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2007-08 | IMAGESCOLUMBUS.COM | VIDEO TOUR ONLINE TM

OF COLUMBUS-LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

How Refreshing Tenn-Tom Waterway makes it fun to play outside

STRONG IN MIND AND BODY New Stark Recreation Center caters to all students

CREOLE-SPICED RED SNAPPER Restaurants offer variety of interesting, tasty dishes

SPONSORED BY THE COLUMBUS-LOWNDES DEVELOPMENT LINK


2007-2008 EDITION | VOLUME 4 TM

OF COLUMBUS-LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

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HOW REFRESHING The Tenn-Tom Waterway has everything an outdoor enthusiast could want.

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STILL YOUNG AT HEART Senior citizens who retire here will find a variety of entertaining activities.

22 CREOLE-SPICED RED SNAPPER Columbus restaurants serve up delicious food sure to please any palate.

26 DANCIN’ IN THE STREET The annual Market Street Festival attracts thousands of people each May.

44 WHERE TRADITION REIGNS Architecture and academics are what set Mississippi University for Women apart.

57 ON THE COVER Mississippi University for Women Photo by Greg Emens

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STRONG IN MIND AND BODY The new Marie Charlotte Stark Recreation Center helps MUW students stay healthy.

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ACTION! ADVENTURE! “IT KEPT ME ON THE EDGE OF MY LAPTOP!”

“COLUMBUSLOWNDES COUNTY LIKE IT’S NEVER BEEN SEEN BEFORE!” Images of Columbus-Lowndes County

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SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT ANY RESEMBLANCE TO PLACES, EVENTS OR QUALITY OF LIFE IN COLUMBUS-LOWNDES COUNTY IS PURELY INTENTIONAL!

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PRIDE AND PERFORMANCE O F COLU M B US - LOWN DE S COU NT Y, MISSISSIPPI

COLUMBUS BUSINESS 36 Helicopter Haven News that American Eurocopter was awarded another contract means a facility expansion for the Golden Triangle region.

38 Biz Briefs 41 Chamber Report 42 Economic Profile

D E PA R TM E NT S

SERVING THE GOLDEN TRIANGLE SINCE 1976.

8 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Columbus-Lowndes County’s culture

31 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Columbus-Lowndes County

51 Education 55 Arts & Culture 59 Health & Wellness 67 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

70 Membership Directory

Civil & Environmental Engineering Testing ▲ Surveying ▲ Planning P.O. Drawer 1078 West Point, MS 39773 (662) 494-7101 (662) 328-5962

78 Business Guide CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y

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ONLINE CONTENTS More lists, links and tips for newcomers

IMAGESCOLUMBUS.COM

MOVING PICTURES Take a video tour of Columbus-Lowndes County at imagescolumbus.com.

GET SMART ABOUT LOCAL SCHOOLS Find listings and links to schools, colleges and universities.

SEE HOW THE GARDENS GROW Get the dirt on growing seasons, soils plus tips on plant selection.

WHAT DO THE LOCALS EAT? Discover what makes cuisine in Columbus so deliciously different.

NO PLACE LIKE HOME Search for a new home, plus get moving tips and more at www.realtor.com.

A B O U T TH I S M AGA Z I N E Images of Columbus-Lowndes County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is sponsored by the Columbus-Lowndes Development Link. In print and online, Images gives readers a taste of what makes Columbus-Lowndes County tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts.

“Find the good – and praise it.” – Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

jnlcom.com

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Almanac | Columbus-Lowndes County

A Place for Swingers

Tennessee in Mississippi

If you want to hit the links, there are plenty of places to play in the Columbus area. Green Oaks Golf Club on Green Oaks Drive boasts 18 holes over 6,504 yards with a par 72, and Elm Lake Golf Course on Taylor-Thurston Road is a par-72 course with more than 6,874 yards. In addition, Whispering Pines Golf Club is a military course on Columbus Air Force Base, and the Columbus Country Club is another private course for duffers.

Columbus pays homage each year to prolific playwright Tennessee Williams, who was born here in 1911. The annual celebration is called the Tennessee Williams Tribute and Tour of Victorian Homes, which occurs each September. It includes dramatic readings, scholarly presentations and visits to historic homes. Williams won Pulitzer Prizes for A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and also penned The Glass Menagerie. Today, his boyhood home serves as a Mississippi Welcome Center.

SEE MORE ONLINE | To learn more about the Rosenzweig Arts Center, visit the archives at imagescolumbus.com/04-05.

Let There Be Art Art aficionados, rejoice. The Rosenzweig Arts Center hosts six to eight exhibits every year, with a Thursday-night reception prior to the show’s opening. The center, located on the corner of Main and Fifth streets in downtown Columbus, also features a gift shop, classroom space, a small theater and meeting rooms, and is home to the Columbus Arts Council, an organization that has had roots in the city since 1965. The Rosenzweig Arts Center can also be rented for weddings and business receptions.

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Say Cheese ‌ Cake Mmmm. Raspberry swirl, heavenly Kahlua and blissful blackberry. That’s only three of the 40 cheesecake flavors available through Jubilations Cheesecakes, a company started in 1983 by former schoolteacher Tammy Craddock. She took her love of baking and turned it into a lucrative business. The only way to order a Jubilations cake is by phone or the Internet (800-530-7808 or www.jubilations.com), and customers receive their fresh dessert by UPS the next day. The motto of the company is “Life is short. Eat dessert first.â€? SEE MORE ONLINE | To learn more about Jubilations Cheesecakes, visit the archives at imagescolumbus.com/04-05.

Columbus-Lowndes County | At A Glance POPULATION (2005 ESTIMATE) Columbus: 24,425 Lowndes County: 59,773 LOCATION Columbus is in east-central Mississippi, five miles west of the Alabama border and 22 miles west of Starkville, home of Mississippi State University. BEGINNINGS The Chickasaw Treaty of 1816 provided land to the U.S. government where Columbus now stands, and the town was officially established in 1821.

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Race fans will find plenty of action at the two dirt tracks located here. Columbus Speedway, a highbanked 3/10-mile red clay oval, is known for its extremely intense action and has been nicknamed the Baddest Bullring in the South. The speedwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schedule runs from early March through early November. Magnolia Motor Speedway is a state-of-the-art race facility featuring a 3/8-mile dirt oval. The track is near the intersection of U.S. highways 82 and 45, with racing from mid-March through mid-October.

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Hot Rods

FOR MORE INFORMATION Columbus-Lowndes Development Link /PS`RSS /PS`RSS\ / SS S 1102 Main St. "#/ # P.O. Box 1328 Columbus, MS 39701 (662) 328-8369 Fax: (662) 327-3417 ESab>]W\b >] b www.cldlink.org

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Almanac | Columbus-Lowndes County

Fast Facts ■ A local patriotic observance back in 1866 became the nation’s first Memorial Day and inspired the poem “The Blue and the Gray.” ■ The first public school in Mississippi, Franklin Academy, opened in Columbus in 1821 and is still going strong today.

Her Legacy Lives On Many interesting stories are told every October on the campus of Mississippi University for Women. That’s when the Eudora Welty Writers’ Symposium takes place, with top Southern writers and scholars on hand to present and read from their written works. All events are held in Poindexter Hall at MUW and are open to the public, free of charge. The event is sponsored by MUW’s Department of Languages, Literature and Philosophy, and is named for the school’s famous alum. Three writers who have appeared at the symposium in the recent past have been Pulitzer Prize winners.

Plane and Simple The largest Fourth of July celebration in northeast Mississippi touches down each year at Columbus Air Force Base. More than 25,000 people pack the base for the family-oriented Go 4th Independence Day event. Gates open at 4 p.m., with live music starting at 5 p.m., along with dozens of activities for kids and adults. The evening culminates at 9 p.m. with a fireworks show. Columbus AFB continues to be the largest employer in Lowndes County and is one of the few military installations where civilian employees outnumber the military personnel. There are 1,700 civilians and 1,500 service men and women.

SEE MORE ONLINE | To learn more about Columbus Air Force Base, visit the archives at imagescolumbus.com/05-06.

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■ The three cities of Mississippi’s Golden Triangle region are Columbus, Starkville and West Point, with Columbus being the largest in size and population. ■ Several hundred retirees from Columbus Air Force Base continue to make Lowndes County their home. ■ Columbus boasts some of the country’s best bass fishing along the TennesseeTombigbee Waterway.

SEE MORE ONLINE | For more Fast Facts about Columbus, visit imagescolumbus.com.

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Almanac | Columbus-Lowndes County

Ahh, Springtime If the flowers are beginning to bloom, then it’s time for the annual Columbus Pilgrimage and Garden Tour. The 12-day event showcases several of the historic 19th-century homes and special gardens that grace the city, with driving and walking tours among the activities. The tentative dates for the 2008 Columbus Pilgrimage are March 26-April 5. Some of the tour sites from recent years include Amzi Love Home & Garden, Colonnade Garden, Errolton, Leighcrest Garden, Rosedale, Shadowlawn, the Stephen D. Lee Home, Temple Heights, Twelve Gables, Waverly and White Arches.

Angel of Repose While there may be more than 15,000 graves at Friendship Cemetery, the most photographed monument is “Weeping Angel.” The story goes that when the pastor of a local Baptist church died, it was such a sad day that the angels wept. The cemetery, located on Fourth Street South in Columbus, was founded in 1849 and contains the graves of four U.S. congressmen, two Mississippi governors, five Confederate Civil War generals and 2,194 Confederate soldiers who died in the Battle of Shiloh.

Check It Out The Columbus-Lowndes Public Library is booked solid with activities. The library has its main facility in Columbus and branches in Artesia, Caledonia and Crawford, and hosts events such as story hour for preschoolers, wee story time, school programs for students in grades K-6 and children’s book week events. The library system also stages an annual adult storytelling festival and special seasonal programs. History buffs will want to visit The Buckley Genealogy Room and The Billups-Garth Archives at the main branch.

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It’s in the

Water THE TENNESSEE-TOMBIGBEE WATERWAY MAKES IT FUN TO PLAY OUTSIDE

SEE MORE ONLINE | To learn more about the Tenn-Tom Waterway, visit the archives at imagescolumbus.com/04-05.

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STORY BY KATHRYN ROYSTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG EMENS

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inding more than 200 miles through the states of Mississippi and Alabama, the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway has everything an outdoor enthusiast could ever want. The waterway is peppered with fishing holes, campgrounds and hiking trails designed to make the most of the gorgeous scenery and the balmy Southeastern weather. Recreational opportunities are particularly abundant in Columbus, the largest city on the waterway. Here, the Tenn-Tom helps to form Columbus Lake and snakes past the downtown Columbus Riverwalk & Trail. Without a doubt, the waterway is one of the area’s most popular attractions. “Approximately 3 million visitors experience the Tenn-Tom Waterway each year,” says Agnes Zaiontz, executive director of the Tenn-Tom Tourism Association. About 1,200 pleasure boats use Columbus Lake each year, and special events can attract thousands of people. “Last year’s Fourth of July fireworks event boasted almost 10,000 in Columbus Lake is perfect for Sunday afternoon fishing.

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attendance,â&#x20AC;? Zaiontz says. Perhaps the most popular lake events are the bass, crappie and catfish tournaments, which Zaiontz says appeal to local fishing clubs, professional anglers and religious and civic groups. The tournament calendar offers everything from charity events to regional championships, and upcoming tournaments include the Team Trails Bass Tournaments and the Bass Anglers Invitational Trail. Zaiontz particularly recommends fishing in the spring or fall.

Riverwalk along the Tombigbee River

Columbus Lake

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“March and October are excellent crappie fishing months. Not too cold and not too hot,” she says. Not far from the lake, Columbus’s downtown Riverwalk is ideal for walking, bike riding and just enjoying the scenery. “We have traffic year-round. It’s phenomenal,” says George Irby, who serves as director of federal programs for the city of Columbus. Irby helped to coordinate the Riverwalk project, which was partially funded by a federal grant and opened in July 2005. Irby is particularly proud of the pavilions that bookend the Riverwalk. They were built, he says, because

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the project designers wanted to do something different. “They’re like overlooks,” he says. “You can see the river from the trailhead – it’s a real scenic view.” Located on previously unused land, the trail and its pavilions now host wedding receptions, picnics and regional 10K runs. Irby says even local schools use the trail as an environmental classroom. “Some schools use it for nature training,” he explains. “They go there, and the students identify trees.” With the Riverwalk so popular, it’s no surprise that Columbus has plans to expand it. Soon, it will connect with a

nearby nature trail that ends at the John C. Stennis Lock and Dam. The expansion will more than triple the Riverwalk’s length, from 1.25 to 4 miles. Irby, however, is most excited about the way the Riverwalk brings families together. “I like to see the parents with little children on the Riverwalk on their bikes,” he says. For Zaiontz, it’s all just part of the character of Columbus. The city is made for outdoor buffs, she says. “The area’s vast natural resources are vital in attracting people to the region and tend to support a quality outdoor recreational experience.”

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Still

Young at

Heart SENIORS FIND A NUMBER OF ENTERTAINING OPTIONS FOR RETIREMENT IN COLUMBUS

STORY BY VALERIE PASCOE PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG EMENS

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e’s been involved in everything from space shuttle liftoffs for NASA to public policy in Washington, D.C., and like many modern retirees, Jack Brett isn’t slowing down much in his golden years. The former U.S. Department of Defense employee has lived in nearly 10 cities across the United States but decided to retire in Columbus because of its quality of life and proximity to his hometown of West Point. “I stay so busy, my sister complains that she can’t even get me on the phone. I’ve loved every minute of being here,” says the 80-year-old Brett, who lives at Trinity Place Retirement Community, a

Trinity Place Retirement Community is home to more than 240 seniors.

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Jack Brett, a resident at Trinity Place Retirement Community, likes to play cards, exercise and take classes.

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Plantation Pointe Retirement Community provides a variety of comfortable living options for active seniors, offering both independence and convenience.

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continuing-care facility that is home to more than 240 local seniors. When he’s not at exercise class or attending a continuing education course on topics such as Civil War history or Broadway musicals, Brett can be found playing cards, socializing or relaxing in his independent-living apartment at Trinity Place. “There are so many activities to take advantage of, including the road trips. We’ve been to Meridian to hear a Cab Calloway concert and to Birmingham and Pigeon Forge,” says Brett, who is looking forward to an upcoming trip to Tuscaloosa to attend the opera. A few doors down, Elsie Sanderson is also enjoying retirement at Trinity Place. The North Mississippi native worked as a teacher at Fairview Elementary School in Columbus for 28 years. “Even though there are several larger cities convenient to here, seniors have all of the services we need right in Columbus – a good hospital and wonderful doctors are nearby, and we don’t have to worry about transportation because Trinity Place takes care of it for us,” says Sanderson, who also enjoys attending worship services, playing bingo and visiting with friends. According to Stan Maynard, executive director of Trinity Place, the retirement community employs 140 staff members and offers 139 independent-living retirement apartments, 52 personalcare and assisted-living suites and a 60-bed skilled nursing home. Trinity Place was also the first healthcare facility in the state of Mississippi to earn Eden Alternative Accreditation, a designation that recognizes a commitment to promoting an environment rich in variety and spontaneity. “The Eden Alternative is about culture change, especially in skilled nursing facilities,” Maynard says. “We have empowered our staff, especially the front-line staff, into self-directed and self-managed work teams.” Nearby, Plantation Pointe Retirement Community also provides comfortable living options for active seniors, as well as for those who need assistance. Zero-lot line homes in the estate section of Plantation Pointe are popular with seniors in search of independence and convenience with the comfort of a private home. The retirement community also CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y

Elsie Sanderson enjoys the many amenities that are available at Trinity Place.

features The Windsor Place Nursing and Rehabilitation and The Arrington Assisted Living Community. For residents in need of even more specialized medical attention, the community’s Philwood Suites section offers a specialized unit licensed for Alzheimer’s and dementia care. In addition to qualified nursing staffs, a growing number of local volunteers

also serve seniors at both Trinity Place and Plantation Pointe. “Columbus and Lowndes County is a great place for retirees,” Maynard explains. “Columbus is a Mississippicertified retirement community, we have the best weather year-round, and we offer many different recreational activities in the Golden Triangle and surrounding area.” I M AG E S C O L U M B U S . C O M

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Restaurants to

DINE FOR COLUMBUS’ CULINARY COMMUNITY SERVES UP A VARIETY OF DELICIOUS OPTIONS

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hef Sarah Labensky’s recipe for success at her downtown Columbus restaurant, the Front Door/ Back Door, is providing singly delicious food while maintaining a double identity. She serves gourmet lunch fare at the Front Door, located on Main Street, during the day and offers fine Mediterranean dining each evening at the Back Door, located in the same building with a back entrance on Fourth Street. Labensky says her secret weapon is employing students from Mississippi University for Women’s Culinary Arts Institute, a program she helped found in 1997 and oversaw until she purchased the Front Door/Back Door in 2006. “Because we have the culinary school at MUW and have so many graduates in this area wanting to stay on and work here, the culinary community in Columbus is growing,” says Labensky, who moved to Columbus from Arizona, where she worked as a pastry chef and culinary instructor. “I expect to see more great restaurants opening as a result in the future.” In addition to offering homemade soups, salads and pastries at the Front Door during the daytime, Labensky also sells gourmet market items and professional kitchen

tools, such as Viking cookware and cutlery in the restaurant’s front section. Just one block away, Mary Broussard and her daughter, Beth, serve up the pizzazz of New Orleans-style cuisine with Mississippi grace and charm at J. Broussard’s. The restaurant is

J. Broussard’s is known for its creative cuisine, such as this grilled duck entree. Right: Fleet’s Eets treats diners to a home-cooked meal at an all-you-can-eat lunch buffet.

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named in honor of the late Joseph Broussard, who trained under some of New Orleans’ best-known chefs before opening his own restaurant in Columbus seven years ago. Located in a century-old Victorian-style building that was originally built to house the Columbus Elks Club, J. Broussard’s serves dinner entrees such as grilled duck breast with Creole pepper jelly and pecan panee catfish. A popular spot with locals, J. Broussard’s was recently named one of the best restaurants in America for catfish by Southern Living magazine. “These are my husband’s own special recipes, and now our daughter, who is a pastry chef by training, has taken over the kitchen to continue the family tradition, so we also have an extensive dessert menu,” Mary Broussard says. Down the road at the Columbus Marina, restaurateur Woody Lovejoy has opened Woody’s on the Water, an elegant dinner destination overlooking the Tombigbee River. His son, Kirk Lovejoy, who trained in Charleston, S.C., at Johnson & Wales University, is the executive chef and cooks up regional seafood dishes such as Creole-spiced red snapper, baconwrapped oysters and duck gumbo. Even further off the beaten path, down Highway 82 West between Starkville and Columbus, Shelia and Norfleet Reichle are giving new meaning to the term “home cooking” at their unique meat-and-three. The couple opens the doors of their home to nearly 200 customers a day for lunch at their restaurant, Fleet’s Eets. “Everyone says it’s like going to their mother or grandmother’s house to eat,” says Sheila Reichle, who doles out homegrown vegetables, fried chicken and steak on an all-you-can-eat buffet in her living room. “It feels like home because it is a home. They just walk right in and ask what’s for lunch.”

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Woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Water overlooks the Tenn-Tom Waterway, providing a nice view for diners. Right: The Back Door restaurant offers fine Mediterranean food every evening. Far left: J. Broussardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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Dancin’ in the

Street ANNUAL MUSIC FESTIVAL GETS PEOPLE MOVIN’ AND GROOVIN’ STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN

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GREG EMENS

ost longtime ColumbusLowndes County residents remember the old Magnolia Bowl football field, where the Columbus High School Falcons used to play their home football games. The Magnolia Bowl was also where the Main Street Columbus held its first festival in 1996. The springtime event was so surprisingly successful that it had to be moved to a larger location the following year. “The festival became a part of downtown along Market Street in 1997, and that’s where it has been held ever since,” says Laura Quinn, manager of Main Street Columbus, the downtown organization that sponsors the annual Market Street Festival. “Market Street, which is also known these days as Fifth Street, welcomes about 40,000 people to the annual one-day event. It is the biggest festival in

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Columbus each year.” The celebration occurs the first Saturday of May, but, technically, the entertainment portion of the festival begins on Friday night. “There is a ‘tickets-only’ concert held Friday night, then

The annual Market Street Festival brings 40,000 people downtown to enjoy music, crafts and kids’ activities.

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The Market Street Festival takes place the first Saturday in May.

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GREG EMENS

the entire lineup of Saturday activities is free and open to the public,” Quinn says. “The Friday-night session is called Market Street After Dark and features a big-name entertainment act. Then throughout Saturday, we have more live music, with a number of well-known local and regional music acts.” Saturday activities also include a 5K run/bike tour in the morning along the Columbus Riverwalk & Trail. It begins downtown at the Tombigbee River and winds to the end of the trail, then returns to the starting point. “The late-morning and afternoon activities include 200 arts and crafts vendors, six music stages, a rockclimbing wall, train rides and an indoor laser range,” Quinn says. “In addition, the merchants along Market Street move their products onto the sidewalks so that true shoppers can be in their glory finding numerous sale items.” Another festival highlight is a Kids Stage, which is set up in front of the Cable One building. “Several of the cartoon characters that appear on Cable One TV shows have made appearances at the festival,” Quinn says. “SpongeBob SquarePants showed up one year, then a Nick Live show took place another year and Dora the Explorer was here in 2006. Kids Stage is one of the most popular destinations of the entire day.” Since 1999, the Southeast Tourism Society, based in Atlanta, has rated the Market Street Festival as a Top 20 Event. “The festival is a nice downtown attraction, but actually all of downtown Columbus is interesting,” Quinn says. “We have nearly 120 upper-level apartments located downtown that are always filled, plus nice restaurants and great stores with convenient parking. Downtown also has a lot of history, and it’s close to the Mississippi University for Women campus. My job is to promote downtown, and I have a nice product to work with.”

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Portfolio

Make Yourself at Home AREA BED-AND-BREAKFASTS OFFER A COMFORTABLE PLACE TO SPEND THE NIGHT

outhern hospitality is easy to find in Columbus – just spend a night at one of the town’s cozy bed and breakfasts. The Cartney-Hunt House on Seventh Street radiates historic charm. Built in 1828, the bed-and-breakfast is the oldest brick house in northern Mississippi. It was named for its builder, James Cartney, and one of its first owners, Henry Hunt. “The house is built in the Federal style, which predates styles like Victorian and Greek Revival,” says Marleen Hansen, who owns the Cartney-Hunt House with her husband, Vagn. “It was restored in 1983 as a bed-and-breakfast, and it’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places.” The inn’s three guest rooms feature antique furnishings and reproductions, private baths, reading lamps, terry-cloth robes and a generous heap of hospitality. “We used to live in North Carolina, and I’ve been having company all my life,” Hansen says. “I saw this house

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and fell in love with it.” Despite the Cartney-Hunt House’s old age, it offers modern conveniences such as wireless Internet access in all the rooms. Breakfast typically consists of omelets, fruit, meat, muffins and scones, and coffee and juice. “We have pecan trees on the property, so sometimes we make blueberry and pecan waffles,” Hansen says. “We plan breakfast around what the guests can and will eat.” Amzi Love-Lincoln Home Bed & Breakfast is another historic Columbus inn. It’s an Italian-style villa that has been in the same family for several generations. Many notable guests have lodged at the inn, including novelist John Grisham. Backstrom’s Country Bed & Breakfast

The Cartney-Hunt House bed-andbreakfast is the oldest brick home in northern Mississippi.

is a peaceful countryside retreat in a brick and wood home on Highway 182. The house is built of lumber from a century-old Tennessee country store owned by Betty Jo Backstrom’s family, and many stained-glass works of art by her husband, Bill, are displayed throughout the home. Finally, the Jackie O House was built in 1907 and is a fine example of neoclassical design. The B&B has six guest rooms and is a popular choice for weddings and holiday events.

PHOTOS BY GREG EMENS

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It Pays To Have Good Taste

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At MUW’s Culinary Arts Institute, students learn all about the food industry.

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f you’ve eaten at any of Columbus’ restaurants, you’ve probably tasted the culinary talents of graduates of the Mississippi University for Women Culinary Arts Institute. “Our graduates go on to work in fine restaurants, resorts and hotels locally and all over the country,” says Jim Fitzgerald, director of the MUW Culinary Arts Institute. “Our program allows them to branch out in other areas. Some are interested in being chefs, and some go on to graduate school to earn a master’s in food science or nutrition.” The Culinary Arts Institute is housed in the renovated Shattuck Hall, one of 24 MUW campus buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Students have the opportunity to earn a bachelor of science degree with a minor in food journalism, food styling and photography, nutrition/ wellness or entrepreneurship/small business development. Throughout the program, students gain hands-on experience by catering several annual community events, such as the Lowndes County Alumni Association’s Valentine’s Extravaganza, which raises money for scholarships. “Our students cook and prepare a buffet, and we’ve been catering that event for a decade,” Fitzgerald says. “A lot of people love our food, and we’re noted for good hospitality.” The Culinary Arts Institute began in 1997. Three years later, the institute graduated 10 students, and in the 200607 school year, nearly 115 were enrolled in the program. In 2006, a team of students from the Culinary Arts Institute took second place in a national competition sponsored by the Culinary Research Chefs Association. The competition required the students to blend culinary arts with food science. “I enjoy seeing our students blossom and gain confidence,” Fitzgerald says. “Though there are academics involved, this is a very hands-on program. I love to see our students succeed in the real world.” CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y


Portfolio

One Giant Family almer Home for Children has been rescuing kids from hopeless situations for more than 100 years. “Palmer Home started because there were so many orphans from the Civil War,” says Judi Brown, information services coordinator for Palmer Home. “I believe it’s survived so long because it’s God’s ministry. Palmer Home has been through many tough times, but the Lord always came through.” Founded in 1895 by a group of Presbyterians and concerned community members, Palmer Home opens its arms to kids who have been neglected or abused. Many come as infants and leave when it’s time to go to college. The home cares for approximately 80 boys and girls at any one time. Palmer Home is named for Dr. Benjamin Morgan Palmer, a native of South Carolina and one the leading Southern Presbyterian preachers of the 19th century. He served for more than 50 years as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in New Orleans and touched many lives. “Nowadays, there’s so much upheaval in families, and so many families just don’t survive,” Brown says. “Children come to us after maybe a pastor, grandparent or social services sees a situation and sends them to us.” While at Palmer Home, children live in seven different cottages with house moms and dads, attend local public and private schools and form lasting relationships with each other and their caregivers. “We have alumni reunions, and many of them come back. They consider this their home – their roots,” Brown says. Palmer Home’s staff works hard to help children reach their full potential, no matter what their background may be. “We had one girl who became a runner-up in Miss America while she was here, and Evelyn McPhail, former co-chairman of the Republican National Committee, was one of our alumni,” Brown says. Two things set Palmer Home apart from other children’s shelters: It’s privately funded by donations and churches, and it makes every effort to keep siblings together. CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y

“We’ve had a family as large as seven kids,” Brown says. Without Palmer Home, many children would have lived without hope. “Maybe a child’s parents were on drugs, and the child was headed down the same path,” Brown explains. “It’s rewarding to see these kids come in, and sometimes they don’t smile at all. You can tell they’ve been through tough times. And later they start to smile and develop a sense of security. It’s neat to watch that happen.”

Palmer Home for Children has been instrumental in helping childen who have been neglected or abused.

GREG EMENS

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Portfolio

Tuning Into the Right Station W

Store into a high-tech facility. The station covers 18 counties and reaches 721,000 viewers in Mississippi, from Booneville to Philadelphia, west to Grenada and east to Tuscaloosa County, Ala. In 2002, WCBI reached another milestone when it became North Mississippi’s first digital station and one of the few stations in the nation broadcasting multiple streams of news, sports, weather and entertainment. “We’re always on the cutting edge of technology,” Berry says. “We were the first stereo television and first HDTV station in North Mississippi. We’re four stations in one, from analog to digital.” WCBI ownership changed in 2003 from Imes Communications to Morris Multimedia Inc., one of the largest privately owned media companies in the United States. “The Imes family owned WCBI for a very long time, but the sale of WCBI to Morris Multimedia did not change the fact that WCBI is a local TV station,” Berry says. “We’re still a local TV station, and we’ll never forget that.”

WCBI-TV. “WCBI is committed to this community and providing them with local news and severe weather coverage as well as hit shows like ‘Smallville,’ ‘7th Heaven,’ ‘Friends’ and ‘Seinfeld.’ ” WCBI was the first television station in North Mississippi and began operations in 1956 east of Columbus, on Highway 12. In 1993, WCBI moved to historic downtown Columbus, renovating the former Egger’s and Loeb’s Department

GREG EMENS

CBI-TV in Columbus does more than provide news, weather, sports and entertainment in North Mississippi and Northwest Alabama. The CBS affiliate also makes an effort to give back to the community. “We’re involved with the ColumbusLowndes Development Link, the United Way, the Columbus Air Force Base, Relay for Life, MS walks … whatever we can do to provide a public service,” says Bobby Berry, general manager of

WCBI-TV has been a source for news and entertainment since 1956.

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An Economic Source of Power VA Economic Development plays a big role in bringing new industry to Columbus and North Mississippi. Toyota officials announced plans in February 2007 to locate a new automotive assembly plant near Tupelo, representing a $1.3 billion investment by Toyota that is expected to create at least 2,000 jobs. “The automotive industry continues to move south, and having a new OEM (original equipment manufacturer) in proximity to existing OEMs should prove to be lucrative via suppliers to the region,” says Chandler Russ, project manager for TVA Economic Development’s Mississippi Region. “TVA and its power distributors will be actively recruiting suppliers to the region.” Some of North Mississippi’s biggest industries include furniture, forest and timber products, agriculture, metals, aerospace, automotive and plastics. Columbus and Lowndes County had TVA Economic Development’s first certified megasite, which is a large industrial property, for potential automotive manufacturing or assembly plants. Megasites in Lowndes County include the 1,400-acre Golden Triangle Megasite, which was purchased by SeverCorr for a steel plant, and the 1,800-acre Crossroads Megasite. “The local community, power distributors and the [ColumbusLowndes Development] Link should be commended for a tireless effort in both the certification and sale of one megasite, as well as the certification of a second megasite,” Russ says. “It’s truly remarkable considering we only have eight megasites throughout our seven-state coverage area.” Several industries in North Mississippi are growing rapidly. “Aerospace, aviation, metals and automotive are some examples of industries showing growth potential,” Russ says. “With the location of SeverCorr on the megasite, steel and metal-trade industries should continue to rise in the region. “Reliable, low-cost power, professional teamwork and a can-do attitude permeate business success,” Russ adds. – Stories by Jessica Mozo CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y

PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE HAINSEY

T

SeverCorr has a high-tech steel mill at the Golden Triangle Megasite.

ALWAYS LOW PRICES.

1913 Highway 45 North • Columbus, MS 39705 (662) 329-4810 • www.wal-mart.com

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Helicopter Haven AMERICAN EUROCOPTER IS FLYING HIGH IN COLUMBUS STORY BY KATIE PORTERFIELD | PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG EMENS

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Business | Columbus-Lowndes County

C

olumbus is already home to a first-rate American Eurocopter manufacturing facility. Recent news that the company was awarded yet another contract means a facility expansion and more benefits for the Golden Triangle region. American Eurocopter, a subsidiary of France-based EADS, is the largest U.S. helicopter manufacturer, providing helicopters to corporations, medical facilities, law enforcement agencies, the military and others. The company, which also has a facility in Grand Prairie, Texas, began working with a small staff in a temporary hanger at the Golden Triangle Regional Airport several months before breaking ground on its 85,000-square-foot facility in August 2003. Today, the plant manufactures parts and produces aircrafts. “American Eurocopter started a trend in this area for aerospace-related industries to locate here,” says Brenda Lathan, vice president of economic development for the Columbus-Lowndes Development Link. “Thus far, Aurora and Stark Aerospace have followed them, and they [the companies] have provided an opportunity for a new skill set in this area, as well as about 250 jobs [with the expansion].” In 2006, the U.S. Army hired American Eurocopter to produce 342 UH-72A Lakota (Light Utility) helicopters throughout a 10-year period. As a result, says Bruce Riekels, American Eurocopter’s senior director of facilities, the company is expanding its Columbus operation to encompass more than 300,000 square feet. Riekels says the new facility will be ready for use by Sept. 1, 2007. The company employs 150 people in Mississippi and plans to add another 100 positions by 2009. “We anticipate the majority of those jobs coming from the Mississippi area, and we have worked with East Mississippi Community College to develop training programs to prepare people to come to work with us, and then we train people on the job,” he CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y

says. “We’ve had good success, and we have been fortunate in that the state of Mississippi has partnered with us financially.” In addition to generating new jobs and skill sets for the region, American Eurocopter is investing $36 million in the expansion. “Over 50 percent of that is labor, and most of the subcontractors are within 100 miles of the plant, so all of that money is f lowing back into the community,” Riekels says. The company chose to expand the Mississippi facility in support of the Army contract, Riekels says, because they had used only 45 acres of an 80-acre on-site option and because of local and state support and a strong work ethic – some of the same reasons they located here in the first place. Eric Walden, American Eurocopter’s senior vice president for strategy and business development, says the future looks bright for American Eurocopter and, in turn, its Mississippi facility. “Historically, these kinds of contracts with DOD have blossomed much larger than the original order,” Walden says. “We think that 300 number is just a good start on this aircraft as far as DOD and worldwide impact are concerned. So, there is nothing but good things coming from this contract and the Mississippi facility in the future.”

American Eurocopter manufactures helicopters for corporations, medical facilities, law enforcement agencies, the military and other groups.

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Business | Biz Briefs

PHOTOS BY GREG EMENS

The recent addition of an in-shop kitchen led Le Gourmet to offer desserts and coffee. Java lovers can buy their favorite blend and pair it with Georgia-made chocolate truffles or treat themselves to European-made soaps and other pampering products. “We’ve had great feedback from our customers,” Borchers says. “We offer old-world ambiance.”

Le Gourmet Cheese & Gift Shoppe sells a variety of high-end food items.

GOURMET GOODIES Shannon and Lawrence Borchers brought a taste of the good life to Columbus two years ago, when they opened Le Gourmet Cheese & Gift Shoppe. “This is my dream, my passion,” Shannon Borchers says of the shop at 2240 Military Road. “If you’re a gourmet cook and enjoy food, we have things that aren’t widely available.” The store specializes in imported 38

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cheeses from high-quality, small farms in the United States, as well as from 34 different countries. Le Gourmet also places special orders for in-house pickup or home delivery. Borchers says she has stocked the shelves with a variety of gourmet cooking products and delicacies such as breaddipping oils, olives and paté. The shop also holds cheese-tastings every Saturday and Gourmet Saturday Nights twice a month.

THE ‘ART’ IN PARTY Mothers and daughters in need of some quality time together need look no further than Kaboodles. Maureen Missel’s Columbus shop is a haven for creativity, with a studio area fit for a few or a group looking for a night out. Missel says her shop is home to craft parties two or three times a week, ranging from wedding showers to club meetings, all with a creative bent. The rest of the shop is an eclectic blend of consigned furniture, home accessories and an art gallery that features work by about 40 local artists. “It’s a fun place to shop,” Missel says. “The inventory is constantly changing; I get new things in every day.” Missel says Kaboodles, located in The Shops at Brickerton, is ideal for shoppers looking for one-of-a-kind gifts. “I make custom gift baskets,” she says, “and I focus on Mississippi-made products, such as food and bath items.” A whimsical, fired-glass container, for example, holds such goodies as a scented candle, peach tea, olive bread mix and pecans. ENGINEERING PROGRESS Stanley Spradling describes CalvertSpradling Engineers as a general civil and environmental engineering company serving public and private clients in a 90-mile radius of Columbus. “In this business, you get to see a problem, come up with ideas for a solution and then see the solution carried out,” he says. “It’s very rewarding.” In 1980, Spradling joined forces with fellow engineer Robert Calvert, who had formed his own firm in 1976. The company has built a reputation for following projects from design through construction. Calvert-Spradling serves as the engineers for Lowndes County and has worked on many of the area’s road and bridge projects. The CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y


firm also specializes in water supply and wastewater issues, such as low water capacity or dirty water. Spradling praises the area as one that is aggressive about economic development. “The majority of the people in Columbus and Lowndes County have the unity needed to move forward,” he says. COLLECTIBLES AND DELECTABLES For 30 years, Pitty Pats Home Furnishings, Accessories & Gifts has been a veritable who’s who of high-end items. Whether shoppers seek Giuseppe Armani figurines or timeless M.I. Hummel collectibles, they check with owner Patsy Wilkins to see what the unusual store has in store for them. Wilkins also carries Mark Roberts’ popular fairy collection, whimsical figures homeowners can place in plants, atop shelves or in other nooks and crannies.

“These cute little guys add magic to any room of the house,” according to the shop’s Web site, www.pittypats.com. A selection of pictures, needlepoint pillows and mirrors give homeowners options for decorating or adding a fresh touch to their houses. Pitty Pats also tempts shoppers’ taste buds with a variety of Paula Deen gourmet items. The shop, located at 74 Crescent Drive, is also known for its annual open house during the holidays. “Columbus is a fast-growing area,” Wilkins says. “We are seeing a lot of new businesses.” REED-ING THE CUSTOMERS Since opening in Tupelo as a general store in 1905, Reed’s Department Store has grown to include four locations, including the Columbus site in Jackson Square. “Basically, we’re a specialty store,”

says Lex Jackson, Reed’s Department Store president. “Our selection and employees are very different from a regular department store.” Jackson says Reed’s is known for carrying quality outdoor clothing, including The North Face and Patagonia, as well as high-end fashions such as 7 For All Mankind jeans. Reed’s also pleases children and their parents by offering heirloom clothing and kid-friendly fashions. “We’re constantly looking for what our customers say they want,” Jackson says. Reed’s dedication to service has resulted in regional and statewide recognition. Jackson says the Columbus area has the best business environment he’s seen in about 15 years. “The attitude of the town is extremely optimistic,” he adds. – Leanne Libby

Reed’s Department Store carries outdoor clothing, kids’ fashions and unusual items for both women and men.

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1600 12th Ave. S. • Columbus, MS • (662) 328-5528 • www.msindwaste.com


Business | Chamber Report The Columbus-Lowndes Developent Link is helping boost business and economic development in the area.

A Very Strong Link for Business CHAMBER’S PRIMARY GOAL IS TO ASSIST SMALL-BUSINESS OWNERS IN 2007

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he chamber of commerce division at the Columbus-Lowndes Development Link is thinking small in 2007. An effort is under way to help small business owners grow their companies throughout the year. “The Link happens to be a combined organization that houses both the chamber, as well as economic development, in the same body,” says Melissa Cook, vice CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y

president of the chamber division at Columbus-Lowndes Development Link. “The Link has lately been focused on economic and industrial development and has been very successful at it,” she adds. “However, we have let the small business aspect lag a bit during that time, but that is all changing in 2007.” Cook joined the Link in 2007 to oversee the chamber side of the organization. “I bring much experience and success

in chamber work to this job,” she says. “Besides continuing to assist our larger chamber members, my main objective in 2007 is assisting small businesses, retail stores and restaurants to make them more successful.” The Columbus-Lowndes Development Link currently has 650 chamber members, and Cook estimates that about 90 percent of them are owners of small businesses, retail stores or restaurants. “I have already initiated focus groups with some members to get their input about how the chamber can better serve them,” she says. “As a result, I will be organizing a number of specific seminars that could impact smallbusiness owners. “For example, one of those seminars is on the possibility of the minimum wage being raised, and how small businesses can absorb such a hit,” she continues. “I am also planning more networking opportunities, including adding business expos to our networking lineup.” Cook says Columbus and Lowndes County have plenty going for it, which makes the area attractive for any business owner. “We are a regional trade center and a destination for consumers from several surrounding communities,” she says. “Columbus-Lowndes is conveniently located at the intersection of U.S. highways 45 and 82, and we are an education nucleus thanks to the Mississippi University for Women as well as East Mississippi Community College and the Center for Manufacturing Technology Excellence. And to attract future business owners, we have available buildings and sites that can accommodate companies of varying sizes.” In addition, Columbus-Lowndes County is a regional health-care center, a regional transportation hub and a certified Mississippi retirement community. “We really have a lot of businessrelated opportunities here,” Cook says. “That includes plenty of opportunities for small businesses.” – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S C O L U M B U S . C O M

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Business | Economic Profile

COLUMBUS-LOWNDES COUNTY BUSINESS CLIMATE Columbus-Lowndes County is in the midst of an economic boom, with a variety of industrial projects under construction in the area.

OCCUPATION (FROM 2000 CENSUS) Number of People

Percentage

2,973

12.0%

107

0.4%

Management, professional and related occupations

6,866

27.8%

Production, transportation and material moving occupations

5,211

21.1%

Sales and office occupations

6,281

25.4%

Service occupations

3,288

13.3%

Occupation Construction, extraction and maintenance occupations Farming, fishing and forestry occupations

INDUSTRY (FROM 2000 CENSUS) Industry

Number of People

Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining

327

1.3%

Arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation and food services

1,648

6.7%

Construction

2,005

8.1%

Educational, health and social services

5,085

20.6%

Finance, insurance, real estate, and rental and leasing

1,044

4.2%

462

1.9%

Manufacturing

5,593

22.6%

Other services (except public administration)

1,230

5.0%

Information

Professional, scientific, management, administrative, and waste management services

1,195

4.8%

Public administration

1,052

4.3%

Retail trade

3,024

12.2%

Transportation and warehousing, and utilities

1,403

5.7%

658

2.7%

Wholesale trade

42

Percentage

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TRANSPORTATION Airports Golden Triangle Regional Airport, (662) 327-4422 Lowndes County Airport (662) 327-6907 Rail Burlington Northern (662) 328-7001, (662)329-4811 (662) 328-5605 Columbus and Greenville Railway Co., (662) 327-8664 Golden Triangle Railroad (662) 243-4804 Kansas City Southern (800) GO-TO-KCS Norfolk Southern, (662) 327-8662 Luxapalila Valley Railroad Co. (662) 329-7730 Ports Lowndes County Port (662) 329-5886

BUSINESS POINTS The Crossroads Megasite, a Tennessee Valley Authoritycertified 1,800-acre site in Lowndes County, is a prime spot for automotive manufacturing and assembly plants. Columbus Air Force Base, the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest employer, pumped more than $234 million into the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy in fiscal year 2005, including payroll, contracts, supplies and equipment. Known as a regional trade center, the county has plenty of available buildings and industrial sites.

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A number of projects totaling more than $246 million were scheduled to break ground in the Columbus area in 2006, including Linde Gas, American Eurocopter and SeverCorr expansions.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

MAJOR EMPLOYERS Employer Columbus Air Force Base

Product/Service

Employees

Pilot training

3,035

Health care

1,100

Baptist Memorial Hospital-GT

Columbus-Lowndes Development Link 1102 Main St. Columbus, MS 39701 Phone: (662) 328-8369 www.cldlink.org

Columbus Municipal Schools

Education

750

Lowndes County Schools

Education

690

Printing paper

600

Vinyl wall coverings

425

Columbus Convention & Visitors Bureau P.O. Box 789 Columbus, MS 39703 Phone: (662) 329-1191, (800) 327-2686 www.columbus-ms.org

Mississippi University for Women

Education

420

Prefab metal buildings

281

Furniture

263

Industrial electric motors

244

Microtek Medical

Disposable medical devices

210

American Players

Military BDU uniforms

124

Sources: www.cldlink.org, www.census.gov, www.columbus-ms.org

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Management & executive recruiting

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www.cpi-group.com CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y

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Photo Essay

Where

Trad

ARCHITECTURE AND ACADEMICS SET THIS UNIVERSITY APART

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG EMENS

M

ississippi University for Women stands out not only for its highly regarded academics but for the beautiful buildings that dot its campus. Of the school’s 60 buildings, 24 are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, making MUW one of the nation’s most architecturally distinguished campuses. The public university, which has approximately 2,400 students from 19 states and 24 countries (including men), continues to renovate its historic structures while building new facilities to accommodate its ever-growing student population. The school was founded in 1884 as the first state-supported college for women in America. That’s the kind of history worth preserving.

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ition

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Reigns

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Photo Essay

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Photo Essay

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Golden Triangle’s Largest Commercial and Industrial Construction Company Nissan Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems

MUW Pohl Gymnasium/Stark Recreation Center

MSU Simulation and Design Center

Clients include: Mississippi State University • Mississippi University for Women • Mississippi Major Economic Impact Authority Talley Defense Systems/DOD • Local city and county governments • East Mississippi Community College SeverCorr • MSU Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine 5716 Hwy. 182 E. • Columbus, MS 39702 • (662) 328-2438 • Fax (662) 328-2746 • www.westbrothersconstruction.com

Everything in Janitorial, Paper & Packaging Supplies 1616 7th Ave. S. Columbus, MS (662) 327-1467 (800) 844-1467 www.newellpaper.com

Tennant Scrubbers & sweepers Hillyard products Mats of all kinds Rubbermaid Gym floor finishes Lysol Butchers Johnson Diversity

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Roll foam Bubble wrap Carton sealing tapes Pallet wrap Poly bags Deb soaps Gojo soaps Retail packaging supplies Swimming pool supplies

Copy paper Bay-West paper products Kimberly Clark Bakery supplies Safety supplies Hotel/motel supplies Weed killers Liners of all sizes Memphis gloves

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Education

A Golden Opportunity CAMPUS OFFERS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS TO MATCH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

E

ast Mississippi Community College Golden Triangle Campus is taking an active part in shaping the educational and economic landscape of northern Mississippi. Recent partnerships, new programs and expanding facilities are adding to the school’s offerings. The 3,000 full-time students enrolled at the Golden Triangle Campus are attracted to the campus’s central location – between Columbus, Starkville and West Point – affordability and low student-to-teacher ratio. “One factor that I hear a lot when talking to students is the personal attention they receive from our faculty,” says Michael Gann, EMCC public relations and recruiting director. “Even

ANTONY BOSHIER

though our student population continues to grow, our class sizes remain limited.” Students looking for advanced manufacturing-oriented programs will find more on the Golden Triangle Campus than at any of the other three EMCC locations. Two years ago, EMCC’s Workforce Services department merged with the Center for Manufacturing Technology Excellence, and the resulting growth and positive community impact have been even better than expected. “The Center for Manufacturing Technology Excellence is now bursting at the seams with activity, and training programs have expanded to other facilities,” says Stan Rice, workforce services director. The partnership’s joint resources have also strengthened EMCC’s economic development role in the community – attracting industries such as SeverCorr – and allowed for more training to be provided at less cost. “The merger has proven very beneficial for expanding the availability of technical-training programs for EMCC students and for our industrial customers,” says EMCC President Dr. Rick Young. The recent addition of a robot welder and a new manufacturing certification program are also adding to the technical training offered at the Golden Triangle Campus. In addition to technical training, approximately 65 percent of Golden Triangle students are pursuing academic degrees. A 25,000-square-foot Fine Arts and Humanities Complex – located at the south end of campus – will open in fall 2007 and will provide students with additional classrooms, art labs and music rooms. And more programs and expansions aren’t far behind. EMCC and three major hospitals in the Golden Triangle area have partnered to develop a surgical technology program, with enrollment slated for January 2008. A metals-intensive manufacturing program is also on the horizon, pending federal funds. “If funded, by fall 2008, considerable renovation to existing training facilities will be made, and new facilities will be built to house the program,” says Paul Miller, vice president of the Golden Triangle Campus and dean of Career and Technical Training. “We also anticipate opening an associate degree nursing program in 2009 as part of our Allied Health offerings. These advances are evidence that EMCC is responding to needs in all of its service areas.” – Carol Cowan

The Center for Manufacturing Technology Excellence plays a vital role in the economic development arena.

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SEE MORE ONLINE | To learn more about the Center for Manufacturing Technology Excellence, visit the archives at imagescolumbus.com/04-05.

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GREG EMENS

Education

Stokes-Beard Elementary is just one of the seven K-4 lottery schools in Columbus-Lowndes County.

A School Lottery That Works COLUMBUS MUNICIPAL SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFERS CHOICES FOR ITS K-4 CHILDREN

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f there’s one thing that parents worry about, it’s where their children will go to elementary school. But in ColumbusLowndes County, the school district makes that process nearly stress-free. Dr. Lester Beason, former Columbus Municipal School District superintendent, says that the school-choice lottery results in 95 to 98 percent of families getting their children enrolled in the elementary school of their choice. Beason says the decision three years ago to go to a lottery system meant a lot more work for the district than standard zoning, but he believes it’s worth it. “We think it gives parents more of a choice,” says Beason, who retired in summer 2007 and was replaced by Dr. Del Phillips. “There are a lot of positive components that parents like.” Figuring out which of the seven K-4 schools is best for their child might be the hardest part for parents. But the CMSD makes it easier by posting detailed information about each school on its Web site (www.columbuscityschools.org) and holding open houses prior to the lottery so parents can CO LU M B US - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y

meet teachers and tour facilities. “The best way to evaluate a school is to look at several factors,” Beason says. “The AYP numbers [Adequate Yearly Progress according to the No Child Left Behind standards] give some indication, but it’s best to consider those in conjunction with a visit to the school.” Teacher training is key to the quality of education provided by the CMSD. The district enrolls all new teachers in a multiyear training and professional development program that introduces them to the district’s philosophy and trains them in effective teaching techniques. “ ‘Differentiated instruction’ means that different students in the same classroom will all learn the same material,” Beason says. “We do a lot of work on understanding our students. We also consider what they bring with them into the classroom.” The CMSD serves 5,000 students in the Columbus area through seven elementary schools, an intermediate school, a middle school, a high school and a technology center. – Carol Cowan I M AG E S C O L U M B U S . C O M

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Save Money. Smell the Flowers.

Looking for ways to save money on gas and help the environment? The EPA wants to share some smart driving tips that could give you more miles per gallon of gas and reduce air pollution. Tips like making sure your tires are properly inflated and replacing your air filter regularly. And where possible, accelerate and brake slowly. Be aware of your speed ... did you know that for every 5 miles you go over 65 mph, you’re spending about 20 cents more per gallon of gas? If you’re shopping for a new car, choose the cleanest, most efficient vehicle that meets your needs. If we each adopt just one of these tips, we’d get more miles for our money and it would be a little easier to smell the flowers. For more tips and to compare cleaner, more efficient vehicles, visit

www.epa.gov/greenvehicles.

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SEE MORE ONLINE | To learn more about the Columbus Historic Foundation, please visit the archives at imagescolumbus.com/05-06. Rosewood Manor is one of Columbus’ beloved historic homes.

For the Love of History NINETEENTH ANNUAL ARTS/PRESERVATION FORUM FOCUSES ON THE GILDED AGE

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en, get your best suit pressed. Women, break out your nicest evening gown. A cocktail buffet at historic Rosedale mansion in Columbus will kick off the 19th-annual Decorative Arts and Preservation Forum, which will be held Nov. 1-4, 2007.

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The Columbus Historic Foundation sponsors the event each year in an effort to educate, entertain and enlighten those who are interested in historic preservation in Columbus and Lowndes County. “Antebellum mansions and Victorian homes are a fact of life in the South, and

GREG EMENS

Arts & Culture appreciating their beauty and charm is what our annual forum is all about,” says Nancy Carpenter, executive director of the Columbus Historic Foundation. “That tradition of splendor is why we always begin the Decorative Arts and Preservation Forum with a Thursday night cocktail buffet – to formally introduce an exciting weekend of events.” The 2007 event will have a special offer for forum participants. For an allinclusive $100 ticket, attendees to the 2007 forum will have access to every activity that is offered over all four days. Those activities include admission to the 39th annual Antiques Show and Sale, which runs concurrently with the forum. “At the cocktail buffet, attendees will enjoy music, hors d’oeuvres champagne and wine, and then they can enjoy three more days of events with the allinclusive ticket,” Carpenter says. “There is the antique show Friday, Saturday and Sunday, there is a decorative arts lunch and dinner on Saturday, as well as a preservation forum breakfast, lunch and dinner served Sunday. Plus, there will be a number of weekend guest speakers.” Those speakers include Dr. Richard Guy Wilson, an architectural historian from the University of Virginia, and John W. Keefe, curator of decorative arts from the New Orleans Museum of Art. “The overall theme for the 2007 forum is, ‘Of Money, Mansions and Pretensions: The Gilded Age 1890-1915,’ which is a time that saw incredible wealth and expansion in the South,” Carpenter explains. “Most of the weekend events will take place at the Trotter Convention Center and Mississippi University for Women. If you are a history buff or appreciate architectural beauty, Columbus will be the place to be.” Tickets to individual events throughout the weekend are also available. For example, tickets to the cocktail buffet are $20 apiece. “The Columbus Historic Foundation is proud of our rich past and tradition, which is why we sponsor these events that appreciate history,” Carpenter says. “Even our foundation headquarters is historic – we are housed in the former Tennessee Williams Home on Main Street, which now also serves as the city’s welcome center.” – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S C O L U M B U S . C O M

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Sports & Recreation

Strong in Mind and Body

A

tornado ripped through the Mississippi University for Women campus in the fall of 2002, destroying the Emma Ody Pohl Physical Education Assembly Building that housed athletics. There was other damage to the university but, luckily, nobody on campus was hurt. In 2007, a brand-new Emma Ody Pohl Building and a Marie Charlotte Stark Recreation Center have opened where the old physical education building used to stand. The new buildings are named for Emma Pohl, a popular physical education instructor at MUW from 1907-1955; and Marie Charlotte Stark, Pohl’s niece, who graduated from MUW in 1933. The total cost of the new Pohl Building and the Stark Recreation Center was $13.5 million, funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, as well as the university itself. “Shortly after the tornado hit in 2002, the university decided to drop sports but wanted to build something athletics-related for all students – instead

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of for just those who played on organized sports teams,” says Amy Swingle, executive director for campus recreation at Mississippi University for Women. “MUW went in this direction because studies show that college students who engage in recreational activities are more likely to stay at a university, and are more likely to be attracted to a university in the first place,” she adds. “That’s what the Stark Recreation Center is all about.” Swingle says an academic-and-athletic philosophy at MUW gives all students a well-rounded college experience. “Approximately 700 of our 2,400 enrolled students live on campus, so recreation can now be a big part of their everyday lives,” she says. The Pohl Building amenities include two basketball courts, a running track above the courts and plenty of offices and labs for the university’s health and kinesiology departments that are also housed in the building. Meanwhile, the Stark Recreation Center is equipped with a 5,000-squarefoot weight room, two racquetball courts,

PHOTOS BY GREG EMENS

NEW STARK RECREATION CENTER HELPS MUW STUDENTS STAY FIT AND HEALTHY

a six-lane indoor swimming pool and a large atrium lounge area with a bigscreen TV and pool tables. “The Stark Recreation Center will most likely become the preferred student union gathering spot on our campus, where students can work out and hang out,” Swingle says. “It is also set up for wireless Internet, so it can also be a good place to catch up on laptop work. Both the Pohl Building and the Stark Recreation Center are fine additions for all students to enjoy on the Mississippi University for Women campus.” – Kevin Litwin The Stark Recreation Center offers state-of-the-art equipment and is a nice place to pass the time.

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Whitecar Cancer Care Center

CANCER ... No one likes to talk about it. But when it happens to you ... just know you are not alone. We are here for you. Columbus Hematology & Oncology, PA John P. Whitecar, Jr., MD, FACP Tammy Miller, MSN, APRN-BC J. Shelley Dornan, MSN, CFNP 425 Hospital Dr. • Columbus, MS • (662) 240-0650


Health & Wellness

Leonardo Would Be Proud BAPTIST MEMORIAL INSTALLS STATE-OF-THE-ART DA VINCI ROBOTIC SYSTEM

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American Academy of Sleep Medicine. “At our sleep center, Baptist has certified respiratory therapists, a pulmonologist and neurologist who monitor sleep activities such as brain wave, muscle and eye movements,” Lassiter say. “They also monitor breathing through the mouth and nose, snoring, heart rate and leg movements.” The hospital also provides services for patients with behavioral and mental health problems, as well as

chemical dependency. “In addition, we were the first comprehensive cancer center in this area of Mississippi and one of the first hospitals outside of Jackson [Miss.] to perform vertebroplasty procedures for compression fractures in the spine caused by osteoporosis or cancer,” Lassiter says. “Baptist Golden Triangle is proud to offer comprehensive surgical services in almost every medical specialty.” – Kevin Litwin

WES ALDRIDGE

he new da Vinci system at Baptist Memorial HospitalGolden Triangle has nothing to do with painting, but it is truly a work of art for the medical profession. The system allows surgeons to sit at a console – away from the patient – and operate four robotic arms. One arm holds a camera that produces a magnified image to give the surgeon a better view, while the other three arms hold surgical instruments. Surgeons make four small incisions with the da Vinci robot, using the mechanical arms to perform surgeries. Baptist Golden Triangle officials say they are initially using the system only for prostate surgeries. “Patients who have the da Vinci surgery have smaller scars, less pain after surgery, shorter hospital stays and a quicker recovery,” says Rick Lassiter, CEO and administrator of Baptist Golden Triangle. “This new robotic technology enables us to continue our focus on providing high-quality medical care to the citizens of Lowndes County and the surrounding areas.” Baptist Golden Triangle, which was founded in 1969, has more than 328 beds and a staff of 1,000 that includes 100 physicians and surgeons. Besides the da Vinci system, recent additions to the hospital include a Level II trauma emergency department, an onsite pharmacy as well as services such as pediatric dentistry and plastic surgery. Doctors and nurses at Baptist care for nearly 50,000 emergency room patients each year, and the hospital oversees approximately 850 annual births. “We completed a $34 million construction in June 2005 that included 151 new patient beds as well as labor/ delivery/recovery suites and a well-baby nursery,” Lassiter says. “Also, in the area of women’s services, we offer a 24-hour baby hot line, childbirth and sibling classes, digital mammography services and bone density scans.” The hospital also has a sleep disorders center – the only sleep center in the Golden Triangle area accredited by the

Baptist Memorial Hospital-Golden Triangle continues to expand its technological services for patients, in addition to other improvements.

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Health & Wellness

Dental care for infants, children, adolescents & teenagers

300 HOSPITAL DRIVE | COLUMBUS, MS 39705 | (662) 327-0995 | DKCURTIS@TILC.COM | WWW.DRDKCURTIS.COM

Serving Columbus & the Golden Triangle Area for 11 Years!

GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEUROLOGY CLINIC Reynolds P. McCain, M.D. 516-B Lincoln Rd. • Columbus, MS 39701 (601) 327-2700

Treatment for Neurological Non-Surgical Diseases: Stroke • Headache • Sleep Disorders • Multiple Sclerosis Carpal Tunnel Syndrome • Parkinson’s Disease Back & Neck Pain • Alzheimer’s Numbness/Tingling of Arms/Legs

Baptist & Physicians Healthlink • MPCN Other Major Insurances

Columbus (662) 327-2700 Amory (662) 257-9106 Starkville (662) 338-9106 60

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Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Dedicated ... ... to providing only the best in orthopaedic care.

Columbus Orthopaedic proudly provides sports medicine to the Mississippi State University Athletics Program. COLUMBUS ORTHOPAEDIC OUTPATIENT CENTER 640 Leigh Dr. Columbus, MS 39705 (662) 328-7123

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COLUMBUS ORTHOPAEDIC CLINIC 670 Leigh Dr. Columbus, MS 39705 (662) 328-1012

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Health & Wellness

We change your smile ... You change the world.

2500 Military Rd. #3, | Columbus, MS 39705 | (662) 329-4225 theteam@callawayorthodontics.com | www.callawayorthodontics.com

Get the

Results

You

Deserve

Specializing in Surgery and Diseases of the Eye Cataracts – Restore Lens Implants, No Stitch Lasik – VISX Customvue Wavefront Free Consultation Glaucoma – Medical Treatment and SLT Laser Surgery Retina and Macular Diseases – Diagnosis and Treatment Diabetic Eye Exams and Treatment Medical Eye Exams Cosmetic Lid Surgery

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COLUMBUS EYE CLINIC & LASER SURGERY CENTER

William Gillespie, M.D.

Excellence in Vision Care

Fellows of American Academy of Ophthalmology

Doctors Park | 425 Hospital Drive, Suite 8 | Columbus, MS | 328-2061 www.columbuseyeclinic.com

Board Certified by American Board of Ophthalmology

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Scott Bradley, M.D.

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Got Hope?

We Do.

Providing hope when you need it most. Specializing in cancer care for over 25 years to all of northeast Mississippi. 961 S. GLOSTER ST. TUPELO, MS 38801 (662) 844-9166

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2221 5TH ST. NORTH COLUMBUS, MS 39705 (662) 328-8125

201 ALCORN DR. CORINTH, MS 38834 (662) 286-3277

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BENNETT OPHTHALMOLOGY GROUP

Columbus OB-GYN Specialty Pregnancy • Ultrasound • 3-D Ultrasound Disorders of Menstruation • Gynecological Health Family Planning • Infertility Studies Colposcopy • Computer Enhanced Surgery Outpatient Procedures • Endometrial Ablation Outpatient Sterilization • Well-Woman Care Hysterectomy including Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

J. DAN BENNETT, M.D.

Bladder Control Disorders • Pelvic Pain Management

Diplomate of the American Board of Ophthalmology Board Certified Ophthalmologist

Medicare Assignment Accepted • Diseases & Surgery of the Eye Cataracts • Implants • No-Stitch Surgery • Glaucoma

Gregory W. Childrey M.D., FACOG

Theresa A. Murch D.O., FACOOG

Diabetes • Retinal Diseases • Macular Diseases Laser Surgery • Eyelid Surgery • ReSTOR® Lens

(662) 328-1254 • 2475 Fifth St. N. • Columbus, MS 39705

Columbus OB-GYN Specialty Center, PLLC 425 Hospital Drive, Suite 5 • Columbus, MS 39705 (662) 240-0095 • Fax: (662) 240-0096

Willowbrook Dental Center For the smile you always dreamed of! Mark A. Nobles, DMD Ben W. Harrelson, DMD Members of: American Dental Association Mississippi Dental Association

Children’s Health Center of Columbus Inc. 114 N. Lehmberg Rd. • Columbus, MS 39702 (662) 329-2955 • www.drskiskids.us

Cosmetic • Laser • Implant Laser Whitening • Invisalign • Veneers Family Dentistry Appointments Only • Most Insurances Filed Hours: Mon.-Thu. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fri. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. CARE CREDIT

(662) 327-4523 540 Willowbrook Rd. Columbus, MS 39705 Listing of this previously mentioned area of practice does not indicate certification of expertise therein.

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Community Profile

COLUMBUS-LOWNDES COUNTY SNAPSHOT The Columbus-Lowndes County area is one of the Southâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s richest architectural communities, known for its graceful antebellum homes, Southern hospitality, a top-notch U.S. Air Force base and plenty of opportunities to play outdoors.

LIFE IN COLUMBUSLOWNDES COUNTY Southeastern Conference sporting events take place at Mississippi State University and the University of Alabama, both short drives from Columbus. The Columbus Pilgrimage, an award-winning tour of antebellum mansions held each spring, is considered one of the best and most authentic historic home tours in the South.

4-County Electric Power

Community-based education

Association, 327-8900

Greater Columbus Learning Center 329-7691

Tennessee Valley Authority 338-3186 Natural Gas Atmos Energy, 328-3521

Sylvan Learning Center 328-9009

Tennessee Gas Pipeline 328-6716

MEDICAL FACILITIES

Telephone BellSouth, (601) 557-2119 Water Columbus Light & Water Department, 328-7192

CLIMATE Average January high, 53 F

Water Association, 328-1065

SPECIAL EVENTS

EDUCATION

Annual Spring Pilgrimage (800) 920-3533 or 328-0222

Mississippi University for Women 329-4750 East Mississippi Community College Golden Triangle Campus 243-1900

Average July high, 92 F

Center for Manufacturing Technology Excellence 243-2683

Average July low, 71 F

Public schools

Average annual precipitation 55.91 inches

Columbus Municipal School District, 241-7400

Average January low, 32 F

Lowndes County School System, 244-5000

UTILITIES Cable Cable One, 328-1781 Electricity Caledonia Generating, LLC 356-0231 Columbus Light & Water Department, 328-7192

The area code for Columbus is 662 .

North Mississippi Medical Center, 377-3148

East Lowndes

Higher education A moderate climate and miles of rivers, lakes and trails make the county a prime place for outdoor recreation.

Baptist Memorial Hospital-Golden Triangle 244-1500

Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science 329-7687 Private schools Heritage Academy, 327-5272 Annunciation Catholic School 328-4479 Immanuel Christian School 328-1668

Go 4th Independence Day Celebration & Biennial Wings Over Columbus/Thunderbirds Air Show 434-7068 JuneTeenth Celebration 329-5871 Market Street Festival 328-6305

GOLF Columbus Country Club 2331 Military Road 328-5584 Elm Lake 1609 Taylor-Thurston Road 329-8964 Green Oaks 326 Green Oaks Drive 328-3879 Whispering Pines Golf ClubColumbus Air Force Base 434-7932

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Community Profile ATTRACTIONS Columbus-Lowndes Public Library Billups-Garth Archives/ Buckley Genealogy Room 314 Seventh St. N. 329-5300 Columbus Malco Cinema 2320 Hwy. 45 N. 240-4171 Columbus Speedway 2616 Tabernacle Road 241-5004 Friendship Cemetery Fourth Street South (800) 327-2686 Historic Downtown District 328-6305 Historic Home Tours 300 Main St. 328-0222 Lee Home Museum 316 Seventh St. N. (800) 920-3533, 327-8888 Magnolia Speedway 495 Hwy. 45 S. 328-0376 Plymouth Bluff Museum 2200 Old West Point Road 241-6214 Rosenzweig Arts Center 501 Main St. 328-2787

FOR MORE INFORMATION Columbus-Lowndes Development Link 1102 Main St. Columbus, MS 39701 Phone: 328-8369 www.cldlink.org Columbus Convention & Visitors Bureau P.O. Box 789 Columbus, MS 39703 Phone: 329-1191 (800) 327-2686 www.columbus-ms.org

Sources: www.cldlink.org, www.census.gov, www.columbus-ms.org

The area code for Columbus is 662 .

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RENT-A-SPACE Third climate-controlled building opened in mid 2007 • On-site management Non-climate-controlled units • Seven-day/24-hour access Security cameras, computerized gate and building access Covered unloading area at climate-controlled buildings Moving boxes and supplies • Fax, copy and notary service Rent-A-Space locations: 406 Wilkins Wise Road ...................................................... (662) 327-5656 1530 Gardner Boulevard ................................................... (662) 328-5666 2193 Lake Lowndes Road ................................................. (662) 327-0659 columbusrentaspace.com

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Columbus-Lowndes Development Link T.E. Lott, Jr., CPA Oliver L. Phillips, Jr., CPA Charles M. Hawkins, CPA, CBA John F. Prince, CPA Nellah F. Taylor, CPA – Starkville Jeffry H. Read, CPA – Starkville Thomas J. Buckley, CPA Vivian L. Yeatman, CPA Bobby G. Shaw, CPA, CBA – Tuscaloosa Debby H. Gray, CPA, CPC Clayton H. Richardson, III, CPA, CVA – Starkville J. Michael Prince, CPA Mark A. Vickers, CPA, CVA Stewart R. Greene, CPA – Tuscaloosa J.H. Kennedy, Jr., CPA Samuel A. Bray, CPA Frank F. Gray, CPA – Tuscaloosa Leslie W. Wood, CPA – Starkville Lawrence E. Wilson, CPA David C. Neumann, CPA, CBA Louise L. Chappell, CPA John T. Frazier, CPA Kristy A. Tunnell, CPA – Starkville

COLUMBUS OFFICE 221 North Seventh Street (662) 328-5387 STARKVILLE OFFICE 106 B South Washington Street (662) 323-1234

T. E. Lott & Company A PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

www.telott.com

Audits, Reviews & Compilations Tax Planning & Preparation Payroll Services Estate & Trust Tax Preparation Management Advisory Services Pension & Profit Sharing Services

Quickbooks Advisors Accounting & Bookkeeping Services Business Valuation Technology Counseling Online Tax Preparation

• American Institute of Certified Public Accountants • Mississippi Society of Certified Public Accountants • Alabama Society of Certified Public Accountants • Registered with Public Company Accounting Oversight Board • Member of Center for Public Company Audit Firms • Member of Employee Benefit Plan Audit Quality Center • Member of Governmental Audit Quality Center

Serving the Golden Triangle Area and beyond since 1926

TUSCALOOSA OFFICE 2422 12th Street (205) 759-4195

Look, a tall purple rectangle!

Bringing Safe, Reliable Natural Gas to You and Your Community At Atmos Energy, we provide clean, efficient natural gas to the communities we serve. We are dedicated to delivering exceptional customer service and superior energy value and we are proud to work with our communities to encourage growth.

When you talk to your child you build vocabulary, so everyday moments become learning moments. For more tips, visit bornlearning.org

We call that The Spirit of Service . SM

Visit us online at atmosenergy.com.

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atmosenergy.com

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Columbus-Lowndes Development Link

For the past decade, East Mississippi Community College has been the fastest growing community college in the state. EMCC offers a quality education at an affordable price. The college has ďŹ ve convenient locations within its six-county district, which consists of Clay, Oktibbeha, Lowndes, Noxubee, Kemper and Lauderdale counties.

Scooba Campus P.O. Box 158 Scooba, MS 39358 (662) 476-5000 Meridian Naval Air Station 255 Rosenbaum Avenue NAS Meridian, MS 39309 (601) 679-2747 Golden Triangle Campus P.O. Box 100 Mayhew, MS 39753 (662) 243-1900 Macon Extension Center (662) 476-5041 Columbus Air Force Base 81 Fifth Street, Suite 14 CAFB, MS 39710 (662) 434-2660 To see our current class schedule, visit our Web site at www.eastms.edu or call us today.

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Columbus-Lowndes Development Link

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Chancery Clerk Lisa Younger Neese and Staff Always here to serve you PO Box 684 Columbus, MS 39703 (662) 329-5800 We are also the accepting agent for US passports Mon.-Fri. 8a.m.-5p.m.

Land Records Recording of deeds of trust Power of attorney Oil and gas leases

Court Records Divorces • Estates • Adoptions Name change • Land disputes Alcohol and drug commitment Mental commitment

Providing 100 stable jobs to friends and families in Lowndes County for 117 years.

Columbus Brick Company Since 1890

P.O. Box 9630 • Columbus, MS 39705 (662) 328-4931 • Fax: (662) 328-4934 • www.columbusbrick.com For 117 years, Columbus Brick Company has been producing high-quality face brick. With two manufacturing plants in Lowndes County, Columbus Brick continues its tradition of quality brick for future generations.

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CONTRACTING CO., INC.

Asphalt Paving Construction Streets • Roads • Parking Lots Driveways • Subdivisions Parking Lot Maintenance Airports • Paint Striping

(662) 327-2053 1500 Moss Street • P.O. Box 5044 Columbus, MS 39704

www.falconcontracting.com LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED • FREE ESTIMATES

GHOLSON, HICKS & NICHOLS, P.A. ATTORNEYS AT LAW Hunter M. Gholson* Dewitt T. Hicks, Jr. Aubrey E. Nichols John W. Crowell** Katherine S. Kerby**** David B. Jolly William F. Gillis P. Nelson Smith, Jr. Marc D. Amos William T. Cooper M. Jay Nichols Kristen W. Williams *Also admitted in District of Columbia **Also admitted in Arkansas ****Also admitted in Choctaw Tribal Court

Practice Areas Banking Bankruptcy Business & Corporate Class Action Litigation Construction Employment Law Environmental Litigation Estate Planning Government Entities Litigation Probate & Trust Products Liability Professional Negligence Real Estate Workers’ Compensation

AmSouth Bank Building 710 Main Street, Third Floor • P.O. Box 1111 Columbus, MS 39703-1111 (662) 243-7300 • www.ghnlaw.com

Quality. Experience. Knowledge. Commitment. Excellence.

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McConnell Brothers Transfer & Storage

family

corporate

www.mcconnellbrothers.com

2406 Hwy. 69 S. • Columbus, MS • (662) 328-2731

Toll-free (800) 424-2731 • www.mcconnellbrothers.com

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Specialty Gift Shop Monogram & Personalization Specialists Embroidery • Engraving • Imprinting Premier Vera Bradley Retailer

Highway 45 North, Next to Belk Columbus, Mississippi (662) 327-3332 • (662) 327-3365 fax www.monogramsplusgifts.com

Make an initial impression that lasts

PHILLIPS CONTRACTING CO., INC.

1500 Moss St. • P.O. Box 2069 Columbus, MS 39704 (662) 328-6250 • (662) 329-3291 fax info@phillipscontracting.com phillipscontracting.com


© 2002 American Cancer Society, Inc.

answers

8 0 0 . A C S . 2 3 4 5 / c a n c e r. o r g

Columbus-Lowndes Development Link

• Iron & ironing board, coffee maker, hair dryer, microwave & refrigerator • Free high-speed Internet • Complimentary hot breakfast • 24-hour business center • Meeting facilities for up to 70 people • Indoor pool, fitness center & whirlpool • Free local calls • 100% satisfaction guarantee

129 Brickerton St. Directions: Hwy. 82 to Military Rd. Exit, then one block West.

questions

All rooms include:

Toll-free reservations 1.800.228.1000 | 662.327.9999 | wingateinn.com

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O F CO LU M B U S - LOWN D E S CO U NT Y SENIOR EDITOR SUSAN CHAPPELL COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, KIM MADLOM, ANITA WADHWANI ASSISTANT EDITOR REBECCA DENTON SENIOR WRITER DIANE BARTLEY STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN, JESSICA MOZO DIRECTORIES EDITORS AMANDA KING, KRISTY WISE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LEANNE LIBBY, VALERIE PASCOE, KATIE PORTERFIELD, KATHRYN ROYSTER ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER TODD POTTER AD PROJECT MANAGER ANDREA JOINER SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR SARA SARTIN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS WES ALDRIDGE, ANTONY BOSHIER, MICHAEL W. BUNCH, IAN CURCIO, BRIAN M CCORD PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT JESSY YANCEY CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR SHAWN DANIEL PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS ASST. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR HAZEL RISNER SENIOR PRODUCTION PROJECT MGR. TADARA SMITH SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRITTANY SCHLEICHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER LAURA GALLAGHER GRAPHIC DESIGN JESSICA BRAGONIER, CANDICE HULSEY, LINDA MOREIRAS, DEREK MURRAY, AMY NELSON WEB DESIGN RYAN DUNLAP WEB PRODUCTION JILL TOWNSEND DIGITAL ASSET MANAGER ALISON HUNTER COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN CORY MITCHELL AD TRAFFIC SARAH MILLER, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY, JILL WYATT CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./PRODUCTION & OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING SYBIL STEWART EXECUTIVE EDITOR TEREE CARUTHERS MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS MAURICE FLIESS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS, JACKIE YATES RECRUITING DIRECTOR SUZY WALDRIP DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH IT SYSTEMS DIRECTOR MATT LOCKE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR NICOLE WILLIAMS CLIENT & SALES SERVICES MANAGER/ CUSTOM MAGAZINES PATTI CORNELIUS

Images of Columbus-Lowndes County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Columbus Lowndes Development Link and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Columbus-Lowndes Development Link 1102 Main St. P.O. Box 1328• Columbus, MS 39701 (662) 328-8369 • Fax: (662)327-3417 www.cldlink.org VISIT IMAGES OF COLUMBUS-LOWNDES COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESCOLUMBUS.COM ©Copyright 2007 Journal Communications Inc., 361 Mallory Station Road, Ste. 102, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

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Ad Index

75 4 - Co u nt y Elec tr i c 1 0 A m er i ca n Eu ro co p ter 6 A s h le y F u r n it u r e H o m e S to r e 7 2 Atm os En ergy C 2 Ba p ti s t Mem o r i a l H os p ita l 6 5 B en n e t t O p hta lm o lo gy G ro u p 62 C a ll away O rth o d o nti c s 5 C a lv ert-S p r a d li n g En g i n eer s C 4 C eco B u i ld i n g Sys tem s 3 0 C ent u ry 2 1 / D o r i s Ha r dy 7 7 C h a n cery C ler k 6 5 C h i ld r en â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s Hea lth C enter 32 Co ldw ell Ba n k er C 3 Co lu m b u s Ba n k A s so c i ati o n 7 7 Co lu m b u s B r i c k Co m pa n y

70 Co lu m b u s Co n v enti o n & V i s ito r s B u r eau 62 Co lu m b u s E y e C li n i c 5 8 Co lu m b u s Hem ato lo gy & O n co lo gy 6 6 Co lu m b u s Li g ht & Water Dep t 6 5 Co lu m b u s Ob - Gy n S p ec ia lt y 6 1 Co lu m b u s O rth o paed i c C li n i c 3 3 C ry e- Lei k e P ro p erti e s U n li m ited 7 3 E a s t M i s s i s s i p p i Co m m u n it y Co l leg e 2 8 E at With U s 3 0 El li s Co n s tr u c ti o n Co m pa n y 78 Fa lco n Co ntr ac ti n g Co m pa n y 76 Ga l loway- C h a n d ler- Mc k i n n e y I n s u r a n ce


Ad Index (cont.)

78 G h o l s o n , H i c k s & N i c h o l s

6 0 G o l d e n T r i a n g l e Neu r o lo gy C li n i c

6 1 G o l d e n T r i a n g l e Ra d i o lo gy

52 He r itag e Aca d e m y

6 9 J o h n s o n Ba i l e y He n d e r s o n Mc n ee l

79 J u b i l ati o n s

C 3 Ma l ac h i Fi n a n c i a l G r o u p

79 Mcco n n e l l B r ot h e r s T r a n s fe r & S to r ag e

74 M i c r ot e k Me d i ca l , I n c .

C 3 M i d -S o u t h S i g n s

1 M i s s i s s i p p i U n i v e r s it y Fo r Wo m e n 8 1 M itc h e l l , McN u t t & Sa m s , P. A .

8 0 M o n o g r a m s P lu s

4 0 M s I n d u s t r i a l Wa s t e D i s p osa l

C 3 Nee l-Sc h affe r

5 0 Ne w e l l Pa p e r Co m pa n y

6 3 N o rt h M i s s i s s i p p i Me d i ca l C e n t e r

6 3 N o rt h M s He m ato lo gy & O n co lo gy A s s o c i ati o n

6 0 Pe d i at r i c De n ti s t ry

8 0 P h i l li p s P i p e & P r o d u c ts

6 8 P h ys i c i a n s & S u r g eo n s

1 2 P l a n tati o n P o i n t e 7 P ryo r & M o r r ow A rc h it ec ts

C 3 Ra s , I n c .

6 8 Ree d â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s

7 1 Re n t-A-S pace

3 4 R o b i n s o n Rea l E s tat e

C 3 Sa n d e r s O i l Co m pa n y

C 3 S m it h La n ds ca p i n g & T h e G r ee n h o u s e

7 1 s tat e fa r m

7 2 T. E . Lot t & Co m pa n y, C . P. A .

4 3 T h e C PI G r o u p

2 8 T h e S h o p s At B r i c k e rto n

2 T r i a n g l e Fe d e r a l C r e d it U n i o n

5 2 T r i a n g l e Ma i n t e n a n ce

5 4 TVA

3 5 Wa l- Ma rt # 49 5

6 6 WC B I TV- DT

5 0 We s t B r ot h e r s Co n s t r u c ti o n

6 5 W i l low b r o o k De n ta l C e n t e r

8 1 W i n gat e I n n


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It’s about honoring survivors and those who’ve lost the battle. It’s about raising funds for research, education, screening and treatment. The Komen Race for the Cure® is about support, not competition. Join us at komen.org or 1.800 I’M AWARE®.

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Images Columbus-Lowndes County, MS: 2007-08