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2010 | IMAGESCASTLEROCK.COM ®

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CASTLE ROCK, COLORADO

In the Swing of Things Golf courses, communities here showcase vibrant outdoor life

IT’S A KID’S WORLD Adventure club, triathlon keep children active

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE WineFest, Artfest highlight annual events calendar

What’s Online ine ne Enjoy the visual arts on display throughout the city.

SPONSORED BY THE CASTLE ROCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND VISITOR CENTER


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EXPERIENCE MATTERS Sunday Services: 8 a.m. – Communion 9 a.m. – Coffee Hour 9 a.m.-Noon – We welcome our youngest parishioners, ages 0-4, in The Children’s Place 9:15 a.m. – Middle School and High School Programs and Adult Journey 10:30a.m. – Festive Eucharist and Children’s Chapel (for children K-5) 615 4th St. (in historic Castle Rock) $BTUMF3PDL $0t   www.ChristsEpiscopalChurch.org

Dr. Steiner has helped over 1/2 a million people

Two Convenient Locations: Castle Rock & Denver Tech Center (DTC)

(303) 660-2668 (303) 660-2667 fax

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imagescastlerock.com THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

What’s Onl Online n

CASTLE ROCK , COLOR ADO MANAGING EDITOR KIM MADLOM COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, JESSY YANCEY STAFF WRITER KEVIN LITWIN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JOE MORRIS, BETSY WILLIAMS DATA MANAGER CHANDRA BRADSHAW INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER JOLENE MCKENZIE SALES SUPPORT MANAGER CINDY HALL SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN McCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, J. KYLE KEENER CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, CANDICE SWEET, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER JANINE MARYLAND GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, JESSICA MANNER, MARCUS SNYDER WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR FRANCO SCARAMUZZA WEB CONTENT MANAGER JOHN HOOD WEB PROJECT MANAGER YAMEL HALL WEB DESIGN LEAD LEIGH GUARIN WEB PRODUCTION JENNIFER GRAVES

PICTURE PERFECT

COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN ALISON HUNTER AD TRAFFIC MARCIA MILLAR, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY

We’ve added even more of our prize-winning photography to the online gallery. To see these photos, click on Photo Gallery.

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN

RELOCATION Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./SALES TODD POTTER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS V.P./CUSTOM PUBLISHING KIM NEWSOM MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS BILL McMEEKIN MANAGING EDITOR/TRAVEL SUSAN CHAPPELL PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS

VIDEOS

RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY SIMPSON DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR YANCEY BOND

In our Interactive section, watch quick videos by our editors and photographers featuring people, places and events.

IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE SALES SUPPORT RACHAEL GOLDSBERRY EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

FACTS & STATS Go online to learn even more about: • Schools • Health care • Utilities • Parks • Taxes

LOCAL FLAVOR From the simple to the sublime, the delicious offerings here are guaranteed to satisfy every appetite.

ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Images gives readers a taste of what makes Castle Rock tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts. “Find the good – and praise it.”

– Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

Images Castle Rock is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce 420 Jerry Street • Castle Rock, CO 80104 Phone: (303) 688-4597 • Fax: (303) 688-2688 www.castlerock.org VISIT IMAGES CASTLE ROCK ONLINE AT IMAGESCASTLEROCK.COM ©Copyright 2010 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

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th anniversary issue

2010 EDITION | VOLUME 5 ®

CASTLE ROCK, COLORADO CO NTE NT S

CASTLE ROCK BUSINESS

F E AT U R E S

22 Boot Camp for Business

6 IT’S A KID’S WORLD Castle Rock offers popular programs geared to children of all ages.

Chamber hosts economic training program for 12 Castle Rock businesses.

24 Biz Briefs 26 Chamber Report 27 Economic Profile

10 MEET ME AT THE ROCK A vibrant downtown is a top priority here.

14 STILL MEADOWS Region’s breathtaking scenery serves as the backdrop for a growing residential community.

30 HAVING AN ART ATTACK Community gets visual with its art scene.

31 IN THE SWING OF THINGS

D E PA R TM E NT S 4 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Castle Rock’s culture

16 Local Flavor 17 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Castle Rock

29 Health & Wellness 33 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

Golf courses, communities here showcase vibrant outdoor life.

32 NOT THE SAME THREE R’S Castle View High School applies a new approach to traditional learning. ON THE COVER Photo by Brian McCord The Club at Pradera

CASTLE ROCK

All or part of this magazine is printed on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

I M AG E S C A S T L E R O C K . C O M

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Many Strings Attached Talented musicians aren’t hard to find in Castle Rock. They gather every Sunday to rehearse a variety of music including Impressionism, Americana, pops and film music. All members are college-level musicians. Popular performances of film music have included the Harry Potter Experience, Pirates of the Caribbean and Lord of the Rings. For Halloween, the orchestra treated the community to the music of Wicked. The Castle Rock Orchestra (Director – Matt Rose) also includes ensembles that play Dixieland, jazz, bluegrass, Cajun, and country and western. estern.

Dashing Ducks Shopping Is in the Bag Shoppers in Castle Rock don’t have to choose between bigname outlet retailers and more intimate, boutique-style shops. This city has the best of both worlds when it comes to shopping, from the Outlets at Castle Rock just off Interstate 25 to the many one-of-a-kind, locally owned shops that make downtown a favorite destination. Shop owners downtown welcome customers with warm greetings, interesting items and plenty of parking. The Outlets at Castle Rock is home to popular, big-name brands including Hilfiger, Nine West and Nike – all in a beautiful outdoor setting with views of the Rocky Mountains.

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Dashing ducks and waddle walks draw crowds at the Castle Rock Rotary Club’s annual fundraiser. Held each May, the Ducky Derby and Street Festival is a day filled with fun for families. The duck race is no laughing matter. One of the 3,333 ducks launched is worth $1 million dollars if it comes in first. But even if none of the special ducks places first in the race, the winner can still take home up to $3,000. The event also includes live entertainment, a silent auction and a car show. Money raised during the derby has helped many area organizations.

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Almanac

Fast Facts Q More than three quarters of the Castle Rock workforce is white-collar.

This Town Rocks Much of the west was founded thanks to gold, but it was the discovery of rhyolite stone that put Castle Rock on the map. The town was founded in 1874 and named for the distinctive brown outcropping that tops a hill just north of the community. The castle rock is visible to motorists traveling along Interstate 25. Hikers can enjoy the perfect view from the rock itself. A trail leading up to the rock offers a challenging hike.

Q There are more than 100 stores located at The Outlets at Castle Rock. Q Noted residents of Castle Rock include professional golfer Dale Douglass, Oscar-nominated actress Amy Adams and WBA professional basketball player Ann Strother. Q In 2006, Business Week named Castle Rock and Douglas County one of the Top 18 Emerging Golf Retirement Regions.

Castle Rock At A Glance POPULATION (2009 ESTIMATE) Castle Rock: 46,811 Douglas County: 290,311 LOCATION Castle Rock is in central Colorado, 30 miles south of Denver and 40 miles north of Colorado Springs. BEGINNINGS In 1874, homesteader Jeremiah Gould donated 120 of his 160 acres to the settlement that became Castle Rock. Within a year, the Denver & Rio Grande Railway arrived in town, and shipments of quarried ryolite helped the community grow.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce 420 Jerry Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 Phone: (303) 688-4597 Toll Free: (866) 441-8508 Fax: (303) 688-2688 www.castlerock.org

Castle Rock

D Denver

Parker

Highlands Ranch

Castle Rock

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Franktown

What’s Online e

CASTLE ROCK

Q The annual Compass Bank Elephant Rock Cycling Festival in Castle Rock kicks off the Colorado cycling season.

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Lone Tree

Take a virtual tour of Castle Rock, courtesy of our award-winning photographers, at imagescastlerock.com.

Q Rhyolite has been mined in and around Castle Rock since the town was officially established, and the mineral is still seen today on the exteriors of many of the town’s historic buildings.

D OU G L AS

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Q The Plum Creek Valley Farmers’ Market in downtown Castle Rock is open every Saturday from early July through early October.

I M AG E S C A S T L E R O C K . C O M

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It’s a

Kid’s 6

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CASTLE ROCK


BRIAN M C CORD

CASTLE ROCK OFFERS POPULAR PROGRAMS GEARED TO CHILDREN OF ALL AGES

STORY BY BETSY WILLIAMS

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f it’s an activity for children, chances are the Castle Rock Parks and Recreation Department is in charge of it. From toddlers through teens, this active agency plans creative and meaningful programs that are so popular, the lottery system is used for participation. And the activities aren’t limited to the youth, with more than 400,000 participants of all ages taking advantage of the multitude of activities and amenities provided through the parks and rec department. “We contribute to the healthy lifestyle of families in Castle Rock by having programs that our residents want to become involved in,” says Rob Hanna, director of the Castle Rock Parks and Recreation. “Whether it’s with walking trails, our parks, our recreation center or our sports programs, we touch everyone in Castle Rock.”

Children become involved early through such programs as the state-licensed Adventure Club Preschool and Pre-K, which provides a secure, enriching and nurturing environment where children ages 3 through 5 can establish solid educational foundations. Or they can choose to learn dance, art, cooking, crafts, drama and foreign language through a variety of fun and interesting classes. The Teen Advisory Group, comprising middle- and highschool students, meets twice a month to plan events that teens will enjoy, says Eileen Matheson, recreation manager. “They apply to get on the committee and come up with special projects for fundraisers and activities,” she says. “They also help with a lot of the special events the town has.” Kids Night Out, held on Fridays throughout the school

Above: Castle Rock’s Parks and Recreation Department Youth Athletics Programs offers Little Tykes Developmental Soccer for kids from 4 years old through the first grade. Left: Castle Rock Skatepark PHOTO BY JEFF ADKINS

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“We contribute to the healthy lifestyle of families … by having programs that our residents

year, draws anywhere from 200 to 300 teens each week and features contests, food and music. The Daddy Daughter Ball has become so popular that it has had to be moved off-site to an events center, Matheson says. The Tri the Rock Youth Triathlon, entering its sixth year and drawing 300 participants, utilizes the department’s indoor and outdoor facilities. “We use our local park and outdoor swimming pool for this event,” Matheson says. “It’s really popular. We have kids from Denver and Colorado Springs who participate in this.” KidStage is a drama program that focuses on building self-confidence while stimulating creativity and imagination. Every session culminates in a performance for peers, parents and expanded audiences. Of course, the department also provides the array of sports programs for all ages, from volleyball to baseball. Moving into adult programs, classes are offered in pottery, aquatics and fitness for all ages. Especially popular is Silver Sneakers, a fitness class covered by most insurance programs that has one of the highest enrollments in the country, Matheson says. The 84,000-square-foot recreation center offers a gym, a lap pool, a leisure pool, two racquetball courts, weight and activity rooms. “The recreation center is perfect for families because it meets a lot of needs,” Matheson says. “Parents can leave their children in day care or one of our programs, swim in the pool or work out. They can bring the whole family here to meet the needs of everyone.” The leisure pool at the Castle Rock Recreation Center

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BRIAN M C CORD

want to become involved in.”

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Meet Me

Rock at the

DOWNTOWN BEGINS MARKETING PUSH

STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN

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BRIAN M C CORD

ark Williams believes in downtown Castle Rock – so much so that he closed his own business to work on behalf of other businesses. Williams shut down his law office in 2009 to concentrate on a new full-time career as executive director of the Downtown Development Authority. The DDA was established in November 2008 when downtown voters selected in favor of its creation. That November 2008 vote also included the passage of tax resources that the DDA can utilize to fund downtown improvement projects. “I served as Castle Rock mayor in the early 1990s as well as on the town council and several boards, and now I want to help make downtown a vibrant community,” Williams says. “The vision for the district is to combine its small town character with some unique urban flair.” Williams says Castle Rock faces the same question that every community faces – how does the downtown set itself apart from big-name retailers? “Not only the big box stores, but Castle Rock also has an

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Left: A cowboy boot bird house for sale at The Barn Right: Wilcox Street PHOTO BY JEFF ADKINS

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN M C CORD

outlet mall in the northern part of town that the downtown must compete with,” he says. “It’s cheaper to build stores on the edges of town than in the core, but the DDA now has access to financing tools that will make everything an even playing field. This way, we can persuade more top businesses to come downtown.” Williams believes the district needs more entertainment venues, including nightclubs and one-of-a-kind restaurants. “Also, additional residential living options will add people onto the sidewalks, plus more office space needs to be developed,” he says. “I’m also working with a historical preservation board. Downtown Castle Rock already has a lot going for it, and the DDA will now tackle one project at a time to increase the excitement.” As for community events, downtown Castle Rock has several in place to attract people. Events include car shows, an Artfest, parades, a summertime outdoor movie program, and a Lighting of the Star holiday tradition. “We have also launched a www.downtowncastlerock.com

Web site that lists every downtown business as well as events that are scheduled,” Williams says. “The overall goal is for downtown to become a destination – we’ve even rolled out a ‘Meet Me at the Rock’ marketing campaign to get more people thinking about visiting the district.” Williams says that for 2010, plans for downtown Castle Rock include infrastructure construction that will result in more pedestrian crossings. “Perry and Wilcox are our two main streets, so we will construct two mid-block crossings on each – between Second and Fourth streets – that will make it much easier for pedestrians to visit downtown stores,” Williams says. “Right now, there are 22,000 car trips along our two main streets every day. We just need to get more of those motorists to park and then visit our shops.” Williams says there are a variety of downtown upgrade projects planned for the next several years. “Sure, there’s a lot to do in the district, and the expectations are high,” he says. “That’s okay – they should be.”

Above: Enchanted Gifts and Collectibles specializes in unique merchandise. Right: Copperfalls Spa and Salon

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Still Meadows RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT CONTINUES TO GROW WITH BREATHTAKING SCENERY AS THE BACKDROP

STORY BY BETSY WILLIAMS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN McCORD

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hile other regions across the country are seeing a decline in new residential development, Douglas County, with quality neighborhoods such as The Meadows and Crystal Valley Ranch, is among the fastestgrowing Colorado areas. At the top of the “why” list is The Meadows, a 4,000-acre planned community zoned to accommodate almost 11,000 single- and multi-family homes. “Castle Rock is a great place to raise a family,” says Jim Riley, president of Castle Rock Development Company, the developer of The Meadows. “Our development has a really good connection to the historic downtown area of Castle

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Rock, and we’re basically 10 to 15 miles from the major job employment center of Denver.” While new home construction within The Meadows is down from years past, Riley says they still have about 75 percent of the building permits issued in Castle Rock. “I think we’ll get to about 200 new home sales this year,” he says. “We’re the No. 1 community sales group in all of the metro Denver area.” The first-time homebuyer program has helped keep sales going, Riley says, but it’s the premier amenities, scenic area and quality of home construction that continue to bring new homeowners to The Meadows. Although homeowners are not limited to a specific type of design, a design team reviews every house and siting plan, CASTLE ROCK


The Meadows at Historic Castle Rock is a master planned community seen at the foothills of the Rocky Mountains.

encouraging different styles. The development, currently with about 4,500 homes, is about 35 percent complete. At the heart of this community is The Grange, a facility that hosts dance lessons, cooking classes, lectures and theater productions, and offers outdoor activities with its elaborate water features. “We have a series of landmark events that are tied to the seasons,” Riley says. Joining the list of activities that includes the Pumpkin Chunkin’ and Easter Eggstravaganza is the celebration of Chinese New Year, which has featured fireworks in the middle of winter. Approximately 1,100 acres have been designated for parks, trails and schools. “We have about 12 miles of all kinds of CASTLE ROCK

trails, with both hard and soft surfaces, that are good for walking and mountain-biking,” Riley says. “The scenery with the mountains is spectacular.” On the development horizon are Town Center, a 30,000-square-foot retail and office development, plus a grocery store, bank and health care facilities. “We will have a full mix of retail options to provide the appropriate services for the neighborhood,” Riley says. Crystal Valley Ranch is a 1,500-acre development that features awe-inspiring views of the Rocky Mountains. With its easy access to I-25, it is close to shopping, fine dining and golf, and emphasizes nature as the focal point and basis of the overall planning design of its home sites. I M AG E S C A S T L E R O C K . C O M

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Local Flavor

An Italian Passion UNISCALI PROVIDES A TOUCH OF ITALY IN CASTLE ROCK

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t’s almost like being in New York or San Francisco when diners visit Uniscali restaurant in Castle Rock. The ownership of Uniscali – an Italian word meaning “join us” – noticed a couple years ago that the town didn’t have a modern wine bar restaurant, but now it does. The interesting eatery offers a full wine and beer list along with numerous upscale Italian food selections. “My goal as executive chef here is to take really good, fresh ingredients and put a modern Italian twist on all the appetizers and entrees,” says Kim Heideman, who is also a part owner of Uniscali along with Dennis and Christina Dickey. “I went to culinary school in Chicago and studied in Europe, and have always had a passion for Italian cuisine.” Besides a community bar and regular restaurant seating, attractions at Uniscali include a private chef’s counter where diners can sample a five-, seven- or nine-course meal. “The chef’s counter is great for special events such as an anniversary, birthday or first date,” Heideman says. “Diners will sample several dishes that nobody else is making here in town.” Those dishes can include housemade potato gnocchi with braised pork and sweet potato chips, or a free-form butternut squash lasagna. “I also prepare a veal meatballs with ricotta cheese dish that is one of the most popular selections at the restaurant,” Heideman says. “And not everything we serve is necessarily from the menu. One gentleman asked me if I could prepare him a chicken parmesan meal, even though we don’t offer it … I said, ‘Sure, no problem.’” Uniscali is open for dinner from 5-9 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, and features two happy hours from 5-6 p.m. and 8-9 p.m. – Kevin Litwin

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BRIAN M C CORD

Caprese Skewers: housemade mozzarella, tomatoes and fresh basil drizzled with balsamic and EVOO

What’s Online e Hungry for more? Sink your teeth into other stories about Castle Rock’s local flavor in the food section at imagescastlerock.com.

CASTLE ROCK


Portfolio

Message In a Bottle WINEFEST, ARTFEST HIGHLIGHT ANNUAL EVENTS CALENDAR

H

ere is a toast to the annual Castle Rock WineFest. The upscale event will enter its seventh year in 2010, with the clinking of glasses set for July 24 from noon6 p.m. The festival has become so well regarded that Castle Rock was chosen by the Colorado Wine Board in 2009 to be one of five sites to host statesanctioned wine festivals. Representatives from more than 20 top wineries throughout the state are expected to attend the 2010 festival, and the 1,500-2,000 wine lovers in attendance will be welcome to taste wines ranging from deep merlots and expressive chardonnays to elegant Rieslings and cabernets.

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Besides wine tasting, the Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce, which organizes the event, is scheduling attractions such as wine seminars and demonstrations, artisans and lifestyle vendors, musical entertainment and a couple nights of fine dining enjoyment. “The art of wine making at modern vineyards is thriving today in Colorado,” says Pam Ridler, president and CEO of the Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce. “We are pleased to host such an event.” Participating wineries in 2009 traveled to Castle Rock from cities such as Boulder, Denver, Evergreen, Olathe and Palisade. Local winery Concetta Cellars represented Castle Rock itself.

Meanwhile, this town is also home to an annual Castle Rock Artfest that celebrated its 20th anniversary in September 2009. Nearly 180 top artists from throughout the United States showcase their talents for crowds estimated to total 25,000 people. Artfest takes place at Castle Rock Town Hall and the Philip Miller Library. The event obviously showcases paintings and sculpture, but it also highlights art forms such as music, dance and photography. There is live continual entertainment on a main stage, and other attractions include a number of ethnic food vendors along with an Imagination Zone for children. – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S C A S T L E R O C K . C O M

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big reason avid adventurer Ian Steyn founded The Outdoor Experience near Castle Rock is to get people moving. “It is certainly no secret that the current obesity rate in America is staggering, and it’s especially unfortunate when it comes to kids,� says Steyn, who comes from an athletic background in his native South Africa. “Children are often sedate throughout the day at school and then especially at home, in front of the TV or playing video games. That’s where The Outdoor Experience is looking to help change this sedentary trend.� The goal of the large outdoor recreation area is just that – to get more people involved with outdoor recreation. “We have a wide-open expanse here with accommodations that include teepees, safari tents, RV sites, primitive cabins and luxury cabins,� Steyn says. “We are all about getting more kids, families and friends to have fun in the great outdoors.�

Steyn says activities can include mountain biking, hiking, camping and rock climbing. For young children, there is also a Yogi Bear-themed Jellystone Park on site. “There are plenty of activities aimed at getting kids in motion and running off some energy at Jellystone Park,� he says. “But there are also several features that will get moms and dads moving as well. The Jellystone Park portion of The Outdoor Experience is getting increasingly popular all the time.� Steyn says a total of 20,000 campsites and RV sites are booked at The Outdoor Experience each year, which works out to 50,000-80,000 annual visitors. The acreage, campsites, RV park and Jellystone Park are all located off Interstate 25 at exit 174. “We also host interesting little education workshops that help teach kids to be good stewards of the outdoors,� he says. “This is an ideal place to get your body moving and breathe in some good, clean air.� – Kevin Litwin CASTLE ROCK


Portfolio

Keep Rolling Right Along I

volunteer dispatchers. Speaking of driving, the senior center also oversees a Meals-on-Wheels program for all of Douglas County. “As for recreational activities, we organize a hiking club, sewing club, golf league and a Monday morning bowling league,” Prichard says. “We also schedule dinner trips as well as trips to attend plays, and we feature an excellent wellness program that is supervised by a registered nurse.” The center also showcases a number of educational seminars throughout the year, including an income tax assistance workshop in the spring and a large craft-making show in the fall.

“Of course, we also have the usual playing card tournaments, pot luck luncheons, health clinics and music get-togethers, and we send out a monthly newsletter that lists all the activities scheduled for the upcoming month,” Prichard says. Castle Rock Senior Center was established 1971, and its staff hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. “We have a grand total of 300 volunteers who run quite a few night programs as well, so this place is always busy,” Prichard says. “Anyone in Castle Rock ages 55 and older is welcome to join us.” – Kevin Litwin

BRIAN M C CORD

f you are a senior citizen who needs a ride somewhere, Castle Rock Senior Center is a good place to call. The non-profit center oversees 10,000 rides each year for people who no longer drive themselves or are uncomfortable driving on the interstate. “Medical and dental appointments are our priority, but we also supply this service to places such as the supermarket or the library,” says Sandy Prichard, executive director of Castle Rock Senior Center. “Our transportation service relieves the burden on family members who might have to take time from work in order to drive their elderly relatives to appointments.” There are 50 volunteer drivers involved with the center’s transportation program, plus 30

Castle Rock Senior Center

CASTLE ROCK

I M AG E S C A S T L E R O C K . C O M

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Serving Douglas County Since 1972! 37ILCOX3Ts3TEs#ASTLE2OCK #/ 

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CASTLE ROCK


Portfolio

Art Without Walls

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ouglas County’s commitment to art is easy to see. Just look on the street corner, in a park or at the city’s entrance. Art Encounters began its first countywide exhibit in 2008 with 14 sculptures. The year-long exhibit placed selected works in various media and styles in highly visible areas throughout Castle Rock, Highlands Ranch, Lone Tree and Parker. The goals of the program are to promote interest in art, develop community pride and draw visitors to the retail or civic areas where the works are displayed. The Art Encounters program was launched by the Douglas County Cultural Council, which set aside a portion of funding to be distributed to three communities. Castle Rock’s funding came from the Philip S. Miller Trust. In addition to adding beauty and interest to the locations where art is displayed, the program benefits the artists. Along with exposure of their works, selected artists receive $500 and the opportunity to have their work purchased while it remains on display. To further engage the community in the public art program, Art Encounters created a People’s Choice Award that allowed the public to vote for their favorite entry in the program. The 2009 People’s Choice Award winner was artist Anthony Guntren for his painted metal sculpture, Impulse. The work is exhibited at Southridge Recreation Center in Highlands Ranch. The Guide by artist Christopher Romero was selected for display in Festival Park in Castle Rock. Also on display in Festival Park are two sculptures by artist Joshua Wiener, who also has other art on display in Castle Rock. He was commissioned to create a sculpture and a sign for Gemstone Park at Maher Ranch. – Kim Madlom

CASTLE ROCK

Enjoy natural beauty in a friendly place ‌ Welcome to the Hampton Inn $Ä‘ÄŁÄ¤ÄœÄ•3Ä&#x;Ä“Ä›

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Everything but

Drill Sergeants CHAMBER’S BOOT CAMP HELPS BUSINESSES RE-TOOL

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CASTLE ROCK


Business

STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN

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tten-hut. The Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce has established a Castle Rock Boot Camp to help businesses re-tool for the challenging economy. In September 2009, the chamber invited 12 small businesses to participate in a six-month camp, to provide assistance to companies in areas such as marketing, strategic planning and financial projections. All 12 local companies are established in Castle Rock, ranging from four to 16 years of experience. Participants attended a series of high-impact training sessions, met with leader mentors and ultimately developed a one-year business and marketing plan. A total of 10 business mentors assisted the class participants throughout the entire boot camp process. “This was a good refresher course in what I need to do, with experienced business people looking over my shoulder and asking if I’m achieving my goals in business,” says Peter Goldstein, a partner attorney with Gubbels Law Office, one of the 12 participating companies. “The Chamber had a clever idea with this boot camp and was generous enough to offer the program for free, at least for this initial installment.” The Castle Rock Chamber utilized information from the U.S. Small Business Administration to establish many of the camp guidelines. That information assisted participants in areas such as increasing revenue and profits, adding staff personnel, and acquiring investment capital. “The 12 invited businesses were from a variety of disciplines, and they were asked not to divulge any of the information they learned at our boot camp,” says Pam Ridler, president of the Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce. “There is a lot of business counseling, and the participants actually have homework on every topic. It’s a tough camp designed to give businesses tools to not only survive a difficult economic downturn, but also to prosper during those times.” Ridler says some participants never even had a business plan for their company prior to the camp. “Participants learn about projections, values, sales tips and how to fund future expansion projects,” she says. “All of the

business people in attendance know their craft, but they might not have the needed business sense in some specific categories. Now, they do.” Michael Likens, owner of gopixel design studios inc., says he wants to grow his home-based business to the next level and was eager to participate in the boot camp. He runs a marketing and brand development company that helps businesses establish logos, corporate identities, brochures and Web site development. “I needed to better anticipate ways to manage my financial needs and impact the Castle Rock community in a positive way,” Likens says. “Having people come in from the outside and advise me was a great help. The most beneficial individual workshop for me personally was on finance, but I learned something valuable at every session. It’s a well-run boot camp for the small business community.”

Left: Michael Likens and Gary Benware of gopixel.com PHOTO BY BRIAN M C CORD

CASTLE ROCK

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Business

Biz Briefs BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE CASTLE ROCK’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

76% white-collar jobs

24% blue-collar jobs

7.5% total sales tax

30 miles to nearest major airport (Denver International) Source: Onboard Informatics

DREAM PASTRIES Biz: bakery, restaurant Buzz: Following the European tradition, Dream Pastries products are made fresh daily with no preservatives or extenders. Established in 1997, Jacquot Balleydier is the pastry chef and baker. He refined his talents in France and the United Kingdom before moving to Colorado with his wife Soraya. The menu includes cakes, pastries, breads, soups, salads and gelato. www.dreampastries.com 24

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LITTLE WHITE DRESS Biz: wedding dresses Buzz: This designer wedding gown shop brings a new dimension to Castle Rock. The firm promises to be patient and supportive with brides-to-be who are searching for the perfect dress for a special day. In addition, brides can find hair ornaments, ribbon headbands, jewelry and veils to complement the look. www.lwdbridal.com CASTLE ROCK


ONLINE TRADING ACADEMY Biz: stock trading instruction Buzz: Online Trading Academy provides financial education for people interested in participating in the world of stock trading from the comfort of their homes. Training courses are geared toward individuals and include the opportunity to trade stocks in real time. www.tradingacademy.com

CASTLE ROCK

MOUNTAIN MAN NUT AND FRUIT CO. Biz: snack foods Buzz: Mountain Man began as a nut and fruit candy company. That’s still the core business, but the firm is also known for its chocolate treats, trail mixes, meat snacks and popcorn. Much of the business is conveniently conducted online. www.mountainmannut.com

COMMNET WIRELESS Biz: telecommunications Buzz: A premier wholesale wireless carrier, the company focuses on domestic and international wireless partners with affordable roaming services in rural areas throughout the country. Voice and data services are provided to the wireless telecommunications industry in 14 states. www.commnetwireless.com

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Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce staff, from left, Tammy Cratty, Joanne Taylor, Michael House, Melissa Mares, Pam Ridler, Melissa Moroni and Diane Leduc

JEFF ADKINS

Business | Chamber Report

Strength in Numbers FOUR GROUPS BAND TO BOLSTER CASTLE ROCK’S ECONOMY

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f two heads are better than one, then what about four heads? A new four-member group called Castle Rock Economic Partners was formed in 2009 to help promote Castle Rock for the sake of prosperity. The four participating members are the Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce, Castle Rock Economic Development Council, Downtown Development Authority and the Town of Castle Rock. “Many times there is competition between organizations in a community, and they simply don’t play well in the sandbox together,” says Pam Ridler, president of the Castle Rock Chamber of Commerce. “But here, we’ve brought together four entities that all receive some public funds, and we’re making sure that everyone works well with one another for the sake of economic development.” Ridler says if one of the organization’s members knows that a particular business is thinking about relocating to Castle Rock, they inform the other

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groups instead of keeping it to themselves. “That way, everyone can pull together as a team to work on that particular business,” she says. “It better ensures that the potential company thinks hard about coming to Castle Rock, instead of the whole thing being a random decision.” As a member of Castle Rock Economic Partners, each group is responsible for a different component of the overall plan. For example, the Castle Rock Chamber focuses on tourism, business support services and community branding and marketing, while the EDC concentrates on business recruitment. Meanwhile, the town is responsible for developmental services, such as ways to push through processes quicker. And the Downtown Development Authority focuses on the marketing and expansion of downtown businesses and services. “This seems like such a simple concept – everyone getting along – but we talked to many communities

in Colorado and beyond that aren’t implementing this idea,” Ridler says. “Actually, complementing one another really isn’t done too much, but it is now part of the plan here in Castle Rock.” Ridler says that even though the Partners program is still in its early stages, the group has already launched a www.visitcastlerock.org Web site, and has also implemented an overall “shop and do business in Castle Rock” marketing campaign. In 2009 the Castle Rock EDC assisted and logged more than 150 new business prospects and 25 local company expansions. “The Economic Partners have a lot of plans for 2010,” Ridler says. “One is a Commercial Improvement Award to recognize the efforts of businesses that improve the overall appearance of their buildings. The Partners is a group that is going to get a lot of things done, with everything aimed at always improving the economy of Castle Rock, Colorado.” – Kevin Litwin CASTLE ROCK


Business | Economic Profile

CASTLE ROCK ECONOMIC OVERVIEW Castle Rock offers a highly educated and skilled workforce and ideal location midway between Denver and Colorado Springs, with a thriving economic climate that welcomes new and expanding businesses. Businesses are being drawn to the community because of its consistent growth in population and affluent market.

Buses run Mondays through Fridays except Thanksgiving, the Fourth of July and Christmas, beginning at 7:15 a.m. each day. Different schedules are provided for riders’ convenience.

TAXES

3.6% City Sales and Use Tax

1% County Sales Tax

2.9% State Sales Tax

7.5% Total Sales Tax

TRANSPORTATION Clean Air Transit Co. (CATCO) www.crgov.com

CASTLE ROCK

Denver International Airport 8500 Peña Blvd. Denver Colorado 80249-6340 (303) 342-2000 (800) 247-2336 www.flydenver.com Located 47 miles northeast of Castle Rock, this new, state-of-the-art airport offers daily non-stop air service to more than 110 domestic and international destinations.

Centennial Airport Arapahoe County Public Airport Authority 7800 S. Peoria St., Box G-1 Englewood 80112 (303) 790-0598 www.centennialairport.com

MORE EO ONLINE imagescastlerock.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

Colorado Springs Airport 7770 Milton E. Proby Pkwy. Colorado Springs Colorado 80916 (719) 550-1972 www.springsgov.com Provides scheduled air service to nearly 2.5 million passengers a year from its location 45 miles south of Castle Rock.

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Health & Wellness

They’ve Got You Covered TOP MEDICAL FACILITIES ARE PLENTIFUL IN CASTLE ROCK

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number of highly regarded medical facilities in Castle Rock is just what the doctor ordered for citizens of this 47,000-resident town. For example, Sky Ridge Medical Center in Lone Tree has opened an Imaging Center at Castle Rock so that patients can schedule radiology procedures close to home. Also at the Castle Rock location on Perry Street is an Invision Sally Jobe Breast Center. Services at the imaging center include ultrasound, x-rays, computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imagings, while the Sally Jobe Breast Center provides high-tech and minimally invasive mammography procedures. “As a result, Castle Rock residents no longer need to travel to the Denver metro area to receive these basic services,” says Damon Trahan, manager of the Sky Ridge Imaging Center at Castle Rock.

CASTLE ROCK

In addition to imaging services, the center has also become home to a team of physicians who specialize in a variety of medical fields. On staff are cardiologists, obstetrician/gynecologists, allergists, neurosurgeons and internal medicine physicians as well as nursing professionals. “Many of our team members live in Castle Rock,” Trahan says. “This brings added comfort and helps reduce anxiety for our patients.” Also in Castle Rock is Liberty Dialysis, a treatment facility for kidney patients. The medical building on Trail Boss Drive prides itself on a patient-centric approach that includes a comfortable, spa-like atmosphere along with WiFi and television access for its clients. The town of Castle Rock is also home to MedExpress Urgent Care, which is open seven days a week from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. at the corner of Founders Parkway and

Woodlands Boulevard. Their slogan is, “Great care, fast, ” and MedExpress physicians and nurses offer a full line of services that include x-rays, EKGs, stitches and IV fluids. Meanwhile, Plum Creek Medical has been serving the community since 1987. Patients have the convenience of services and advanced equipment that include an on-site laboratory, x-ray machines, osteoporosis bone scan, cardiac room, cardiac treadmill and occupational medicine/preventative medicine. “We can serve adults and children of all ages,” says the owner, Dr. Jack D. England. “Plum Creek Medical is closer to home,” he says. “Our full range of services is what makes Plum Creek Medical the obvious choice for complete health care treatment in Castle Rock.” – Kevin Litwin

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Arts & Culture

PHOTOS BY BRIAN M C CORD

Coolin the Dogs by Craig Bergsgaard

Having an Art Attack TOWN WELCOMES MULTIPLE ARTISTIC ENDEAVORS

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rushes with greatness are becoming commonplace throughout the Castle Rock art scene. Case in point is the annual Front Range Art Exhibit, a one-month extravaganza that showcases top artwork by local citizens. The event has become so well regarded that the National Arts Program serves as co-sponsor, along with the Greater Castle Rock Art Guild. The exhibition of talent occurs each year from early October to early November, with the works of 110 top local artists on display. The National Arts Program contributes a substantial amount of prize money to winners in five categories, plus an additional

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$4,000 in art scholarships. “The first-, second- and third-place winners in the divisions of children, teens, amateurs, intermediates and professionals – they all receive prize money,” says Dix Morris, founder and president of the Greater Castle Rock Art Guild. “The month-long event showcases the mediums of painting, sculpture, pottery, jewelry and photography.” Front Range Art Exhibit is staged at Philip S. Miller Library, and artists can participate if they live within a 35-mile radius of Castle Rock. Speaking of the library, the east side of its building now features an 18-foot by 24-foot mural titled The Life of

Castle Rock, designed by international artist Malcolm Farley. Also regarding visual arts, the town is home to an annual Castle Rock Artfest that enters its 21st year in 2010. The mid-September weekend festival attracts 25,000 art enthusiasts who appreciate the works of 170 artists from across the country. In addition, during the last decade the town has seen the creation of the Castle Rock Public Art Commission, comprising seven community members appointed by the town council. “Also evidencing the growing art scene is the continued expansion of the Greater Castle Rock Art Guild,” Morris says. “It had a handful of members in 2006 and now has more than 200 members. We oversee a lot of eye-pleasing projects.” One such project is a sculpture titled Cooling the Dogs, which graces the Craig & Gould entry into town at Fifth and Gilbert streets. Artist Craig Bergsgaard sculpted the 1,300-pound bronze sculpture that depicts a seated cowboy shaking out his boot, with a horse at his side. “It shows sacrifice, survival and someone doing what he wants to do – which is what life is all about,” Bergsgaard says. “It celebrates a person willing to sacrifice some things in order to achieve others, which is kind of how Castle Rock became the fine community that it is.” Bergsgaard, a resident of Windsor, Colo., says he was honored to sculpt the town’s entryway landmark. “It really shows the mark of a progressive community when they start bringing art in,” he says. – Kevin Litwin CASTLE ROCK


Sports & Recreation

What’s Online e Go to imagescastlerock.com and click on “recreation” to read more about Castle Rock’s sports and recreational activities.

In the Swing of Things GROWING GOLF SCENE DRAWS VISITORS, NEW RESIDENTS

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astle Rock has long capitalized on its location in one of the most glorious outdoor recreation spots in the world. But while skiing, snowboarding and other winter sports often claim the spotlight, the area’s golf courses sometimes have been overlooked. That’s changing, and in a very big way. The city and surrounding area boast several outstanding public and private courses, many of which are part of residential communities. The success of these shows that Castle Rock is not only a draw for traveling golfers, but for those who want to put down roots in a growing and dynamic community as well. “Golf is definitely part of the lifestyle here,” says Greg White, membership director at The Club at Pradera, a course and community that opened in 2005. “People have always skied in the wintertime, but now they’re golfing in the summertime as well.” Pradera’s course ranges from 4,500 yards to 7,300 yards and was designed by architect Jim Engh. It was set up to challenge players at every level, and does so through dramatic elevation changes and more. “We’ve got some drops, one of which is more than 200 feet from tee box to the landing area,” White says. “But around here it’s just thrilling topography everywhere, and some amazing views from every tee.”

Other courses in the area include The Country Club at Castle Pines, which offers a 7,400-yard Jack Nicklaus Signature Championship course as well as an 11-acre practice facility and comprehensive instruction program; The Pinery Country Club in Parker, which has wrapped up an $11 million renovation program that includes renovated bunker and green complexes as well as a new irrigation system on its 27-hole course; and the city’s own award-winning Red Hawk Ridge, another Jim Engh masterpiece where every inch of the 6,942-yard course tees up beautiful Front Range scenery. With these and other courses seeing a brisk business during the golfing season, it’s no wonder that more people are coming into the area both as short-term visitors and new residents. Even the newest courses and communities haven’t seen much of a drop-off during the recent slow economy, which can only bode well for the sport’s future here, says White. “Castle Rock continues to grow, and Parker continues to grow,” he says. “This is one of the top spots to live in the country as far as schools, sports, everything you can think of. We’re one of the newest private golf-club communities, and we’ve had a lot of momentum going for us. We think that’s going to continue into the future, and will be the case for everyone else around here as the area continues to see the growth of golf as a destination.” – Joe Morris

Golfers enjoy a challenging round at Pradera Golf Club in Castle Rock.

CASTLE ROCK

I M AG E S C A S T L E R O C K . C O M

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Education

Not the Same Three R’s CASTLE VIEW HIGH SCHOOL PROVIDES A NEW APPROACH TO AN OLD PROCESS

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astle View High School offers Douglas County students a different approach to the traditional three R’s of education. With five academies of study to choose from – including two that focus on math/science/engineering and biotechnology/health sciences – this high school of just more than 1,500 students is placing its emphasis on preparing students for the world of high-tech work in a personalized environment. “We believe in the three R’s, but they are different than they once were,” says Dr. Lisle Gates, principal. “Our three R’s are relationships, rigor and relevance. The relevance piece is very important to us with all our academies. The core curriculum is designed and wrapped around the academy interests.” Dr. Gates and his team make

connections with businesses that are related to the five academies. For example, with the Biotechnology/Health Science Academy, students could intern in surgical clinics, while Lockheed Martin could be a clinical setting for the 430 students enrolled in the popular Math and Science Engineering Academy. “We have businesses that support the content area of each academy,” Dr. Gates explains. “And they also serve as advisors to our programs.” Castle View High School is equipped with more than 600 computers for staff and student use. Seven labs meet the technology needs for specific courses of study, including one with architectural printers used by the architecture students, one with robotics and others with a wind tunnel and bridge-testing equipment to see if students’ bridge

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Hampton Inn www.castlerock.hamptoninn.com Intermountain Rural Electric www.intermountain-rea.com Nadine Kirk – Re/Max www.thekirkteam.com Perry Street Pediatrics PC Premier Pilates www.premierpilates.us Re/Max – Darla Newton www.darlanewton.com

Diet Center www.dietcenter.com/castlerock

Sky Ridge Medical Center www.skyridgemedcenter.com

Douglas County Fairgrounds www.fairgrounds.douglas.co.us

State Farm – David Topolnicki www.davetop.com

Folkestad Fazekas Barrick & Patoile PC www.ffcolorado.com

Steiner Chiropractic PC www.steinerchiropracticpc.com

Go Pixel Design Studios www.gopixel.com

UR Time Fitness www.urtimefitness.com

I M AG E S C A S T L E R O C K . C O M

designs will stand the test of weight and structure. It isn’t just high-tech that gets the high scores, however; high-touch is an equal part of the equation, Dr. Gates says. “The academies make our school a smaller, more personal environment,” he says. “Relationship is a huge part of our program. The teachers have 20 to 22 students assigned to them as freshmen who stay with them for four years, so they get to know them very well. Close relationships are developed, and that’s one of the strengths we have.” It appears to be working. According to Dr. Gates, 83 percent of the 2009 graduating class were enrolled in a college last spring before graduation. “I feel very good about our students in last year’s graduation class and where they are now,” Dr. Gates says. With such outstanding results, one might think that the school is only about academics. Such is not the case. “We have the full range of athletics any other school in Douglas County has,” Dr. Gates says. “We are about academics, but research is loud and clear that when students are involved outside the classroom, they are better students. We are a comprehensive high school with a liberal arts school stance.” – Betsy Williams

CASTLE ROCK


Community Profile

CASTLE ROCK COMMUNITY OVERVIEW With spectacular views of the front-range and the unique vistas of the buttes, Castle Rock is in a beautiful setting. Residents have quick and easy access to some of the best recreational opportunities available in the country. Students here excel in top-quality schools and play in safe neighborhood parks. Businesses are drawn by a labor force that is highly skilled, educated and experienced and by the proximity to the state’s two major markets, Denver and Colorado Springs.

CLIMATE OVERVIEW

EDUCATIONAL OVERVIEW

Sunny days are the norm in Castle Rock throughout the year. In the summer, hot daytime temperatures are kept comfortable due to the low humidity level, and the evenings cool off to a perfect temperature for sleeping. Winter snowfalls melt quickly, and warm Chinook winds bring temperatures up into the 60s on occasion during the winter months.

Douglas County School District students benefit from small class sizes and an excellent curriculum. In addition, there are two charter schools in Castle Rock and two private elementary schools. Several colleges and universities are located within a short commute to Denver and Colorado Springs.

14 F

MEDICAL SERVICES OVERVIEW

January Low

HOUSING

$249,798 Average Home Price

15% Home Turnover Percentage

MORE E ONLINE O imagescastlerock.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

Castle Rock offers a state-ofthe-art emergency medical response system and there are numerous physicians, specialists, dentists and local medical centers offering general patient and emergency care. Douglas County offers two hospitals near Castle Rock.

44 F January High

53 F July Low

84 F July High

THIS SECTION IS SPONSORED BY

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Ad Index C2 BEST WESTERN INN & SUITES C4 CASTLE ROCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1 CASTLE ROCK DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

C2 GO PIXEL DESIGN STUDIOS 21 HAMPTON INN 27 INTERMOUNTAIN RURAL ELECTRIC 18 NADINE KIRK – RE/MAX

C2 CHRIST’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 19 PERRY STREET PEDIATRICS PC C2 COPPER CANYON REMODELING 29 PREMIER PILATES 20 COWEST C3 RE/MAX – DARLA NEWTON C2 DECOR & YOU 28 SKY RIDGE MEDICAL CENTER C2 DIET CENTER 25 DOUGLAS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

C2 STATE FARM – DAVID TOPOLNICKI C2 STEINER CHIROPRACTIC PC

20 FOLKESTAD FAZEKAS BARRICK & PATOILE PC

29 UR TIME FITNESS


Images Castle Rock, CO: 2010  

This scenic Colorado town is named for a small but prominent butte in the middle of town. Castle Rock residents enjoy a wonderful quality of...

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