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2008 | IMAGESCHARLESCOUNTY.COM | VIDEO TOUR ONLINE TM

OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND

HOME FIELD ADVANTAGE New stadium, new ball team give baseball fans reasons to cheer

A NATURAL BEAUTY Preservationists take action to protect forests and rivers

A Bedroom Community Makeover Relocating businesses begin transforming former suburb into workforce destination SPONSORED BY THE CHARLES COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


2008 EDITION | VOLUME 7 TM

OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND

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CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S 12 A NATURAL BEAUTY Preservationists are working to protect the county’s natural and man-made history.

16 OFF THE BEATEN PATH Charles County retains a pristine natural beauty that makes for some fabulous outdoor adventures.

20 LIVING IT UP IN ST. CHARLES At least a quarter of the county’s population lives in St. Charles, where children can walk to school and houses offer a lot of bang for the buck.

24 A BEDROOM COMMUNITY MAKEOVER Charles County is transitioning from a commuter suburb to a commercial hub and workforce destination.

26 TURNING THE BIG 3-5-0 Founded in 1658, Charles County has served as a backdrop for some of the nation’s most memorable events.

28 DISCOVER CHARLES COUNTY Charles County draws tourists interested in historic architecture and heritage sites.

53 HOME FIELD ADVANTAGE The arrival of the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs Independent League baseball team is giving fans something to cheer about.

ON THE COVER Harry W. Nice Memorial Bridge Photo by Michael W. Bunch

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OF CHAR LE S COU NT Y, MARYL AN D

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CHARLES COUNTY BUSINESS 36 Staying Connected Charles County has become a magnet for new residents looking for small-town charm, a healthy economy and easy access to Washington, D.C.

40 Biz Briefs 43 Chamber Report 44 Economic Profile

49 D E PA R TM E NT S 8 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Charles County culture

31 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Charles County

49 Arts & Culture 50 Education 55 Health & Wellness 57 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know CHARLES COUNT Y

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ACTION! ADVENTURE! “IT KEPT ME ON THE EDGE OF MY LAPTOP!”

“CHARLES COUNTY LIKE IT’S NEVER BEEN SEEN BEFORE!”

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SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT ANY RESEMBLANCE TO PLACES, EVENTS OR QUALITY OF LIFE IN CHARLES COUNTY IS PURELY INTENTIONAL!

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What’s Online More lists, links and tips for newcomers

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PLUS SEARCH OUR ARCHIVES Browse past issues of the magazine by year or search for specific articles by subject. INSTANT LINKS Read the entire magazine online using our ActiveMagazine™ technology and link instantly to community businesses and services.

VIDEO TOUR INSIDE LOOK Join us on a virtual tour of Charles County through the lenses of our award-winning photographers at imagescharlescounty.com.

EVEN MORE Read full-length versions of the magazine’s articles; find related stories; or read new content exclusive to the Web. Look for the See More Online reference in this issue.

A GREAT PLACE TO GARDEN A temperate climate allows almost all garden plants to flourish. Abundant flowers dot the landscape in the summers, while the foliage of maples and oak trees light up the fall. Find out more at imagescharlescounty.com.

BLUE CRAB CUISINE Crab cakes, steamed crabs, crab dip, crab soufflé – no matter how you serve it up, the Mid-Atlantic blue crab is a must-have delicacy. Get a taste of regional cuisine at imagescharlescounty.com.

A B O U T T H I S M AG A Z I N E Images of Charles County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is sponsored by the Charles County Chamber of Commerce. In print and online, Images gives readers a taste of what makes Charles County tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts.

“Find the good – and praise it.” – Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

jnlcom.com

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Almanac

Pedal Pushing For some interesting exercise, try paddle boating on Wheatley Lake. The 60-acre waterway in Gilbert Run Park in Dentsville offers paddle boat rentals starting in mid-April and going until the last Sunday in October. Gilbert Run Park ultimately closes on the third weekend of November. The boats can hold one to four people. Half-hour rates are $4 for two people, or $5 for four people. Paddle boats are available to the public Wednesday-Sunday until Labor Day; then rentals are only available on weekends in September and October.

Music to Your Ears Take note: The College of Southern Maryland offers a free concert series in the summer, and it is family friendly. The Twilight Performance Series bowed in 2007 with a variety of concerts on the CSM campuses. Outdoor concerts featuring salsa, rhythm and blues, bluegrass and pop took place on the La Plata, Leonardtown and Prince Frederick campuses. The concert season ran from early July through early August and is scheduled to take place again in 2008. Performers in 2007 included Bio Ritmo Salsa Band and the High Ground Bluegrass Band.

The town of Indian Head is throwing a party – an art party. River Artsfest 2008 will take place June 7 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on the town’s picturesque Village Green. The annual event is organized by the Charles County Arts Alliance, celebrating the county’s rivers and bay through visual, performing and literary arts. The festival includes entertainment, exhibits and original art for sale, plus a silent auction and children’s activities.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER BARTLETT

Festival Occasion

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Big Bass Bash Nearly 35 bass tournaments are held each year on the Mattawoman Creek and Potomac River, which are both known for some of the best bass fishing in the country. These waters even attracted a Bassmaster Elite Series Tournament to Smallwood State Park in Marbury in August 2007. More than 200 professional and amateur anglers competed for $11 million in prize money. The primary event of the weekend was an inaugural Bass Bash, an all-day national tournament of professional fishermen. It was televised on ESPN, and the Bass Bash is tentatively scheduled to return to Smallwood State Park in the summer of 2008.

Cash or Charge? Grab your comfortable shoes and head to Waldorf for a shopping adventure. St. Charles Towne Center features 1.2 million square feet of shopping space, with the 160acre mega-complex offering a variety of retail stores. The center is anchored by Dick's Sporting Goods, JC Penney, Kohl’s, Macy's, Macy's Home Store and Sears, and visitors can also frequent more than 130 specialty stores. Those specialty shops include known national retailers such as Bath & Body Works, Borders Express, LensCrafter, Men’s Warehouse, Old Navy, Starbucks Coffee, The Disney Store, Victoria’s Secret and Yankee Candle.

Wow, They’re Tall Love is in the air every February for great blue herons in Charles County. The 4-foot-tall birds with 6-foot wing spans make an annual return to Nanjemoy Creek to mate during the week of Valentine’s Day. About 2,500 of the East Coast’s largest wading birds arrive at the Nanjemoy Creek Great Blue Heron Sanctuary to build nests and mate, then each female heron ultimately lays three to five eggs. By July, the eggs hatch and the herons disperse northward. The great blue heron is the official bird of Charles County.

Fast Facts ■ Purse State Park has become a popular spot for fossil hunters, with low tide yielding good finds of fossilized shark’s teeth, bones and shell fragments. ■ Bike riding has been gaining popularity in the region, so much so that the Charles County Office of Tourism has put together a free map and brochure titled Southern Maryland Bicycle Routes. ■ St. Ignatius Catholic Church, built in 1641 near Port Tobacco, is the country’s oldest continually active Catholic congregation. ■ The town of Waldorf has a sister city: Walldorf, Germany. ■ The Dr. Samuel A. Mudd House Museum in Waldorf recognizes the Charles County doctor who treated assassin John Wilkes Booth’s broken leg shortly after the killing of Abraham Lincoln in 1865. SEE MORE ONLINE | For more Fast Facts about Charles County, visit imagescharlescounty.com.

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Almanac

Charles County At A Glance

Charles County

POPULATION (2006 ESTIMATE) Charles County: 140,416 LOCATION Charles County is in southern Maryland, 23 miles south of Washington, D.C., 54 miles south of Baltimore and 89 miles north of Richmond, Va. BEGINNINGS Charles County was formed in 1658 by an Order in Council in England and named for Charles Calvert, the third Baron of Baltimore. FOR MORE INFORMATION Charles County Chamber of Commerce 101 Centennial Ave., Suite A LaPlata, MD 20646 Phone: (301) 932-6500 Fax: (301) 932-3945 www.charlescountychamber.org

Washington, ingto on D.C. 295 295

Waldorf

Indian Head 301

St. Charles 5

Bryantown

La Plata

C H AR LE S 6

Hughesville 6

Port Tobacco Village

MARYLAND D MARYLAND

VIRGINIA Cobb Island

SEE VIDEO ONLINE | Take a virtual tour of Charles County at www.imagescharlescounty.com, courtesy of our award-winning photographers.

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Crustacean Sensation Watermen are often in a crabby mood when they fish the 150 miles of shoreline along Charles County. Blue crabs are found in abundance in the waters of Chesapeake Bay, with the commercial crab season running from April through mid-December. The blue crab’s scientific name is callinectes sapidus, which translates as “beautiful swimmer that is savory.” Blue crab meat has been compared to the sweetness of lobster meat, and there are more than a dozen restaurants in Benedict, Cobb Island and Popes Creek that specialize in preparing the crustacean. Crabs can be steamed or sautéed, or served in soups and dip. Scientists say the brackish – or slightly salty – water of Chesapeake Bay is ideal for the blue crab to thrive.

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Natural Beauty A

PRESERVATIONISTS WORK TO PROTECT NATURAL AND MAN-MADE HISTORY

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STORY BY MELANIE HILL

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MICHAEL W. BUNCH

or centuries, Southern Maryland’s economic and social structures were rooted in the farms, fields and waterways of Charles County. Generations later, residents are coming together in an attempt to purify and preserve the very elements that once served as a cornerstone for this historic community. Little better symbolizes Maryland’s rural farming days than the 3,000-plus wood-frame tobacco barns scattered throughout the state. Unique for their hinged ventilators used to cure tobacco, the barns also are distinctive in their large size. But as the county continues to evolve, so do the fields that supported farmers well into the 20th century. “The tobacco barns are primarily threatened by development and neglect,” says Joshua Phillips, director of Preservation Services for Preservation Maryland. “It’s important to find new uses for the barns and to support sustainable agriculture in Southern Maryland so that property owners will have cause to maintain the barns and their surroundings.” Preservation Maryland’s Southern Maryland Tobacco Barns Preservation Initiative aims to preserve the barns and address the threats facing them through funding, public policy, outreach and education, survey, and information sharing. Assistance also is provided by the Maryland Historical Trust, the National Trust, the Southern Maryland Heritage Area and county governments. “Response from barn owners has been overwhelming,” says Phillips, who estimates that a quarter of the state’s tobacco farms are in Charles County. “In the face of rapid change, the barns provide a visible symbol of the unique

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Historic barn on Chapel Point Road in Port Tobacco

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Tobacco barns dot the landscape. STAFF PHOTO

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to discuss possible solutions, including increased education and tougher fines for littering. “You can’t fix it alone because everyone’s connected,” Bowen says. “It’s a winnable problem though because it’s one people can see and relate to.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF RICHARD J. MARKS

a trash-free watershed by 2013, is taking a holistic approach to the issue. In an effort to increase awareness and promote collaboration between jurisdictions, a trash treaty was created and signed by more than 70 of Maryland’s elected officials. A trash summit also was held

PHOTO COURTESY OF OF GEORGE GADBOIS

culture that modern Southern Maryland inherits.” The Alice Ferguson Foundation is another group committed to preserving the natural beauty of Charles County. Their Trash-Free Potomac Watershed Initiative aims to reduce trash and increase recycling, education and awareness of trash issues along the watershed, which spans 15,000 square miles between Washington, D.C. and parts of Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and Pennsylvania. Since 1989, the Foundation has hosted an annual Potomac Watershed clean-up day. In 2007, 8,000 volunteers at more than 400 sites collected more than 239 tons of trash. Tracy Bowen, executive director of the Alice Ferguson Foundation, says the effort is especially important in Charles County, where the watershed distributes debris collected upstream. “There’s not just one source of trash, but a whole range of causes from throughout the region,” Bowen says. Much of the trash is the result of illegal dumping, although accidental littering, such as debris washed into drains from overflowing trashcans, also is common. The Foundation, which hopes to see

Cub Scouts at Boiling Brook Parkway & Randolph Hills Local Park bag trash. Above: Trash-Free Potomac Watershed Initiative volunteers work to roll a large metal ring out of the river. The annual cleanup draws thousands.

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Off Beaten Path the

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES ABOUND IN THE COUNTY’S EXTENSIVE NATURAL AREAS

STORY BY REBECCA DENTON | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL W. BUNCH

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harles County may rank among the fastestgrowing areas in the state, but this region – the third most forested county in Maryland – retains a pristine natural beauty that makes for some fabulous outdoor adventures. Whether you’re into biking or birding, fishing or fossil hunting, the county offers a range of activities to fit the varying interests and fitness levels of families, retirees, casual tourists or extreme adventurers. “Surrounded by the Potomac, Patuxent and Wicomico rivers, Charles County is a mecca for boating and fishing,” says Tom Roland, chief of the Parks & Grounds Division of Charles County Public Facilities. “In fact, the Potomac River is recognized as a world-class large-mouth bass fishery. Our

waters also offer exceptional blue catfish and striper fishing.” The rivers also offer paddling opportunities for canoeists and kayakers of all skill levels, from flatwater excursions to guided tours along intricate waterways. And that’s just for starters. The abundance of undeveloped land in the county creates a haven for birds – and bird watchers. “Charles County supports one of the largest bald eagle populations in the region,” Roland says, along with 321 other species. Some especially fascinating bird activities can be witnessed here, depending on the time of year. During the week of Valentine’s Day, for example, the Nanjemoy Creek Great Blue Heron Sanctuary, operated by The Nature

Fishermen love to frequent Smallwood State Park, which includes a marina, boat ramps and nature trails.

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Conservancy, sees the dramatic reappearance of nearly 2,500 great blue herons in their traditional nesting site. Some favorite Charles County spots for bird watchers include the Chicamuxen Wildlife Management Area, Cobb Island, Friendship Landing, Gilbert Run Park, Myrtle Grove Wildlife Management Area, Popes Creek and Purse State Park. Purse State Park – a wooded area on the Potomac River used for hunting, bird watching and fishing – is also known as a great place to find fossils. Fossilized shark teeth, bones and shell fragments are often discovered at low tide in the rocks and sand along the water’s edge. “Purse State Park is extremely popular with both amateur and serious fossil hunters,” says Joanne Roland, Charles County’s former tourism director. “Fossils in the area are up

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to 59 million years old and include shark teeth and vertebrae, ray plates, crocodile teeth, gastropod molds and turtle shells. The state park attracts visitors from all over the country.” County parks alone attract more than 550,000 visitors each year, Tom Roland says. “Gilbert Run Park is one of our most popular parks,” he says. “Located in Dentsville, this park provides fresh-water fishing opportunities in its 60-acre lake, hiking trails, largeand small-group pavilions, playgrounds and boat rentals.” Another favorite is Laurel Springs Regional Park in the La Plata area. This park features 17 sports fields, the largest special-needs playground in the region, a wooded jogging trail and several picnic facilities. Charles County recently acquired a 13-mile-long abandoned railroad corridor from the federal government, with plans

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to begin development of a hiker-biker trail that would meander through undeveloped and state-protected lands – ultimately extending almost halfway across the county, Tom Roland says. “Also in the plans is the new Pisgah Park in the western portion of the county,” he says. “In addition to much-needed athletic fields, this park will feature our first-ever BMX course and a mountain-bike trail.” For on-road cyclists, Charles County offers some of the most scenic bike routes in Maryland, featuring wide shoulders, light traffic and historic sites along the way.

Below Left: A jogger runs in Smallwood State Park. Below Right: Boats at Smallwood State Park

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Living It Up in St. Charles MASTER-PLANNED COMMUNITY OFFERS JOBS, SCHOOLS, HOMES – AND A HOMETOWN

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STORY BY REBECCA DENTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL W. BUNCH

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hen Charles County Commissioner Gary Hodge and his family moved to the county in 1980, they chose to live in St. Charles – a 9,100-acre master-planned community just 23 miles south of Washington, D.C. Hodge still lives here more than 25 years later, and he has plenty of company. At least a quarter of the county’s population lives in St. Charles, where children can walk or bike to neighborhood schools and houses offer a lot of bang for the buck. “It offered the best of both worlds – an attractive, wellplanned community between the country and the city, with good-quality housing we could afford, close to schools, parks, recreation, shopping and services,” Hodge says. “St. Charles is still growing because it offers this winning combination of a well-planned, conveniently located community with an attractive mix of housing choices.” St. Charles has been around since the 1960s, and it’s the most ambitious planned community started by American

Heritage at St. Charles is a master-planned, active adult community of luxury homes and is just minutes from area shopping, dining and entertainment options.

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County Commissioner Gary Hodge strolls the boardwalk in Waldorf. Right: The senior center at Heritage at St. Charles in Waldorf Facing Page: Homes in the Westlake section of St. Charles signify the county’s growth.

Community Properties Trust, a real-estate organization with headquarters in St. Charles. The overall community is designed to include five mixeduse villages with residential neighborhoods – each with a school, places of worship, shopping centers and recreational opportunities. Two villages are complete, and a third – Fairway Village, adjacent to White Plains Regional Park and its 18-hole public golf course – is in the works. St. Charles also includes an active-adult community called Heritage at St. Charles, which is open to people age 55 and older. “One of the strengths of St. Charles as a planned community is our ability to adapt to emerging housing needs over time – and there was a need for active adult housing in the county,” says Craig J. Renner, assistant vice president for community relations at American Community Properties Trust. As part of ACPT’s development agreement with the Charles County, St. Charles must create more tax revenue than it receives in county services. No worries there, Renner says. In fact, the community offers many additional benefits to the rest of the county. For example, St. Charles is the only community in the county that donates school sites to the county free of charge. “Those become neighborhood schools that serve our residents 22

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and residents outside of St. Charles as well,” Renner says. The company also builds neighborhood community centers that it deeds over to St. Charles’ neighborhood associations. And ACPT builds the infrastructure that supports St. Charles and those who live outside the community, including work on a current project that will extend St. Charles Parkway to create an alternate north-south route from the Charles County line to La Plata. Through ACPT, “St. Charles builds infrastructure to keep pace with the growth of the community,” Hodge says. “It has donated land for recreational facilities like White Plains Regional Park and the new Southern Maryland Stadium and Entertainment Complex, which is now under construction. Because commercial development is integrated into the planning of St. Charles, the community is more than selfsustaining. It contributes positively to the economic well-being of the entire county.” CHARLES COUNT Y


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A Bedroom

Community

Makeover CHARLES COUNTY UNDERGOES A MAKEOVER AS COMPANIES MOVE TO THE AREA

Paul Facchina is founder of the construction giant, the Facchina Group, which has more than 1,000 employees.

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SEE MORE ONLINE | To learn more about the economic impact of national defense research efforts in Charles County, visit the Archives at www.imagescharlescounty.com/07.

Bolton & Associates, headquartered in La Plata, is another example of the county’s economic growth.

STORY BY VALERIE PASCOE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL W. BUNCH

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aul Facchina can’t imagine running his family of companies from anywhere other than Charles County. Facchina founded his homegrown construction and development enterprise, the Facchina Group, in 1987 in La Plata and has expanded the company into a halfbillion-dollar conglomerate with more than 1,000 employees. “There is a tremendous market in southern Maryland with high quality, talented people. The growing labor base will drive a very pronounced change in Charles County over the next decade, with even more significant growth in the commercial sector,” says Facchina, whose company is responsible for building and developing high-profile projects across the region, including repair and restoration of the Pentagon after 9/11 and an upcoming $100 million office park nearby at Indian Head. As Charles County transitions from a commuter suburb to a commercial hub and workforce destination, Facchina commends local leaders for their dedication to providing a balance between meeting the demands of increased development and preserving the county’s existing quality of life. “One thing that makes Charles County CHARLES COUNT Y

unique is that there is a tremendous effort to preserve land in the private sector and public sector to prevent sprawl,” says Facchina of the county’s bedroom community makeover. “This will make future development much more orderly.” According to John Reardon, former director of the Charles County Economic Development Department, part of the plan to absorb new growth includes a controlled approach to development where specific districts are set aside for commercial expansion. “Charles County is advancing to become an employment center as well as a lifestyle center, even though 90 percent of the land here is still undeveloped,” says Reardon. “The goal is to proceed methodically and strike a balance between active space and work space with a return to the village concept. We want to maintain the quality of life people here value.” That quality of life has attracted a growing base of highly skilled and educated residents from across the United States. Reardon says employers are following for access to the professional workforce. “Over the past six to eight years, Charles County has had a large amount of in-migration, mostly affluent working

families. The majority of these professionals are highly educated and very attractive to employers,” says Reardon, noting that the number of residents commuting away from the county to work has declined steadily in recent years as more local white-collar jobs are created. Companies are also attracted to Charles County for its reputation as the home of military operations, including large research facilities at the Naval Support Facility in Indian Head. Building on this military background, the county recently welcomed the Energetics Technology Center, a new organization dedicated to the science of explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics. The center, to be located within a 250acre business and technology campus five miles north of Indian Head, will focus on research, development and workforce training, as well as policy and analysis for the global stage. The center’s director, Dr. Richard Nadolink, says three major European firms are already considering expanding to Charles County for proximity to the new center. “We’re anticipating this technology park as being the catalyst for growth and a magnet for high-tech firms,” says Nadolink. I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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Turning the

Big 3-5-0 CHARLES COUNTY WILL MARK ANNIVERSARY WITH MONTHLY EVENTS

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STORY BY MELANIE HILL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL W. BUNCH

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harles County’s storied past includes fleeing felons and foreign invasions, tobacco and turmoil, bitter wars and heroic stands for freedom. Founded in 1658, the community has served as a backdrop for some of the nation’s most memorable events. As the county celebrates its 350th anniversary, its colorful history lives on through the buildings, tales and artifacts passed down by generations past. “Charles County’s geographical position as a warm, tobacco society had a significant influence on its future,” says Patricia McGarry, coordinator for the Southern Maryland Studies Center at the College of Southern Maryland. Art, tools and weapons used by the county’s first residents can be found at The American Indian Cultural Center/Piscataway Indian Museum in Waldorf. In La Plata, the African-American Heritage Society Museum houses 17th-century artifacts and slavery era documentation. The county’s native heritage can be traced to Port Tobacco, original home of the Indian Village of Potopaco. Settled in 1634, the once-thriving seaport and county seat now offers tours of a oneroom schoolhouse and reconstructed courthouse. Port Tobacco also was home to Thomas Stone, a lawyer and politician who signed the Declaration of Independence. Stone’s sprawling home site includes a tobacco plantation, colonial mansion and 19th-century farm buildings. Founded as a colony for religious freedom, Maryland is home to some of the nation’s oldest churches, including the site of the first Roman Catholic Mass celebrated in English-speaking America. Today, these historic buildings can be seen on a self-guided driving tour along The Religious Freedom Byway. And as the only spot in the United States where foreign troops invaded American shores, the small town of Benedict serves as yet another reminder of America’s struggle for independence. CHARLES COUNT Y

During the War of 1812, British troops landed in Benedict, marched to Washington, D.C., and burned the city. Perhaps the best known story among locals is that of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, who inadvertently became a celebrity when he mended the leg of John Wilkes Booth one day after the assassination of President Lincoln. The country physician was sentenced to life in prison but was pardoned by President Andrew Johnson in 1869. The Dr. Samuel A. Mudd House Museum is open for tours. Barbara Baldus, chairperson of the county’s 350th anniversary celebration, says the events that took place here long ago molded the community into what it is today. “We’re a community that has really grown and come together,” she says. To mark the historic anniversary, monthly events featuring art, lectures, music, education and entertainment will take place across the county in 2008, with a May 10 gala to celebrate the county’s charter day.

An 1876 one-room school house stands well-preserved in Port Tobacco. Left: St. Ignatius-Chapel Point Church in Port Tobacco. Above: Christ Church in La Plata. The churches are located along the Religious Freedom Byway tour.

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Discover

Charles County FIND OUT FIRSTHAND WHAT MAKES THIS COMMUNITY SPECIAL

STORY BY KIMBERLY DALY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL W. BUNCH

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ith communities dating back to the 1600s and some of the oldest churches in the nation, Charles County is often called “the gateway to historic Southern Maryland,” drawing tourists interested in historic architecture and heritage sites. But the history books haven’t got a monopoly on Charles County. The communities of La Plata, Waldorf and Port Tobacco offer gourmet restaurants, fine theater, art galleries and great shopping. Set against a varied landscape of pristine forests, vast tracts of farmland, and miles of coastal beaches where crabbers still ply their trade, it’s sometimes hard to imagine that Charles County is just a short drive away from nearby Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Richmond, Va. Here are a few suggestions for a weekend enjoying just a small portion of what Charles County has to offer.

Friday 6 P.M. Get your fill of authentic Greek dishes such as lamb chops or souvlaki served in the old country way at Ouzo’s Greek Restaurant (68 Drury Drive, (301) 392-9500), where the Greissis family will treat you like their family. They might even serenade you with an old-fashioned Greek ballad or an invitation to join them on the dance floor. 8 P.M. Put on your walking shoes and head to the St. Charles Town Center Mall in Waldorf (1110 Mall Circle, (301) 932-3229), with 160 acres of shopping that includes big retailers such as J.C. Penney, Hecht’s and T.J. Maxx.

High tea is served at the Royal Tea Room.

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A historic marker points the way to the Victorian-era home of Dr. Samuel Mudd.

Then, to ensure sweet dreams, be sure to drop by the Twin Kiss Drive Inn in La Plata (7415 Crain Highway, (301) 934-4025), a local institution popular for its namesake: a chocolate and vanilla braid of soft ice cream.

Saturday 8 A.M. Enjoy a hearty breakfast of chipped beef and sausage gravy at Herb’s Restaurant in Waldorf (2794 Old Washington Road, (301) 645-2620), which has dishing up down-home meals to regulars for more than 40 years. 9:30 A.M. Take a tour with costumed docents inside the Dr. Samuel A. Mudd House Museum in Waldorf (3725 Dr. Samuel Mudd Road, (301) 274-9358). Mudd was the country doctor who found himself – and his home – put on the map of American history after setting the leg of fugitive John Wilkes Booth shortly after he assassinated President Abraham Lincoln. Mudd was convicted of harboring Wilkes for the night in his home. The 1754 Victorian-era home includes the displayed letter from President Andrew Johnson pardoning Mudd years after he was sent to prison. There is also a farm museum, gift shop, kitchen, exhibit building and outbuildings. 12:30 P.M. For an afternoon pick-me-up, head to the Crossings at Casey Jones (East Charles Street and Maple Avenue, (301) 932-6226). The La Plata restaurant has received rave reviews as far away as London for its creative gourmet cuisine featuring fresh and unusual ingredients. The dining room, filled with handcrafted wood, stone and pottery from the American Arts & Crafts movement, exudes a warm atmosphere. Try some of the lunch specialties, which include Grilled Bison Burger, Thai Chili Chicken Pizza and the La Plata Salad. CHARLES COUNT Y

2 P.M. After lunch, find out for yourself why Charles County is called the “wild side of the Potomac.” Rent a canoe or paddleboat from the marina at Smallwood State Park (2750 Sweden Point Road, (301) 743-7613) and enjoy a leisurely ride down the river through 630 acres of unspoiled scenery. 6 P.M. Grab a table on the deck overlooking the river and watch the sunset while waiting for freshly caught crabs to be steamed for your dinner at Captain John’s Crab House & Marina on Cobb Island. The tiny island rests in the Potomac River and is a short and very picturesque ride from the mainland. (16215 Cobb Island Road, (301) 259-2315). 8 P.M. Head back to La Plata to catch a play at the Port Tobacco Players Theater (508 Charles Street, (301) 932-6819) in a restored 1940s movie theater in La Plata. The award-winning theater draws fans from around the region for its intimate showing of productions such as Enchanted April and Death of a Salesman.

Sunday 11 A.M. On your way out of town, stop by the Royal Tea Room and Restaurant in La Plata (110 Charles Street, (301) 392-1111). Lace curtains hang from the windows of this former church rectory, a commanding fireplace fires up in the winters and Victorian-era furnishings and displays of delicate china complete the very British décor. Enjoy a traditional English meal of high tea with a Charles County twist, such as crab soup, along with finger sandwiches, scones, cakes, cream and – of course – a variety of teas in the former church rectory. I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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“All the Comforts of Home” United Way of Charles County Serving our community by providing health and human services through assistance to our 36 Partner Agencies.

Bel Alton Motel (301) 932-1774 • (301) 934-9505 • (301) 934-8331

Accokeek Foundation Alice Ferguson Foundation/Hard Bargain Farm

Air Conditioned • Satellite TV Direct-Dial Telephones • Swimming Pool Microwaves & Refrigerators • Grill & Picnic Area Secured Parking for Bass Boaters & Racers

Alternatives for Youth and Families Arc of Southern Maryland Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Maryland Boy Scouts of America, National Capital Area Council

Five Miles South of La Plata • Eight Miles North of Bridge 25 Miles South of D.C. Beltway Near Maryland International Raceway ROUTE 301 9295 CRAIN HWY. • BEL ALTON, MD

Catherine Foundation Pregnancy Care Center Catholic Charities Center for Abused Persons Center for Children Charles County Association for Handicapped and Retarded Citizens

American Owned & Operated

Charles County Children’s Aid Society Charles County Cooperative Ministry on Aging

www.belaltonmotel.com

Charles County Freedom Landing Charles County Literacy Council Christmas in April, Charles County Compassionate Friends Southern Maryland Chapter

Children’s Learning Tree

Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital

Open a book ... Open your mind.

Greater Baden Medical Services Habitat for Humanity in Charles County Health Partners Hospice of Charles County

Our specialty is helping children experience the JOY of childhood by learning through playing.

Humane Society of Charles County The Jude House Legal Aid Bureau Lions Camp Merrick Maryland Foundation for Quality Healthcare Melwood Senior Services of Charles County Share Food Network Southern Maryland Child Care Resource Center Southern Maryland Community Network Southern Maryland Tri-County Community Action Committee Special Olympics Maryland, Charles County Spring Dell Center

ur staff has over 100 years of combined experience in Early Childhood Education. Our curriculum provides a broad base of developmentally appropriate activities and it encourages thinking and problem-solving while enhancing socialization, self-concept, language development and provides an environment to develop an appreciation of books and reading.

O

Tri-County Youth Services Bureau

(301) 609-4844 www.unitedwaycharles.org

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112 Charles St. • La Plata, MD 20646 • (301) 934-1477

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Portfolio

It’s Almost Paradise TINY COBB ISLAND OFFERS A QUIET GETAWAY AND PLENTY OF SEAFOOD

Y

ou won’t find any bustling shopping malls or crowded interstates on Cobb Island. Instead, this 290-acre triangle located 22 miles south of La Plata offers gorgeous sunsets, freshly caught seafood and the chance to dangle your feet over a pier. “It’s like Mayberry surrounded by water,” says Rick Pike, president of the Cobb Island Citizen’s Association. “It’s a small town where there’s no traffic and neighbors take care of each other.” Surrounded by the Wicomico and Potomac rivers and the Neale Sound, Cobb Island used to be primarily a weekend and summer retreat. But today, it’s home to 400 families who live there year-round and enjoy its scenic, unspoiled environment. “There’s an abundance of nature here,” Pike says. “You’re surrounded by birds, crabs and nature.” For visitors, Cobb Island makes a relaxing day trip. “People can park their car and bike or walk everywhere because the island is mostly flat,” Pike says. “It’s a mile-anda-half long by a half-mile wide.”

Two of the best reasons to visit are Shymansky’s Restaurant and Captain John’s, both of which serve fresh seafood. Visitors can also try their hand at fishing and crabbing. “Throughout the year, the Cobb Island Citizens’ Association sponsors educational and environmental programs, and we always do fundraisers like spaghetti dinners to support our programs,” Pike says. In June, the association sponsors Cobb Island Day, a festival with crafts, food and entertainment. Another highly anticipated event on the island is the Cobb Island Fire Department’s Fall Dinner the first Sunday in November. “People come from all over for that,” Pike says. “They serve fried oysters and ham, and there are games and raffles.” Growing up, Pike spent weekends and summers on Cobb Island at his grandmother’s house. He later spent weekends on the island while attending St. Mary’s College. Six years ago, he made it his permanent home. “It still has a neighborly feel,”Pike says, who can’t imagine living anyplace else.

Serene scenes like this sunrise over a marina near Cobb Island have made the area a popular retreat.

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STAFF PHOTO

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PHOTOS BY MICHAEL W. BUNCH

Helping Horses D

Real Estate Settlements Title Insurance Refinance Loans Commercial & Residential

Nancy Gasparovic President

Buyers love the SAVINGS. Sellers love the PROFESSIONALISM. Agents and Lenders love the SMOOTH TRANSACTIONS. Main Office

Satellite Office

114 LaGrange Ave. • La Plata

101 Charles St. • La Plata

(301) 870-3005 • (301) 934-2900 • www.titleprofessionalsltd.com

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ebbie Burger is a woman with a mission. “I don’t know if I got it from my father or it’s a God-given thing, but I’m driven to save any animals I can,” she says. Burger owns and operates Frederick Hall Equestrian Services in Waldorf, an animal sanctuary for abandoned horses that is funded by boarding services and horseback riding lessons. “My father trained problem dogs, and I got involved in organized dog rescue 25 years ago,” Burger says. “We rescued dogs and cats for 10 years, and eventually it carried over to horses. I’ve always loved horses.” Burger estimates she has almost 30 rescued horses at Frederick Hall in addition to the ones she uses for riding lessons. The hard part is finding room for them all and tending to their needs. “There are horses everywhere that need homes, and we’re already at capacity,” Burger explains. “The work is very hard, and there’s a huge lack of volunteers. I work seven days a week with no vacations.” Burger is in the process of establishing 501(c)(3) status to help fund the animal sanctuary and support her passion for saving horses. “There are millions of horses being slaughtered every year. They are young, healthy animals people can no longer care for,” she says. One way Burger works to protect horses is to educate young people about the importance of training the animals. “The better trained the horse is, the better chance they have of not ending up for slaughter.” For Burger, working with animals comes naturally. “I’ve loved animals since I was a little girl,” she says. For additional information, visit www.frederickhall.com.

Jim Miller, a local ferrier, and Jessica Moor trim Freyja’s hooves at the Frederick Hall Equestrian Center.

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Portfolio The Charles County Public Library offers a variety of programs that educate and entertain children.

More Than Just Story Time

G

ot kids? Head for the Charles County Public Library, which has branches in La Plata, Indian Head and Waldorf. From preschool story time to afternoon kids clubs and the Teen Advisory Board, the library has something to entertain kids of all ages. “We start from age 0 by giving parents of newborns the first book for their child through our ‘From the Beginning’ program,” says Emily Ferren, Charles County Public Library Director. Preschool story time at the library includes songs, crafts and finger plays, and afternoon kids’ clubs encourage reading and poetry writing during the summer for school-age children. “The first Saturday of every month, we do family events like songs, games and stories at all three branches,” Ferren says, “and we just started a Teen Advisory Board where teens meet monthly with librarians to suggest programs like a movie night or Halloween night.” Teens even have their own link on the library’s Web site, www.ccplonline. org, called The Prism. It has homework help, reading lists, information about teen events at the library and hot links to games, movies and books. There’s also a Kids Only link on the Web site. “We have a popular mother/daughter book club at our Waldorf branch, as well as a parent/son book club geared toward kids ages 10-14,” Ferren says. “Throughout the year, we do special events like a Harry Potter Day, magic shows and murder mysteries.” The library encourages kids to read at least 15 minutes every day. Ferren enjoys working for the library because it’s such a valuable resource in the community. CHARLES COUNT Y

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Portfolio Hughesville Bargain Barns used to be an auction house for tobacco yields. “My mom and dad decided to turn it into a flea market in the off season, and they also got permanent vendors,” Damba explains. “They sell collectibles, Native American items, vintage and estate jewelry, designer-inspired handbags, old and out-of-print books, crafts and more. We even have a food vendor that sells hamburgers, hot dogs, funnel cakes and a variety of other things.” The barns are open Saturday and Sunday, and parking and admission are free. “It’s a one-stop shop,” Damba says. “My whole house is decorated with finds and antiques from the barns.” A couple of times each year, Hughesville Bargain Barns sponsors special events with live music. “We have holiday events and a big Christmas show at Thanksgiving,” Damba says. “It’s a really neat atmosphere. The vendors are like family, and if they don’t have what you want, they know where to get it.”

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ou never know what you’ll find during a trip to Hughesville Bargain Barns. The unusual shopping complex consists of two large tobacco warehouses and more than 50 vendors selling everything from antiques and old coins to home décor and swords. “It’s quite an experience – much different from going to the mall,” says Darlene Damba, who runs Hughesville Bargain Barns with her parents, Gilbert and Bunky Bowling. “We have really hard-to-find things, and most of our

vendors have been with us since we opened in 1988.” Hughesville Bargain Barns is one of many jewels in Charles County’s shopping scene. Antiquing is a popular activity here – bargain hunters and antique connoisseurs come from miles around searching for centuries-old treasures such as china and relics from the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Amish homes and farms also dot rural county roads selling handmade wooden furniture and quilts.

Best Western La Plata Inn

Best Western La Plata Inn 6900 Crain Hwy., Rte. 301 La Plata, MD 20646

(301) 934-4900 • Fax (301) 934-5389 (877) 356-4900 • (800) 528-1234 www.bestwestern.com/laplatainn

STAFF PHOTO

• Newly renovated rooms • Luxury suites, king & double rooms • Free deluxe continental breakfast • Free high-speed Internet • Microwave oven & mini-fridge in every room • In-room coffee maker, hair dryer, iron & board • Outdoor swimming pool • Exercise room • 24-hour filter fresh coffee in lobby • Friendly, courteous service

Antique glassware on display

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New Life for Sunken Ships

S

hrouded in the foggy waters of Mallows Bay is an eerily beautiful sight – the largest shipwrecked fleet in the Western Hemisphere. Some 150 abandoned World War I wooden steamships have been slumbering in Mallows Bay since the 1920s. “It’s a ship graveyard,” says Donald Shomette, a marine archaeologist and author of a book about the ships called The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay. The ships were built between 1917 and 1920 after President Woodrow Wilson’s national call to arms against imperial Germany. However, Germany surrendered before any of the ships crossed the Atlantic, and they came to rest in Mallows Bay after the U.S. government sold the fleet to a salvage company, which spent several years transporting the ships to the bay. When the salvage company went bankrupt during the Great Depression, the deserted ships became bait for independent scrappers trying to profit from any scraps they could salvage. “There were wildcat scrappers there at any given time, and scrap fighting broke out,” Shomette says. Though it has the potential to be a huge tourist draw, the shipwreck site is accessible only by canoe or kayak today. Those fortunate enough to see the partially submerged vessels are left in awe of their beauty. “The site is very fragile, but it’s absolutely gorgeous,” Shomette says. “The ships have become flowerpots and wooden islands in the water. Every ship there is an ecocenter with its own mini-environment. Some have beaver dams and eagles’ nests, and it’s an incredible habitat for bass.” Shomette’s interest in the ships at Mallows Bay began when he was a child. “My father took me on a boat trip there,” Shomette recalls. “It was really spooky for a kid.” Shomette returned while in college. He filmed a documentary about the site, eventually writing a book about it. – Stories by Jessica Mozo CHARLES COUNT Y

Mallows Bay is the site of approximately 150 abandoned World War I ships.

I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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Staying

Connected ROADWAY AND RUNWAY IMPROVEMENTS LINK BIG-CITY NEIGHBORS TO CHARLES COUNTY

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I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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Business

STORY BY PAM GEORGE

STORY BY PAM GEORGE

C

harles County has become a magnet for new residents looking for small-town charm, a healthy economy and easy access to Washington, D.C. To preserve that ease of access, the county has embarked on an ambitious series of transportation projects, investing more than $150 million in roadway expansions and improvements and another $26 million to accommodate the increasing number of corporate jets gliding down the runway at Maryland Airport. Getting around, says Wayne Cooper, president of the Charles County Commissioners, “is just a pleasure now. The traffic runs so smoothly.” The county’s popularity is due in no small measure to the number of main transportation arteries leading into it and local officials are working hard to keep the traffic moving. In August 2007, the $56 million Hughesville Bypass opened, providing ease of access to the region with a fourlane, 3.2-mile highway. In addition, the state is working with the Virginia Department of Transportation to study improvements to the Gov. Harry W. Nice Memorial Bridge, a 1.8-mile-long steel truss bridge that carries Route 301 across the

Traffic at the intersection of Highway 301 and Charles Street in La Plata PHOTO BY MICHAEL W. BUNCH

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I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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Commercial Division (301) 645-1999 (301) 843-9306

WE’RE

HERE FOR ALL YOUR

REAL ESTATE NEEDS! New & resale homes Residential rentals Building lots Farms Acreage Commercial sales & leasing Industrial sales & leasing

Waldorf (301) 645-8800 (301) 843-0100

La Plata (301) 934-8407 (301) 870-3131

MEET

US AT

THE MALL!

ST. CHARLES TOWNE CENTER Serving southern Maryland since 1960!

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Potomac River. The 1940’s bridge carries a daily load of more than 26,000 vehicles. The state also has set its sights on Route 301 in Waldorf. The county has petitioned for a four-lane bypass with controlled access and a limited upgrade of US 301 to create a boulevard effect on Waldorf’s “main street.” Moreover, the County has asked the state to accelerate public transit improvements – enhanced commuter bus services and, with federal help, a light rail connection to METRO at Branch Ave. Realizing the immediate need to move traffic, the county put local funds into a road network strategy, says Jason Groth, Adequate Public Facilities Manager for the Charles County Department of Planning & Growth Management. “We want to create greater circulation within the County. As we become more urbanized and the population grows, we realized we needed to get a lot of these projects on the ground.” Among the most publicized new roads is the Cross County Connector, which will link Route 5 to Route 210. It’s a project for which the county laid the groundwork more than 15 years ago. “We had the road laid out a long, long time ago,” Groth explains. “Developers dedicated a portion of the property to us.” The County has five other projects that include roadway extensions, expansions or new construction. Scheduled in phases, the County’s improvements – which total about $150 million – should be complete by summer 2009. It’s also going to be easy to get around by air, thanks to the Maryland Airport’s $26 million improvement plan. “We’re completing the final designs and purchasing a property off the end of the runway, known as the runway protection zone,” says Gil Bauserman, co-owner of the Maryland Airport. The runway will expand from 3,000 feet to 4,300 feet, and a new orientation will better serve corporate jets and general aviation planes. By air or by land, Charles County accessibility is becoming yet another one of its many assets. CHARLES COUNT Y

STEPHEN CHERRY

Business

Maryland Airport is expanding to accommodate more corporate jet traffic.

I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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Business | Biz Briefs acquire the latest technology, says Slater, pointing to the co-op’s mobile workforce management system, which equips service trucks with wireless laptops. “We’re always looking to improve our response time and accuracy in performing our duties,” Slater says of the high-tech trucks in SMECO’s fleet.

IAN CURCIO

BUSINESS A LA CARTE For Bill Campbell, the potential customer base for his company is every entry in the Southern Maryland yellow pages. Campbell’s business, BalanceLogic, LLC, offers a complete menu of business support services to operations of all sizes. The company provides financial, accounting/bookkeeping, information technology, Web design, human resources and administrative services. “Every organization needs these services, so every business is a potential client,” says Campbell, the company’s president and CEO. “Our client base includes the one-person retail shop to a 200-person government contractor.” Campbell founded the company as a one-person operation in August 2004 and has watched it double in size – twice – in a year’s time. He now has seven employees at his White Plains location. “Small businesses can’t afford to have an employee in each of these departments,” says Campbell. “With our services, they can focus on their business.”

Southern Maryland Electrical Cooperative was born in the 1930s when local residents sought federal assistance to establish an electric cooperative.

SMALL FRIES NO MORE Seventy years ago, when Southern Maryland was so sparsely populated that utility companies bypassed it, a cooperative of local residents stepped in to form the Southern Maryland Electrical Cooperative (SMECO). Though the demographics of the region have changed, the primary power source for Charles, St. Mary’s, and Calvert counties remains the SMECO. The 40

I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

cooperative venture is now the eighthlargest of its kind in the United States, with more than 145,000 customers. Size does have its advantages, admits Joe Slater, president and chief executive officer of SMECO. The local operation is able to benefit from economies of scale. The company has more than 470 employees, including specialists that smaller co-ops can’t afford. Additionally, SMECO is able to

AMBITIOUS FOUNDATIONS When Eugene Chaney was awarded his first building contract, he had no equipment and more ambition than experience. Much has changed in 45 years. Chaney Enterprises is the leading provider of construction materials in Southern Maryland, supplying sand, gravel and concrete to builders. The Waldorf-based company employs 300 people in 16 separate Maryland facilities. The company works from the ground up, mining its own sand and gravel from throughout the state and along the Eastern Shore. Once extraction operations are over, Chaney Enterprises is committed to restoring the mined land to a better condition than it was when it started. The company has frequently created wetlands where they didn’t exist. CHARLES COUNT Y


PREPARING DINNER WITH A VIEW A development company is transforming some empty land into a dining, lodging and work destination. It’s also turning a man-made storm water pond into a proper lake. American Communities Properties Trust (ACPT) is developing a patch of land behind the St. Charles Town Center Mall that will ultimately feature six restaurants, a hotel and 40,000-squarefoot office complex. A 1,700-foot boardwalk wrapping around an 18-acre pond ties the development – called The Wharf at O’Donnell Lake – together. “There’s a large promenade there, which should encourage people to gather and hang out,” says Mark McFarland, vice president of land development for ACPT, noting the site’s prime location for hosting live music performances and other events. A bridge will partly cross the pond, also connecting the development to the neighboring mall, its shops and movie theater. “It’s a very pedestrian-friendly atmosphere,” McFarland says. BEST OF BOTH WORLDS Angela Kabala was in the early days of motherhood when she decided to make a gentle return to the working world with her own business. She quickly had to modify her plans. Kabala founded Accountable Solutions, an accounting/financial management company, out of her home. But the company quickly outgrew her living room, and Kabala decided to take the business “where it needed to go.” She hired her first employee after 18 months. Soon another hire followed. Kabala now has a staff of seven who provide a complete range of services to a mix of small to mid-size businesses and government contractors. CHARLES COUNT Y

She gives much of the credit for her company’s success to Mary Estevez, who was downsizing her bookkeeping firm and provided 10 of her early clients. “It helped get my foot in the door,” Kabala says. Fortunately, she hasn’t allowed the demands of work to intrude on

motherhood. The family built an 800square-foot office at her La Plata home, which “allows me to do to the mom thing,” says the mother of two. – Dan Markham

MICHAEL W. BUNCH

Moreover, it’s the only company in Maryland to win the U.S. Reclamation of the Year Award, Non-Coal Mining division, for its Renditions Golf Course project, developed on the site of mined land. The company is equally committed to the Charles County community. Ten percent of its profits are earmarked for the Chaney Foundation, which supports a variety of charitable organizations in the area.

Boston’s Restaurant and Sports Bar is one of six new eateries at the new Wharf at O’Donnell Lake in Waldorf.

Ch ar le s C o un t y Public Sch o ols

Where success is measured one student at a time (301) 932-6610 • www.ccboe.com

I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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“Serving Charles County for 80 Years” • Automatic Delivery • Budget Payment Plans • Same-Day Credit Approval • Clear & Dyed Kerosene • Propane Gas Delivery/Service • Heating Equipment Sales & Service • A/C Equipment Sales & Service • Equipment Service Plans

“No One Delivers More for You”

(800) 492-3420

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• Above & Below Ground Tank Installations

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MICHAEL W. BUNCH

Business | Chamber Report

Charles County Chamber of Commerce staff

Business Boosters CHARLES COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE LINKS BUSINESSES TO EDUCATION, CAPITAL

T

he business climate in Charles County offers much more than a flourishing economy with prime access to the nation’s capitol. Through the Charles County Chamber of Commerce, businesses can access a variety of resources to expand their business skills, establish key contacts and influence legislation affecting their businesses and employees. “We offer networking and training for almost anything you need to learn in your business,” says Chamber President and CEO Dan Barufaldi. A recently formed network of ten industry-specific councils is an especially popular business-building tool among chamber members. Groups meet monthly to share best practices and receive training from notable industry leaders. Councils are specific to small business/CEO; engineering and architecture; financial services; health care; hotel, motel and restaurant management; information technology; marketing professionals; minority business; nonprofit; and, most

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recently, financial services. Plans are also underway to collaborate with the local real estate board. The chamber also offers educational seminars on topics ranging from cash flow management to information technology. A bank loan training course provides small business owners an insight into the world of financing, as well as the chance to complete lending paperwork in advance and receive a partial or complete waiver of application fees. “The program is effective because small business owners generally don’t have time to sit around with bankers, and bankers get the opportunity to catch the eye of business owners,” Barufaldi explains. Meanwhile, a legislative committee led by industry experts works each week during Maryland’s legislative session to keep chamber members informed on pertinent issues. “Any legislation or regulation change affects businesses in some way, from health care and insurance laws to the

construction of highways and bridges,” Barufaldi says. “As a group representing 800 business members, we’re able to influence how things go by letting our elected officials know our position.” Chamber members also participate in informal lobbying and often testify at legislative sessions. Meanwhile, frequent networking events, such as the chamber’s monthly Connections breakfasts, encourage alliances between new and old members. Barufaldi attributes the chamber’s success to the commitment of local business leaders who want to do more than simply join the fast-growing organization. “Becoming a member is great, but what we really appreciate is participation,” he says. “The businesses that participate are those that get a terrific return on their investments, and we’re seeing a real uptake in the amount of participation and enthusiasm. We really have some momentum going.” – Melanie Hill I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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Business | Economic Profile

CHARLES COUNTY BUSINESS CLIMATE Charles County has a diverse private-sector economy, with strong technology, international business and tourism sectors. The region is also an association capital.

container-ship facilities. Channel depth of the Potomac River is sufficient to support shipping directly to Charles County.

TRANSPORTATION Airports BWI, Washington Reagan National and Washington Dulles International airports all serve Charles County residents. General aviation services are available at Charles County’s Maryland Regional Airport, with a $15 million expansion in the works.

La Plata County real property, 0.941 Municipal real property, 0.32

TAXATION

County personal property $2.3525

Charles County County real property, $1.016 Municipal real property, 0 County personal property $2.90

Municipal personal property 0.75 County utility property $2.3525

Municipal personal property, 0

Port Tobacco

County utility property $2.54

County real property, $1.016

Highways

Indian Head

U.S. 301 connects Charles County with the eastern Washington suburbs to the north and with I-95 in Virginia to the south.

County real property, $1.016

County personal property $2.54

Maryland 210 connects Charles County with the Washington Capital Beltway at I-295, which carries traffic directly into Washington, D.C. Maryland 5 connects Charles County with the Washington Capital Beltway (I-495) and with the rest of Southern Maryland. Railroad

Municipal real property, 0.32 County personal property $2.54 Municipal personal property 0.8

Municipal real property, 0.04

Municipal personal property 0.04 County utility property, $2.54 All tax rates are shown per $100 of assessment.

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Industry

No. Employed

Construction

4,010

Education/Health Services

5,168

Federal Government

2,168

Financial Activities

1,542

The county is served by CSX.

Information

508

Trucking

Leisure/Hospitality

4,111

The Waldorf area lies within the Washington, D.C., Commercial Zone; 46 motor freight common carriers serve the Charles County area.

Manufacturing

Water Charles County is served by the Port of Baltimore (50' channel), a leading U.S. automobile port with excellent

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County utility property $2.54

I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

1,226

Natural Resources/Mining Other Services

121 1,272

Professional Services

3,044

State/Local Government

6,085

Trade/Transportation/Utilities

11,479

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics QCEW 2005

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EDUCATION LEVELS 16 years+, 6.8% 16 years, 13.2%

MAJOR EMPLOYERS Company

Product/Service

Employees

Naval Surface Warfare Center (Indian Head)

Ordnance manufacture and testing

Civista Medical Center

Medical services

800

College of Southern Maryland Higher education

700

Under 12 years, 14.1%

Facchina Construction

Construction

400

12-15 years, 59.3%

Hecht’s Department Stores

Consumer goods

350

Electric power

300

Sears Roebuck

Consumer goods

260

Target

Consumer goods

253

Commercial printing

250

Janitorial services

250

Total college graduates, 20% Workforce Education Attainment (25-64 years of age)

12 years, 33.4% Some college, 25.9% Associate degrees, 6.5%

LABOR FORCE Charles County has a strong and stable labor force. The county’s unemployment rate is consistently among the lowest in the state and below the national average. More than half of the county’s workers commute out of Charles County every day. On the other hand, the local labor force includes workers from across the region who enjoy a largely uncongested commute into Charles County.

Southern Maryland Electric Co-op

Automated Graphics Systems Noslot Cleaning Services Southern Maryland Oil Chaney Enterprises Besche Oil Lowe’s Home Improvement Warehouse Maryland Independent Newspaper

3,678*

Fuel oil

240

Concrete, block, gravel

225

Fuel oil

204

Home improvement products

200

Newspaper

200

System technology & electronic document maint.

200

Home improvement products

198

Genesis Elder Care

Nursing care

160

Employment, 71,423

Applied Ordnance Technology

Engineering consultant

130

Unemployment, 2,509

Giant Food

Groceries

129

Civilian Labor Force (June 2006 averages) Labor Force, 73,932

System Maintenance Technologies Home Depot

Unemployment Rate, 3.4% Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Local Area Unemployment Statistics Charles County, Md

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME With a median household income of $72,463 in 2005, Charles County is one of the wealthiest regions in the nation. Median Household Income, 2005 Metro Area, Income Miami, $45,401 Los Angeles, $51,272 Dallas, $54,903

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*Civilian and military Sources: Charles County Economic Development Commission; Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development

Philadelphia, $55,191 New York, $57,157 Chicago, $58,296 Atlanta, $59,127 Boston, $63,958 San Francisco, $71,201 Greater Washington, $72,799

Distribution by Age Group Under 5, 7.2% 5-19, 23.1% 20-44, 36.1% 45-64, 24.7% 65+, 8.9%

Source: Claritas, 2005

Population Under 5, 10,000 5-19, 32,010 20-44, 49,930 45-64, 34,250 65+, 12,310 Total, 138,500

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Number of households, 41,675 Under $35,000, 9,129 $35,001–$50,000, 6,278 $50,001–$75,000, 10,340 Above $75,000, 15,928

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Business | Economic Profile Goods Producing, $853

Other Services, $627 Total Private Sector, $641

Number of homes on the market, 621

Natural Resources and Mining, $929 Construction, $834

Average sale price, $278,900

Manufacturing, $911

OFFICE PARKS

Average monthly rental $858

Service Producing, $597

AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE PER WORKER

Information, $906

Centennial Plaza Located in the county seat of La Plata, this new office complex offers:

Financial Activities, $921

Class A office space

Professional and Business Services, $991

Proximity to government offices

HOUSING

Trade, Transportation and Utilities, $554

Federal Government, $1,278 State Government, $655 Local Government, $803

Education and Health Services, $712

Total Government Sector, $924

Leisure and Hospitality, $248

Total Employment, $699

Easy access to Route 301, just 30 miles from Washington, D.C. Proximity to Indian Head NSWC, Andrews AF Base, Dahlgren NASWC, and Patuxent Naval Air Station For more information, contact (301) 918-2923. Waldorf Technology Park A master-planned, office and R&D complex on 56 acres in the center of Charles County’s business district. 270,000 square feet of office space and stateof-the-art research and development facilities

WHEN YOU NEED US MOST … We’re here for you. Take advantage of current Low Rates and Tax Deductions* with a Home Equity Line of Credit – an opportunity to provide for your immediate needs while thinking about tomorrow. Let us help you. Subject to credit approval. *Consult your tax advisor for deductibility of interest.

People Helping People

11 Locations Serving Southern Maryland: Lexington Park • Waldorf • Bryans Road • Fort Washington La Plata • California • Callaway • Solomons • Prince Frederick La Plata Wal-Mart • Waldorf Berry Road

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Centrally located to Indian Head, Andrews AFB, Dahlgren, Patuxent Naval Air Station, and federal government offices Location on Route 228 that is minutes to residential communities, schools, libraries, hospitals, shopping and entertainment For more information, contact (301) 775-5720. White Plains Office Campus About 20 miles from the Washington Capital Beltway, this planned office park combines a convenient location and ideal setting. Class A office space and flex space Pad for bank, restaurant, and day care center

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Located directly on Route 301, the county’s main artery, between the main business district of Waldorf and the county seat in La Plata

Car • Home • Life • Annuities • Business LIFE COMES AT YOU FAST ® • Low Monthly Payments • Low Down Payments • High Risk & Preferred Drivers Welcome • 24/7 Claims Reporting • Blue Ribbon Service • Home, Tenant & Condo • Motorcycle & Boat • Home/Condo Association • Business Insurance

Minutes to residential communities, schools, libraries, hospitals, shopping, and entertainment Centrally located to Indian Head NSWC, Andrews AF Base, Dahlgren NASWC, Patuxent Naval Air Station, and Federal Government offices For more information, contact (301) 372-2943 or (877) 492-8419.

Felicia Drury Office Manager

Rochelle Creighton-Tompa CLU, LUTCF, President

Creighton Insurance & Investments, Inc. 12108 Old Line Centre Waldorf, MD 20602 (301) 645-6075 • (301) 843-9633 For claims reporting only (800) 421-3535

Call For a Free, Friendly Phone Quote! Established 1983

On Your Side

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Nationwide Life Insurance Company. Home office: Columbus, OH 43215-2220. Nationwide, the Nationwide Trademark, Life Comes at You Fast® and On Your Side are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Charles County Chamber of Commerce 101 Centennial St., Ste. A La Plata, MD 20646 Phone: (301) 932-6500 www.charlescounty chamber.org Charles County Economic Development Department Phone: (301) 885-1340 www.charlescounty.org/ thebest Charles County Government Phone: (301) 645-0550 www.charlescounty.org

AREHART - ECHOLS FUNERAL HOME, P.A. Five Generations of Family Service

Garyton C. Echols, Jr. – Garyton C. Echols III David C. Echols – Daniel T. Lindamood, Jr.

Sources: www.charlescounty chamber.org, www.charles county.org/thebest, www.charlescounty.org, www.greaterwashington.org, www.ccbiz.org

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211 St. Mary’s Ave. • P.O. Box 567 La Plata, MD 20646 (301) 934-8342 • (301) 870-3234

echolsfh@aol.com • www.arehartecholsfuneral.com

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Town of Indian Head “On the Move”

Comfort Suites 11765 Business Park Dr. Waldorf, MD 20601 (301) 932-4400

Sleep Inn & Suites 680 Crain Hwy. La Plata, MD 20646 (301) 392-0065

For more information, contact the Town Hall at: (301) 743-5511 www.townofindianhead.org

A quaint, rural community on a peninsula formed by the Potomac River and the Mattawoman Creek A small-town atmosphere – 20 minutes from the Capital Beltway Indian Head – Washington DC – So near – So different Adjacent to the Naval Surfaces Warfare Center A variety of recreational and water amenities New quality water access housing Growing community – “Watch our progress” Great business opportunities

La Quinta 11770 Business Park Dr. Waldorf, MD 20601 (301) 645-0022

Country Inn & Suites 2555 Business Park Dr. Waldorf, MD 20601 (301) 645-6595

Contact us for more information on blocking rooms for out-of-town guests. Our Sleep Inn & Suites banquet rooms are perfect for bridal showers, rehearsal dinners and intimate receptions! All properties are part of the Crossroads Hospitality Family of Hotels Waldorf, MD

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A DESIGN/BUILD FIRM INDUSTRIAL • AGRICULTURAL WAREHOUSES • RETAIL • CHURCHES RENOVATIONS • METAL BUILDING SYSTEMS

(301) 475-2755 23511 Hollywood Rd. • P.O. Box 1210 • Leonardtown, MD 20650 www.wmdavis.com • MHBR#395 AUTHORIZED BUILDER

BUILDING SYSTEMS

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STEPHEN CHERRY

Arts & Culture

The Port Tobacco Players Theater is home to a variety of productions.

The Play’s the Thing COUNTY SUPPORTS A THRIVING THEATER SCENE

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harles County has a long-term relationship with the theater. The Port Tobacco Players, a robust community theater, has been putting on shows here since 1948. And before that, from 1914 to 1941, the James Adams Floating Theatre traveled the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, stopping at area ports to entertain folks who lacked access to bigcity venues. In fact, Edna Ferber wrote her 1926 epic novel Show Boat – which later became a hit Broadway musical – after spending four days aboard the James Adams. Today, the Chesapeake Bay Floating Theatre Inc. works toward reviving the floating theater concept. Eighty-fouryear-old Spike Parrish, CBFT founder and chairman of the board, hopes to see construction of the James Adams II Floating Theatre completed in his lifetime. CBFT currently operates the Black Box Theatre at Indian Head Center for the Arts, an intimate, 84-seat venue that serves as something of an arts incubator. “We were invited to the Indian Head Center for the Arts to create an arts venue that would spur the economic development of the town of Indian Head,” says Peggy Palmer, president and CEO of CBFT. “We have a resident professional theater company, NobleHeart, that provides the basis for our season, and we CHARLES COUNT Y

invite other performers in to use the venue,” Palmer says. The Black Box Theatre provides performance space for concerts, poetry readings and children’s programs, as well as gallery space for art exhibits. The group also runs an outreach program for at-risk youth – Stage Training Apprentice Mentoring Program. The Port Tobacco Players Inc. community theater in La Plata produces six to seven shows per season, with auditions open to all-comers. PTP’s 300-seat venue, a former movie theater built in 1942, recently underwent a $1.5 million renovation and expansion. “We’ve probably got the tallest building in town,” Reckeweg says. “Part of the renovation was building a new stage and a fly tower, which is 56 feet high, for pulling scenery up out of sight. This is typical with theaters, but not necessarily small community theaters like ours. The town of La Plata is terrifically supportive of us.” In January 2008, PTP will host the Maryland Community Theatre Festival Association’s One-Act Festival at its improved venue. And the College of Southern Maryland, also in La Plata, stages three open-audition productions a year. Its recently formed Southern Maryland Actors’ Repertory Theatre presents additional shows. – Carol Cowan I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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RENDERING COURTESY OF SHW GROUP

Education

A new high school will feature a giant domed planetarium with seats that recline and swivel 360 degrees.

Being Career-Minded BUSINESS, SCHOOLS COLLABORATE TO PREPARE STUDENTS FOR THE FUTURE

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usinesses located in Charles County have a number of advantages, namely location, quality of life and – perhaps most importantly – an educated workforce. To preserve and grow that local talent pool into the future, the Charles County Chamber of Commerce is linking employers and schools to work in tandem with one another. The chamber is serving as a link between the elementary, middle and high schools, the College of Southern Maryland (CSM) and employers. “Everyone is now working together to solve the problems,” says Dan Barufaldi, President and CEO of the Charles County Chamber of Commerce. “It’s a major breakthrough.” The focus includes student-readiness for college, advanced placement exchange between high school and college, and employer input as to the level of training

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and education the workplace requires. “We are concentrating heavily on math and the hard sciences now because that seems to be a requirement of employers at several levels: the technician level, the bachelor’s level, the master’s level and the Ph.D. level,” Barufaldi says. James E. Richmond, superintendent of Charles County Public Schools, agrees. “Engineering companies, for instance, are worried about not having enough people in the area to meet the demands of business,” says Richmond, who’s also met with representatives from the Indian Head Naval Surface Warfare Center and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). “We are developing how to attract kids to math, science and engineering programs at an early age.” Not only does the initiative help businesses, but it also helps students prepare for the future.

Programs to build student readiness start in elementary school, creating a momentum that extends into high school. The programs help students do well on achievement tests, as well as prepare them for college. The goal is also to reduce the amount of remediation currently required in college. As part of this effort, some high school advanced placement courses are shifting to CSM, which has more extensive resources, Barufaldi says. Businesses are getting involved with the initiative. Some businesses have donated equipment to the North Point High School for Science, Technology and Industry, which features 19 cuttingedge programs, including computer repair, engineering, CISCO networking and health-care occupations. “It’s a state-of-the-art, 21st-century school,” Richmond says. – Pam George CHARLES COUNT Y


Education

Students: Meet the Universe

K

ids need the ‘Wow!’ factor,” says Charles County Public Schools Superintendent James Richmond. And the school system has plans to provide just that with a digital classroom/ planetarium in its new high school planned for 2011. The room will be housed inside a 60-foot dome equipped with the latest in 21st-century digital technology, such as planetarium projection technology, surround sound, a stage, laser technology and 150 interactive seats. “What we’re trying to do is turn kids onto math, science and the performing arts by creating a digital classroom that immerses them in the technologies of each one of those subjects,” Richmond says. “It’s another tool for teachers to get kids excited about different areas. It will never replace a teacher, but a talented teacher will do wonders with it.” The digital classroom is a fitting follow-up to North Point High School, the stateof-the-art, comprehensive career technical high school the district opened in 2005. “We aim to create a world-class school system,” Richmond says. “There’ll be nothing like it in the country.” Consultation with Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson of the Hayden Planetarium in New York and teacher training by the Space Foundation are helping support the endeavor. After all, Richmond says, “what bigger ‘wow’ is there than the universe?” – Carol Cowan

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Sports & Recreation

Home Field Advantage PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL FINALLY ARRIVES IN CHARLES COUNTY

A

20-year quest by local sports fans – and Charles County Commissioner Gary Hodge – soon will be realized. Hodge has been championing the construction of a professional sports stadium in Southern Maryland since the 1980s. Fast forward to 2008, when the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs play their first game at the newly built Regency Furniture Stadium in Waldorf. Hodge plans to savor the day in the stands with other committed fans. “Throughout the ages, building a stadium has been an expression of a community’s self-confidence, pride and optimism about the future. And so it is with us, here in Charles County, as we begin construction of our new stadium,” says Hodge, who began advocating for a stadium project when he served as executive director of the Tri-County Council for Southern Maryland. The stadium is being funded through equal contributions from the county, state and Blue Crabs ownership group,

Maryland Baseball. And unlike the big leagues, where governments finance stadiums then turn them over to the team’s owners, Regency Furniture Stadium will be wholly owned by Charles County. That ownership will allow the county to use the stadium for more than just professional baseball. The stadium will be the site of concerts, jamborees, festivals and other sporting events. “It’s always been envisioned as a multipurpose, year-round facility with baseball as the anchor,” says Hodge. “It’s a great venue for a variety of events and activities.” But for 70-odd (and, Hodge believes, glorious) nights each year, the venue will be used by the Blue Crabs, whose name was chosen in a vote by local baseball fans. The Blue Crabs are the latest entry in the eight-team Atlantic League, an Independent League with teams in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut. The team’s ownership group, Maryland

Baseball, has been a major presence in the Atlantic League, working with two stadium developments in Pennsylvania and nearly a dozen other projects. That experience will help deliver a “miniature Major League stadium,” to Charles County, says John Danos, president of Maryland Baseball. Regency Furniture Stadium will seat approximately 5,000 fans, with skyboxes, party suites, picnic areas and a playground among its amenities. “It’s a measure of confidence the team owner has in this market that they’re willing to make this commitment,” says Hodge. “They’re our partners in this venture.” Another asset of the organization is the presence of Brooks Robinson, a Maryland baseball legend and Hall of Famer following a career with the Baltimore Orioles. Robinson is now a partner in Maryland Baseball. “Brooks Robinson is an icon in Maryland,” Danos says. “We’re obviously thrilled to have him as part of Maryland Baseball.” – Dan Markham

Charles County’s new $25 million baseball stadium is the future home of the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs.

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Public Health Services for the Community

Child & Adolescent Services

Adult Services

• Health

• Infants & toddlers

• Family planning

• Adult evaluation

• Health insurance

• School health

• Mental health

• Immunizations

• Substance abuse

• Developmental disability

• Pregnant women health insurance

• Communicable disease

• Mental health

• Communicable disease

• Developmental disability

• WIC

• Substance abuse

• Healthy start

• Cancer screening • AIDS/HIV

• Personal care

Other Information: Vital records • Employment • Environmental health services • Health education & promotion services • Public health preparedness & response services

4545 Crain Hwy. • White Plains, MD 20695 • (301) 609-6900 • FAX (301) 934-4632 • TTY (800) 735-2258 • www.charlescountyhealth.org Hours of operation: 8 am-5 pm (some programs may include evening hours)

HERE FOR YOU

When you need us, where you need us, for as long as you need us

Hospice

OF CHARLES

COUNTY, INC.

105 LaGrange Ave. • P.O. Box 1703 • La Plata, MD 20646 (301) 934-1268 • (301) 934-6437 fax info@hospiceofcharlescounty.org • www.hospiceofcharlescounty.org

RECIPIENT OF THE CHARLES COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE REED W. MCDONAGH BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD 2004

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Health & Wellness

Upgraded Condition CIVISTA MEDICAL CENTER EXPANDS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY

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MICHAEL W. BUNCH

F

or Civista Medical Center in La Plata, the past three years have been marked by an extensive renovation and expansion project bringing new technology and health-care services to a fast-growing community. “In terms of square footage, we have more than doubled the size of our facility,” says Christine Stefanides, president and CEO of Civista Medical Center. For a hospital that once had to accommodate 30,000 patients a year – in a facility designed for just 18,000 – the expansion brings new opportunities to serve patients. When construction began in 2005, the first step was to add a 10-bed coronary care unit, giving the hospital more flexibility in terms of critical care capacity. To complement the unit, Civista opened an interventional lab, spending well over $1 million outfitting the space to provide new services, including advanced vascular and cardiac catheterization procedures. One of the most noticeable changes to the medical center has been the addition of a fourth tower, which now includes a 30-bed emergency department, a 23-bed acute section, and a seven-bed fast track section. “With the current facility, we’ll have the capacity to absorb significant volumes in the coming years,” Stefanides says. The new tower also includes the hospital’s surgical services with four major operating rooms, two procedure rooms and an endoscopy suite. The tower’s top two floors each have 30 private patient rooms, replacing the semi-private rooms that were part of the pre-renovation floor plan. “One of the driving forces of the entire project was to support our patient-family centered care model, and to do that we really needed to have patients have their own space,” Stefanides says, adding the private rooms also are important in terms of patient safety by minimizing risks for cross-contamination. Aesthetically, the lobby area has been transformed into a three-story atrium overlooking a healing garden. In addition to registration, this space was designed with families in mind and includes a new coffee bar, gift shop, family waiting area and meditation rooms. “It connects with nature … there is a very strong healing element to the area,” she says. Stefanides continues, “As impressive as the physical facility is, I think the technology additions are even more impressive.” The medical center has upgraded existing technology and instituted new measures to enhance efficiency, patient care and safety. “It is thrilling to be able to bring a facility like this to the community – they really deserve it,” Stefanides says. Today, the facility is serving 36,000 patients each year and has a built-in capacity to serve more. “We’re done with this project, but really we’ve just laid the foundation to keep going. We still have a lot of things on the drawing board, but this project laid the groundwork for us to be able to articulate future phases.” – Cindy Sanders

Civista Medical Center in La Plata

Post Office Lake

Dental Associates “We Care”

Glander Fitchett, Jr., DDS • James P. Hood, III, DDS Cathy Wiltshire, DDS, Orthodontist Preventive dentistry Gum treatment Pediatric care Cosmetic dentistry

Orthodontics/braces Bleaching Root canals Crowns & bridges

Specializing in Invisalign

Accepting most insurance plans Lakeview Professional Park 603 Post Office Rd., Ste. 208 • Waldorf, MD (301) 705-7552 • (301) 870-7077 Modern facility nestled in the Lakeview Professional Park • Emergency Care

I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

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questions

Š 2002 American Cancer Society, Inc.

answers 8 0 0 . A C S . 2 3 4 5 / c a n c e r. o r g


Community Profile

CHARLES COUNTY SNAPSHOT Charles County is part of the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, but it retains much of a rural feel. The county’s history dates from the mid-17th century, and many historic sites are open to the public. Although agriculture remains an important part of the local economy, a diversified industrial base has developed. Recreation is another growing industry.

GOVERNMENT

Sewer Charles County Department of Public Facilities, 932-3440

HOUSING The average price of a home in Charles County is approximately $320,000.

Telephone

The average monthly rent of a two-bedroom apartment is $1,100.

Trash removal

Verizon Maryland, 954-6260

Charles County Department of Public Facilities, 932-3440 Newspapers

CLIMATE

Maryland Independent 645-9480

Avg. summer temperature 73.9 F Avg. winter temperature, 37.6 F

The Washington Post (800) 477-4679

Avg. growing season, 185 days

UTILITIES Cable television Comcast, 645-9300

County Administration Paul Comfort County Administrator 645-0550 or 870-3000

ARTS/ ENTERTAINMENT Charles County Arts Alliance 392-5900

George Clarkson Press Secretary 885-1329 or 870-3000

Chesapeake Bay Floating Theatre, 742-3040

State Government

College of Southern Maryland Fine Arts Center, 934-5900

Electricity Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative, 274-3111

County Commissioners President Wayne Cooper Vice President Edith Patterson Sam Graves Reuben Collins Gary Hodge Next election 2010

Avg. annual rainfall, 44" Avg. annual snowfall, 17.2"

Charles County is governed by five county commissioners elected to four-year terms. The president of the commissioners serves on a fulltime basis, while the other four commissioners serve part-time.

Natural gas

Mattawoman Creek Art Center 743-5159

Washington Gas, 595-8042

Port Tobacco Players, 932-6819

Legislative General Assembly Number of locally elected members, 4 State Senate 47 seats statewide House of Delegates 141 seats statewide

There are places that simply must be experienced ...

At Swan Point, our goal is to ensure that your event is more than you expected. Whether you are enjoying 18 holes of award-winning golf or celebrating your wedding, you deserve the finest. We specialize in corporate and charity golf outings from four to 144. Our beautiful banquet facilities, meeting rooms and on-site catering are unmatched. Come see for yourself Charles County’s best kept secret. Call for more information on membership, golf outings, business meetings, banquets or weddings.

(301) 259-0047 • www.SwanPointGolf.com Schedule your own Swan Point experience

The area code for Charles County is 301.

Offering: • Residential Services • Information/Referral Services 79 Industrial Park Dr. • Waldorf, MD 20604 (301) 932-7030 • www.ccharc.com charlescountyharc@comcast.net A United Way of Charles County Agency

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Community Profile Governor Martin O’Malley

Emergency Preparedness 609-3402

Next election: 2010

Fiscal Services, 645-0567

U.S. Representative Serving the Area

Gambling Permits, 645-0555

Steny Hoyer Years in office: 24

Hospital – Civista Medical Center, 609-4000

Next election: 2010 U.S. Senators Serving Maryland

Hospital – Southern Maryland Hospital Center, 868-8000

Ben Cardin

Indian Head Town Hall, 743-5511

Next election: 2010

Juvenile Services, 705-1994

Barbara Mikulski Years in Office: 19

La Plata Police Department, 934-1500

Next election: 2010

SPORTS PROGRAMS Charles County outdoor sports programs are organized and directed by the Parks & Grounds Division of the Department of Public Facilities. Leagues are offered in the spring/summer and fall seasons for both the youth and adult sports enthusiast. Indoor sports programs include volleyball, basketball and soccer. Pool and aquatics programs are also offered. For more information, call 934-9305.

HEALTH CARE Civista Health Inc., 609-4000 Southern Maryland Hospital Center, 868-8000

IMPORTANT NUMBERS Circuit Court, 932-3201

La Plata Town Hall, 934-8421 Library – Bryans Road 375-7375 Library – La Plata, 934-9001 Library – St. Charles, 843-7688 License Commissioners (Liquor Board), 645-0555 Naval Surface Warfare Center, 744-4401 Orphans Court, 932-3345 Planning and Growth Management, 645-0627 Post Office (central office), 645-5231

The College of Southern Maryland, near La Plata, has an enrollment of more than 15,000 students, of whom more than 6,000 live in Charles County. The college offers a two-year program leading to an associate of arts degree and a joint program with the University of Maryland at the Waldorf Center leading to a bachelor’s degree.

Sheriff’s Office – Indian Head, 743-2222

Charles County Public Schools 932-6610

Sheriff’s Office – La Plata, 932-2222

College of Southern Maryland 934-2251

Sheriff’s Office – Waldorf, 932-7777

University of Maryland 645-4303

Small Business Development Center, 934-7583

Higher Education

Social Services, 392-6600

Community Services, 934-9305

State’s Attorney, 932-3350

District Court, 932-3275

Tax Assessment Office, 932-2440

I M AG E S C H A R L E S C O U N T Y. C O M

There are more than 200 educational partnerships between the schools, businesses, individuals and groups. In addition, 15 private schools are operated in the county.

Register of Wills, 932-3345

Public Facilities, 932-3440

State Highway Administration, 934-8031

Elections, Supervisors of 934-8972

The Charles County Public School system operates 19 elementary schools, seven middle schools, five high schools, a career and technology high school, an outdoor education center, an alternative school, and several other special centers. Sixteen schools offer a prekindergarten program for 4-year-olds.

Charles County is also home to satellite campuses of Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland.

Civil Defense & Disaster Preparation, 645-0630

Economic Development Department, 885-1340

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Health Department, 609-6900

EDUCATION

Transportation, 609-7917 Treasurer, 645-0701 Tri-County Council, 274-1922

St. Mary’s College of Maryland (240) 895-2000 St. Mary’s City University of Maryland 405-1000, College Park Community Colleges College of Southern Maryland 934-2251, La Plata Southern Maryland Higher Education Center, 737-2500 California, Md.

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PARKS & RECREATION Cedarville State Park Brandywine, 888-1410 Location: 10201 Bee Oak Road Located in Prince George’s and Charles counties, Cedarville State Forest offers 3,697 acres of woodlands for hiking and freshwater fishing. A visitors’ center at the state’s only warm-water fish hatchery is open during the summer. Chapel Point State Park Port Tobacco, 743-7613 Location: Chapel Point Road off Maryland Route 6 Located on the Port Tobacco River, a tributary of the Potomac, this scenic setting has a ramp for car toppers, canoes and kayaks. Hunting is permitted in the 600-acre state park. The area provides habitat for quail, squirrels, doves, rabbits, white-tailed deer, wild turkey and waterfowl. Chicamuxen Watchable Wildlife Center Marbury, 743-4705 Location: Stump Neck Road off Maryland Route 224 south of Mason Springs The Naval Surface Warfare Center’s 30-acre Watchable Wildlife Center is tucked away on a peninsula surrounded by the Potomac River and Chicamuxen and Mattawoman creeks. It contains about 20 acres of wetlands. Doncaster Forest Nanjemoy Location: Maryland Route 6, 13 miles west of La Plata This site offers 1,445 acres for hiking, horseback riding or picnicking. Friendship Farm Park and Boat Launch Nanjemoy Location: Maryland Route 6 west, left on Maryland Route 425, left on Friendship Landing Road

The area code for Charles County is 301.

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Community Profile For the canoeist, kayaker or small boater, this creek offers miles of scenic marshes that abound with wildlife. The winding creek offers protection from strong winds and is home to many nesting sites for bald eagles. A county-owned boat ramp on Nanjemoy Creek offers easy access to the Potomac River. Fishing from the pier and shoreline is permitted without a license. Open yearround from dawn to dusk.

Oak Ridge Park Hughesville

Southern Park Issue

Location: Oaks Road

Location: Off Maryland Route 257

Gilbert Run Park La Plata, 932-1083

A 90-acre reserve that remains virtually unimproved, Purse is ideal for fossil hunters. The park lies in a remote area that includes gently rolling hills, wooded countryside, marshlands and pools surrounded by mosscovered rock walls and stunted trees.

Location: Maryland Route 6, 7 miles east of La Plata. Admission: $4 parking fee Within this scenic 180-acre wooded parkland are hiking and nature trails, picnic areas (grills and tables), picnic pavilions, playground areas and fishing piers. The main attraction is a 60-acre freshwater lake. Rowboats, paddleboats, canoes and aqua bikes are available for rent. Open March-November. Laurel Springs Regional Park La Plata Location: Radio Station Road A tot lot and playground, jogging trail, two picnic pavilions, 16 athletic fields, and several informal areas with picnic tables make this a great getaway location for families. Open 9 a.m. until dusk. Myrtle Grove Wildlife Management Area 743-5161 Location: Maryland Route 225, 7 miles west of La Plata The area offers 834 acres for fishing, hiking and hunting. It includes a 23-acre lake and three reservoirs for fishing as well as a gun range. The area also is considered a prime location for bird-watching and nature photography.

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The park offers equestrian trails and show rings on a first-come, first-served basis, unless special events are scheduled. A playground and picnic pavilion area also are available. Purse State Park Nanjemoy, 743-7613 Location: Off Route 224 near Liverpool Point Road

Ruth B. Swann Memorial Park Bryans Road Location: Off Maryland Route 210 This park borders Pomonkey Creek and the Potomac River. Hikers can take advantage of a mile-long trail that passes through mature woodlands on its way to the shoreline. A birdwatcher’s haven, the park also include picnic areas and large open areas for soccer and baseball. Smallwood State Park Marbury, 743-7613 Location: Maryland Route 224 This 630-acre park includes the restored home of Revolutionary War hero General William Smallwood (open to visitors on weekends and holidays). Sweden Point Marina has boat-launching facilities. The Mattawoman Natural Area is a great place for hiking and picnicking. The Mattawoman Creek Art Center, adjacent to the park, offers exhibitions of the visual arts.

Enjoy a scenic view of the Potomac River from the playground, picnic areas, ballfields, tennis courts and fishing pier. Open dawn to dusk. Thomas Stone National Historic Site Port Tobacco, 392-1776 Location: 6655 Rose Hill Road This National Park Service site offers self-guided hiking and birding trails. White Plains Regional Park 645-1300 Location: DeMarr Road and St. Charles Parkway Facilities include an 18-hole golf course with Bermuda grass fairways, a 15,000square-foot concrete-based skate park, lighted tennis courts, a tot lot and playground, and several small picnic pavilions.

MUSEUMS African-American Heritage Society & Cultural Center 7485 Crain Highway, La Plata 843-0371, www.aahscc.org McConabie School & Farm Museum Charles County Fairgrounds, La Plata, 934-9175, 743-7558 Mudd House Museum Poplar Hill Road at Dr. Samuel A. Mudd Road, Waldorf, MD 20646 934-8464 www.somd.lib.md.us/ MUSEUMS/Mudd.htm Piscataway-Conoy Museum 5125 Gwynn Road, Pomonkey 932-2899 Piscataway Indian Museum American Indian Cultural Center, 16816 Country Lane Waldorf, 372-1932

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info@piscatawayindians.org www.piscatawayindians.org Port Tobacco Courthouse Chapel Point Road (off Route 6 west), Port Tobacco, 934-4313 Port Tobacco One-Room Schoolhouse Chapel Point Road (off Route 6 west), Port Tobacco, 932-6064 www.ccboe.com/ccrta/ school.htm St. Thomas Manor 8855 Chapel Point Road, Port Tobacco, 934-8245 frsalsj@chapelpoint.org www.potomacheritage.org/ pathfind/tmano.asp Smallwood State Park 2750 Sweden Point Road, Marbury, 743-7613 e-mail: Roberta Dorsch puffin10@erols.com www.dnr.state.md.us publiclands/southern /house.html Thomas Stone National Historic Site 6655 Rose Hill Road Port Tobacco, 392-1776 www.nps.gov/thst/

2008 CALENDAR OF ANNUAL EVENTS (Partial List)

January 19 – PRESIDENTIAL BALL

I spy something green.

Charles County Chamber of Commerce, Waldorf Jaycees Center, 932-6500

February 9 – WASHINGTON BALLET College of Southern MD La Plata, 934-7828

Everyday moments can be learning moments with your kids. For more tips, visit bornlearning.org

16 – 17TH ANNUAL MARDI GRAS BALL Jaycees Community Center, Waldorf, 609-4132

The area code for Charles County is 301.

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Community Profile 24 – EXHIBIT & AUCTION Jaycees Community Center Waldorf, 934-9472

April 9 – SPRING BUSINESS EXPO AND LEGISLATIVE WRAP-UP LUNCHEON Waldorf Jaycee Center Charles County Chamber of Commerce, 932-6500

24 – 39TH ANNUAL WORKING WOMAN’S DAY

18 – CIVISTA RUN/WALK FOR WELLNESS

Waldorf Jaycee Center Charles County Chamber of Commerce, 932-6500

La Plata, 609-4132

May 9 – 41ST ANNUAL GOLF CLASSIC White Plains Golf Course Charles County Chamber of Commerce, 932-6500

12 – 350TH PROCLAMATION REENACTMENT

10– 350TH CHARTER DAY GALA

Port Tobacco, 885-1342

Mt. Victoria, 885-1342

www.VisitCharlesCounty.com Come Play in The Nation’s Backyard

10 Fun Things to Do in Charles County this Weekend • Eat at over 240 restaurants – (Southern Maryland specialties, unique dining and national franchises) • View the new e-calendar for festivals, markets and county events • Get outdoors at over 2,804 acres of maintained parkland • Check out the cultural arts – music, visual arts, drama, dance and literature • Visit one of the 14 museums and interpretive centers • Take a scenic drive through our county and find the 44 historical marker signs • Go shopping, a lot, at a good choice of shopping centers anchored by St. Charles Town Center Mall – Southern Maryland’s largest mall • Stay at over 1,060 hotel/motel rooms • Visit one of 37 operating farms open to the public for products and activities • Cast a line for a rockfish from one of our marinas, ramps or shore fishin’ locations

21-22 – JEWELRY SALE Civista Health Foundation La Plata, 609-4132

25-26 – FIRE UP & THUNDER OUT ROLLING THUNDER RALLY Charles County Fairgrounds 893-2900

June 4 – LA PLATA’S FARMERS MARKET Charles County Courthouse, La Plata, 934-8421

7 – RIVER ARTSFEST! Village Green, Indian Head 392-5900

July 4 – INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION Thomas Stone National Historic Site, Port Tobacco, 392-1776

4 – 31ST ANNUAL 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION Village Green Park, Indian Head, 743-5574, 753-6633

4 – INDEPENDENCE DAY FIREWORKS DISPLAY Charles County Fairgrounds, La Plata, 932-1234

August 5 – NATIONAL NIGHT OUT

Get details on these and other fun things to do at

www.VisitCharlesCounty.com Send ideas to Tourism@CharlesCounty.org

Village Green Pavilion, Indian Head, 743-5574, 753-6633

9 – 161ST ANNUAL OLD DURHAM CHURCH FESTIVAL Christ Church Durham Parish, Nanjemoy, 743-7511

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16-17 – 6TH ANNUAL NATIONAL FALLEN BIKER MEMORIAL WEEKEND RIDE All American Harley Davidson, Hughesville, 893-2900

September

P

OTTER

HEATING & ELECTRIC, INC. Air Conditioning Specialists

1 – LABOR DAY PARADE La Plata, 743-5334 (571) 238-5241

13-16 – 85TH ANNUAL CHARLES COUNTY FAIR Charles County Fairgrounds, La Plata, 932-1234

20 – AUTUMN WINE TASTING Port Tobacco Courthouse, Port Tobacco, 609-4132

HEATING & A IR CONDITIONING HEAT PUMPS

GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMPS

AUTHORIZED FACTORY SALES & SERVICE RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL

(301) 645-7071 or (301) 843-0300 6 Irongate Dr. • Waldorf

27 – ANNUAL CRAFT FAIR Clark Senior Center La Plata, 259-2816

Celebrating Our 52nd Anniversary

October 1 – 14TH ANNUAL FALL BUSINESS TO BUSINESS EXPO & 22ND ANNUAL STATE OF THE COUNTY ADDRESS

Save Money. Smell the Flowers.

Waldorf Jaycee Center Charles County Chamber of Commerce, 932-6500

11 – FALL “FISHIN’ BUDDIES” TOURNAMENT Gilbert Run Park Dentsville, 932-3470

20 – CRAFT FAIR La Plata Volunteer Fire Department, 392-9066

CRAB FEAST Civista Health Foundation Pope’s Creek, 609-4132

25 – 3RD ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF SCARECROWS Charles County Chamber of Commerce, 932-6500

The area code for Charles County is 301.

Looking for ways to save money on gas and help the environment? The EPA wants to share some smart driving tips that could give you more miles per gallon of gas and reduce air pollution. Tips like making sure your tires are properly inflated and replacing your air filter regularly. And where possible, accelerate and brake slowly. Be aware of your speed ... did you know that for every 5 miles you go over 65 mph, you’re spending about 20 cents more per gallon of gas? If you’re shopping for a new car, choose the cleanest, most efficient vehicle that meets your needs. If we each adopt just one of these tips, we’d get more miles for our money and it would be a little easier to smell the flowers. For more tips and to compare cleaner, more efficient vehicles, visit

www.epa.gov/greenvehicles.

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Community Profile 25-26 – FALL ARTS & CRAFTS WEEKEND Charles County Chamber of Commerce, 932-6500

28 – CHARLES COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT Charles County Economic Development Dept. 885-1340 Location TBD

November 9 – VETERANS’ DAY PARADE La Plata

3 – CHRISTMAS TREE OF LIFE Civista Health Foundation La Plata, 609-4132

28-31 – 21ST ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF TREES

6-7 – VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE

Jaycees Community Center, Waldorf, 934-1268

Dr. Samuel E. Mudd House, Waldorf, 274-9358

December

31 – ANNUAL CHILDREN’S HALLOWEEN PARTY

2 – TREE LIGHTING PROGRAM

Village Green Pavilion, Indian Head, 743-5574, 753-6633

Village Green Pavilion, Indian Head, 743-5574

6 – THOMAS STONE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE Port Tobacco “Christmas at Haberdeventure,” 392-1776

7 – 12TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL OF TREES DECORATING AND SING-ALONG Village Green Pavilion Indian Head, 743-5574

9 – HOLIDAY FESTIVAL & CRAFT FAIR Village Green Pavilion, Indian Head, 743-5574

Source: Charles County Office of Tourism FOR MORE INFORMATION Charles County Chamber of Commerce 101 Centennial Ave., Ste. A La Plata, MD 20646 (301) 932-6500 www.charlescounty chamber.org Charles County Public Schools (301) 932-6610 www.ccboe.com Charles County Office of Tourism (301) 645-0558 www.charlescounty.org

Sources: Charles County Chamber of Commerce; Charles County Economic Development Department www.greaterwashington.org

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O F CHAR LE S CO U NT Y, MARY L AN D SENIOR EDITOR ANITA WADHWANI COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, KIM MADLOM ASSISTANT EDITOR REBECCA DENTON STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN, JESSICA MOZO DIRECTORIES EDITORS AMANDA MORGAN, KRISTY WISE EDITORIAL ASSISTANT JESSY YANCEY CONTRIBUTING WRITERS KIMBERLY DALY, PAM GEORGE, MELANIE HILL, DAN MARKHAM, VALERIE PASCOE, CINDY SANDERS REGIONAL SALES MANAGER CHARLES FITZGIBBON ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER TODD POTTER INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER DESHAWN GOODRICH ONLINE SALES MANAGER MATT SLUTZ SALES COORDINATOR SARA SARTIN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, WES ALDRIDGE, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, MICHAEL W. BUNCH, IAN CURCIO, BRIAN M CCORD CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR SHAWN DANIEL PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS ASST. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR HAZEL RISNER SENIOR PRODUCTION PROJECT MGR. TADARA SMITH PRODUCTION PROJECT MGRS. MELISSA HOOVER, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER JESSICA BRAGONIER GRAPHIC DESIGN CANDICE HULSEY, ALISON HUNTER, JANINE MARYLAND, LINDA MOREIRAS, AMY NELSON, CARL RATLIFF WEB PROJECT MANAGER ANDY HARTLEY WEB DESIGN RYAN DUNLAP, CARL SCHULZ WEB PRODUCTION JILL TOWNSEND COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN CORY MITCHELL AD TRAFFIC MEGHANN CAREY, SARAH MILLER, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING SYBIL STEWART V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS MAURICE FLIESS MANAGING EDITOR/TRAVEL SUSAN CHAPPELL PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS, JACKIE YATES RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY WALDRIP COMMUNITY PROMOTION DIRECTOR CINDY COMPERRY DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH MARKETING COORDINATOR AMY AKIN IT SYSTEMS DIRECTOR MATT LOCKE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR NICOLE WILLIAMS SALES SUPPORT MANAGER/ CUSTOM MAGAZINES PATTI CORNELIUS OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM

Images of Charles County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Charles County Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com.

Visit Our Advertisers Arehart-Echols Funeral Home, PA www.arehartecholsfuneral.com

Hospice of Charles County, Inc. www.hospiceofcharlescounty.org

Baldus Real Estate www.baldus.com

J&J Builders www.jandjbuildersllc.com

Bel Alton Motel www.belaltonmotel.com

Jane Staples – State Farm www.janestaplesinsurance.com

Best Western La Plata Inn www.bestwestern.com/laplatainn Chaney Enterprises www.chaneyenterprises.com Charles County www.charlescounty.org Charles County Association for Handicapped & Retarded Citizens, Inc. www.ccharc.com

Joson Fine Jewelry www.josonjewelryhome.com Ken Dixon Automotive www.kendixon.com Manekin www.manekin.com Maryland Bank & Trust Company www.mdbank.com Mirant Mid-Atlantic, LLC

Charles County Economic Development www.visitcharlescounty.com Charles County Health Department www.charlescountyhealth.org Charles County Nursing Rehabilitation Center www.ccnrc.com Charles County Public Library www.ccplonline.org Charles County Public Schools www.ccboe.com Chick-Fil-A www.mdcfa.com Children’s Learning Tree www.laplataclt.com Civista Health www.civista.org College of Southern Maryland www.csmd.edu Colony South Hotel & Conference Center www.colonysouth.com County First Bank www.countyfirstbank.com

Naval Surface Warfare Center www.ih.navy.mil Post Office Lake Dental Associates Potter Heating & Electric, Inc. www.potterheatingandelectric.com Sleep Inn & Suites Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative www.smeco.coop Southern Maryland Hospital Center www.smhchealth.org Southern Maryland Oil www.southernmdoil.com Sport & Health www.sportandhealth.com State Farm – Jillian Davis www.jilldavisagency.com Suburban Propane www.suburbanpropane.com Swan Point Yacht & Country Club www.swanpointgolf.com Title Professionals, LTD www.titleprofessionalsltd.com

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Charles County Chamber of Commerce 101 Centennial Ave., Suite A • La Plata, MD 20646 Phone: (301) 932-6500 • Fax: (301) 932-3945 E-mail: info@charlescountychamber.org www.charlescountychamber.org

Creighton Insurance & Investments www.nwagent.com/ rochell_creighton-tompa.html

Town of Indian Head www.townofindianheadmd.org

VISIT IMAGES OF CHARLES COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESCHARLESCOUNTY.COM

Edible Arrangements www.ediblearrangements.com

United Way of Charles County www.unitedwaycharles.org

Facchina Construction www.facchina.com

W.M. Davis, Inc. www.wmdavis.com

GP Homes

Washington Savings Bank

©Copyright 2007 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

Magazine Publishers of America

Member Custom Publishing Council Member Charles County Chamber of Commerce Please recycle this magazine

The area code for Charles County is 301.

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STAFF PHOTO

Photo Finish

H

ousing options are plentiful in Charles County, offering everything from urban living to beautiful waterfront retreats. The Bryantown Community offers majestic living just a short drive the from major urban centers of Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Alexandria, Va.

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Images Charles County, MD: 2008  

A pleasant visit to Charles County can interest any history buff, since the community was established way back in 1658. It is home to landma...

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