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2009-10 | IMAGESDICKSON.COM ®

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DICKSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

I’d Rather Be Farming Agricultural roots run deep

SMOKIN’ GOOD BARBECUE Restaurants go whole hog

What’s s e Online Video of Montgomery Bell State Park

SLICE OF AMERICANA Roots-music festival takes center stage

SPONSORED BY THE DICKSON COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


1Wbg]T2WQYa]\ Offering Small Town Values and Outstanding Opportunities

CITY DEPARTMENTS

Don L. Weiss Jr., Mayor

www.cityofdickson.com Building Inspector/ Enforcement Officer Cemetery City Administrator Fire Department Mayor’s Office Municipal Court Parks & Recreation Police (Emergency 911) Police Department Public Works Recorder Business Licenses/ Tax Collector Senior Citizens Ctr. Treasurer Maintenance Dept.

441-9505 446-0147 441-9570 446-0390 441-9508 446-9249 446-1721 446-8041 441-9590 441-9506 441-9508 441-9503 446-9350 441-9504 441-9526

Council Members: Mike Legg, Vice Mayor Richard Arnold James Monsue R. Scott England Dwight E. Haynes Bob Rial Marvin Corlew Jimmy Jennings Tom H. Waychoff, City Administrator Jerry V. Smith, City Attorney J. Reese Holley, City Judge


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DICKSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S

DICKSON COUNTY BUSINESS 22 A Recipe for Success

8 I’D RATHER BE FARMING Agriculture remains a major part of the county’s lifestyle and charm.

Odom’s Tennessee Pride sausage has been a breakfast-table staple for 66 years and counting.

26 Biz Briefs

12 SMOKIN’ GOOD BARBECUE

29 Chamber Report

Restaurants go whole hog with ribs, sandwiches and homey side dishes.

31 Economic Profile

19 A SLICE OF AMERICANA Popular roots-music festival takes center stage each fall at Montgomery Bell State Park.

45 NOW THAT’S ‘DINNERTAINMENT’ Renaissance Center’s Gaslight Theatre presents a meal and a show.

D E PA R TM E NT S 4 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Dickson County’s culture

16 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Dickson County

32 Photo Essay 38 Sports & Recreation 41 Education 43 Health & Wellness 47 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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ON THE COVER Daniels’ family dairy farm Photo by Antony Boshier

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imagesdickson.com THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

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What’s On Online nl

SENIOR EDITOR REBECCA DENTON COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, SUSAN CHAPPELL, JESSY YANCEY STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN CONTRIBUTING WRITER JESSICA MOZO DATA MANAGER CHANDRA BRADSHAW INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER CLAY PERRY SALES SUPPORT MANAGER CINDY HALL SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN McCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, IAN CURCIO, J. KYLE KEENER PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT MANAGER ANNE WHITLOW CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS MELISSA BRACEWELL, KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, CANDICE SWEET, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER ALISON HUNTER GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, JESSICA MANNER, JANINE MARYLAND, AMY NELSON, MARCUS SNYDER WEB DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR BRIAN SMITH WEB IMPLEMENTATION DIRECTOR ANDY HARTLEY WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR FRANCO SCARAMUZZA WEB PROJECT MANAGER YAMEL RUIZ

A LOOK AT H.R. LOVELL’S ART

WEB DESIGN CARL SCHULZ WEB PRODUCTION JENNIFER GRAVES COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN TWILA ALLEN AD TRAFFIC MARCIA MILLAR, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY

Hear Tennessee’s former Artist in Residence H.R. Lovell talk about his work, and visit his gallery on the square in Charlotte. Watch this and other quick videos in the Interactive section.

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN

RELOCATION

SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN

Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./SALES TODD POTTER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS V.P./CUSTOM PUBLISHING KIM NEWSOM MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS BILL McMEEKIN MANAGING EDITOR/COMMUNITY KIM MADLOM PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY WALDRIP DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR YANCEY TURTURICE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE SALES SUPPORT RACHAEL GOLDSBERRY SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR RACHEL MATHEIS EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM

PHOTOS We’ve added even more prize-winning photography to our online gallery. To see these spectacular photos, click on Photo Gallery.

RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

Images Dickson County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Dickson County Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Dickson County Chamber of Commerce 119 Hwy. 70 E. • Dickson, TN 37055 Phone: (615) 446-2349 • Fax: (615) 441-3112 www.dicksoncountychamber.com

FACTS & STATS Go online to learn even more about: • Schools • Health care

LOCAL FLAVOR

• Utilities

Barbecue is quintessential Southern fare, and Dickson County has plenty of places to find it. Get a taste of local flavor in our food section.

• Parks • Taxes

VISIT IMAGES DICKSON COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESDICKSON.COM ©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

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Custom Publishing Council

ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Images gives readers a taste of what makes Dickson County tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts. “Find the good – and praise it.”

– Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

Member Dickson County Chamber of Commerce

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Almanac

Something To Celebrate Each season brings some kind of celebration to Dickson County. The newest addition to the area’s roster of festivals is the Middle Tennessee Sheep, Wool and Fiber Festival, sponsored by Three Creeks Farm in Charlotte. The May festival, held at the Dickson County Fairgrounds, features sheep, alpacas and llamas, along with spinning demonstrations, classes and more. Also in May is the Old Timers Day festival, a popular four-day event. June brings the weekend-long Promise Land Festival just outside Charlotte. Fall festivals include the Apple Butter Festival in White Bluff and the Americana Folk Festival at Montgomery Bell State Park.

All Aboard! After many years of planning, the newly renovated Hotel Halbrook in downtown Dickson opened in June 2009 as the Clement Railroad Hotel Museum. The 1913 building’s exhibits explore the heritage of railroading, the Civil War, the stories of men and women who settled Dickson County, and the early years, campaigns, and accomplishments of Gov. Frank G. Clement, who was born in the hotel in 1920. The museum also will host traveling exhibits from other museums and heritage institutions. Visit www.clementrailroadmuseum.org for more information.

Moving the Past Into the Future With more than 22 historic buildings, the Charlotte Courthouse Square Historic District has been a designated National Historic Site since 1977. Nearly all of the historic properties on the town square in the county seat have been restored to their original appearance and adapted for modern uses. Among them are the recently renovated Collier House – a popular spot for special events – and the Hickerson Hotel, which is more than 150 years old. The venerable building is home to four businesses.

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A Fair To Remember Each September, about 50,000 people – mostly from Dickson County and surrounding counties – head to the 50-acre fairgrounds to enjoy the Dickson County Fair. Along with agricultural events, vendors and a carnival, the 86-year-old fair puts on one of the most popular demolition derbies in Tennessee each year. About 12,000 spectators come just to see the car wreck competition.

Way Above Par Top-notch golfing is easily found at three local courses. GreyStone Golf Club’s 18-hole course, opened in 1998, was designed by PGA Tour pro Mark McCumber. It has been pegged as one of Middle Tennessee’s finest daily-fee golf courses. The Montgomery Bell State Park Golf Course, an 18-hole, par 71 course in Burns, was built in 1973 and redesigned in 1988. Dickson Country Club is a private club featuring an 18-hole golf course with a driving range, practice putting green and a practice pitching green.

Look Around Downtown No visit to Dickson is complete without a tour of the historic downtown area. Main Street is lined with independently owned businesses, and Civil War soldiers built the railroad that fronts the Historic Hotel Halbrook – now the Clement Railroad Hotel Museum. Also downtown is the War Memorial Building, one of only two Depression-era War Memorial Buildings in the state. Music lovers gather at the Grand Old Hatchery downtown every Saturday night for Vance Smith’s Grand Old Hatchery Music Show, which begins at 7 p.m.

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Now Showing in Our Video Gallery

Sit back and enjoy a preview of Dickson County amenities. Explore its landscapes, cultural offerings, food and fun. See its downtowns, neighborhoods, parks and attractions. Experience the history, hot spots and local happenings. Dickson County is rated L for Livability

imagesdickson.com


Almanac

Wedding, Anyone? The historic Old Spencer Mill in Burns is a popular spot for weddings and other special events. The 1800s gristmill uses original equipment powered by a 20-foot-tall waterwheel, and it also includes a general store, post office, a tee-pee, cabins and live peacocks. The site offers living-history tours by appointment. Renovations on the general store and post office were completed in spring 2009. But the scenic, creekside mill isn’t just for show. It produces fresh gristmill products, including cornmeal and white corn grits. Visit www.oldspencermill.com for more information.

Dickson County At A Glance

Fast Facts

POPULATION 2007 Dickson County: 52,529 Dickson: 19,274 White Bluff: 2,929 Charlotte: 1,651 Burns: 1,439 Vanleer: 454 Slayden: 227

Q The Stampede Days Rodeo in Dickson takes place each June and features seven sanctioned events.

Speaker of the House of Representatives (1799-1801) and then as a U.S. Congressman (1801-1807). FOR MORE INFORMATION Dickson County Chamber of Commerce 119 Highway 70 E. Dickson, TN 37055 Phone: (615) 446-2349 Fax: (615) 441-3112 www.dicksoncountychamber.com

LOCATION Dickson County is in Middle Tennessee, 30 miles west of Nashville and 30 miles south of Clarksville.

What’s Online e

BEGINNINGS Dickson County was formally established in 1803 and named for Dr. William Dickson, a Nashville physician who served as Tennessee

Take a virtual tour of Dickson County, courtesy of our award-winning photographers, at imagesdickson.com.

Dickson County Slayden 48 24

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Vanleer Charlotte

DI CKSO N Nash ash hville h ville v l White Bluff 70

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Q Dickson County’s new Higher Education Center at the Renaissance Center in Dickson offers college-credit courses. Q Dickson is home to the family-owned and family-operated Broadway Drive-In theater. Q The Renaissance Center offers a yearround calendar of musical performances, plays, exhibits and classes. Q Dickson is home to 19 Century Farms – farms that have been family-owned and –operated for at least 100 years.

Burns 48 46

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I’d Rather Be

Farming AGRICULTURAL ROOTS RUN DEEP IN DICKSON COUNTY

STORY BY JESSICA MOZO

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ake a drive through the rolling hills of Dickson County, and you’re sure to see plenty of cattle grazing and crops popping up from fertile soil. It’s obvious from the peaceful scenery that agriculture remains a deep-rooted tradition here – despite the county’s close proximity to Nashville. “Our No. 1 commodity is beef cattle, and tobacco is No. 2,” says Brad Greenfield, a Dickson County agricultural extension agent. “We’ve got around 1,285 total farms, including 25,000 head of cattle and about 500 acres of tobacco. And we’re starting to see fruits and vegetables become a big commodity here, too. There’s a growing trend of organic producers and many others trying to maintain that type of production.” The Dickson County Farmers Market has gained momentum in recent years, thanks to a bevy of customers who appreciate locally grown produce such as fresh-picked corn, colorful peppers, juicy tomatoes and sweet strawberries. “Over the last couple years, the market has grown from seven or eight vendors to more than 15,” Greenfield says. “The customer support has been great. Vendors rarely leave without selling out of their products. People are realizing it doesn’t

Right: Dairy farmer Johnny Daniel

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ANTONY BOSHIER

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“Both my parents and grandparents farmed this land, and now I’m moving it on to my daughters.” Simpkins typically orders greenhouse-grown tobacco plants in January and February and transplants them to the fields in May and June. After a 90- to 120-day growing season, the tobacco crop is put into barns to dry and cure. “The curing process gives the tobacco a distinct flavor and changes its color from green to brown,” Simpkins explains. The tobacco cures for about 30 days before being sent to a factory to be weighed. “We have a 60,000-pound contract, and that’s how we get paid,” Simpkins says. “Tobacco farmers work all year and get one check at the end of the year.” Simpkins admits tobacco farming is a high-risk job – he’s lost two barns to fires in his lifetime, and bad weather can cut a year’s tobacco yield by devastating numbers. But all things considered, he wouldn’t trade it for anything. “Dickson County’s rolling land is great for tobacco, and there are a lot of tobacco farms in this area that have been handed down through generations,” he says. “I was raised here – it’s my home place. I guess that’s why I like it so much, because I’m home.”

PHOTOS BY ANTONY BOSHIER

make sense to buy a head of lettuce from California when you can stop by the market and pick up one grown in Burns.” While buying local is a trend that’s just beginning to click with consumers across the nation, it’s something farmers have been promoting for ages. Dairy farmer Johnny Daniel operates his family’s Century Farm in Dickson County and sells milk to Dean Foods, owner of the Nashville-based Purity Dairies and Athens, Tenn.-based Mayfield Dairy. “We milk around 160 cows two times a day, and we raise all our own feed,” Daniel says. “My first ancestor bought this farmland in 1861, and my dad, Lewis Daniel, started the Grade-A dairy.” Daniel’s farm is one of only two Grade-A dairies in Dickson County, which means the farm is inspected regularly by the health department, and milk samples are checked regularly for things like bacteria and antibiotics. Daniel enjoys farming in Dickson County because of its climate and rural heritage. “We don’t have extreme temperatures like other places, and we’re not encroached by urbanization,” he says. Daniel’s son Benji, 33, is already following in his father’s footsteps. He lives on the farm in his grandfather’s old house and makes a lot of the decisions for the dairy. Tobacco farmer Randy Simpkins is also carrying on a family tradition of farming in Dickson County. Along with his wife, Dee, and daughters, Jennifer, 23, and Jamie, 20, Simpkins raises beef cattle and 24 acres of tobacco, which he sells to R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.’s Conwood division for use as a snuff – or dip – tobacco. “Both my parents and grandparents farmed this land, and now I’m moving it on to my daughters,” Simpkins says. “This farm is the old home place of my grandmother, and it’s been in my family close to 100 years.”

Tobacco farmer Randy Simkins Left: About 160 cows are milked twice a day at Johnny Daniels’ dairy farm near Charlotte. One of two Grade-A dairies in the county, the farm has been in Daniels’ family for more than 100 years.

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Fine Sw BARBECUE RESTAURANTS GO WHOLE HOG

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ine STORY BY CAROL COWAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANTONY BOSHIER

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ender, juicy barbecue is quintessential Southern fare, and Dickson County has plenty of places to find it. Local barbecue joints serve up smoky pork and beef ribs, chicken, turkey and pulled pork and beef sandwiches with traditional side dishes such as coleslaw, beans, greens and cornbread. Down-home desserts like banana pudding and fruit cobblers top off the meal. The well-known Whitt’s Barbecue franchise that originated in Athens, Ala., has grown to include stores throughout northern Alabama, Middle Tennessee and southern Kentucky. Thanks to Ricky Jennette, Dickson has had its own Whitt’s Barbecue since 2005. Jennette owns the Dickson store, as well as the Whitt’s Barbecue restaurants in nearby Ashland City and Waverly. Jennette’s restaurants draw a steady stream of hungry customers – for good reason. “I can’t reveal any secrets, but we cook our own barbecue right here at the restaurant. We just do it the Whitt’s way,” Jennette says. That includes a full day of cooking over a

Pulled pork barbecue, baked beans and coleslaw from Whitt’s Barbecue in Dickson

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glowing, hickory-wood fire. “We take pride in our quality and in our work,” he adds. Whitt’s signature sauce comes in hot or mild varieties. Menu selections include St. Louis-style ribs and smoked chicken, as well as pulled meats – pork, beef and all-whitemeat turkey. The pulled pork is customers’ hands-down favorite. “Ninety-five percent of what we sell is pulled pork,” Jennette says. “We also offer catering services.” Specializing in ribs that are to-die-for, Carl’s Perfect Pig in White Bluff is a local favorite, but its fame extends from New

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York to Hollywood. The 20-year-old, no-frills establishment has been written up in Vanity Fair and the Wall Street Journal and featured on Emeril Live! on the Food Network. “We got lucky in the beginning,” owner Carl Teitloff says of the restaurant’s renown. “We had a really good product. We got tied in with some music people, and word got out. One thing just led to another.” But how does he get that famous flavor? “I cook it the way I like it,” Teitloff says. “There’s really no hidden secret – just hard work and consistency. Consistency is what we strive for.”

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Over on Walnut Street in Dickson, Fossie’s has been a mainstay since 1956. This quaint establishment is still cooking up the tasty barbecue it’s known for and baking delicious, homemade fruit pies. Bart’s Bar-B-Que & Catfish Cooker, also in Dickson, serves juicy, hickory-smoked meat that’s been cooked on site in an open-pit barbecue. The fried catfish also earns rave reviews, as does the assortment of desserts,

including peach cobbler and banana pudding. Bart’s décor recalls the 1950s and ’60s and features a collection of Andy Griffith, Betty Boop and Elvis Presley memorabilia. Another option on the Dickson County barbecue circuit is Hog Heaven Family Restaurant & Steakhouse in White Bluff. This favorite spot serves barbecue as well as steaks, turnip greens, cornbread, sweet tea and other homey dishes.

Where To Go Whitt’s Barbecue 590 Highway 46 S. Dickson, TN 37055 Open Mon. through Sat., 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Carl’s Perfect Pig 4991 Highway 70 White Bluff, TN 37187 Open Wed., Thurs. and Sat., 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Fri., 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Sun., 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Closed Mon. and Tues. Fossie’s Bar-B-Q 603 W. Walnut St. Dickson, TN 37055 (615) 446-8674 (Call for hours of operation) Bart’s Bar-B-Que and Catfish Cooker 1836 Highway 46 S. Dickson, TN 37055 Open Mon. through Thurs., 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Fri. and Sat., 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Hog Heaven Family Restaurant & Steakhouse 4142 Highway 70 White Bluff, TN 37187 Open Mon. through Sat., 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sun., 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Clockwise left to right: Ribs on the grill at Carl’s Perfect Pig in White Bluff; customers enjoying lunch at Carl’s Perfect Pig; hickory-smoked barbecue with chips at Bart’s Bar-B-Que & Catfish Cooker in Dickson

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JEFF ADKINS

Portfolio

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It’s Quite a Caffeine Scene COFFEE SHOPS IN DICKSON SERVE A RANGE OF SPECIALTY DRINKS AND MORE

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Specialty coffee at House-Blend Gourmet Coffeehouse and Gifts on North Main Street in downtown Dickson

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ANTONY BOSHIER

ver have an ice-spresso? How about a monkey mocha? Dickson is now home to a few comfortable coffee shops that seem to serve new specialty items every week. These shops offer relaxing retreats where customers can stop in to relax or work on their Blackberry or laptop while sipping a flavored concoction. But a wide variety of hot and cold coffees and teas can also be quickly prepared to go. A favorite caffeine destination in Dickson is House-Blend Gourmet Coffeehouse and Eclectic Gifts, which has been open since February 2002 on North Main Street. Some of its most popular drinks in the warm-weather months are icespressos – blended cold coffees in a variety of flavors such as caramel, white caramel and mocha. House-Blend also serves fruit smoothies and an assortment of teas, including Oregon chai, a spicy blend of honey and tea mixed with milk and topped with whipped cream. The cozy shop serves tasty sandwiches with names such as The Parisian, The Mediterranean, The Chesapeake and The Mighty Mississippi – pulled white chicken meat topped with barbecue sauce and served warm on country wheat bread. Visit www.houseblendonline.com for more details. The Liquid Bean Pourhouse on Henslee Drive is another popular stop in town, serving a variety of hot and cold coffees in a laid-back setting. And just down the road, at 105 Mathis Drive in Dickson, is the ever-popular Dunkin’ Donuts, which offers a full range of specialty coffees – iced or hot – along with donuts and other tasty treats.

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Portfolio

Honoring the Larkins Family Farm A

nd the winner is: The Leslie D. Larkins family farm, which dates back to the early days when Tennessee became a state. The Dickson County Chamber of Commerce announced in November 2008 that the long-standing Larkins family farm in Dickson had won the chamber’s 2008 Agricultural Leader of the Year Award. The recognition goes to an individual, family or business that exemplifies the tradition of farming excellence in Dickson County.

The Dickson County Chamber chooses a worthy recipient that portrays not only top agricultural standards, but one that also gives back to the community. As a result, the Larkins farm was feted in November 2008 at the banquet that was attended by nearly 400 people. One of the interesting aspects of the Larkins property is that it is classified as a Century Farm, which means that it has been family-owned and -operated for at least 100 years. Dickson County is home to 19 Century Farms.

The Larkins property was founded in 1787 by John Larkins of North Carolina, and the farm originally spanned 1,000 acres. John Larkins was a Revolutionary War veteran and the first treasurer of Dickson County, which was founded in 1803. The Larkins estate originally raised corn, hay, wheat and cattle, and those four commodities continue to be cultivated in 2009. This Century Farm is in its fifth generation of ownership. L.D. Larkins Jr. now owns the 215-acre site while his son, Kevin, manages the dayto-day operations. The Larkins property is a busy and productive 21st-century farm these days, but family members say they also take the time to appreciate and preserve their history and the rural landscape.

A DIFFERENT KIND OF REAL ESTATE COMPANY

Left to Right: Janet Lewis, Melinda Wright, Carrie Parker Peery, Missy Chandler, Debbie Jared, Peggy Horne, Deidre Helmey Actively participating in a growing Dickson County!

Call (615) 446-1884 today! www.ppproperties.com

ANTONY BOSHIER

215 Church Street Dickson, TN 37055

L.D. Larkins, owner of the Larkins family farm in Dickson County

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MIMOSA ARTS, NASHVILLE, TN

More than 30 bands and singersongwriters perform at the festival.

A Slice of Americana F

olks who enjoys down-home, rootstype music should mark their calendars for a fall trip to Dickson County. The annual Americana Folk Festival takes center stage at Montgomery Bell State Park every October, with 4,000 spectators in attendance for the event that has been occurring since 2004. The crowd numbers would actually be much higher, but since the event works so well with the beloved state park, organizers have chosen to keep the crowd low and remain in the park. One of the main goals for the oneday festival is to re-create a sense of the old-time, back-porch picking party, even though thousands of fans are listening. The event has hosted performers such as Patty Griffin, Old Crow Medicine Show, Jars of Clay, The Avett Brothers, Mindy Smith, The Alison Brown Quartet, and more than 100 other acts over the past four years. With more than 30 bands and singersongwriters performing throughout the event on three different stages, the day is filled with concerts, folk art, hikes, bike rides and other outdoor events. In keeping with the festival’s “better living and listening� mission, concessions focus on locally grown, diverse food offerings, including kettle corn, barbecue, soups, baked goods and samplings of organic food. A custom, organic brew of Yazoo beer is made and sold especially for the festival. Future plans include incorporating a farmers market. Also on the scene are folk artisans and craftsmen displaying their work. The Americana Folk Festival is not 0festival, but a celebration where diverse artists and fans gather to freely express their love for roots music. For more information, visit the Americana Folk Festival’s Web site at www.americanafolkfest.com. DICKSON COUNT Y

NHC R EHABILITATION DICKSON “Helping People Live Life Again�

NHC Rehabilitation, Dickson is a locally operated Rehabilitation Center dedicated to improving the quality of life of the patients and residents they serve. Our services are provided by compassionate caregivers who incorporate a holistic approach to total patient care. Our sta includes professional nursing, in-house therapy sta, medical directors, a full-time nurse practitioner, social workers, a registered dietitian and recreational sta. Psychological services, respiratory care, wound care and pain management services are also available. NHC Rehabilitation, Dickson is the only health care campus in Dickson County to oer a complete continuum of care for its residents and patients. NHC is able to provide skilled nursing and rehabilitation services, assisted living services, intermediate care services, respite care and hospice services. NHC Rehabilitation, Dickson distinguishes itself by providing patients and residents with a level of care and service that enables them to maintain their independence and good health, while aging with grace and dignity. /$IBSMPUUF4Ut%JDLTPO 5/t   XXXOIDEJDLTPODPN

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Portfolio Staircase in the Drouillard House Retreat and Conference Center

PHOTOS BY ANTONY BOSHIER

Now That’s a Beautiful Mansion

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f you’re looking for an impressive place to hold a meeting or a corporate retreat, consider heading over to Cumberland Furnace. The tiny Dickson County community is home to the long-standing Drouillard House Retreat and Conference Center, which features a Victorian-style mansion and four modern cabins that have a total of 12 bedrooms. The spacious property on Old Highway 48 North is an ideal setting for workshops, training sessions, company seminars or organizational retreats. The tranquil setting and comfortable accommodations are inviting for groups of up to 43 people for overnight stays; the facility can accommodate up to 50 guests for meetings and seminars. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are prepared each day in the historic mansion, and every meal is served buffet-style on the porch, if the weather permits. The house sits peacefully in the midst of an abundance of oak and fir trees, and the property’s amenities include shuttered windows, a widow’s walk and a spacious wrap-around porch. The mansion has five guest rooms, each of which is furnished in an authentic Victorian design. Drouillard House has been a mainstay in Cumberland Furnace for nearly two centuries, but the refurbished mansion has only been in operation as a guest retreat and conference center since 1997. During that time, thousands of visitors have stayed overnight, and nearly 100 special corporate retreats, day meetings and company seminars have been booked in the luxurious house. Drouillard House also caters oneday events. For guest fees, meal costs and more information about booking special events, visit the Web site at www.drouillardhouse.com. DICKSON COUNT Y


Technology Center Meets Demand T

ake note: Students who graduate from Tennessee Technology Center at Dickson often work in careers that start at $30,000 a year, and they can advance to positions where the sky is basically the limit. The education center is one of the top providers of technical workforce development in Tennessee, and it is a valuable resource for residents, local companies and industries. Additional campus locations are in Franklin, Waverly and Clarksville. TTC’s mission is to train students for careers that are in demand in today’s economy, and its goal is to supply high-quality training that will qualify students for employment or advancement in jobs. TTC works with individual companies to implement customized training that will enhance employee efficiency and productivity. The programs are designed so that companies can ultimately have lower training and recruiting costs, lower employee turnover and increased profits. TTC also offers training programs at

times that are convenient for companies. The staff at TTC does all the program work, including course planning, registration, evaluation, selecting competent instructors, recordkeeping and all of the training. Individual student programs at Tennessee Technology Center at Dickson include the fields of practical nursing, auto technology, dental assisting, heating and cooling repair, and heavy equipment/diesel mechanics. Other programs include business systems

technology, computer information technology, surgical technology, cosmetology and machine tool technology. Evening classes are available in computers, auto CAD, skilled trades, languages and the medical industry. Some of the courses are offered online, and TTC tries to provide its training in ways that are economically feasible and easily accessible to all students. For more information, visit the Web site at www.ttcdickson.edu. – Stories by Kevin Litwin

GREATER DICKSON GAS AUTHORITY Your Hometown Energy Source WE SELL AND SERVICE BOTH NATURAL AND PROPANE APPLIANCES. 4FSWJOHNATURAL GASUPDVTUPNFSTJO%JDLTPO$PVOUZBOEQPSUJPOT PG$IFBUIBN )PVTUPO 4UFXBSUBOE.POUHPNFSZDPVOUJFT 4FSWJOHPROPANE GASUPDVTUPNFSTJO%JDLTPO$PVOUZBOE QPSUJPOTPG$IFBUIBN )PVTUPO 4UFXBSU .POUHPNFSZ  )VNQISFZT )JDLNBOBOE8JMMJBNTPODPVOUJFT CONVENIENT 1BZCZDSFEJUDBSEt&MFDUSPOJDUSBOTGFST 1BZJOHTUBUJPOTJOZPVSBSFB 'SFFTFSWJDFDBMMTEVSJOHSFHVMBSCVTJOFTTIPVST *OUFSFTUGSFFGJOBODJOHUPIPNFPXOFSTXJUIBQQSPWFEDSFEJU

SAFE – RELIABLE – ECONOMICAL &8BMOVU4Ut%JDLTPO 5/  t   XXXHEHBDPN

MEMBER OF THE COUNCIL FOR RESPONSIBLE ENERGY

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Business

A Recipe for

Success

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ODOM’S TENNESSEE PRIDE SAUSAGE REMAINS A BREAKFAST FAVORITE

STORY BY JESSICA MOZO PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANTONY BOSHIER

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dom’s Tennessee Pride Real Country Sausage has been a staple with Southern cooks in the Dickson and Nashville area since the familyowned company was founded in 1943. “The Odoms come from a long line of meatheads,” company president Larry Odom says with a laugh. “We go back a number of generations of butchers. My grandfather, Douglas Odom Sr., was a meat cutter, and his brother and dad were meat cutters. He had a burning desire to make sausage, and he liked experimenting with different seasonings.” When Douglas Odom Sr. finally settled on the perfect blend of flavors for his country sausage recipe, he made it available to the public by starting Odom’s Tennessee Pride Real Country Sausage. Today, the company is headquartered in Madison and runs manufacturing plants in Dickson and Little Rock, Ark. “My grandfather started with a stall at the Nashville Farmers Market, where he made products and cut meat,”

The Odom’s Tennessee Pride facility in Dickson is one of the most automated meat plants in the industry.

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Business

Workers assemble sausage biscuits at Odom’s Tennessee Pride facility in Dickson. The company’s precooked products are made at the Dickson plant, which employs about 350 people. Odom’s Tennessee Pride was founded in 1943.

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Odom says. “Then in the mid-1950s, the Tennessee Pride logo was born. That’s when we started the radio jingle and the whole nine yards.” Anyone who lives in or around the Greater Nashville area has heard Odom’s catchy bluegrass jingle advertising “real country sausage, best you ever tried,” whether between acts at the legendary Grand Ole Opry or on television commercials. It encourages listeners to “take home a pound or two of Tennessee Pride,” and they do – by the thousands. “We make one-pound and two-pound packages of chub sausage, links and patties, and pre-cooked products like sausage gravy, sausage balls and sausage biscuits and croissants,” Odom says. The precooked products are all made at the Dickson plant, which employs 350 people and is one of the most automated meat plants in the industry. “The sausage and biscuits are still put together by hand, but all the products are robotically picked off the line, and wrapped and packaged automatically – everything there is hightech,” Odom says. The Little Rock plant is about the same size as the Dickson facility and houses all the company’s raw processes and the slaughter facility. Odom’s Tennessee Pride employs about 780 people in all, and about 75 percent of the company’s business is retail – a fact that’s helped them thrive even in the midst of a nationwide economic recession. “To a certain degree, we’ve been immune to the recession time, because people are choosing to buy food at the grocery and eat at home more,” Odom says. “We do feel the effects of it, but fortunately, ours is a basic food product.” Odom’s also makes raw and precooked products for food service distributors, which make up the other 25 percent of the business. DICKSON COUNT Y

Odom continues to lead the longstanding sausage company into the future with the help of his daughter, a merchandiser, and sister, a food sales analyst. His father, Douglas Odom Jr., and uncle, Richard Odom, are both retired from the business but remain active on its board of directors. “I enjoy the fact that there’s never a dull moment in the meat business, from the economic issues of the day to the ins and outs of the raw materials market,” Odom says. “We have some good competitors, but if you compare us to other sausages, the main difference is the unique flavor and service we provide to our customers. Our quality control process is pretty tightly buttoned up, so you get consistently great flavor and quality from us. After all, we have the Tennessee Pride name to protect.”

What’s s e Online

Take a tour of Odom’s Tennessee Pride facility in Dickson in our quick video. Visit imagesdickson.com.

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Business

Biz Briefs BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE DICKSON COUNTY’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

$484,179 Retail sales ($1,000)

$10,924 Retail sales per capita

$44,479 Accommodations and food service sales ($1,000)

3,916 Total number of firms Source: U.S. Census QuickFacts

DICKSON COMPOUNDING PHARMACY Biz: Compounding pharmacy Buzz: Using special tools, including a precise capsule machine, Dickson Compounding Pharmacy can make doses or dosage forms of commercial drug products to fit each patient’s particular need. The pharmacy is located inside Dickson Apothecary. (615) 446-5585 26

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WHITE BLUFF BUILDING SUPPLY Biz: Building-supply store Buzz: At White Bluff Building Supply, customers can find just about anything for their home under one roof. From lawnmowers and plants to paint and building supplies, this locally owned store has it all – including a friendly, knowledgeable staff. www.whitebluffbldgsupply.com UNITED MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL Biz: Commercial and industrial mechanical contractor Buzz: This commercial and industrial mechanical contractor provides air conditioning and electrical services. Technicians are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Owned by David Baggett, the Dickson company is licensed, bonded and insured. (615) 446-9369 TENNESSEE ATTACHMENT CO. Biz: Industrial sewing-machine parts manufacturer Buzz: Tennessee Attachment Co. in White Bluff rebuilds and manufactures parts for industrial sewing machines. The company also makes labor-saving devices for the stitching industry. The company was incorporated in Dickson County in July 1977. www.tennatchco.com TENNESSEE BUN CO. Biz: Full-service, high-speed bakery Buzz: Located in Dickson, Tennessee Bun Co.’s high-speed bun line manufactures more than 1,000 buns per minute and is capable of producing round buns, hoagies, cluster buns and double-decker buns. TBC celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2007. www.buncompany.com DICKSON COUNT Y

We’d be stretching the truth if we tried to tell you we weren’t pleased to have been named the best bank in Dickson. It’s always nice to be appreciated – especially by people you genuinely care about. And since opening back in 1954, caring about our neighbors in Dickson has been the whole idea. It’s why we work so hard to make sure you can enjoy the same up-to-date banking options available in the world’s major ďŹ nancial centers. It’s also why we take the extra time to greet customers by name. If by chance you don’t yet bank with us, please stop by and let us show you why Bank of Dickson is still the bank in Dickson.

sWWWBANKOFDICKSONCOMs-EMBER&$)#

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Making History One Year at a Time Throughout the years, the spirit and pride of Dickson County have been captured in Images magazine. In print and online, Images reaches newcomers, new businesses and existing residents annually with stories about living and working in Dickson County. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to be a part of preserving the history of one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most livable communities as it continues to evolve.

READ ARTICLES FROM PAST ISSUES OF THE MAGAZINE ONLINE AT imagesdickson.com UNDER RELATED ARTICLES


Business | Chamber Report

Connected to the Land AGRI-TOURISM OPTIONS INCLUDE A FARMERS MARKET, FARM VISITS AND EVENTS

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Public Library. The farmers market has a new Web site, www.dicksonfarmers market.com, that helps promote the growing effort. “Agri-tourism is being promoted more and more these days because the list of

agricultural attractions is expanding for the public to see,” he says. “With changing times, agri-tourism has become an added source of income and interest in the overall farming economy.” – Kevin Litwin

BRIAN M C CORD

A

gri-tourism in Dickson County is growing, no pun intended. As people become more interested in visiting farms and experiencing farm life, farmers in Dickson County are taking advantage of all the attention. “There are so many people in our current society who have never been on a farm, which is why schools often book trips to local farms,” says Mike Henry, Dickson County Farm Bureau insurance agent and chairman of the agriculture committee for the Dickson County Chamber of Commerce. “Kids see things there that amaze them. In addition, there are a lot of requests from senior citizens groups who want to see farms and perhaps bring back fond memories of when they were growing up.” With that rising interest in farm visits comes a bolstered interest in the agri-tourism industry. One popular annual agritourism event that occurs each July is the Dickson County Farm Tour, which features a number of buses transporting 200 people to several farms in the community. “The tour shows people new practices in agriculture as well as new commercial products, proving that farming is still alive and viable in our county,” Henry says. “The event is limited to 200 people, and we always have a waiting list for the one-day tour.” Henry adds that agri-tourism in Dickson County ranges from pumpkin patches and corn mazes to Christmas tree farms. The Dickson County Farm Bureau even schedules an Ag Day each spring. “All fourth-graders are invited out to Dickson County Fairgrounds for an Ag Day to see and touch animals, and to learn about agriculture at a variety of 10-minute information stations,” he says. “Private places like Three Creeks Farm in Charlotte also offer farm visits and classroom settings for students to further learn about agriculture.” Henry says another popular agritourism endeavor is the Dickson County Farmers Market, which runs from May to November behind the Dickson County

Beth Collier picks flowers at Three Creeks Farm. She and her husband, Steve Shafer, offer sheep-shearing, blacksmithing and spinning demonstrations.

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Connecting with Dickson County has never been easier …

imagesdickson.com 1 2

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SIMPLY SEARCH: In a hurry? Find the exact info you need quickly with our enhanced search capabilities.

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SMOOTHER SURFING: Explore the site and interact with us more easily with our reorganized navigation bar.

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JUST THE FACTS: Get a quick snapshot of the community with our greatly enriched Facts and Stats section.

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WATCH AND SHARE: Experience first-hand views of the community in our video gallery, then share them with friends.

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VIRTUAL VIEW: Flip through pages of the digital magazine, an enriched online version of the print publication.

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MOVING MUSTHAVES: Visit our new Relocation Tools section for many useful tips and information to make your transition go smoothly.

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MORE EYE CANDY: Check out our enhanced Photo Gallery for more stunning photos of the community.

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OUTSIDERS WELCOME: Read about the best places to play in this community.

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IN GOOD TASTE: Get the dish on local flavor from favorite restaurants, noted area products and farmers markets in our new Food section.


Business | Economic Profile

DICKSON COUNTY BUSINESS CLIMATE The services and manufacturing sectors are some of the largest private-sector employers in Dickson County. The region’s labor force is characterized by an eagerness to learn, a willingness to work and a high level of productivity. An excellent rural road system and a moderate climate allow employers to draw labor from a wider geographic area.

Nashville International Airport (615) 275-1675 www.nashintl.com (about 50 miles from Dickson)

City of Dickson 600 E. Walnut St. Dickson, TN 37055 (615) 441-9570 www.cityofdickson.com

TAXES

Dickson County Government P.O. Box 267 Charlotte, TN 37036 (615) 789-7003 www.tennesseeanytime.org/ local/dickson.html

2.75% MAJOR INDUSTRIAL MANUFACTURERS/ DISTRIBUTION

City Sales and Use Tax

2.75% County Sales Tax

Company Tennsco Corp.

500

Tennessee Odom’s Pride Sausage

400

State Sales Tax

Quebecor World

300

9.75%

210

Total Sales Tax

Interstate Packaging Masonite International Corp.

200

Ebbtide Corp.

150

Nemak Tennessee

150

Porcelain Industries

150

Shiloh Industries Inc.

150

Bridgestone APM

140

Nashville Wire Products Inc.

140

Martin-Brower Co. LLC

125

Sumiden Wire Products Corp.

105

Middle Tennessee Lumber Co.

100

7%

ECONOMIC RESOURCES Dickson County Chamber of Commerce 119 Highway 70 E. Dickson, TN 37055 (615) 446-2349 www.dicksoncounty chamber.com

INDUSTRIAL SITES www.dicksoncountychamber. com/property

MORE EO ONLINE imagesdickson.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

Tennessee Department of Economic & Community Development 312 Rosa Parks Ave., 11th Floor Nashville, TN 37243 (615) 741-1888 www.tennessee.gov/ecd

TRANSPORTATION

GOVERNMENT OFFICES

Dickson Municipal Airport 2370 Sylvia Rd. Dickson, TN 37055 (615) 446-5962

City Tax Collector 600 E. Walnut St. Dickson, TN 37055 (615) 441-9503

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Charlotte City Hall 22 Court Square Charlotte, TN 37036-4935 (615) 789-4184

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Photo Essay

HistoryWorth

Revisiting CHARLOTTE’S COURTHOUSE SQUARE PRESERVES THE PAST

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANTONY BOSHIER

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drive through the rolling hills of central Dickson County leads to historic downtown Charlotte, home of the state’s oldest operating courthouse, built in 1833. With more than 16 historic buildings, the Charlotte Courthouse Square Historic District has been a designated National Register District since 1977. The oldest house still standing in Charlotte is the Voorhies-James Hous-e, built in 1806. But most buildings on the square were built in the 1840s and 1850s, after a tornado swept through and nearly destroyed the town in 1830. The Collier House – a stately historic building that’s been around since 1830 – is enjoying new life as a banquet hall. A few years ago‚ the city spent close to $200‚000 renovating the charming old home. The 1‚600-square-foot house has become a popular spot for wedding receptions‚ reunions‚ baby showers‚ bridal showers‚ dinners and birthday parties. Artist H.R. Lovell – a former Tennessee artist-inresidence – has a gallery on the square in the old Mallory and Leech General Merchandise Store, built around 1860. The Hickerson Hotel, a former hotel on the stagecoach route to Clarksville before 1876, now houses four businesses. Cumberland Presbyterian Church was built by slaves in 1855 and includes an upstairs slave gallery. Other historic buildings downtown include the Christopher Columbus Collier Home, the Collier-Cook House, the Old Jailer’s House and a dozen more.

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Photo Essay

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s s e Online

Hear artist H.R. Lovell discuss his work and his downtown Charlotte gallery in our quick video. Visit imagesdickson.com.

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Photo Essay

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Sports & Recreation

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s s e Online

STAFF PHOTO

Get a glimpse of Montgomery Bell State Park in our quick video. Visit imagesdickson.com.

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Into the Great Outdoors MONTGOMERY BELL OFFERS A SERENE ESCAPE

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ontgomery Bell State Park’s 3,700 acres of rolling hills and scenic backdrops offer a wealth of ways to enjoy the outdoors. “I may be biased, but I think this is the best of Tennessee’s state parks,” says Pat Wright, park manager at Montgomery Bell State Park. “You can enjoy all kinds of recreational activities in a quiet, serene setting, and there’s lots of wildlife like deer, turkey and squirrels. The park is safe and friendly – a hidden jewel. It invites people to escape from the hustle and bustle and enjoy our good nature.” And they do. Roughly one million people flock to the park each year to camp, hike, mountain bike, fish, swim, golf, boat, picnic and simply relax. “Camping is a big draw, and so are our 12 miles of hiking trails,” Wright says. “All of them are fairly easy walking, but there are some hills.” The park’s 20 miles of mountain biking trails are another draw and range in difficulty from easy to expert. “They’re really popular and getting bigger every year,” Wright says. Water enthusiasts are in seventh heaven at Montgomery Bell, thanks to the park’s three lakes, all of which are open for fishing. Bass, bluegill, crappie and catfish are common catches. The scenic Lake Acorn also offers swimming and has a sand beach for relaxation. Visitors can even rent paddleboats, canoes and flat-bottom boats from Memorial Day to Labor Day. “In spring and summer, we also have free ranger programs that focus on environmental education,” Wright says. Program topics may include the iron ore history of the park, birds of prey, aquatic ecosystems, amphibians and reptiles, nature games, recycling, fossils and mammals of Tennessee, and wildflower nature walks. “We always have a great turnout for our spring Wildflower Weekend in April,” Wright says. “Our rangers lead walks and identify spring-blooming plants and flowers.” With so much to do and see, one day isn’t enough to explore Montgomery Bell State Park. But that’s no problem, thanks to the park’s 130-room inn and conference center, which invites guests to book a room and stay awhile. Dining is also conveniently located on site. A full-service restaurant adjacent to the inn offers impressive views of Lake Acorn. “The restaurant serves home-style buffets every day for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and one of its specialties is catfish,” Wright says. “We get a lot of people who come out from Dickson every day just to eat lunch here. – Jessica Mozo

The park’s inn and conference center overlooks Lake Acorn.

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1916-1920 Charlotte Courthouse

Working for the Prosperity of Dickson County to Make Our County a Better Place to Live, Work and Play ELECTED OFFICIALS Robert L. Stone County Mayor

Glynda Pendergrass Trustee

Gail Wren Assessor of Property

Phil Simons County Clerk

24-Hou r H Emerge n c y Hargis Service Availab Heating & Air le H Serving Dickson and Surrounding Counties H H H H H H H H H H Dennis Hargis 1010 Jordan Circle White Bluff, TN 37187 394-6475 or 797-9352

Jackie Farthing Register-of-Deeds

Pam Myatt Circuit Court Clerk

Tom Wall Sheriff

Jasper McEwen Road Superintendent

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Randy Simpkins District #1

John W. Gunn District #2

Gary Suggs District #3

Tennsco steel products, manufactured here in Dickson, Tennessee, are distributed throughout the United States and are known for their quality and durability.

Regina H. Fowler District #4

James “Cotton” Dawson District #5

Benny Spencer District #6

Virginia Gray District #7

Horace G. Perkins III District #8

Tony Adams District #9

Buford Reed District #10

Tennsco’s product line includes shelving, storage cabinets, media storage, lockers, workbenches and card files. With over 600 employees in six plant locations, Tennsco is proud of the role we play in our community.

Gaither C. Bagsby District #11

David McMillen District #12

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(615) 446-8000 www.tennsco.com

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Education

Raising the Academic Bar DIPLOMA PROJECT CHANGES WILL HELP PREPARE ALL STUDENTS FOR THE FUTURE

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new school of thought in Dickson County says that all high school students should be on the same academic path – whether they plan to attend college or jump right into the workforce. The Dickson County Schools system has become part of the Tennessee Diploma Project, an initiative by the state to raise the academic bar for all students. Beginning with the freshman class entering high school in August 2009, all students will need 22 credits upon graduation – instead of the previous 20 – with that first “22-credit class” graduating in 2013. “So from this point forward, all students will be required to earn an additional credit in math, a half-credit in physical education, and a half-credit in a course called personal finance,” says Devin Sisco, director of secondary education for Dickson County Schools. The Tennessee Diploma Project is a move by the state to get schools more in line with National Assessment of Educational Progress standards. NAEP assesses student academic progress in all states. “All students will be on the same educational path and level, whether they are immediately going into the workforce or attending college,” Sisco says. “One of the Tennessee Diploma Project goals was to have high school students take four years of math classes, and this will now be achieved.” In addition, Dickson County students must also have an initial career focus by the beginning of their sophomore year. At that point, they must choose from one of four broad areas of elective study in which they will ultimately earn three DICKSON COUNT Y

of their credits toward graduation. Those four areas of elective study are STEM, which is science, technology, engineering and mathematics; humanities, which involves language arts, foreign languages and social studies; fine arts, which encompasses choral and instrumental music, visual arts and performing arts; and career technical education. “Students must pull three total credits from one of those curriculums,” Sisco says. “And the Tennessee Diploma Project will ultimately have an effect on middle schools, too, because we need to be moving those young students toward

greater academic capability – especially in the key areas of math, science and language arts.” Sisco adds that the Dickson County Schools system is also moving away from a block schedule to a more traditional seven-period school day. “We are implementing these several changes for the good of all students, so they will be better trained for the workforce or college following graduation,” he says. “It all makes for an especially interesting and exciting time here at Dickson County Schools.” – Kevin Litwin

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615-446-4644

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Health & Wellness

ANTONY BOSHIER

Dickson Medical Associates’ new facility on Highway 46 in Dickson

Looking Ahead to the Next 50 Years MEDICAL FACILITIES ADD NEW DIGS IN DICKSON

H

orizon Medical Center celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2008 – and now it’s making room for new technology and a new generation of medicine. The medical center is establishing a brand-new campus on 66 acres along Highway 46, near Interstate 40. Known as Natchez Medical Park, the campus already houses one building that includes a Sarah Cannon Cancer Center on one side and a Natchez DICKSON COUNT Y

Imaging facility on the other. “Our old hospital building continues to serve the community well, but the eventual goal is to keep expanding Natchez Medical Park and move everything there by around the year 2012,” says John Marshall, CEO of Horizon Medical Center and Natchez Medical Park. Marshall says the next expansion to Natchez Medical Park is scheduled to begin in late 2009.

“We will be breaking ground on a new ambulatory surgery center for outpatients and will construct some medical offices as part of that phase,” he says. “Then a couple years later, the final stage of construction will be implemented to build an inpatient tower. Once the tower is constructed, all equipment and services from Horizon Medical Center will be moved to Natchez Medical Park.” While all of these plans unfold, Horizon Medical Center continues to be a leader in medical innovation and treatment for the five counties it serves. For example, one of the surgeons at HMC is trained to perform an innovative balloon sinuplasty procedure, whereby the surgeon relieves a patient’s sinus passages by running angioplasty tubes through the gums instead of the nose. “We also have a surgeon who does a procedure on the lower back called an axial lift, to separate vertebrae that have been compressing together,” says Betty Weaver, director of marketing for Horizon Medical Center and Natchez Medical Park. “Horizon Medical Center certainly has high-skilled surgeons on staff.” Dickson County has other top-notch medical facilities available to the public, including Dickson Medical Associates, which opened a new, 83,000-square-foot facility along Highway 46 in spring 2009. The multi-specialty practice provides the latest in medical technology, with an emphasis on convenience and satisfaction for the patient. “We have a beautiful, scenic quality of life here in Dickson County, so medical facilities are able to recruit top doctors and physicians who don’t want to live in big metropolitan cities,” Betty Weaver says. “This whole region west of Nashville is growing, and so is the quality of medical care that residents here are receiving.” – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S D I C K S O N . C O M

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Experience the Alexander difference!

2211 Hwy. 46 S. Dickson, TN 37055 (615) 446-5141 www.alexanderchevroletdickson.com

30 Anniversary s7EWANTTOTHANKYOUFORYOURCONTINUEDSUPPORT ANDTRUSTASWEHAVEGROWNTONINEAGENTSAND SIXAUCTIONEERS s 7ESPECIALIZEINRESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL FARMS LANDANDAUCTIONESTATESALES %#OLLEGE3Ts$ICKSON 4.   

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Arts & Culture

Gaslight Dinner Theatre’s recent productions include the musical A Chorus Line.

Now That’s ‘Dinnertainment’ GASLIGHT DINNER THEATRE PRESENTS A MEAL AND A SHOW

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here’s no need for Dickson County residents to drive to Nashville to enjoy a professional dinner theater experience. The Renaissance Center’s Gaslight Dinner Theatre offers “dinnertainment” five times a year, and the experience includes a professional comedy or musical accompanied by a satisfying buffet. “Many people don’t know Dickson has a dinner theater,” says Pacer Harp, managing director of The Gaslight Dinner Theatre and Faraday Science Theatre at The Renaissance Center. “It makes for a wonderful evening. You can make it a date for two with private conversation, or you can make it a party of 10 and catch up with old friends. Church groups come in groups as large as 40 sometimes.” Now in its ninth year, The Gaslight Dinner Theatre is produced in a space originally designed as a science theatre where students on field trips could see interactive and educational science shows. “After one year of the space being used for its original purpose, we tested the room in another way,” Harp says. “We presented a country music and western-style revue in a dinner theater setting. We wrote the show ourselves, purchased costumes from Opryland’s ‘Country Music USA’ show and had it catered. It was very well received, so we decided to produce a dinner theater year-round.” With only 80 seats, The Gaslight Dinner Theatre is an intimate atmosphere where there’s not a bad seat in the house. Crowd favorites from DICKSON COUNT Y

past years include Honky Tonk Angels, Nunsense, Run for Your Wife, Smoke on the Mountain and A Tuna Christmas. The buffet always includes a salad bar, a selection of meats and vegetables, hot rolls, and cakes and pies. Evening dinner performances take place on Fridays and Saturdays, and senior lunch matinees are offered Tuesday through Friday for patrons ages 55 and older. Tickets are $35 for dinner shows and $25 for lunch matinees. “These shows are entirely professional talent and staff,” Harp says. “Dinner theater is an event of sorts, and you can decide the occasion. Celebrating a birthday or anniversary is common.” Another way to experience theater at The Renaissance Center is attending one of four annual productions offered by the Renaissance Players Community Theatre. The Renaissance Players have more than 400 local members and present popular musicals and plays cast through open auditions. The center also provides drama classes each semester for students ages 8 to 14. “They learn stage directions, script reading and improv, and they usually end with a performance at the end of the semester,” Harp says. “Many students go on to audition for our community theater shows and perform year after year.” For more information, visit the Web site at www.rcenter.org. – Jessica Mozo

What’s s e Online

Check out the Renaissance Center in our quick video. Take a virtual tour at imagesdickson.com.

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visit our

advertisers Alexander Chevrolet www.alexanderchevroletdickson.com Bank of Dickson www.bankofdickson.com Charles Woodard & Associates Inc. www.charleswoodard.com City of Dickson www.cityofdickson.com Dickson Apothecary Dickson County www.dicksoncounty.net Dickson County Chamber of Commerce www.dicksoncountychamber.com Dickson County Schools www.dicksoncountyschools.org Dickson Electric System www.dicksonelectric.com East Hills Dental Center www.easthillsdentalcenter.com Greater Dickson Gas Authority www.gdga.com Hargis Heating & Air Horizon Medical Center www.horizonmedicalcenter.com NHC Healthcare www.nhcdickson.com Parker Peery Properties www.ppproperties.com Results Physiotherapy www.resultsphysiotherapy.com Taylor Funeral Homes www.taylorsince1909.com Tennessee State Parks www.tnstateparks.tn.us Tennessee Technology Center www.hcdickson.edu Tennsco www.tennsco.com TriStar Bank www.tristarbank.com

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Community Profile

DICKSON COUNTY SNAPSHOT Dickson County is located in the north central portion of Tennessee, and it’s a part of the eight-county Nashville Metropolitan Statistical Area. Charlotte is the centrally located county seat, although the city of Dickson is the county’s largest.

CLIMATE OVERVIEW Generally, Tennessee has a temperate climate, with warm summers and mild winters. However, the state’s varied topography leads to a wide range of climatic conditions.

26 F January Low Temperature

45 F January High Temperature

67 F July Low Temperature

87 F July High Temperature

Nashville, the 158-bed community hospital offers medical/surgical care, obstetrics, gynecology, critical care and skilled nursing services, as well as 24-hour emergency services, MRI, CT, cardiac catheterization, outpatient services and more. The medical center is building a new outpatient surgery center and inpatient tower at Natchez Medical Park, along Highway 46 near Interstate 40. Dickson Medical Associates opened a new, 83,000square-foot facility along Highway 46 in spring 2009. The multi-specialty practice

provides the latest in medical technology, with an emphasis on patient convenience and satisfaction.

REAL ESTATE

$124,199 Average Home Price

15.84% Home Turnover Percentage

ARTS AND CULTURE Muzart 24 Court Square Charlotte, TN 37055 (615) 789-6655

MORE EO ONLINE

MEDICAL SERVICES OVERVIEW

imagesdickson.com

Horizon Medical Center serves Dickson, Hickman, Houston, Humphreys, Stewart and Montgomery counties. Located 45 miles west of

More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

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BRIAN M C CORD

Photo Finish

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harles Woodard’s life-size replica of an old country grocery store, complete with a vintage gas pump out front, houses his collection of country store memorabilia. The store – along with Woodard’s collection of antique farm paraphernalia – can be found on his working farm, Cluster Springs Farm, in White Bluff.

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Ad Index 4 4 A L E X A N D E R C H E V RO L E T

2 1 G R E AT E R D I C K S O N GA S AU TH O R IT Y

27 BA N K O F D I C K S O N 4 0 H A R G I S H E ATI N G & A I R 4 4 C H A R L E S WO O DA R D & A S S O C I AT E S I N C .

2 H O R IZO N M E D I C A L C E N T E R

C 2 C IT Y O F D I C K S O N

1 9 N H C H E A LT H C A R E

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1 8 PA R K E R P E E RY P R O P E RT I E S

4 0 D I C K S O N CO U N T Y 4 6 D I C K S O N CO U N T Y C H A M B E R O F CO M M E RC E C 3 D I C K S O N CO U N T Y S C H O O L S

47 R E S U LTS P H YS I OT H E R A PY 2 0 TAY LO R F U N E R A L H O M E S 4 4 T E N N E S S E E S TAT E PA R K S C3 TENNESSEE T EC H N O LO GY C E N T E R

4 6 D I C K S O N E L EC T R I C SYS T E M 4 0 T E N N S CO 42 E A S T H I L L S D E N TA L C E N T E R

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The Road to Success DICKSON COUNTY SCHOOLS

ON E CH I L D AT A T I M E

W W W. D I C K S O N C O U N T Y S C H O O L S . O R G This ad sponsored by: Cornerstone Animal Hospital t A-1 Signs t Middle Tennessee Mortgage Inc. t United Mechanical and Electrical

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Far from Wall Street â&#x20AC;Ś Close to YOU

650 Hwy. 46 S.

719 E. College St.

3416 Hwy. 48 N., Charlotte

Inside Kroger

615-446-7100 www.tristarbank.com Member FDIC


Images Dickson County 2009-10