-PLEX Energy Hall 682-7262

CAM-PLEX Morningside Park 686-1171

31

8-10

CAMPBELL COUNTY COWGIRLS/COWBOYS CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-0971

JUNE

ENERGY CAPITAL OF THE NATION CAR SHOW CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 660-0988 8-10

CCSD ART GALA

2

CAM-PLEX Energy Hall 682-1676

4-H COUNTY SHOOT CAM-PLEX Barn 3

9

2-3, 16

AG AND NATURAL RESOURCE EXPO

4-H HORSE PROGRESS SHOW

9-10

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 682-1824

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-1704

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-1704

4-H ENERGY CLASSIC PROGRESS SHOW CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 682-1704

GREG EMENS

4-H HORSE CLINIC

The Ag and Natural Resource Expo plows into Gillette May 9.

82

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


16

14

9, 16, 23

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY RELAY FOR LIFE

LITTLE LEVI RODEO

CAMPBELL COUNTY COWGIRLS/COWBOYS

CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion & Plaza 682-8287

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-0912

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-0971

JULY 31-AUG. 6

23

WYOMING CELTIC FESTIVAL CAM-PLEX Park wyomingceltic@gmail.com15-

CAMPBELL COUNTY FAIR CAM-PLEX Facilities 687-0200

AU G U S T

23

17-18

JESUS LITTLE LEVI RODEO CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 686-4183 18

TRACTOR PULL

7, 14, 21, 28

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 685-1063

RAZOR CITY RODEO SERIES

HORSE POWER RODEO & CAR SHOW

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-9872

CAM-PLEX Morning Side Park 685-3141

23-30

NEWMAR INTERNATIONAL RALLY CAM-PLEX Facilities 682-0552

J U LY 3, 10, 17,24

RAZOR CITY RODEO SERIES CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-9872 4

CCPRD 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION CAM-PLEX Plaza 682-7406 5, 19, 26

CAMPBELL COUNTY COWGIRLS/COWBOYS CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-0971 7

4-H HORSE PROGRESS SHOW CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-1704 7-8

POWDER BASIN HORSE TRIALS Powder Basin Equestrian Park 686-1573

Stainless steel • Aluminum • Heavy wall carbon steel and alloy tubing Large diameter alloy bar • Forgings • Seamless carbon steel pipe Steel plate fabrication (rolling and bending) STEEL PLATE GRADES IN STOCK A633 GRC/API 2H50 (3/4”-4” thick) A36/AH36 (3/16”-3”) A514 (T-1) (1/4”-6”) A572 GR50 (1/2”-4”) AR400 (1/4”-2”) Chrome carbide overlay

IN-HOUSE CNC CUTTING Four oxy fuel torches One plasma cutter Can outsource any type of steel or metal product efficiently and cost effectively

NEW 6900-SQ.-FT. FACILITY

WE STAND ON SERVICE Superior Service • Knowledgeable Staff Expedited Deliveries • On-Call Service All quotes include freight either to our doorstep or job site. Call on Major Metal Service and let 18 years of experience work for you!

8-13

AMERICAN DAIRY GOAT ASSOCIATION NATIONAL SHOW CAM-PLEX Facilities 682-0552 GILLETTE

1110 Robertson Circle • Gillette, WY 82718 (307) 685-3301 • (888) 685-3301 • fax: (307) 685-3299 majormetalservice@collinscom.net

IMAGESGILLET TE.COM

83


ANNUAL EVENTS 20-23

4, 11, 18, 25

ROADTREK INTERNATIONAL CHAPTER RV RALLY

RAZOR CITY RODEO SERIES

CAM-PLEX Facilities 682-0552

CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 682-9872

24-26

6-9

WASATCH GUN SHOW

ACTRA TEAM ROPING

CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 466-7556

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 672-6201

24-26

8

COX PRODUCTIONS TEAM ROPING CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 682-9872 25

TRACTOR PULL CAM-PLEX Wrangler Arena 685-1063

SEPT EMBER 1-4

84

ACTRA FALL ROPING BANQUET AND DANCE CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 682-0333 19-23

NORTH AMERICAN DOG AGILITY COUNCIL CHAMPIONSHIPS CAM-PLEX East and Central Pavilions 682-0552

OC TOBER 6

PUMPKIN FESTIVAL CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 685-1231 11-14

NORTHWEST BARREL RACING – ASSOCIATION FINALS CAM-PLEX East Pavilion (605) 642-1940 13

CAM-PLEX GARAGE SALE – GILLETTE’S LARGEST INDOOR GARAGE SALE CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 682-0552 13-14

POWDER RIVER COLLECTOR’S SHOW CAM-PLEX Energy Hall 682-2579

WTRA CRUEL GIRL BARREL RACE

29

20

4-H HORSE CLINIC

4-H HORSE CLINIC

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 682-9872

CAM-PLEX Barn 3 682-1704

CAM-PLEX Barn 3 682-1704

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

GILLETTE


20-21

BASIN RADIO NETWORK OCTOBERFEST BUSINESS EXPO CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 685-5364 26-28

FLAT TRACK MOTORCYCLE RACES CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 660-4414 27

CHILI COOK-OFF CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 682-7277

The 4-H Horse Clinic gallops into town Oct. 20.

31

HARVEST FESTIVAL CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 682-3308

NOV E M BE R 2

CAMPBELL COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL EVENT Boss Lodge 682-3673 3

RCM BARREL RACE CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 687-2017 3

4-H HORSE CLINIC CAM-PLEX Barn 3 682-1704 11

BLIZZARD CLASSIC STOCK DOG TRIALS CAM-PLEX Barn 3 358-9448 16-18

WASATCH GUN SHOW CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 466-7556 16-18

RED HILLS PRODUCTIONS TEAM ROPING CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 685-2614 23-25

NRCA FINALS RODEO CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion, CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 283-3401 GILLETTE

IMAGESGILLET TE.COM

85


Visit Our Advertisers Adecco www.adeccousa.com

Holistic Coaching Center www.holisticcoachingcenter.com

Allstate Insurance www.allstate.com/susandoop

Home Team Associates www.gillettehometeam.com

Alltel www.alltel.com

Ida Snead Insurance

American National Bank www.anbbank.com

Kinder Morgan www.kindermorgan.com

AVA Community Art Center www.avacenter.org

Knecht Home Center www.knechthc.com

Big Horn Pediatrics, P.C.

L&H Industrial www.lnh.net

Black Hills Power www.blackhillscorp.com Blue Ribbon Mortgage www.blueribbonmortgage.com BW Insurance Agency, Inc. www.bankofthewest.com CAM-PLEX Multi-Event Facilities www.cam-plex.com Campbell County Memorial Hospital www.ccmh.net Campbell County Parks & Recreation www.ccprd.com

Lubnau & Bailey, PC Attorneys at Law www.etseq.com Major Metal Service North East Wyoming Surgery Center Pacific Steel & Recycling www.pacific-steel.com PCA Engineering, Inc. www.pcaengsur.com

Campbell County School District www.ccsd.k12.wy.us

Peregrine Leadership Institute www.peregrineleadership.com

Campbell County EDC www.gillettewyoming.com

Powder River Dental Associates www.powderriverdental.com

Campbell County Public Library www.ccpls.org

Powder River Energy Corporation www.precorp.coop

Campco Federal Credit Union www.campcofcu.com

Real Estate Associates www.wesellwy.com

Clarion Hotel www.wyhcc.com

Rio Tinto Energy America www.rtea.com

Contractors Supply, Inc. www.gillettecsi.com

S&S Builders, LLC

Department of Workforce Services www.wyomingworkforce.org

Security State Bank www.securitystatebk.com

Devon Energy Corporation www.devonenergy.com

SOS Staffing www.sosstaffing.com

Donald W. Parker, M.D. www.dr-parker.medem.com

Look, a tall purple rectangle!

Tucker’s Office World www.tuckersofficeworld.com

Edenfield Jewelers ERA Boardwalk Real Estate, Inc. www.eraboardwalk.com First National Bank of Gillette www.fnbgillette.com Gillette Optometric Clinic, PC www.visionsource-gilletteopto.com

86

University of Mary www.umary.edu Wells Fargo www.wellsfargo.com White-Davis Motors www.white-davis.com

Gillette Title Services, Inc.

WLC Engineering www.wlcwyo.com

Great Lakes Airlines www.flygreatlakes.com

Women’s Healthcare, P.C.

Heritage Christian School www.hcsgillette.org

Wyoming Machinery Company www.wyomingcat.com

IMAGESGILLETTE.COM

When you talk to your child you build vocabulary, so everyday moments become learning moments. For more tips, visit bornlearning.org

GILLETTE


ANNUAL EVENTS 24-27

30

12

FESTIVAL OF TREES

BUCKIN’ BALL CALCUTTA

BLACK CAT BALL

CAM-PLEX Energy Hall 688-1582

CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 686-6886

CAM-PLEX Energy Hall 688-1515

NOV. 30-DEC. 1

1

12

NEW LIFE WESLEYAN LADIES’ CRAFT SHOW

BUCKIN’ BALL RODEO & DANCE

BLIZZARD CLASSIC STOCK DOG TRIALS

CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 682-2816

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 686-6886

CAM-PLEX Barn 3 358-9448

JAN UA RY 20 08

DEC E M BE R 1, 8, 15

5-6

RCM BARREL RACING

COX PRODUCTIONS TEAM ROPING

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 687-2017 8

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 682-9872

18-20

EASTSIDE RV & BOAT SHOW CAM-PLEX Central Pavilion 686-1435

F EBRUA RY 20 08

BLIZZARD CLASSIC STOCK DOG TRIALS

6

2-3

ANNUAL BRIDAL SHOW & EXPO

CAM-PLEX Barn 3 358-9448

CAM-PLEX Energy Hall (605) 717-6900

COX PRODUCTIONS TEAM ROPING

15

12, 28

4-H HORSE CLINIC

RCM BARREL RACE

CAM-PLEX Barn 3 682-1704

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 687-2017

CAM-PLEX East Pavilion 682-9872

CH AMBER EV EN TS MIXERS The chamber’s evening networking program provides exposure for member businesses. These mixers offer great opportunities for chamber investors to meet new clients and prospective partners.

LUNCHEONS Luncheons include presentations of timely topics of general interest to the membership and offer additional networking opportunities.

RIBBON-CUTTING CEREMONIES Ribbon cutting ceremonies are a festive way to celebrate grand opening events, anniversaries, new product line and expansions. They also bring new and prospective customers to your business.

HOME SHOW This two-day event in March promotes the trades associated with construction, home decoration, remodeling, landscaping, and other home-related businesses. ANTONY BOSHIER

CAREER FAIR

The CAM-PLEX hosts the Blizzard Classic Stock Dog Trails Nov. 11. GILLETTE

The Career Fair is a hiring event and also an opportunity to network with other businesses and employment service agencies. IMAGESGILLET TE.COM

87


Campbell County’s REALTOR OF CHOICE

YOUR FULL-SERVICE COMPANY … Residential Commercial

ERA BOARDWALK REAL ESTATE, INC.

Income Producing Farm & Ranch New Construction Development Relocation Business Only

eraboardwalk.com 600 4-J Court Gillette, WY 82716 307-686-9200 E-mail: era@eraboardwalk.com

REAL ESTATE ISN’T JUST ABOUT PROPERTY … IT’S ABOUT PEOPLE.

Images Gillette-Campbell County, WY: 2007  

Founded in 1911, Campbell County is rich in minerals and in community commitment. Considered the energy capital of the west, coal and gas in...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you