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2007-08 | IMAGESEDMONTON.COM | VIDEO VIGNETTES TM

OF EDMONTON, ALBERTA

It’s Official: City Named Canada’s Cultural Capital HOME, SWIFT HOME Selling points for robust housing market include short commute times – everywhere

COSMOPOLITAN CAMPUSES Thousands of international students have enrolled here since the late 1990s

SPONSORED BY EDMONTON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION


2007-08 EDITION | VOLUME 2 TM

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IT’S OFFICIAL: CITY NAMED CANADA’S CULTURAL CAPITAL Edmonton won that designation for good reason: It is absolutely bursting at the seams with arts and culture.

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Short commutes are just one selling point in Edmonton’s robust housing market.

44 PARLEZ-VOUS FRANÇAIS? (OR GERMAN? OR CHINESE?)

HEAD FOR THE GREATER OUTDOORS

In the Edmonton Public Schools, students must study a foreign language for a minimum of six years.

There’s no place like Greater Edmonton for people who love recreation.

20 COSMOPOLITAN CAMPUSES

47 IT’S ALL DOWNHILL FROM HERE Olympic gold medalist Jennifer Heil will try to repeat at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

Thousands of international students are enrolled in Edmonton’s array of colleges and universities.

24 SEIZING OPPORTUNITIES Edmonton’s high per capita disposable income and low taxes attract thousands of newcomers each year.

HOME, SWIFT HOME

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NEW NAME, FRESH FACE When it opens in 2009, the Art Gallery of Alberta will be an artistic creation itself.

ON THE COVER Alberta Legislature Building Photo by Jeffrey S. Otto

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ACTION! ADVENTURE! “IT KEPT ME ON THE EDGE OF MY LAPTOP!”

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EDMONTON BUSINESS 34 Rolling Out the Red Carpet As the area’s economy continues to boom, the city and local businesses are extending a warm welcome to incoming workers.

36 Biz Briefs 38 Economic Profile

34 D E PA R TM E NT S 8

Almanac: a colourful sampling of Edmonton culture

29 Portfolio: people, places and events that help define Edmonton

40 Image Gallery 49 Health & Wellness 52 Community Profile: facts, stats and

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ONLINE CONTENTS More lists, links and tips for newcomers OF EDMONTON MANAGING EDITOR MAURICE FLIESS COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, SUSAN CHAPPELL, KIM MADLOM ANITA WADHWANI ASSISTANT EDITOR REBECCA DENTON STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN, JESSICA MOZO DIRECTORIES EDITORS AMANDA KING, KRISTY WISE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS PAM GEORGE, ANNE GILLEM, JOHN M CBRYDE, VALERIE PASCOE ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER TODD POTTER SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR SARA SARTIN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS WES ALDRIDGE, ANTONY BOSHIER, MICHAEL W. BUNCH, IAN CURCIO, BRIAN M CCORD PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT JESSY YANCEY CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR SHAWN DANIEL PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS ASST. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR HAZEL RISNER SENIOR PRODUCTION PROJECT MGR. TADARA SMITH PRODUCTION PROJECT MGRS. MELISSA HOOVER, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER LINDA MOREIRAS GRAPHIC DESIGN JESSICA BRAGONIER, CANDICE HULSEY, DEREK MURRAY, AMY NELSON WEB DESIGN RYAN DUNLAP WEB PRODUCTION JILL TOWNSEND DIGITAL ASSET MANAGER ALISON HUNTER COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN CORY MITCHELL AD TRAFFIC SARAH MILLER, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./PRODUCTION & OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING SYBIL STEWART EXECUTIVE EDITOR TEREE CARUTHERS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA M CFARLAND, LISA OWENS, JACKIE YATES RECRUITING DIRECTOR SUZY WALDRIP DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH IT SYSTEMS DIRECTOR MATT LOCKE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR NICOLE WILLIAMS CLIENT & SALES SERVICES MANAGER/ CUSTOM MAGAZINES PATTI CORNELIUS

Images of Edmonton is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through Edmonton Economic Development Corp. and its partners. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Edmonton Economic Development Corp. 3rd Floor, World Trade Centre, 9990 Jasper Ave. Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5J 1P7 (780) 424-9191 • Fax: (780) 426-0535 E-mail: info@edmonton.com www.edmonton.com VISIT IMAGES OF EDMONTON ONLINE AT IMAGESEDMONTON.COM ©Copyright 2007 Journal Communications Inc. 361 Mallory Station Road, Ste. 102, Franklin, TN 37067 (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

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Member Edmonton Economic Development Corp.

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MOVING PICTURES Take a video tour of Edmonton at imagesedmonton.com.

GET SMART ABOUT LOCAL SCHOOLS Find listings and links to schools, colleges and universities.

SEE HOW THE GARDENS GROW Get the dirt on growing seasons, soils and common challenges.

WHAT DO THE LOCALS EAT? Discover what makes cuisine in Alberta so deliciously different.

NO PLACE LIKE HOME Search for a new home, plus get moving tips and more at www.mls.ca.

A B O U T TH I S M AGA Z I N E Images of Edmonton is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is sponsored by Edmonton Economic Development Corp. In print and online, Images gives readers a taste of what makes Edmonton tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts.

“Find the good – and praise it.” – Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

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Room to Vroom The plane truth is that City Centre Airport has hosted a big-time car race every July since 2005. The Rexall Grand Prix of Edmonton draws about 50,000 race fans to the airport grounds to witness top Formula One drivers compete in the Champ Car Series. Those drivers include Paul Tracy, Roberto Moreno and Bruno Junqueira. The temporary road course track measures 3.15 kilometres (1.97 miles). More than 80 per cent of the track can be seen from anywhere in the stands, and speeds on the straightaway can exceed 320 km/h. Besides the Champ Car event, the three-day speed fest features races in the Atlantic Championship division and the NASCAR Canadian Tire Series. PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN J. GAVRILOFF

Life After Dark Old Strathcona exudes energy every day – and night – of the week. The thriving entertainment district, near the University of Alberta, features nearly 40 bars, lounges and live-music venues. Among them are the Yardbird Café that is celebrating 50 years of jazz, and the Cook County Saloon that has been voted Canada’s best nightclub 10 times. Old Strathcona also includes a number of locally owned shops and a farmers’ market. About 100 restaurants serve many different kinds of cuisine.

An ‘A’ for Access Tally ho. Airline passengers can fly nonstop any day from Edmonton to London Heathrow Airport. Air Canada began three-days-a-week service in October 2006 and expanded to daily flights in April 2007. Besides service to many locations within Canada, Edmonton International Airport also offers nonstop flights to the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Mexico and numerous U.S. cities including Chicago, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Salt Lake City, San Francisco and Seattle. The airport is undergoing a $200 million expansion to accommodate a projected 7.5 million passengers by 2015. Further proof that Edmonton is blessed with excellent transportation options is the fact that VIA Rail’s internationally renowned The Canadian travels six days a week east to Toronto and west to Vancouver. And for those who like the open road, Edmonton is situated on the Trans-Canada Yellowhead Highway.

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Almanac

Welcome to Edmonton Edmonton is proud of its many visitor sites – and that includes the Gateway Park Boulevard Visitor Information Centre. The centre received a 2007 RV West magazine Reader’s Choice Award, where readers submitted e-mails on what they liked best about North American “RV-ing.” Edmonton was chosen No. 1 in the category of favourite visitor information centre. The centre, at the entrance to Gateway Boulevard, recently passed a 20-year milestone, having opened in 1987. Approximately 1.7 million people have gone through its doors, and the staff has answered nearly 315,000 phone calls and mailed more than 135,000 information packets.

Edmonton | At A Glance POPULATION (2006 ESTIMATES) Edmonton: 730,372, Greater Edmonton: 1,034,945 LOCATION Edmonton is in central Alberta, with British Columbia and the Rocky Mountains to the west, Saskatchewan to the east and the U.S. state of Montana to the south. BEGINNINGS In 1795, Fort Edmonton was established as a major trading post for the Hudson’s Bay Co. Edmonton, named after a town in England, was incorporated as a city in 1904 and became Alberta’s capital in 1905.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION Edmonton Economic Development Corp. 3rd Floor, World Trade Centre 9990 Jasper Ave. Edmonton, AB, Canada T5J 1P7 (780) 424-9191 or, in North America, (800) 661-6965 Fax: (780) 426-0535 www.edmonton.com

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Newfoundland and Labrador

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Quebec

Manitoba

Prince Edward Island Saskatchewan

Ontario

Nova Scotia

New Brunswick

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Almanac

SEE MORE ONLINE | For more about Canada’s Festival City, visit imagesedmonton.com/06.

A Perfect Place To Party

Fast Facts

Mark your calendar for VisualEyez – as well as the Accordion Extravaganza, A Taste of Edmonton, and on and on. Edmonton is known as Canada’s Festival City, for good reason. It hosts more than 30 themed events each year, with art, theatre, music, dance, sports, film and food celebrations. They include everything from the Canadian Finals Rodeo and the International Fringe Theatre Festival (pictured), to the River City Shakespeare Festival and Capital Ex (formerly Klondike Days). Most festivals occur during the summer, but there are also winter events such as Silver Skate Fest and Ice on Whyte.

Q More than 50 ethnic groups are represented in Greater Edmonton, with nearly 500 various places of worship.

Sidewalk Globetrotting Have you purchased an authentic Ukrainian matrioshka nesting doll lately? Avenue of Nations is an area just northwest of downtown Edmonton that features shops, restaurants and services representing many different nationalities. The shops and restaurants reflect the cultures of countries and regions that include China, Greece, Italy, Japan, Latin zAmerica, Poland, Ukraine and Vietnam. Avenue of Nations is located along 107th Avenue from 95th Street to 116th Street. Nearby are several ethnic neighbourhoods, including Chinatown.

Move Over, Hollywood Patrick Swayze, Tim Curry, Carmen Electra and Chris Kattan acted up in Edmonton during 2007. The four actors were in town for Christmas in Wonderland, a motion picture filmed at West Edmonton Mall that is scheduled for release in late 2007 or early 2008. The mall was chosen because it is widely recognized as the world’s largest and brands itself as “The Greatest Indoor Show on Earth.” The city has hosted several major film productions in recent times, including The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford starring Brad Pitt. The Edmonton Film Commission receives a steady flow of inquiries from movie companies interested in the city’s scenic settings and availability of professional film production crews.

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Q West Edmonton Mall, billed as the world’s largest entertainment and shopping centre and Alberta’s No. 1 tourist attraction, covers the equivalent of 48 city blocks. Q Edmonton is a global leader in recycling. Eightyeight per cent of households recycle, sending more than 48,500 tonnes of material to recycling centres in 2006. Q Nate Gartke, 13, of Spruce Grove, finished in second place at the 2007 Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C. About 10 million youngsters ages 1015 competed in the event, and the Greater Edmonton resident won $12,500 (U.S.) for being the contest’s runner-up. Q Edmonton’s Muttart Conservatory has floral displays of the jungle, desert and temperate forest within glass pyramids. SEE MORE ONLINE | For more Fast Facts about Edmonton, visit imagesedmonton.com.

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It’s Official: City

Canada’s Cul EDMONTON LEADS THE NATION IN ARTS AND CULTURAL

The acoustically acclaimed Francis Winspear Centre for Music in the heart of downtown is the home of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra.

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tural Capital OFFERINGS

STORY BY JESSICA MOZO PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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hen Edmonton was designated a Cultural Capital of Canada by the Canadian government in December 2006, the whole world learned something Edmonton citizens have understood for ages: This city is bursting at the seams with arts and culture. “All of us who partake of the arts have known how strong and vibrant our culture and arts are in Edmonton, and now everyone else is seeing Edmonton has something very special,” says Linda Huffman, executive producer of the Edmonton Cultural Capital Project. “There’s incredible depth within our cultural activities. Our theaters are respected around the world, our festivals

have a terrific profile, and Edmonton is an excellent place for artists to live because they feel appreciated and valued here.” The federal government created the Cultural Capitals of Canada program in 2002 to recognize and support municipalities that demonstrate support for arts, culture and heritage. The Cultural Capital designation is awarded to cities with a population of more than 125,000 that have compiled a solid record of achievement and demonstrated the ability to build a legacy for arts and culture. Past recipients include Toronto and Vancouver. Cities vying for the title also must submit plans for future arts- and culture-related projects. Along with the

The legendary Eartha Kitt is one of the guest artists who have performed with the symphony in the three-tiered, 1,716-seat Winspear Centre.

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Sculptor Ashevak Tunnillie’s work is among the pieces on display at Bearclaw Gallery, one of the 60-plus private galleries clustered in an arts district on Edmonton’s west side.

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Visitors are drawn to the exhibits in the Royal Alberta Museum’s Natural History Gallery. Among the intriguing geologic specimens displayed there is a naturally occurring concretion that is riddled with holes caused by erosion.

2007 Cultural Capital title, Edmonton received $2 million from the federal government (supplemented by $600,000 from the City of Edmonton) to fund six arts and culture projects outlined in its application. They include a Poetry Festival in September, a Symposia and Speakers Series, and a Nightworks community fireworks celebration on New Year’s Eve. “We hope to finish the bulk of our projects by early 2008,” Huffman says. It’s easy even for first-time visitors to see why Edmonton was proclaimed a Cultural Capital. The city has more live theatre per capita than any other large Canadian city, a gallery district west of downtown with more than 60 privately owned galleries, the Art Gallery of Alberta (see story, page 51), the Royal Alberta Museum and numerous performance venues. They include the Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, home of the Edmonton Opera, and the Francis Winspear Centre for Music, home of the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra as well as the Davis Concert Organ, the largest organ in Canada. “The Edmonton Symphony Orchestra E DMONTON

serves as a respected and popular provider of orchestral performances of all kinds,” says Dave Baker, communications and publications manager. “From classical masterpieces to its legendary collaborations with artists as diverse as Procol Harum, k.d. lang, Michael W. Smith and more, the ESO is this city’s orchestra.” Nearly all of the symphony’s 56 core musicians teach music in the community, from private lessons to professorships in the University of Alberta’s Department of Music. As individuals and as a group, the orchestra members play “a vital role in fostering a love of music and arts throughout the community,” Baker says. The Edmonton Arts Council also helps foster an appreciation for the arts. Comprised of Edmonton artists, the council was created to ensure that an arts voice is heard at all civic forums. “This enlightened initiative has brought a creative and colourful perspective to many aspects of civic government and community development,” says John Mahon, executive director of the Edmonton Arts Council. Mahon says Edmonton fully deserved

the Cultural Capital designation because “the plans and energy for a glorious cultural future are everywhere.” “I am a classical musician, and I love the sound of Edmonton’s fine coterie of classical musicians in the Winspear Centre, a fabulous concert hall. Edmonton is full of live theatre, and I know many of the playwrights, actors and directors. I wouldn’t miss the productions they bring us,” he says. “I read books by Edmonton writers, including nationally recognized authors and poets. And the summer festivals celebrating community, art and the long, light-filled days of a northern summer are priceless. But that’s just a start. … Have you ever seen the Ukrainian Shumka Dancers defy gravity?” Baker echoes that sentiment. “Edmonton boasts one of the most active festival seasons in North America,” he says. “Edmonton’s theatre community is thriving, and its musical life features enthusiastic audiences for every kind of music there is. Edmonton is justifiably proud of its reputation as a supporter of the arts.” For more information, visit www. edmontonculturalcapital.com. I M AG E S E D M O N T O N . C O M

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Head for

Designated pathways make it easy for cyclists and others to move around many parts of the city.

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Outdoors EDMONTONIANS ENJOY RECREATION RIGHT IN THEIR OWN BACKYARD

STORY BY ANNE GILLEM PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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ith endless recreational opportunities to enjoy in the magnificent North Saskatchewan River Valley and elsewhere, there’s no place like Greater Edmonton for people who love the great outdoors. Being active comes naturally to local residents, whether they enjoy hiking, walking, running, biking, skiing, fishing, horseback riding, golf, tennis, hunting or just soaking in the spectacular surroundings. “I travel extensively in North America, and I can tell you Edmonton is blessed – the river valley is probably our best-kept secret and our most attractive thing about living here,” says John Stanton, who founded Running Room Ltd. here more than 20 years ago. Stanton says heading to the trails to walk or run is different in every season. “We have four distinct seasons in Edmonton: In the springtime, it’s an awakening with nature coming to life again; in the summer, it’s a way to

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Left: It’s a hop, skip and an occasional bump for 22-year-old cyclist Ray Juffermans as he navigates stepping stones near the Alberta Legislature Building. Inset: Downtown buildings provide a dramatic backdrop for the Victoria Golf Club & Driving Range in the North Saskatchewan River Valley.

Still Glorious, Still Popular, at Age 100 JASPER NATIONAL PARK DRAWS NEARLY 2 MILLION ANNUALLY

escape the heat …; in the fall, there’s the smell of leaves that can be very inspirational; and in the winter, skiers and runners share the trails. “The beauty is we can do this without having to travel a couple of hours. It’s right here,” says Stanton, an avid runner whose stores sell shoes and apparel across North America. Shelley Bindon, outdoors writer for the Edmonton Journal, agrees. Bindon, who returned to her native Edmonton after working several years in the United States, says there’s so much going on every weekend – bike races, running races, fishing contests, water-skiing competitions – she simply can’t cover it all. And those are just the organized events. “Edmonton is incredible,” she says. “We’ve got the North Saskatchewan River that comes direct from the glaciers in the Rocky Mountains. It’s a gorgeous river. Because of the geography of the area, we’ve got these incredible ravines and the river valley.” When Edmonton was beginning to grow, city leaders decided to not develop

the river valley for anything other than recreation, Bindon says. As a result, its 7,400 hectares (about 18,200 acres) represent the largest stretch of urban parkland in North America, including 22 major parks and more than 150 kilometres (93 miles) of trails. For golfers, the region offers more than 70 courses. Farther afield, but still easily accessible, are Elk Island National Park, which is home to 40 species of mammals, Strathcona Wilderness Centre, Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreational Area, Devonian Botanic Garden, and Kalyna Country ecomuseum. Worldfamous Jasper National Park (see story at right) is just a few hours away by car. “I love the idea that you can drive 20 minutes and be in the wilderness,” says Erica Thomas, chair of the Edmonton Regional Tourism Group. “You get away from the city life, and you get into nature. You drive 20 minutes in any direction and you’re outside of the rush of the city, and I just love that. It helps people gain perspective on what’s really important.”

Relaxing at a tranquil lake in William Hawrelak Park is another way to enjoy Edmonton’s 7,400 hectares (18,200 acres) of open space in the river valley.

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appy 100th birthday, Jasper National Park! On Sept. 14, 1907, 13,000 square kilometres of land were set aside as Jasper Forest Park. When Canada’s National Park Act became law in 1930, the name was changed to Jasper National Park, with 10,878 square kilometres (about 4,200 square miles) of protected beauty. Now, as then, this national treasure, which showcases the breathtaking Rocky Mountains and valleys, clear skies, and abundant wildlife, draws tourists and locals alike. The park, with nearly 2 million visitors annually, is within several hours’ drive of Edmonton. The town of Jasper, with a population of 4,700 that swells to 20,000 to 25,000 in summer, lies within the park. “People who love the outdoors just love Jasper,” says Helen Kelleher-Empey, general manager of Jasper Tourism & Commerce, who emigrated from Ireland and has lived in Jasper since 1992. “We have a lot of return visitors once people come here and find out about the lakes, the hiking, the back-country trails, the mountain climbing, rock climbing and canoeing. “Our brand is ‘Jasper. Wonderful. By Nature,’ because Jasper is surrounded by the rugged peaks, the beautiful trees, the animals. “But because we live in Jasper National Park,” KelleherEmpey adds, “our town print never gets any bigger. We’re just unique.”

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COSMOP

Grant MacEwan College’s student body includes about 600 people from 52 countries around the world.

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Campuses EDMONTON ATTRACTS THOUSANDS OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS – AND MANY STAY HERE AS VALUED EMPLOYEES

STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN

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nna Kuranicheva arrived in Edmonton from Ukraine in 1998, ready to study anthropology on the master’s level at the University of Alberta. She graduated in 2002 and today is employed in Edmonton as a program liaison for foreign-trained professionals at the Bredin Institute-Centre for Learning. She primarily works with international medical graduates who are trying to establish their medical practice in Canada. Kuranicheva is one of thousands of international students who have enrolled in Edmonton’s increasingly cosmopolitan colleges and universities since the late 1990s. Today, the University of Alberta is home to about 2,300 international students, while NorQuest College, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology and Grant MacEwan College have roughly 4,000, 1,000 and 600, respectively. That means of the nearly 150,000 students enrolled in Edmonton’s 10 institutions of higher education, well over five per cent are from countries other than Canada. The past 10 years here have been an exciting adventure for Kuranicheva, and her life got even more exciting on May 30, 2007, when she became a Canadian citizen. “The swearing-in ceremony is a special moment, and I am

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Anna Kuranicheva came to Edmonton from Ukraine for graduate studies at the University of Alberta. She stayed on to work at the Bredin Institute-Centre for Learning.

proud to be a citizen and resident of Canada,” she says. “I will stay in Edmonton because it is the right size for me, since I come from a big urban city in the Ukraine. I also like the colder winter temperatures because I enjoy downhill skiing, cross country skiing and ice skating. I have a Nordic spirit in me.” Her success story and those of many other foreign-born students resonate well at colleges and universities across the

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PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

JEFFREY S. OTTO

Left: More than 4,000 immigrant students attend NorQuest College in Edmonton, roughly 60 percent of enrollment. Below left: About 2,300 international students make the U of A their academic home.

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city – and at companies that are recruiting well-educated people to fill job openings. “Our college is actively engaged in recruiting international students, and we target a lot of our efforts toward China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Mexico and Latin America,” says David McLeod, director of international education at Grant MacEwan College. “We currently have 600 students enrolled from 52 different countries, and we welcome every one of them. International students bring new and challenging perspectives to the classroom, and they enliven the academic climate.” McLeod says international students also are determined to achieve their educational goals in a foreign country. And perhaps most importantly, many of these students ultimately will fill jobs within Edmonton’s booming economy. “It’s a fact that there is a labour shortage in Edmonton, and our students can help fill that void,” he says. “Employers need employees, and many of those trained workers can be found in the international pool of student graduates that is increasing more and more throughout Edmonton.” NorQuest College, which welcomes more than 4,000 immigrant students each year, has a teaching situation that is different from those at other institutions of higher learning in Edmonton. “We provide education to adult immigrants, with the average age of those adults being in their mid-30s,” says Anna DeLuca, dean of language training and adult literacy at NorQuest College. “We have students who might arrive here with little education from war-torn countries, or highly skilled immigrants who can easily transition into a professional workplace. At NorQuest College, 60 per cent of our students were born outside of Canada.” DeLuca says a student at NorQuest might simply take one course like English as a second language, or a full load of classes that eventually will connect a student to a highly technical and well-paying career. “A student might need a certificate or two-year diploma program, or simply a short intervention like a communications course that will help them successfully integrate into the Canadian workplace,” she says. “On that note, we also offer intercultural training to leading Edmonton businesses to assist them in developing effective communication strategies to successfully manage a multicultural workforce. Our goal is to train immigrants so that they can adjust to the Canadian workforce. We want them to become contributing citizens to the overall well-being of this country.” SEE MORE ONLINE | For more about higher education in Edmonton, visit imagesedmonton.com/06.

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Canada Reaches Out to Job Seekers IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT ADMINISTERS PROGRAMS THAT ALLOW INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS TO WORK DURING COLLEGE AND AFTERWARD

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administers allow these students to work while in school as well as following graduation, with certain stipulations. “If a foreign student wants to work at a job on campus while in school, they don’t need a work permit at all from our federal department,” Gurlock says. “They can do anything, from flipping burgers at a campus mall to working in a computer lab. But any other situation needs to be approved by Citizenship and Immigration Canada.” Those situations include obtaining a permit to work at a part-time job off campus. Such a permit allows international students to work up to 20 hours a week and then full-time during summer months and winter break. “The other program that we offer is that once a student

graduates, he or she can obtain a permit to work in a job in Canada for two years, as long as the job is related to the course of studies,” Gurlock says. “After that time, they have the option to apply for permanent residence.” A work permit costs $150 per student and can be obtained by mail through Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Students usually receive the permit within 12 calendar days. “Foreign students need to apply for a social insurance number to work in Canada, and they must also initially enter the country with enough money to live and pay their bills while they are studying,” Gurlock says. “Working simply helps them earn extra money and gain Canadian work experience.” For more information, visit www.cic.gc.ca.

JEFFREY S. OTTO

ore than 250,000 permanent immigrants arrive in Canada each year, with a majority of them going to the country’s three biggest cities – Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. Edmonton wants more of those immigrants. “Edmonton has huge labour shortages due to its booming economy,” says Randy Gurlock, area director for Citizenship and Immigration Canada in Edmonton, Northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories. “A big goal in Edmonton is to have foreign students enroll in a college or university here, then graduate and get a work permit to remain in this community.” Citizenship and Immigration Canada is a federal department that oversees work opportunities for international students. Programs the department

Immigration official Randy Gurlock says former students can seek permanent residence when work permits expire.

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A summer sunrise casts an inviting glow on downtown Edmonton and the North Saskatchewan River.

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Seizing Opportunities WELL-PAYING JOBS, HIGH QUALITY OF LIFE ENTICE WORKERS TO EDMONTON STORY BY VALERIE PASCOE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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s a welding instructor in Germany, Karsten Czulay provided a good life for his family, but he often craved a change of scenery and better long-term employment prospects. So he jumped at the opportunity when a former student, who worked for one of the world’s leading manufacturers of heavy equipment attachments and cranes for the mining and forestry industry, offered him a position in Edmonton. “When I visited Edmonton for the first time in December 2005, it was

Karsten Czulay says the hot job market in Edmonton lured him and his family from Germany.

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obvious that the economy was very strong here because so many people were hiring,” Czulay says. “I made the move in March 2006, and my family followed three months later. It’s a decision we are glad we made.” Since relocating to the area, the Czulays have enjoyed Edmonton’s 2,300 hours of annual sunlight by snowboarding and skiing during the winter, biking during the summer, and visiting attractions such as the Old Strathcona Farmers’ Market. They’ve also made a variety of friends. “Canada is such a multicultural place, and in Edmonton we have met people from all over the world, including Germany,” Czulay says. “For my children, the opportunity to learn a new language has been priceless. That is something they will always take with them in life.” With a per-capita disposable income that is 10 per cent higher than the national average and the lowest personal

tax burden in Canada, including low municipal property taxes and no provincial sales tax, Edmonton attracts thousands of newcomers like the Czulay family each year. According to Myron Borys, vice president of economic development for Edmonton Economic Development Corp., the area’s booming economy remains strong as a growing number of companies continue to invest locally. “There aren’t many other areas in the world where you can say that you have $130 billion in announced projects under way over the next 10 years,” Borys says. “Northern Alberta has one of the most exciting economies in the world right now.” He also points to Edmonton’s acclaimed health-care system, awardwinning schools, abundance of housing options and short daily commutes as factors contributing to the area’s superior quality of life. (See story at right.) Mary Pat Barry, the city’s branch

manager for corporate communications, says Edmonton’s big-city cultural offerings combined with its smalltown relaxed attitude are helping draw young professionals in search of a comfortable lifestyle. “Edmonton is unique in that we still have a degree of small-town outlook, but at the same time we are shifting into the ‘big leagues’ in terms of Canadian cities of note,” Barry says. “We’re seeing more young families moving to Edmonton not just for the quality of life but also because future prospects are so bright. They can have more sooner here.”

SEE VIDEO ONLINE | Join Edmontonians as they shop for fresh produce, handmade crafts and other goods at the Old Strathcona Farmers’ Market. www.imagesedmonton.com.

Edmonton provides opportunities for people of different cultures to mingle, such as Old Strathcona Farmers’ Market.

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JEFFREY S. OTTO

Ride or walk? Some fortunate commuters here have the option of taking the light-rail line or the pathway below it.

Ahhhh – Home, Swift Home SHORT COMMUTES CAN BE SELLING POINTS IN THE HOUSING MARKET HERE

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ach day during his morning commute, Bob Vergidis pauses to get geared up for another busy day at work – but only briefly. He lives in a modern loft apartment, which was once warehouse space, just a block from his downtown Edmonton office. “For people looking to raise a family, Edmonton is a great place to be. With our home downtown, we enjoy close access to work, entertainment and the farmers’ market. It’s a great quality of life,” says Vergidis, who is president and chief executive officer of DevStudios, a global information technology education and consulting firm based here. Even with prices on the upswing, homes in Greater Edmonton remain more affordable than those in other Canadian major metropolitan areas and in many international cities. According to Richard Goatcher, a senior market analyst for the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corp., Edmonton’s once-undervalued real estate market now is keeping pace with the area’s rapidly growing economy. “I would say this is probably the hottest real estate market in North America right now because of all the capital investment tied to the oil sands and oil companies putting money into the region. Home

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prices are going up from where they were 10 years ago,” Goatcher says. “With so many people immigrating to the area, the rental market is also very tight. Finding a place to stay in advance is becoming a priority for those moving here.” Housing choices here include loft apartments such as the one Vergidis purchased, starter homes, rental units, older dwellings in leafy in-town neighbourhoods, modest dwellings in need of tender-loving care, suburban subdivisions, high-rise condos, multimillion-dollar mansions and outlying acreages. Stress-free commutes are common. CMHC, which is Canada’s national housing agency, provides a number of resources to help newcomers navigate the market. The organization offers the Newcomers Guide to Canadian Housing, a 52-page manual available online at www.cmhc.ca that provides detailed information on how to buy or rent a place to live. CMHC also publishes detailed housing market reports for Edmonton that are updated monthly. “There’s a lot of effort going on throughout the community to try to bring people into the province and make them feel at home,” Goatcher says. – Valerie Pascoe

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A.L.L. Stars Realty Ltd. (Since 1989)

The #1 Century 21 Office in Western Canada With numerous recognitions, our agents are among the top real estate professionals in the industry. Century 21 agents take pride in their level of professionalism and service, and understand that an increasingly educated and informed public deserves and expects only the highest degree of performance. Whether buying or selling a home, purchasing or investing in commercial property or looking for other real estate investment opportunities, our industry-leading team can provide you with the value-added service you deserve. For all your real estate needs, please contact one of our professional agents by visiting us at 312 Saddleback Rd., Edmonton, Alberta.

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Portfolio

The Centre of Attention ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVES FROM ACROSS CANADA EXPERIENCE SHAW AT ITS BEST

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f there’s a large convention in Edmonton, you can bet it’s happening at the Shaw Conference Centre. “The Shaw Conference Centre is the largest purpose-built convention facility in Alberta,” says Mike Fitzpatrick, general manager. “Our first priority is to make it possible for a convention planner to bring their event to Edmonton knowing that meeting space, exhibition halls, and food and beverage services are available as their program may require.” Situated on the rim of the North Saskatchewan River Valley and a fiveminute walk from the downtown entertainment district, the Shaw Conference Centre boasts award-winning architecture and world-champion chefs. And it keeps getting better. Many of the meeting rooms are freshly renovated with new ceilings, lighting, sound systems, and wall and floor finishes.

Shaw’s latest addition, Hall D, which opened in March 2006, offers unmatched views of the river valley. “The Canadian Society of Association Executives, which represents many of Canada’s national associations, experienced Hall D for their national meeting [in September 2006],” Fitzpatrick says. “The panoramic view was augmented with a spectacular fireworks display in the river valley as part of their gala dinner at the close of the convention. By all accounts, they left Edmonton with a very favourable impression of what is now possible for their events when they return to Edmonton.” Shaw Conference Centre also is making strides in environmental friendliness. It has implemented numerous measures for reducing power, water and natural gas usage as well as recycling waste. Centre officials

are seeking “Go Green” certification by the end of 2007. “Our clients and employees expect that a public facility will recycle, and they also expect to see some evidence of that,” Fitzpatrick says. “An added benefit is that reduced usage continues to result in reduced costs.”

Right: Edmonton’s Shaw Conference Centre can accommodate banquets, trade shows and other kinds of events. Top: The expansive glass of the building’s Hall D (centre right) affords spectacular views of the river valley.

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Portfolio

Grooming the Next Generation

JEFFREY S. OTTO

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Ian Howatt says the Next Gen Task Force is working to offer 18-to-40-yearolds new opportunities to become more engaged in Edmonton’s civic life.

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dmonton’s Next Gen Task Force is working to close the generation gap in the area’s workforce. Currently, people over age 40 manage many departments, boards and agencies in Edmonton. In the years ahead, members of today’s younger generation will be needed to fill key openings. “Next Gen was created in 2005, and it’s designed to support the attraction of the 18-to-40 age bracket,” says Ian Howatt, chair of the Next Gen Task Force communications committee. “Baby boomers are beginning to retire, and we’re losing (some) leaders in the 18-to40 age group. Instead, we want young people to establish roots in Edmonton.” The Next Gen Task Force was the brainchild of Mayor Stephen Mandel, who took office in 2004 with the realization that no city can thrive if its young talent seeks opportunity elsewhere. The task force struck a responsive chord with Edmontonians. “We had over 1,000 people interested,” Howatt says. “They participate in surveys we do, and we invite them to networking events.” The task force advisory committee meets monthly, and five subcommittees report to it. “We have a Wi-Fi group looking at putting free Wi-Fi in Edmonton and a special projects group looking at recommendations made by City Council,” Howatt says. “We have a special events group that puts on networking events. Networking is a key aspect of what we’re doing, and we’ve brought in famous guest speakers.” The City of Edmonton and the private sector have embraced the Next Gen Task Force and its initiatives. “We’ve had people come to us offering to host events,” he says. “People realize this is a real opportunity to market to the 18-to-40 age group. We want this group to have a voice in local culture and every aspect related to growth. We want them to feel engaged in the community and energize the city.” For more information, visit www.edmontonnextgen.ca. E DMONTON


Volunteering to work with kids is one option. Helping seniors is another.

The Win-Win of Volunteering

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ith more than 1,500 registered charities and 8,000 not-forprofit organizations in Edmonton, it’s no surprise that volunteering is a deep-seated tradition here. “We have a lot of festivals that rely on volunteers, and they always get a good response,” says Janice Bell, director of Volunteer Edmonton. Her organization has three main goals: to promote the value of volunteerism to the community, to advocate good standards of practice for volunteer involvement and to network with organizations that support volunteerism. “I believe volunteering is one of the pillars of a civil society,” Bell says. “Volunteers always tell you they get more than they give out of the experience. You get a feeling of doing good, but it’s not just about that – you also get new skills and gain new contacts.” Studies have shown that volunteering is good for the volunteer in other ways, too. According to Health Canada, it improves one’s well being by enhancing social support networks and improving employability, self-esteem and coping skills, among other benefits. “Volunteering helps you make connections, understand the needs of your community and not be isolated,” Bell says. “It’s a win-win situation all around.” With so many choices, finding a satisfying volunteer opportunity here is a snap. Greater Edmonton is home to large, well-known charities such as United Way and Big Brothers Big Sisters, and to small, lesser-known organizations such as the Seniors Volunteer Driving Network, through which people drive senior citizens to medical appointments and grocery shopping. “A lot of the smaller groups don’t have a paid staff and are completely run by volunteers,” Bell says. Visit www.volunteeredmonton. com for information on volunteer opportunities in the area.

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Portfolio

Trading for Success Among Women W

omen aspiring to work as tradespeople can get a foot in the door with the help of Women Building Futures in Edmonton. The not-for-profit organization, led by Executive Director JudyLynn Archer, works to help women build better lives and move toward prosperity by training them in areas such as construction, welding, ironwork, carpentry and automotive service. The program incorporates training, apprenticeships, mentoring and

career placement. Jenn Siegel graduated from WBF two years ago and then specialized in pipefitting. “You learn the basics about almost every trade, so you can figure out what you want to be,” she says. “It’s a great place to start and a great support network. You get a lot of hands-on training – we built a garden shed, laid tiles and shingles, and did some welding.” One could say a career in the trades

was in Siegel’s blood. “I was born and raised on a farm, so all I knew was hard work,” she says. “And both my brothers are electricians.” WBF applicants go through a vigorous screening process before being admitted to the program. “You have to have the drive and really be there because you want to be in the trades. It’s not an easy program,” Siegel says. “If you’re not serious about it, they won’t accept you because a boss wouldn’t accept you either.” Women Building Futures has helped more than 170 women enter jobs in Alberta’s construction trades. And whenever graduates need guidance, they know they can count on the organization. “Every time I need to talk, they’re there,” Siegel says. “It’s a support network. All the girls who were in my class are still very much in contact.” Siegel is on her way to completing a five-year apprenticeship in less than four years. Her goal is to eventually become an instructor at Women Building Futures. For more information about the organization and its various training and mentoring opportunities, visit www.womenbuildingfutures.com.

JudyLynn Archer leads Women Building Futures, which trains women for jobs in various trades.

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West Edmonton Mall’s 800-plus stores include some that line fashionable Europa Boulevard. Within its 570,000 square metres (5.4 million square feet) of space, the mall also contains such attractions as a gigantic wave pool, an amusement park with roller coasters, a skating rink and a saltwater lagoon.

Retail Revolution F

orget Paris and New York City – Edmonton may well be the greatest shopping destination on earth. The city is home to West Edmonton Mall, the world’s largest entertainment and shopping complex, as well as a plethora of more personal, intimate shopping areas such as Old Strathcona and 124th Street. “Edmonton offers so many choices for shopping,” says Sibeal McCourtBincoletto, chief executive officer of Retail Alberta. “Whether you are strolling through a large shopping centre, checking out the exclusive shops on Whyte Avenue or wandering through a farmers’ market, Edmonton is a great place to shop.” And it’s poised to become even greater. New stores and retail developments are following the influx of people into prosperous Greater Edmonton. West Edmonton Mall has added a number of big names to its lineup of 800-plus stores, including Swedenbased H&M clothing, Italian fashion luggage maker Mandarina Duck – its first location in North America – and France-based Sephora cosmetics. Southgate Centre is in the midst of a $108 million expansion that will add significant retail square footage to its E DMONTON

existing 130 stores. Other places in Edmonton are beneficiaries of retail growth, too. “The majority of activity is on the outskirts of the city where newly planned neighbourhoods are under way,” McCourt-Bincoletto says. “The most talked about new development is Windermere, one of the most exciting projects to come to Edmonton in some time.” Windermere bills itself as “a masterfully planned commercial and retail environment inspired by the great meeting places of the world.” Another notable new development is taking shape at 17th Street and Whitemud Drive. “It’s going to be a new home for Home Depot, Staples, Superstore and more national retail tenants,” McCourt-Bincoletto says. “South Edmonton Common, Ellerslie Road and Southwest Edmonton are also gearing up for more retail.” Vacancy rates in the retail market are continuing to drop, while rental rates and consumer spending are increasing. “The current vacancy of 3.62 per cent is at a historic low,” he says. “The city of Edmonton certainly has some areas in which there is no vacancy.” – Stories by Jessica Mozo I M AG E S E D M O N T O N . C O M

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Rolling out the Red

Carpet

INCOMING WORKERS RECEIVE WARM WELCOME FROM COMPANIES, SUPPORT FROM ORGANIZATIONS STORY BY VALERIE PASCOE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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he list of amenities at 7008 Roper Road, just southeast of downtown Edmonton, is impressive. However, the scenic 10-acre site’s 24-hour fitness centre, jogging trail, state-of-the-art game room and cafeteria run by a gourmet chef aren’t part of a posh new residential community. These are just a few of the benefits designed to draw the tech industry’s best and brightest workers to Intuit Canada’s headquarters in Edmonton. According to Jane Sillberg, the company’s director of human resources for Canada and the United Kingdom, the perk-laden work environment was one reason why the company was

Employee benefits at Intuit Canada’s Edmonton headquarters include exercise classes during lunch hour.

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Business | Edmonton

Chris Ferguson works out at the Intuit Canada fitness center, which is open around the clock. To attract and retain employees, the company also offers a jogging trail, game room and gourmet-style cafeteria at its headquarters.

selected as one of Canada’s 50 best employers and named the topranked technology company in Hewitt Associates’ annual study of the 50 Best Employers in Canada. “Our approach is to take care of the entire employee, and we do everything we can to help relocating workers adjust to the area,” says Sillberg, who relocated to Edmonton from London, Ontario, in 2006. “As someone who moved here recently, I can say that the city itself also offers a very welcoming atmosphere for newcomers.” As the area’s economy continues to boom, the city and the local business community are rolling out the red carpet for families and individuals attracted to Greater Edmonton. Employment growth in the region has skyrocketed, with the addition of nearly 25,000 jobs anticipated locally in 2007 and more than 400,000 new jobs expected in all of Alberta by 2015. “What we’re seeing are the good E DMONTON

effects of Edmonton’s economic boom trickling down to the employee level and benefiting individuals in the workplace,” says Karen Link, manager of Edmonton Workforce Connection. “Companies are not just competing from a salary standpoint, they’re also working hard to provide a very highquality work environment.” Edmonton Workforce Connection, a program of the Edmonton Economic Development Corp., collaborates with businesses, educational institutions, governments and other community stakeholders to develop initiatives to address the region’s labour needs. In 2006, EWC launched www. movetoedmonton.com, a comprehensive web portal that provides multilingual and interactive resources for potential newcomers to the area. “We’re looking to attract people from across Canada and around the world to Edmonton for the wide variety of career prospects and the quality of life here,”

Link says. In September 2007, EWC is teaming with the Edmonton Mennonite Centre for Newcomers to form the Edmonton Region Immigrant Employment Council, a multi-stakeholder organization that will further address the need for workers. Jim Gurnett, executive director of the Edmonton Mennonite Centre for Newcomers, says his organization already serves 10,000 people each year by providing settlement and integration support such as helping newcomers find housing and jobs. The centre also offers classes for immigrants to learn or improve English skills. “The best thing about immigration in Edmonton is there are a lot of people coming in with tremendous qualifications and skills who can add to the quality of life here,” Gurnett says. “We provide the information and resources they need to get here and get on with a good life.” I M AG E S E D M O N T O N . C O M

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Business | Biz Briefs

PHOTOS BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

Rig Skills SimuLynx, which provides new service-rig employees a virtual experience of the work they’ll be doing. “It’s very, very detailed,” says Kevin McNulty, a partner at Terris-Hill who oversees e-learning. “We used nine subject-matter experts over a period of two years doing task analysis and risk assessment.” SimuLynx is designed to help lessen the number of service rig accidents, as well as to cut down on turnover in the industry. “Anyone that’s looked at it has had nothing but positive things to say,” McNulty says.

Bison carpaccio is one of the entrees on the menu at downtown Edmonton’s Hardware Grill, acclaimed as one of the 100 best restaurants in Canada.

FOOD WITH FLAIR As fresh and delectable as the meals are, they’re not the only attraction at the Hardware Grill in downtown Edmonton. “The building itself is historic,” says Larry Stewart, owner and executive chef of the restaurant located in the refurbished Goodridge Block. “Just about everybody who eats here has a story, whether they bought their fishing license here or their dad bought them their first pair of skates.” Stewart and his wife, Melinda, opened the Hardware Grill in 1996 in what was once the W.W. Arcade hardware store. It features seasonally inspired Canadian Prairie cooking and includes a wine list of more than 700 selections. “It’s a very hands-on, artisan-style kitchen,” says Stewart, who was introduced to cooking growing up on a 36

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farm in Ontario. “We make everything in-house. We bake our own bread, smoke our own fish, make our own sausage. There isn’t anything we serve that we don’t make on the premises.” The restaurant has won eight consecutive Wine Spectator Awards of Excellence, seven consecutive listings in Anne Hardy’s Where to Eat in Canada, and inclusion in enRoute magazine’s list of the 100 best restaurants in Canada. THIS TRAINING IS RIGGED When it comes to being trained for working in the oil-service-rig industry, there’s nothing like the real thing. And that’s precisely the effect of a new program developed by Terris-Hill Productions Inc., a software training company in Edmonton Research Park. Terris-Hill spent two years and invested $3 million to create the computer training program known as

RECRUITING WITH A HUMMER To help address an increase in hiring needs, Finning Canada could have advertised in the newspaper or participated in a job fair. But “we wanted to do something different,” says Greg McNeill, director of human resources for the Edmonton company that sells, services and finances Caterpillar equipment. “We had to recruit a lot of people, so we created an image, a marketing plan, around the whole idea of recruiting for Finning.” The result may be coming to a location near you. Known as The Wanted Tour, it involves traveling to cities throughout Canada in an attention-grabbing H2 Hummer painted in camouflage. “It’s sort of a military thing,” McNeill says. “Our strategy was go to the people, not wait for them to come to us.” The program began in February 2006, and by the end of that year Finning had hired 1,016 new employees and received around 15,000 resumés. WASTE NOT, WANT NOT At Kitchen Partners Ltd., less is more. Since the Edmonton company adopted the “lean” process in its manufacturing and production, waste has been virtually eliminated. “It’s a pretty straightforward process, but it has yielded pretty substantial E DMONTON


rewards for us,” says Jeff Clark, president of Kitchen Partners. “[The lean process] looks at ways to eliminate waste from the system.” Perhaps the best result is the degree to which it engages the employees. “We have BIG (business improvement groups) meetings every month that are very meaningful,” Clark says. “Employees meet with their managers and basically identify opportunities to make it easier to get the job done. They’re quite enthusiastic about it.” Kitchen Partners, founded as Floron Foods in 1984, specializes in the food manufacturing and distribution business. It distributes products to Boston Pizza franchises in northern Alberta and is the exclusive manufacturer of meat sauce for all Boston Pizza franchises across Canada. THE REAL McCOY The way Jim Rakevich sees it, there is no secret formula to explain the success of McCoy Corp. The company’s president and chief executive officer says it’s fairly simple, actually. “We’ve been successful because of our commitment to satisfying our customers and meeting and exceeding their expectations,” says Rakevich, who has been in his current position since October 2002. “We help them make their businesses successful.” McCoy Corp. started as a blacksmith shop in 1914 in downtown Edmonton. Now with about 800 employees in Alberta and British Columbia, it provides products and services for trucks and trailers, manufactures trailers, and is involved in energy products and services. The company has experienced particularly impressive growth in the past few years, increasing revenue from $27 million in 2002 to nearly $150 million in 2006. McCoy was awarded Edmonton Economic Development Corp.’s 2007 Business Achievement Award for its commitment to best practices and its 90-plus years of business achievements. – John McBryde E DMONTON

Kitchen Partners Ltd. is the exclusive manufacturer of meat sauce and a distributor of other products for Boston Pizza franchises in Canada.

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Business | Economic Profile

EDMONTON BUSINESS CLIMATE Greater Edmonton is an economic powerhouse where businesses and careers thrive. Its sizzling growth is fed by the lowest cost of doing business and one of the hottest investment climates in Canada.

FACTS/STATISTICS Edmonton was ranked as the best Canadian city to do business by Canadian Business magazine in September 2006. As Alberta’s capital city, Edmonton is the focal point for a province with the strongest period of growth of any province in Canadian history. Its GDP exceeded average Canadian growth during eight of the past 10 years. Moreover, Alberta is poised to be one of the hottest economies for years to come. Edmonton was ranked as having the best economic potential in North America by Foreign Direct Investment magazine in April 2007. It is also the only Canadian city in the top-10 Cities of the Future ranking. The Edmonton service area has the second-largest oil reserves in the world – second only to those of Saudi Arabia.

Edmonton boasts a lot more than energy. The city has one of the most diverse economies among Canadian cities of comparable size. Edmonton reaps more than $1 billion in annual economic activity because of its strategic location for companies that support, supply and service the forest and wood-products industry. Edmonton is a hotbed of research and innovation, thanks to 10 universities and colleges, including the University of Alberta – one of the best-funded research universities in Canada. A strong entrepreneurial spirit has made Edmonton third in the country for small businesses.

Edmonton is debt free, enabling the city to allocate more spending on infrastructure – 2.5 times per capita more than the average of other provinces.

Edmonton is strategically located between one of the largest oil supplies and the world’s largest energy consumer – the United States. As the largest urban centre closest to the oil sands, it also serves as the transportation and logistics hub for the oil, gas and mining sector.

Business costs are the lowest of any city of its size in the North American Midwest and rated among the top 10 globally, according to the KPMG Competitive Alternatives Report for 2006.

Given its strategic location as the first major centre on the CN rail line from the Port of Prince Rupert, Edmonton is in a position to be a key transportation hub for the continent.

Edmonton has the lowest-cost class-A office space among

Edmontonians enjoy higher per capita incomes than the

More than $100 billion is expected to be invested in the region over the next decade.

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major Canadian cities. It also offers an ideal corporate tax structure, with no provincial sales tax, capital tax or payroll tax.

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national average, and above that of Canada’s largest city – Toronto.

HOUSING/REAL ESTATE Residents of Greater Edmonton have quality, affordable housing with a broad range of desirable neighbourhoods. Average home prices are among the lowest of any major Canadian city. Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corp. (CMHC) (780) 423-8700 www.cmhc.ca Multiple Listing System (MLS) www.mls.ca Edmonton Real Estate Board (780) 451-6666, www.ereb.com Landlord and Tenant Government Services Alberta www.gov.ab.ca/gs/ information/landlord

TRANSPORTATION Air Edmonton International Airport connects the region to the world, with daily nonstop flights to 10 key U.S. destinations and London’s Heathrow Airport. (780) 890-8382 www.edmontonairports.com Drive Shortest daily commute time of Canada’s largest cities. Public Transportation System The Edmonton Transit System offers more than 140 bus

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routes throughout the city. The 11-station light-rail transit (LRT) system stretches 12.7 kilometres from Clareview in the north through downtown south to the University of Alberta. (780) 496-1611 www.takeETS.com Local Streets City maps are available from www.edmonton.ca and the Edmonton Transit System.

www.edmonton.ca Province of Alberta (780) 310-0000 (toll-free within Canada) www.gov.ab.ca Canada 800 O-CANADA (780) 622-6232 www.canada.gc.ca

LICENSE & REGISTRY SERVICES

Pedway System An extensive system of pedways (above- and belowground) connects most major downtown buildings with the LRT. Taxi fare from the airport to the city centre is approximately $50.

Alberta’s motor vehicle license and registration system is privatized, with many vehicle registry offices available throughout Edmonton. Refer to the Yellow SuperPages under License & Registry Services for the nearest location.

LABOUR FORCE

TAXES

The labour pool consists of more than 610,000 people.

Alberta is the only province that does not impose a Provincial Sales Tax on top of the national Goods and Services Tax of 6%.

Taxis

Alberta has the highest net population in-migration in Canada. There is a positive and productive union/ management environment, with one of the best labour records and fewest workdays lost due to strikes.

GOVERNMENT City of Edmonton (780) 496-8200

WORKING IN EDMONTON Edmonton offers some of the best employment prospects in Canada in a variety of industry sectors because of its booming, sustainable economy. About 66,000 new jobs

DISTANCE TO OTHER CITIES

Calgary

294 kilometres (184 miles)

Jasper

362 kilometres (226 miles)

Banff

404 kilometres (252 miles)

Vancouver

1,159 kilometres (720 miles)

Seattle

1,263 kilometres (785 miles)

Salt Lake City

1,727 kilometres (1,073 miles)

Denver

2,057 kilometres (1,278 miles)

Minneapolis-St. Paul

2,037 kilometres (1,266 miles)

are expected to be created by 2010. To search for opportunities in Edmonton, visit www. movetoedmonton.com and check out the job banks.

SOCIAL INSURANCE NUMBER One of the requirements to work in Canada is a Social Insurance Number (SIN). This nine-digit number is used in the administration of government programs, to receive government benefits such as Employment Insurance or the Canada Pension Plan, and as identification. Apply for a card at Social Development Canada at www.sdc.gc.ca.

MAJOR PRIVATE EMPLOYERS PCL Construction Group, 5,400 employees Flint Field Services, 4,500 TELUS, 3,700 CN, 3,000 EPCOR Utilities Inc.*, 1,940 Alberta Treasury Branches*, 1,700 The Brick*, 1,500 Dell, 1,300 Finning, 1,000 * Headquartered in Edmonton

FOR MORE INFORMATION Edmonton Economic Development Corp. 3rd Floor World Trade Centre 9990 Jasper Ave. Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5J 1P7 Phone: (780) 424-9191 Toll-free: (800) 661-6965 www.edmonton.com www.movetoedmonton.com Source: www.edmonton.com

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Image Gallery

Alberta Legislature Building and grounds

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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Image Gallery

Cycling on the High Level Bridge

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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Parlez-vous Français? (Or German? Or Chinese?) IN EDMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS, THE ANSWER LIKELY IS ‘OUI’ OR ITS EQUIVALENT

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anguage classes are common offerings in most school districts. In the Edmonton Public Schools, for instance, students must study a foreign language for a minimum of six years. But educators here also have taken learning a language to another level, offering what Stuart Wachowicz, director of curriculum services, calls “the most comprehensive language plan in North America.” French Immersion is aptly named. Participating students are immersed in the French language between 70 percent and 100 percent of the school day, during which they learn subjects in French. Students can start in kindergarten and first grade, or they can enroll in the Late French Immersion program that begins in seventh grade. It is assumed that the students accepted into the program – and their parents – do not speak French. “By the time students are finished ninth grade, they are functionally bilingual,” Wachowicz says. Because the district is an international language testing center, it has

received a licence from the French Ministry of Education to conduct formal proficiency testing, and the diploma is recognized in 162 countries. Of the district’s 82,000 students, about 3,000 are in the French Immersion program. The district also offers bilingual programs. Up to 50 per cent of the school day involves courses studied in a target language, such as Arabic, German, Hebrew, Mandarin, Spanish, Ukrainian and American Sign Language. The Chinese language program, which encompasses about 2,000 students, is the best outside of China, Wachowicz says. As with the French Immersion program, students can take officially sanctioned international exams to determine their proficiency. The rewards of passing the tests are evident. Students taking the German exam, for instance, often qualify for four years of free university in Germany. “They’re quite competent; they do very well over there,” he says. Languages are selected based on public demand. “If a student wants a

language that we don’t provide and there is enough interest, we will make every effort to enable that program to exist,” he says. In the third language-study format, students can choose from courses in 10 languages. Because the district calibrates its program according to international standards, schools can easily identify students’ proficiency, whether they take six years of Spanish or are enrolled in the French Immersion program. “This is very attractive for business,” Wachowicz says. “Many industries that locate here can do business globally with our student population. It’s also attractive to people who come to Edmonton and want their child to receive an education at a high international standard.” – Pam George

SEE MORE ONLINE | For more about innovative programs of Edmonton Public Schools, visit imagesedmonton.com/06.

Stewart Wachowicz says Edmonton’s schools offer “the most comprehensive language plan in North America.”

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Education

Artistic Endeavours Applauded at ‘Vic’ EDMONTON SCHOOL NURTURES THE CREATIVE AND SCHOLASTIC MINDS ew would find it surprising that creative students want to attend the Victoria School of the Performing and Visual Arts. But the Edmonton school, affectionately nicknamed “Vic,” also holds strong appeal for students seeking rigorous academics. Consider that eighth-grader Nate Gartke placed second at the Scripps National Spelling Bee in June 2007 in Washington, D.C. Vic, a K-12 school, owes part of its academic success to its participation in the International Baccalaureate program. “It’s a worldwide philosophy in teaching, a methodology in teaching – and in high school, it is curricular,” says John Beaton, the school’s principal. “You get the same curriculum, content and good-quality teaching anywhere in the world.” The IB program has special appeal for relocating families. “If a child moves from an IB school in Egypt to Edmonton, they will still have the same outstanding education,” Beaton says. Clearly, matriculating students also will enjoy the school’s strong performing and visual arts offerings. Spelling whiz Gartke, for instance, plays cello and bass guitar. The school has pioneered the concept of starting artsoriented programs as early as kindergarten. “It’s embedded in everything we do,” Beaton says. “I have physics teachers incorporating the performing and visual arts in physics class, and my dance teachers use physics in dance class. When you layer on the IB with it, it’s a rich program.” The majority of students select a specialty between

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grades seven and 12. Subjects include dance, new media and art. Or, they can remain in a general program. Courses range from ceramics and social studies to world

literature and tap. No matter whether a student chooses dance or acting, parents can rest assured that it will involve exercising mind as well as body. – Pam George

PHOTOS BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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Victoria School salutes eighth-grader and spelling whiz Nate Gartke.

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Celebrating diversity Building community

Catholic Social Services Serving and employing people of ALL faiths and cultures Providing service for ‘at risk’ children and youth

People on parole

Individuals with developmental disabilities

Immigrants and refugees

Men and women dealing with addictions

Men and women living with HIV/AIDS

Families in crisis

Seniors experiencing abuse or neglect

Be part of our world through volunteer or employment opportunities FOR

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MORE INFORMATION :

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(780) 432-1137 • www.catholicsocialservices.ab.ca

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Sports & Recreation

It’s All Downhill From Here GOLD MEDALIST JENNIFER HEIL PREPARES FOR THE VANCOUVER OLYMPICS IN 2010

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h, Canada: Get ready once again for Jennifer Heil. The Greater Edmonton native will be on the Canadian national team at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, competing in women’s freestyle moguls skiing. In fact, Heil will be the defending champion, having won the gold medal in the event at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy. Freestyle moguls features competitors on two skis who maneuver down a snow-packed, 250-metre straight course that is lined with large bumps and two large hills. Skiers speed over the bumps and then do freestyle twists and turns in the air after cresting the two hills. The sport debuted at the 1988 Winter Olympics, and in 2006 it earned the third-highest TV ratings of all events. “Moguls is an exciting sport that’s great for spectators because the course is short enough to see everything that takes place during an entire run,” Heil says. “The sport is scored 75 per cent by judges looking at the flips and twists on the jumps, and the other 25 per cent is the speed at which a competitor completes the course.” Besides being the defending Winter Olympics champion, Heil is a four-time women’s moguls World Cup winner as well as the reigning eight-time Canadian champion. By the narrowest of margins, she missed being the bronze medalist as a teenager at the 2002 games in Salt Lake City. “Representing Canada in Vancouver will be thrilling,” says Heil, who will be two months shy of her 27th birthday when the games commence on Feb. 12, 2010. “It will be my final Olympics, so winning a gold medal in my own country is my ultimate goal going into those games.” Cypress Mountain in West Vancouver will be the venue for all of the freestyle skiing and snowboarding events. Heil grew up in Spruce Grove outside of Edmonton but spent much of her free time as a teenager near downtown Edmonton, skiing on Connors Hill. “Connors Hill was actually a good

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spot to practice, so my sister and I would go there three times a week and all day on Saturdays,” she says. “I’ve always been into sports such as swimming, volleyball, badminton and gymnastics. But nowadays my entire focus is on training in moguls.” Heil also is studying for a business degree at McGill University in Montreal and trains for her sport there by waterskiing in warm-weather months. She skis on downhill slopes in Quebec City during the winter. “I have competed in many beautiful cities in Japan, Korea, Switzerland, France, Germany, Norway and Australia,

and traveling to vibrant cities has given me a perspective of how wonderful Edmonton is,” she says. “It is on par with all the other world-class cities I have been to.” Heil adds that some of her fondest Edmonton memories include being with her friends at West Edmonton Mall or on Whyte Avenue and attending some of the many festivals the city offers. “This is a fantastic community where people still take the time to say hello,” she says. “Wherever I travel, I am always proud to tell everyone that I am from Edmonton.” – Kevin Litwin

Freestyle mogul skier Jennifer Heil, who won the gold at the 2006 Olympic Games in Turin, Italy, is hoping home-country advantage will help her repeat.

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Health & Wellness

Tugging at the Heartstrings MAZANKOWSKI INSTITUTE WILL BRING WORLD-CLASS CARDIAC CARE TO REGION

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veryone is pumped up about Capital Health’s new Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute on the University of Alberta campus. Construction of the $200 million facility is scheduled to be completed in early 2008. The 18-storey structure – with the space of four football fields – is the product of a collaboration between Capital Health and the U of A. “The Heart Institute will be a centre for complex cardiac disease care, education and research,” says Dr. Arvind Koshal, director of development and external affairs for Manzankowski Alberta Health Institute. Koshal, who is also the chief of cardiovascular surgery for Capital Health in Edmonton, adds, “It will be one of the most technologically advanced heart institutes in North America and one of few equipped to accommodate both pediatric and adult heart patients. It is the first institute of its kind in Western Canada.” To see a world-class heart institute in

Edmonton has been a longtime dream of Koshal, who formerly worked at a similar facility in Ottawa. “Canada has two major heart institutes – in Ottawa and Montreal – and I thought it was time to establish one in Edmonton to serve all of western Canada and beyond,” he says. “There are many people who made this dream a reality, and the Heart Institute will serve everyone from pediatrics to the elderly. All cardiac services imaginable will be here under one roof.” The institute is named for Don Manzankowski, a retired member of Parliament from Alberta who also served as a cabinet minister and deputy prime minister. Another joint venture by Capital Health and the University of Alberta is the $909 million health facility called The Edmonton Clinic. It is scheduled to open in 2011 across from the Walter C. Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, with a mission to provide all medical services a patient might need – in one day.

“For example, if a patient is in need of clinical services, we will have a system in place to provide all diagnoses and treatments in one day so that the patient won’t need to make three or four different trips to the institute,” says Michele Lahey, Capital Health executive vice president. “The clinic will have the space and equipment to provide the absolute ultimate care and comfort to patients, which is what we are here for.” Lahey says both the Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute and The Edmonton Clinic will contribute to Edmonton’s emerging reputation as “Mayo North,” a reference to the storied Mayo Clinic in the United States. “We are committed to establishing Edmonton as Canada’s health capital, and calling us Mayo North is obviously a flattering reference,” she says. “Our job is to keep advancing and improving what we do in medicine, and continuing to provide services to patients literally before they are born and then throughout their entire lives.” – Kevin Litwin

Construction of the $200 million Manzankowski Alberta Heart Institute is nearing completion on the U of A campus.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF RANDALL STOUT ARCHITECTS

Arts & Culture

Randall Stout says his design (shown in a rendering) was inspired by the northern lights and Inuit stone sculptures.

New Name, Fresh Face EXPANDED AND IMPROVED ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA IS SCHEDULED TO OPEN IN 2009

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masterpiece is taking shape on Sir Winston Churchill Square in Edmonton. The Art Gallery of Alberta, scheduled to open in 2009, will be an artistic creation itself, as well as a showcase for works of noteworthy artists from around the world. The $88 million project is the result of 10 years of planning. It involves renovating, expanding and improving the 1968 structure housing the former Edmonton Art Gallery; establishing a temporary gallery to function during construction; and building a storage facility for AGA’s permanent collection. “We’ve been trying for years here – probably 10 years before I got here,” to determine the gallery’s future course, says Tony Luppino, executive director since 2003. “We had someone on the board who was an architect – who looked at the existing structure and looked at what would be possible for doing a

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major overhaul. “It’s almost like a new building,” Luppino says of the renovation and expansion program. “It’s such a drastic remodeling – we’re using the skeleton and foundation of the old building.” Architect Randall Stout of Los Angeles was selected in an international competition to design the new AGA. Stout has said he drew inspiration from the aurora borealis (northern lights) and Inuit stone sculptures called inukshuks. His design features expanses of glass and swooping curves of patinaed zinc and stainless steel. The new facility will add 27,000 square feet of public areas and new galleries for a total of nearly 84,000 square feet. In addition to streamlining traffic flow and improving current exhibition space, the project will have improved “backstage” features for moving temporary exhibits in and out. The gallery’s New Vision capital campaign had commitments totaling

close to $70 million as of May 2007 from the City of Edmonton, the Alberta government, the Canadian government and private partners. While construction is under way, AGA’s home is at Enterprise Square on Jasper Avenue, with 11,000 square feet of gallery space and classrooms. The Collection Services Facility, also located downtown, was completed in 2006 and features 18,000 square feet of museumquality, climate-controlled storage space, Luppino says. “We want a world-class building – and we want to remain connected to the community,” he adds. “We want to be a meeting place for the city, not just a static art museum. The project has kind of become a catalyst for re-evaluating architecture in Edmonton – what it means and how we go forward. “The city’s taken this to heart,” Luppino says. “Art is important, and architecture is important.” – Anne Gillem I M AG E S E D M O N T O N . C O M

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Community Profile

EDMONTON SNAPSHOT Greater Edmonton’s 23 municipalities provide a diversity of living options, from loft to acreage, all within a short commute. For a map of the region with links to each municipality, go to www.edmonton.com/region.

(800) 661-6490 www.lakelandc.ab.ca

EDUCATION Greater Edmonton boasts notable education systems. “Edmonton Public Schools is recognized as the bestmanaged and most innovative school board on the continent.” (Source: Time magazine, October 2003) Alberta Learning (780) 427-7219 www.learning.gov.ab.ca

NorQuest College (780) 644-6000 or (866) 534-7218 www.norquest.ca Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (780) 471-7400 or (800) 661-4077 www.nait.ca

Edmonton Catholic Schools (780) 441-6000 www.ecsd.net

Taylor University College and Seminary (780) 431-5200 www.taylor-edu.ca

Edmonton Public Schools (780) 429-8000 www.epsb.ca

University of Alberta (780) 492-3111 www.ualberta.ca

Higher Education

University of Lethbridge (780) 424-0425 www.uleth.ca

The University of Alberta is the top-ranked university in the province. The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology is Alberta’s largest technical school. Grant MacEwan College is Alberta’s largest college. Athabasca University (780) 421-8700 (800) 788-9041 www.athabascau.ca Concordia University College of Alberta (780) 479-8481 or (866) 479-5200 www.concordia.ab.ca

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Grant MacEwan College (780) 497-5040 or (888) 497-4622 www.gmcc.ab.ca

CLIMATE Edmonton is one of the sunniest cities in Canada and experiences four distinct seasons. Winter generally occurs from November to February. Summers are between mid-May and August, with up to 17 hours of daylight per day in June. Temperatures Average January high -7.3 C, 18.9 F

King’s University College (780) 465-3500 (800) 661-8582 www.kingsu.ca

Average January low -16 C, 3.2 F

Lakeland College (780) 416-8844

Average July low 12.1 C, 53.8 F

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Average July high 22.8 C, 73 F

Precipitation Annual rainfall 365.7 mm, 14.40 inches Annual snowfall 123.5 mm, 48.62 inches

MUNICIPALITIES Town of Beaumont Beaumont, located on a “beautiful hill,” maintains strong ties to its French heritage. Its expanding residential component provides a great selection of homes – for example, adjacent to a park or overlooking a golf course. www.town.beaumont.ab.ca Town of Bon Accord The translation of Bon Accord, “Happy to meet, sorry to part, happy to meet again,” reminds visitors and residents of the town’s Scottish roots. The town is set among a lush landscape that includes a wetlands conservation area. www.town.bonaccord.ab.ca Town of Bruderheim Bruderheim was first settled in 1894 by a colony of German Moravians. They organized the first congregation of the Moravian Church in western Canada, naming it Bruderheim – home of the brethen. www.bruderheim.ca Town of Calmar Calmar is built around Highway 39. The Main Street atmosphere is enhanced by antique lighting, flared curbs with park benches and trees, and quiet recreation areas. www.town.calmar.ab.ca

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Town of Devon

Town of Legal

Devon lies adjacent to the North Saskatchewan River and provides residents and visitors with ample parkland and numerous recreation/tourism opportunities. www.devon.ca

Legal offers fully serviced lots, which is a great incentive for young families wanting to own their own home and have peace of mind knowing they are raising their families in a safe, quiet, friendly community. www.town.legal.ab.ca

City of Edmonton Edmonton, the capital city of Alberta, is the largest city in central and northern Alberta. With more than 30 festivals a year, access to the best health care in the country and superb education, Edmonton offers a diverse and satisfying quality of life. www.edmonton.com City of Fort Saskatchewan Its 16,000+ residents enjoy safe, clean and friendly neighbourhoods on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. The city has spacious and well-maintained parks, with a 30-km trail system and excellent recreational/cultural facilities, including the Dow Centennial Centre. www.fortsask.ca

Town of Morinville Morinville is a vibrant suburban community, which has been carefully developed on the foundations of English, French and German heritage. With all the contemporary conveniences of a much larger town, it retains the spirit of a smaller community. www.town.morinville.ab.ca Village of New Sarepta New Sarepta is moments away from Joseph Lake, Centennial Park and Miquelon Lake Provincial Park. The community offers the peaceful setting of a park and picnic area. www.newsarepta.com

services, from big retail to unique independent businesses. www.sprucegrove.org City of St. Albert St. Albert has a reputation of being an attractive, familyoriented community where homes retain their value over time. The city celebrates its rich past while embracing its outstanding quality of life and welcoming the challenges of the future. www.stalbert.ca Town of Stony Plain Residents of Stony Plain enjoy modern recreational facilities, three school jurisdictions, an extensive trail system, arts and cultural amenities, and a vibrant, historic downtown core featuring 27 outdoor murals. www.stonyplain.com Strathcona County Strathcona County is a specialized municipality with both urban and rural lifestyles. Along with its the excellent quality of life and amazing recreational opportunities, Strathcona County has more than $15 billion worth of projected construction projects over the next five to seven years. www.strathconacounty.com

Town of Gibbons

Parkland County

Gibbons offers a beautiful natural setting along the Sturgeon River, with a selection of homes and amenities of a large city only minutes away. Its numerous community organizations provide activities for all age groups. www.gibbons.ca

Parkland County is a diverse and dynamic municipality, with amenities suited to every lifestyle. Numerous natural areas combined with exceptional recreation facilities make it a community of choice. www.parklandcounty.com

City of Leduc

Town of Redwater

Leduc is a vibrant and active community with modern residential developments complemented by playgrounds in attractive lake settings. It was named for a Roman Catholic priest. www.leduc-nisku.ab.ca

Visitors can view the equipment and activity of one of Canada’s largest oil fields. Redwater is a farming community first settled by Ukrainians, then the English and French. www.town.redwater.ab.ca

Family values here are pleasingly integrated with agriculture, commerce and industry. Sturgeon County, a vibrant community of nearly 19,000 residents, offers the lowest tax rates in the Alberta Capital Region. www.sturgeoncounty.ab.ca

City of Spruce Grove

Village of Thorsby

Friendly, affordable and full of green spaces that invite you outdoors, Spruce Grove is a fresh-air city 15 minutes west of Edmonton. Residents have access to a growing menu of commercial shops and

A large farming community surrounds Thorsby. Residents enjoy diverse recreational activities at the village’s extensive recreation complex. Rodeos, livestock shows and other events are held at the

Leduc County Leduc County, home to Edmonton International Airport, is a dynamic municipality. It provides the opportunity for acreage living in many of its subdivisions or a farm lifestyle. www.leduc-county.com

The area code for Edmonton is 780.

Sturgeon County

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Community Compass Inc. Providing personalized relocation support, including: • Introductions to the City • Temporary Accommodation • Pre and Post Arrival Support • Lifestyle/Community Tours • Community Selection • School Selection • Child Care • Elder Care • Spousal Employment • Detailed Information Packages • Objective Research • Meetings with Local Experts • Moving Logistics • Accommodation Rental Search

Helping Clients Discover Edmonton (780) 974-1429 inquiry@community compassinc.com www.community compassinc.com

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Community Profile Haymaker Centre. www.village.thorsby.ab.ca Village of Wabamun Wabamun, which translates to “looking glass” from Cree, is also the name of the local lake known for the recreational activities it offers, such as fishing, boating, water skiing, wind surfing and swimming. www.wabamun.ca Village of Warburg Warburg is a progressive community with a strong desire to grow with the times yet still retain its small-town atmosphere. Residents maintain communication with the German community of Warburg on the Rhine River. www.villageofwarburg.ab.ca

UTILITIES Electricity ATCO Electric (Direct Energy) (800) 668-2248 or (888) 420-3181 Electricity, Water and Drainage Services EPCOR, (780) 412-4000 Gas ATCO Gas (Direct Energy) (780) 424-5222 or (866) 420-3174 Phone, Internet and TV TELUS, (780) 310-2255 Shaw Cable Service (780) 490-3555

LIFESTYLE MoneySense magazine in 2006 ranked Edmonton as Canada’s second-most livable major city. The average price of a singlefamily residence in Edmonton as of July 2007 was $417,150, about 50% less than in Vancouver and 30% less than in Toronto and Calgary. Residents of Greater Edmonton enjoy low personal taxes, no provincial sales tax and high disposable incomes.

regulated child-care options are available to Albertans. These include day-care centres, drop-in centres, nursery schools and out-ofschool care. Contact Edmonton and Area Child and Family Services at (780) 427-2250 or visit www.edmontonandareacfsa. gov.ab.ca. Edmonton has independent, volunteer-based community leagues providing a number of social and recreational activities for all ages. Contact Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues at (780) 437-2913 or visit www.efcl.org. There are numerous municipally operated parks, recreational facilities and programs offering a range of recreational opportunities year-round. Contact City of Edmonton Community Services at (780) 496-4999 or

visit www.edmonton.ca. The North Saskatchewan River Valley, the longest stretch of urban parkland in North America, has more than 150 kilometres of trails designated for biking, hiking, jogging and cross country skiing. Edmonton is the gateway to Jasper National Park, the largest of Alberta’s worldfamous mountain parks.

HEALTH CARE Residents of Greater Edmonton enjoy excellent governmentfunded health care. www.health.gov.ab.ca/ahcip

Considering a move to Edmonton? www.movetoedmonton.com

Sources: www.edmonton.com www.edmontonchamber.com

Visit Our Advertisers A.L.L. Stars Realty Ltd. www.allstarsrealty.ca

Edmonton Oilers Hockey Club www.edmontonoilers.com

Canadian Western Bank Group www.cwbank.com

Edmonton Public Library www.epl.ca

Capital Health www.capitalhealth.ca Catholic Charities www.catholicsocialservices.ab.ca City of Fort Saskatchewan www.fortsask.ca City of Leduc www.leduc.ca City of Spruce Grove www.sprucegrove.org City of St. Albert www.stalbert.ca Colt Engineering www.colteng.com

Enbridge Pipelines, Inc. www.enbridge.com Grant MacEwan College www.macewan.ca Greater Edmonton Growth Team www.edmonton.com King’s University College www.kingsu.ca NAIT www.nait.ca NorQuest College www.norquest.ca

Community Compass Inc. www.communitycompassinc.com

Re/Max River City www.rivercityhomes.ca

Dell Edmonton www.dell.ca/edmonton

Royal LePage Noralta Real Estate www.royallepage.ca

Edmonton Economic Development Corp. www.edmonton.com/eedc

Spherion Staffing Solutions www.spherion.ca

Edmonton Eskimos Football Club www.esks.com

Stuart Olson Construction www.stuartolson.com

Edmonton International Airport www.edmontonairports.com

University of Alberta www.ualberta.ca

Numerous governmentThe area code for Edmonton is 780.

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Images Edmonton, AB Canada: 2007-08