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2009-10 | IMAGESBEDFORDCOUNTY.COM ®

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BEDFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Powerful Strides Walking horse industry moves forward

SQUARE MEALS Head uptown for delicious dining

What’s s e Online Video tour of uptown Shelbyville

FORGING CONNECTIONS New bypass gets in gear

SPONSORED BY THE SHELBYVILLE-BEDFORD COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


Wondering how the federal stimulus package will help you?

IT’S YOUR TURN —to save on your energy bill while improving the environment.—

The economic stimulus package has become a fact. Given the hard times, now it’s your turn to benefit. Get a tax credit for up to $1,500 dollars on the cost of insulating, sealing and weather-stripping your home.

You can be more comfortable and save on your energy bill while improving the environment! Visit Duck River Electric’s Web site, www.dremc.com, for more information about how you can take advantage of these tax credits.

(931) 684-4621


Welcome to Shelbyville and Bedford County

The Walking Horse Capital of the World. City of Shelbyville 201 N. Spring St. Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-2691

Bedford County Public Square Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-7944


OUR WORK ENVIRONMENT AND OUR EMPLOYEES

make the difference!

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THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

What’s On Online nl BEDFORD COUNT Y, TENNESSEE

PICTURE PERFECT We’ve added even more of our prize-winning photography to the online gallery. To see these photos, click on Photo Gallery.

RELOCATION

CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S 8 POWERFUL STRIDES

Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

FACTS & STATS Go online to learn even more about: • Schools

Walking horse breeders play a key role in the county’s thriving equine industry.

12 SQUARE MEALS Head uptown for delicious dining.

18 FORGING CONNECTIONS Long-awaited bypass gets in gear.

D E PA R TM E NT S

• Health care • Utilities

4 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Bedford County culture

• Parks

14 Portfolio: people, places and events

• Taxes

that define Bedford County Images Bedford County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com.

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce 100 North Cannon Blvd. • Shelbyville, TN 37160 Phone: (931) 684-3482 • Fax: (931) 684-3483 www.shelbyvilletn.com VISIT IMAGES BEDFORD COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESBEDFORDCOUNTY.COM ©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

20 Biz Briefs 22 Chamber Report 23 Economic Profile 24 Education 25 Sports & Recreation 26 Health & Wellness 27 Arts & Culture 28 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

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Member Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce EDITOR REBECCA DENTON ON THE COVER STATUE AT A CELEBRATION STABLE PHOTO BY J. KYLE KEENER

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All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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Almanac

Stay Awhile in Wartrace The quaint town of Wartrace is a must-see stop on any visit to Bedford County. The downtown area offers a weekly farmers market on the square during the summer, and antique-lovers will find some great places to browse year-round. Downtown includes commercial buildings in the business district and restored historic homes, many of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Hillbilly Willy’s offers antiques, collectibles and hand-dipped ice cream – and it’s also home to a large collection of Mountain Dew soft drink memorabilia. Other gift, antique and thrift shops include Old Times at The Wartrace Whistle Stop, The Treasure Chest and Wet Your Whistle.

Reel Adventures Fishing for rainbow trout on the Duck River, especially from May through July, is a little bit of angling heaven for outdoor enthusiasts. Trout catches exceed most other fish catches on the Duck below Normandy Dam in Bedford County, of the thanks in large part to the efforts o The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Agen TWRA operates the Normandy Fish Hatchery, including raising a dozen species of fish – inc rainbow trout and brown trout – and an stocking throughout the state. rivers, lakes and reservoirs through

Music to Our Ears Woodworker J.W. Gallagher started making fine fu furniture in the 1930s, but by 1965 he was specializing in guitars – the now-famous handcrafted Gallaghe Gallagher guitars. Don Gallagher, J.W.’s son and mayor of Wartrace, runs the venerable business and is still m making these top-quality guitars, one at a time, in a small sm shop in Wartrace. Every guitar built since 1965 has ha been recorded in the company’s ledger by model, serial number, initial nu owner, and the date it left the shop. Among the first c celebrities to buy one was Paul Yarrow of Peter, Paul and Mary. Grand Ole Opry Gra star Grandpa Jones had one custom made for him, and an legendary picker Doc Watson – a Gallagher fan – has a Gallagher model named for him. Visit www.gallaghe www.gallagherguitar.com for more information.

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Fast Facts Q The Tennessee Technology Center at Shelbyville offers hands-on training in a wide range of programs, including practical nursing and machine tool technology.

World’s Largest Moon Pie Sharing the world’s largest Moon Pie and crowning the Moon Pie Queen and King are just a few of many activities to be enjoyed at the annual RC and Moon Pie Festival. Each June, more than 20,000 people travel to Bell Buckle to celebrate the Southern traditions of Moon Pie and RC Cola. Events include a 10-mile run, games, contests (including a hog-calling contest and a watermelon seed-spitting contest), cloggers, live music, more than 50 arts-and-crafts booths, children’s activities and food vendors. The day ends with the cutting of the world’s largest edible Moon Pie – served by the King and Queen and Knights of the Moon Pie Round.

Q One of the state’s oldest college preparatory schools, the Webb School, was founded in Bell Buckle in 1870. Q Shelbyville is known as Pencil City for its historical importance to pencil manufacturing.

The Next Chapter

Raise Your Glass Tri-Star Vineyards & Winery, seven miles north of Shelbyville off U.S. 41A, offers a variety of grape, berry and other fruit wines ranging from dry to sweet and from white to deep reds. Owners and operators Perry and Elaine Casteel make their wines from free-run juice for more flavor and less bitterness. They offer free tours of the operation and free tastes of their table wines, so visitors can try before they buy. The 5-acre winery is the only one in the county, and some 2,000 guests stop by for tours each year. Visit www.tristarwinery.com for hours and up-to-date wine offerings.

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The Argie Cooper Public Library on South Main Street in downtown Shelbyville is a bustling hub that provides much more than books. The library offers a wealth of activities, including an online book club, summer story time for kids, ds, teen activities and more. The library is in the midst of a capital tal campaign, Moving Our Library Into the Future, which will fund the library’s move to a new location. n. The new facility will include a community room and expanded ed areas for children’s programs, collections, local history and genealogy. For more information, on, visit www.acolibrary.com.

Q The Spotted Saddle Horse Breeder and Exhibitor Association is based in Shelbyville. Q Shelbyville’s 11-day signature event, the Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration, began as a three-day horse show in 1939.

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Connecting with Bedford County has never been easier …

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SIMPLY SEARCH: In a hurry? Find the exact info you need quickly with our enhanced search capabilities.

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SMOOTHER SURFING: Explore the site and interact with us more easily with our reorganized navigation bar.

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JUST THE FACTS: Get a quick snapshot of the community with our greatly enriched Facts and Stats section.

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WATCH AND SHARE: Experience first-hand views of the community in our video gallery, then share them with friends.

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VIRTUAL VIEW: Flip through pages of the digital magazine, an online version of the print publication.

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MOVING MUSTHAVES: Visit our new Relocation Tools section for many useful tips and information to make your transition go smoothly.

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MORE EYE CANDY: Check out our enhanced Photo Gallery for more stunning photos of the community.

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OUTSIDERS WELCOME: Read about the best places to play in this community.

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IN GOOD TASTE: Get the dish on local flavor from favorite restaurants, noted area products and farmers markets in our new Food section.


Almanac

Taking to the Skies Shelbyville is just an hourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drive from a major international airport in Nashville, but the city has its own airport to serve the needs of local businesses and individuals, including pilots-in-training. The Shelbyville Municipal Airport, on Highway 231 North in Shelbyville, has a 5,503-by-100-foot asphalt runway and houses more than 50 planes. The airport offers flight training and aircraft and hangar rentals, and the Shelbyville Sport Flyers Club has a Fly-In Breakfast one Saturday a month at the airport. The facility recently received an Airport of the Year designation from the Tennessee Aeronautics Commission. Visit www.shelbyvilletnairport.org for more information.

Bedford County At A Glance POPULATION Bedford County: 44,696 Bell Buckle: 406 Shelbyville: 19,149 Wartrace: 568

Murfreesboro 70S S

LOCATION Bell Buckle, Shelbyville, Wartrace and Normandy are all located within Bedford County in south-central Tennessee, approximately 50 miles from Nashville and 25 miles from Murfreesboro. BEGINNINGS Shelbyville was established in 1807 by an act of the Tennessee legislature. Respected community leader Clement Cannon donated 100 acres of land where Shelbyville now stands. FOR MORE INFORMATION Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce 100 N. Cannon Blvd. Shelbyville, TN 37160 Phone: (931) 684-3482 Fax: (931) 684-3483 www.shelbyvilletn.com

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Bell Buckle

41A

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Wartrace

Shelbyville 41A

Normandy

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BEDFO R D Tullahoma om 23 231

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Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Online e Bedford County

Take a virtual tour of Bedford County at imagesbedfordcounty.com, courtesy of our award-winning photographers.

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Powerful

STRIDES 8

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WALKING HORSE BREEDERS PLAY KEY ROLE IN THRIVING INDUSTRY

STORY BY CAROL COWAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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helbyville is known among horse fans throughout the country as the home of the Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration – the focal point of the area’s horse industry and one of the largest horse shows in the world. You can’t even get close to Shelbyville without passing a major horse farm or breeding operation. In fact, the Tennessee walking horse breeders and exhibitors who live, work and maintain farms here are major contributors to Bedford County’s culture and economy. Local horse operations buy feed, tractors, equipment and fences. They hire veterinarians. And the owners and

employees build homes and pay for groceries, gas and a range of local services throughout the year. These outfits produce the world champions of the walking horse breed while giving back to the community. “This is the mecca of the Tennessee walking horse,” says David Williams, operations manager for Waterfall Farms, the largest Tennessee walking horse breeding farm in the county. Waterfall Farms, the picturesque facility owned by Bill and Sandra Johnson, includes 1,100 rolling acres and breeds some 1,500 mares each year to World Grand Champion stallions such as Gen’s Black Gin, John F.K.’s Delight,

He’s Puttin’ on the Ritz, José José, Generator’s Santana, A Specialist and All American Cash. Like many people in the horse industry, Williams got an early start, showing horses on a world-championship level as a young man. Over the course of his career, Williams has managed more than 50 stallions. The Middle Tennessee native oversaw breeding operations for several notable area horse farms prior to joining Waterfall Farms in 2006. “For a horse guy like me, Waterfall is like being at Disney World,” he says. Frank and Debbie Eichler, owners of Rising Star Ranch, moved to Shelbyville from Denver, Colo., in 2000 to start their

Debbie Eichler, owner of Rising Star Ranch, rides a walking horse past a doorway in one of the facility’s riding arenas. Above: Horses in fields are common sights throughout Bedford County, home to many horse breeders and exhibitors.

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J. KYLE KEENER

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breeding operation. Rising Star breeds about 800 mares per year, and its lineup of 13 champion stallions includes World Grand Champion Gen’s Armed and Dangerous – also named the Tennessee Walking Horse Breeders and Exhibitors Association’s Sire of the Year in 2004. Other stallions are four-time World Champion Generator’s Silver Dollar, and up-and-comers Main Power – the 2005 World Grand Champion – and A Strong Dollar. “Another popular new producer we have is a horse named Ted Williams – quite possibly the most beautiful horse living,” says Tanya Hopper, breeding office manager at Rising Star Ranch. Owner Debbie Eichler describes herself as a true animal lover. She says the best thing about horse ranching is seeing her stallions’ offspring. “We’re in the baby business,” Eichler says. “I love all the babies, and it’s always interesting to see what the combination of a particular mare with a particular stud will produce. “This year [2009] will be the first time that I will be personally showing babies that I have raised, so that’s fun,” she adds. Sand Creek Farm specializes in the sale of Tennessee walking horses, along with a few other breeds. Sand Creek Sales buys and sells horses all day every day, in addition to offering scheduled sales throughout the year at the company’s Shelbyville facility. Broodmares, performance and pleasure horses are the focus of Sand Creek’s Celebration Sale, held during the Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration in August. Its two-day Christmas at Sand Creek sale features premier show horses.

Left: The annual Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration takes place for 11 days in late summer. Above right: Horses at Rising Star Ranch Below right: Bits in the barn

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Square Meals

HEAD UPTOWN FOR DELICIOUS DINING

STORY BY CAROL COWAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

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nybody hungry? There’s new cuisine on the scene in uptown Shelbyville, along with tried-and-true restaurants that continue to offer great meals and friendly service on and around the courthouse square. Twin brothers Ron and Don Stacy opened 50’s & Fiddles Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor in July 2008 at 203 Depot St., next door to the Capri Theater. But even die-hard locals won’t recognize the totally transformed interior of the building. The front half has been turned into a 1950s-style diner, complete with black-and-white checkered floors and a soda fountain lined with vinyl-covered swivel stools. There’s a jukebox in the corner, pictures of Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe and other 1950s-era celebrities line the walls, and customers can access the modern convenience of free Wi-Fi. “We had a restaurant in Wartrace that we sold,” Ron Stacy says. “We were looking for another place when we found this building. My brother and I both have great memories of going to the soda shop next to the local theater when we were kids, so we built this 1950s diner. “We serve old-fashioned milkshakes – with the mixing tin, so they’re really big portions – made with Blue Bell ice cream,” Stacy continues. “And we serve ice cream floats in frosted mugs.” Milkshakes come in all kinds of flavors, but the peanut butter and banana Elvis shake is a customer favorite. The diner fare has clever names, such as the Bebop Burger and

You-Ain’t-Nothin’-But-a-Hound Dog. Traditional Southern sandwiches such as barbecue, fried bologna and pimiento cheese also are popular picks on the menu. The back half of the building looks like the main street of an Old West town, which the brothers have dubbed “Fiddle City.” A stage at one end features karaoke on Thursday nights, open-mike bluegrass on Friday nights and ’50s bands on Saturday nights. Look for the addition of Sunday afternoon gospel music soon. “We have big crowds every weekend,” Stacy says. Just down the street at 121 Public Square South, The Coffee Break offers specialty coffees and plate breakfasts all day, along with salads, sandwiches and soups for lunch. The restaurant and coffee shop is also known for its desserts, including cookies, pastries and freshly baked lemon, coconut and chocolate pies. The homemade chicken salad is a big hit here, along with the Saddle Salad – a hearty green salad served with the restaurant’s own house vinaigrette dressing. Much of The Coffee Break’s business comes from the Bedford County Courthouse, which is just across the street, and the restaurant often sets up small tables on the sidewalk when the weather is nice. The Coffee Break offers business-tobusiness delivery in the Shelbyville area on orders placed before 10 a.m. Another popular restaurant in the uptown area is Bocelli Gourmet Pizza and Pasta Shoppe on Depot Street.

Clockwise from top: The 50’s & Fiddles Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor features a 1950s-style diner in the front and a live music venue in the back; an ice cream sundae at 50’s & Fiddles; coffee beans at The Coffee Break

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What’s Online e Take a peek at 50’s & Fiddles Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor in our quick video. Visit imagesbedfordcounty.com.

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Portfolio

What’s s e Online

An Upgrade for Uptown SHELBYVILLE AIMS FOR NATIONAL MAIN STREET DESIGNATION IN 2010

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Take a virtual tour of uptown Shelbyville in our quick video. Visit imagesbedford county.com.

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f all goes according to plan, uptown Shelbyville will receive a national Main Street designation in 2010. That’s one of the goals of Main Street Shelbyville, a nonprofit organization formed in 2008 to encourage uptown business development, preserve and upgrade neighborhood buildings, and bring more community events to the uptown district. “We have a nice uptown area already in place, with our public square courthouse, a riverwalk area, an industrial building that was recently converted into an arts center, and good building owners who have invested in restoring their properties,” says Harold Segroves, chairman of Main Street Shelbyville. “We want to ensure that the uptown buildings survive and that district life survives as well.” Segroves says that once Shelbyville achieves a Main Street designation, the city can apply to receive federal and state funds from a number of sources.

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“Main Street is a big-picture organization that takes a lot of baby steps,” he says. “Twenty years from now, when we look at our uptown, we hope to be similar to the other successful Main Street districts of Middle Tennessee such as Murfreesboro, Franklin and Columbia.” Segroves adds that uptown Shelbyville has quite an interesting layout to begin with. “We have our courthouse in the middle of the square, and two streets apiece run into each corner of the square,” he says. “In other words, we have eight individual streets funneling into the uptown district. This type of design is actually known nationwide as the Shelbyville Plan, and it has since been copied by many developing communities.” Main Street Shelbyville’s biggest project now is keeping courthouse offices on the square. “We don’t want any of those offices to move away,” he says, “so we’re getting the word out about Main Street Shelbyville and the plans for future upgrades to the district.” BEDFORD COUNT Y


Celebrating Some Important Changes T trainers actually doubled as horse inspectors, so they would often ignore certain situations,” Meadows says. “They were like foxes guarding the hen house. We now have 25 independent top inspectors who have no ties whatsoever to the owners and trainers. Our goal from this point forward is to put quality, sound horses in the ring.” Changes include the Celebration itself establishing a Horse Industry Organization that will sanction walking

The Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration draws 200,000 fans.

Going Green With Agritourism

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edford County is home to many local farms, and a few of them open their fields for folks to explore and partake in outdoor offerings. Cedar Rock Hunting Preserve is a 389-acre hunting lodge and habitat with 1.5-miles of river frontage. Open to the public for 14 years, it offers lodging, summer camps, bird and deer hunting, corporate events, meeting facilities, hiking trails and now an annual fall festival. The inaugural Cedar Rock Fall Festival will take place in October 2009. Attractions include a pumpkin patch, corn maze, wagon rides, an activity barn and food booths. Valley Home Farm in Wartrace is a 350-acre family farm whose main farmhouse is an 1835 Greek Revival home that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The farm is open to the public for six weeks in the spring each year for strawberry picking. Visitors can pick their own berries or buy them prepicked

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horse shows throughout the country. The Celebration has also formed a SHOW program to oversee every event. SHOW is an acronym for Sound horses, Honest judging, Objective inspection and Winning fairly. So let the competitions continue. Champions in more than 30 different divisions at the Celebration are still crowned during the 11 days, culminated by a World Grand Champion named on the Saturday night before Labor Day.

J. KYLE KEENER

he Celebration has been a big part of Bedford County since 1939. Now, it has even more to celebrate. The 11-day event each year in Shelbyville is officially called the Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration. Walking horses are known for their distinctive high-in-the-air, front-foot gaits, and 200,000 walking horse fans from across the country crowd Calsonic Arena each year to participate in the festivities. The Celebration is estimated to provide an annual $50 million boon to the local economy, and there are five condominium developments within walking distance of the Celebration grounds – with most of those condos serving as second homes to avid Celebration attendees from around the country. But the Celebration has undergone controversy in recent years, with allegations that some participating horses have been mistreated to get them to achieve their distinctive gait. To rectify that situation, several new board members and a new Celebration CEO – Dr. Doyle Meadows – are now in place to make sure that such methods will not be practiced in the future. “In the past, some owners and

from an onsite farm store. Also available for purchase are Valley Home strawberry cakes, strawberry bread, fresh strawberry pie and Valley Home strawberry ice cream. Additional items for sale include chocolate dipped strawberries, Valley Home honey made right on the farm, and farm-fresh strawberry, peach and wild blackberry jams. Another Bedford County destination for agritourism enthusiasts is Vannatta Farms in Bell Buckle. This farm has been around since the 1850s. Mostly known for raising chickens for Tyson’s Shelbyville complex, the operation also grows row crops of cotton, corn, wheat and soybeans. Many of those crops are sold to the public during the year. Vannatta Farms is one of the few century farms still in operation in Bedford County. Tri-Star Vineyards & Winery, just north of Shelbyville, is another popular destination. The family-owned winery offers free tours and free tastings of table wines.

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Portfolio Bell Buckle is known for its historic downtown area, among other attractions.

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JEFFREY S. OTTO

es‚ it’s true. All sports teams at The Webb School in Bell Buckle are nicknamed the Feet. The private school for grades six through 12 was founded in 1870‚ with the facility originally opening in Culleoka‚ Tenn. It was moved to its present-day‚ 100-acre campus in 1886. One of its notable alums is actor Wayne Rogers‚ who played Trapper John on the long running M*A*S*H television show. Besides its quality academics, the school hosts the annual Webb School Arts & Crafts Festival‚ which features more than 120 artists displaying and selling pottery‚ jewelry‚ paintings‚ photography‚ ironworks and more. Voted one of the top 50 arts and crafts shows in the nation‚ it includes live music‚ storytellers and a cultural food court. The festival takes place the third weekend in October. Bell Buckle is also home to a new Tennessee Shakespeare Festival, which started in 2008 and is also held at the Webb School. In June 2008, more than 1,200 people attended five evenings of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, with tickets priced at $10-$15 (and free for children 12 and under). The town of 405 residents is known for its historic downtown area that features plenty of antique shops and interesting eateries. The downtown district also hosts an annual RC and Moon Pie Festival, which draws about 20,000 people.

What’s Online e Check out historic downtown Bell Buckle in our quick video. Visit imagesbedfordcounty.com.

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Plenty To Celebrate in Wartrace T

he Town of Wartrace is proud of its rich traditions of music and craft, and plenty of visitors want in on the action each year. The Wartrace MusicFest is an annual musical get-together that celebrates old-time music and homemade crafts. The event takes place on the weekend after Memorial Day and is a way to bring people together to have a good time. In May 2009, MusicFest attracted top Nashville-based acts such as Cherryholmes, Tom Brantley & Friends, The Doerfel Family Band, The Creek, Jon Garon, Jim and Inge Wood, Richard Starkey, Angelica Grim, Zack Kerber, Stephan Gallagher and Steve Kaufman. Kaufman also hosted a guitar clinic as part of the Friday festivities. Other attractions at MusicFest include an arts and crafts show, along with a one-hour open-mike competition for amateur musicians. All proceeds from the festival go back into the community, primarily for park and downtown improvements. Even the lodging options for MusicFest are one of a kind, with accommodations available at the Walking Horse Hotel, Historic Main Street Inn and the Parish Patch – all located in Wartrace. Besides MusicFest, the town is also home to a Strolling Jim 40-Mile UltraMarathon that draws plenty of hardcore runners to the town on the first Saturday of May. The event is just as its title suggests – a grueling 40-mile run that takes even the top competitors more than five hours to complete. Wartrace has hosted the UltraMarathon for more than 30 years, and the famed endurance event attracts runners from around the world. Other events in town during the year include a Parks & Recreation Spring Dinner in March, a Bethsalem Homecoming in June, a Parks & Recreation Hamburger Supper in July, a Wartrace Horse Show in August, and a Town-Wide Yard Sale in August. Wartrace is also home to the renowned Gallagher Guitars. – Stories by Kevin Litwin BEDFORD COUNT Y

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Business

Keep on

Trucking LONG-AWAITED BYPASS GETS IN GEAR STORY BY JOE MORRIS

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tate Route 437 – a longtime item on the county’s wish list – is finally becoming a reality, with construction under way as of spring 2009. The new road will connect U.S. 231 to U.S. 41A by looping around northeast Shelbyville – a bypass long sought as a way to relieve truck traffic on city roads and allow better highway access for the county’s industrial-area businesses. The roadway will be built with an estimated $23 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment 18

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Act of 2009, and the project also received an additional $1 million in funding that Sen. Lamar Alexander included in the 2008 omnibus appropriations bill. Given the need for the connector, state officials had been drawing up plans and have already completed work on an overpass, says B. J. Doughty, community relations officer for the Tennessee Department of Transportation. “TDOT did work closely with the Bedford County Mayor and Bedford County Railroad Authority from December 2004 to May 2008 to plan,

develop and construct the Walking Horse Railroad Overpass over the proposed location of the roadway,” Doughty says. “Bedford County also made this project its No. 1 priority through the Rural Planning Organization, which works closely with TDOT.” Because the project could begin quickly and will be completed in less than three years – current estimates call for a two-year construction period – it qualified for the stimulus dollars. “We are excited about the progress being made with the Shelbyville bypass,” BEDFORD COUNT Y


PHOTOS BY JEFFREY S. OTTO STAFF PHOTO

says Aaron Melhorn, manager of distribution at Newell Rubbermaid Office Products’ Shelbyville plant. “One of the primary reasons the Railroad Avenue site was chosen for Newell Rubbermaid’s new, state-of-the-art distribution center was its location in relation to the planned bypass. “While the financial impact to our site will be minimal, it will certainly simplify carriers’ transit to and from our site and will likely result in fewer ‘lost’ carriers in Shelbyville as driving directions will become much simpler.” BEDFORD COUNT Y

Clockwise from left: The new bypass will simplify transit to and from industrial businesses; a walking horse relief adorns the new Walking Horse Railroad Overpass; packages move on a conveyor belt at Newell Rubbermaid Office Products’ Shelbyville plant. A new distribution center is in the works.

Newell Rubbermaid’s distribution center, set to open in late 2009, is a 155-000-square-foot facility that will add 120 jobs to the local economy. The project is the first of many that the community believes will be spurred by the new roadway, says Walt Wood, chief executive officer of the ShelbyvilleBedford County Chamber of Commerce. “This is the culmination of nearly 20 years of work by this chamber and the county and city, which have all pressed for a bypass that was conceived and mapped out then,” Wood says. “It has

been a long-term process to get this funded, and it’s going to be a gamechanger as far as opening up a whole new area for development. We’re hoping to site a new industrial park on that road in the near future, because prospects that have been looking at us are very keen to have the details on the roadway. “It’s going to make things like the Newell Rubbermaid distribution center possible, and our existing companies, such as Calsonic Kansei North America and Big G Express trucking, will benefit from having a faster route.” I M AG E S B E D F O R D C O U N T Y. C O M

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Business

Biz Briefs BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE BEDFORD COUNTY’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

$262,323 Retail sales ($1,000)

$6,681 Retail sales per capita

$24,790 Accommodation and foodservices sales ($1,000)

2,941 Total Number of Firms Source: U.S. Census QuickFacts

JABIRU USA SPORT AIRCRAFT Biz: Maker of light sport planes Buzz: Jabiru USA Sport Aircraft is the world’s largest distributor of Jabiru-brand aircraft and aircraft engines. Jabiru USA was established in 1999 as a full-service Jabiru center, and it moved to Shelbyville in 2004. The company manufactures and distributes components for Jabiru engine installations, and it employs licensed engine and aircraft repairmen. www.usjabiru.com 20

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BELL BUCKLE CAFÉ & MUSIC PARLOUR Biz: Restaurant and live music venue Buzz: J. Gregry’s Bell Buckle Café & Music Parlour on the square in Bell Buckle draws folks from miles around for its renowned country cooking, homemade lemonade and friendly ambiance. Offering live music on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights, the café also is fast becoming a center for musical talent from throughout Middle Tennessee. www.bellbucklecafe.com BEDFORD GYM & FITNESS CENTER Biz: Gym and fitness center Buzz: The Bedford Gym & Fitness Center, located at 1733 N. Main Street in Shelbyville, is a full-service fitness center offering group fitness classes, strength training classes, free weights, cardio equipment, strength-training machines, a kids’ room, sauna, tanning and more. Bedford Gym & Fitness Center is open six days a week, and members have 24-hour access. www.bedfordgym.com BEDFORD FARMERS CO-OP Biz: Farm and garden machinery and equipment Buzz: Bedford Farmers Co-op in Shelbyville supplies farmers with just about everything they need, including feed, seed, fertilizer, chemicals, lawn mowers, power equipment, petroleum and more. The co-op also has a gift shop with home-décor items and a bridal registry. (931) 684-3506 JOSTENS INC. Biz: Produces yearbooks, class rings and graduation products Buzz: The multimillion-dollar company Jostens Inc. is headquartered in Minneapolis, but the company runs a busy production facility in Shelbyville. The Union Street site prints the majority of Jostens’ diplomas, and it also specializes in printing high school and college graduation announcements. www.jostens.com BEDFORD COUNT Y

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JEFFREY S. OTTO

Business | Chamber Report

Leadership Bedford members planted a meditation garden for previously incarcerated women at Next Step Home in Shelbyville.

Making Connections, Building Community LEADERSHIP BEDFORD FOSTERS NETWORKING, INVOLVEMENT

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ince 1994, Leadership Bedford has been enhancing its community in big and small ways – from building a meditation garden for a women’s home to delivering Easter baskets for needy families. Other projects have included building a Habitat for Humanity House, launching a youth leadership program and building the Celebration Station playground. Designed to build adult leadership in Bedford County, the Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce-supported program has attracted top members of the business, civic and public-service fields. Each class comes together monthly to learn about the community, meet leaders in a wide array of fields, network and complete a project that benefits the community. “This year we have students from the business community, including a retired Army general,” says Roger Hawks, Leadership Bedford board president. “We have members from the banking community, from the technology center, a chamber employee. It varies widely from year to year.” In 2009, nine adults went through the adult leadership program, and 13 high schoolers signed up for the youth program, which often meets in conjunction with the adult program. Class members launch the year in September with a retreat – including team building and get-to-know-you activities –

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that runs from Friday night through Saturday. They meet again each month through May for one-day training sessions that focus on a different aspect of the community, such as education, social services, government, medicine and agriculture. Classes are held on site, depending on the area of interest. During the course of the year, class members learn about delegating, problem-solving, decision-making, identifying and analyzing issues, and communication. “I was able to see things an outsider might not ever see about the community and services and government,” says Hawks, a graduate of the program. “It helped introduce me to the community, and it gave me the opportunity to find out where I could fit best in terms of volunteering and giving back to the community.” The projects each class chooses may come from members, or they could be submitted by the community and recommended by Leadership Bedford. In 2008-2009, members chose to complete several small projects. They planted trees at Wartrace Community Park, painted at local parks, worked with Habitat for Humanity and built a meditation garden for previously incarcerated women at Next Step Home. – Laura Hill BEDFORD COUNT Y


Business | Economic Profile

BEDFORD COUNTY BUSINESS CLIMATE Bedford County has a strong and skilled workforce, filling more than 4,000 manufacturing and related jobs. The local government is very supportive of new and expanding industries. That support was acknowledged in a 2007 study by the Tennessee Center for Policy Research, which ranked Shelbyville as one of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top 25 most business-friendly communities.

ECONOMIC RESOURCES Tennessee Department of Economic & Community Development 312 Rosa Parks Ave. 11th Floor Nashville, TN 37243 (615) 741-1888 www.tennessee.gov/ecd

TAXES

2.75% City Sales and Use Tax

2.75% County Sales Tax

TRANSPORTATION Nashville International Airport (615) 275-1675 www.nashintl.com (about 46 miles from Shelbyville) Shelbyville Municipal Airport (931) 684-1669 www.shelbyvilletnairport.org

INDUSTRIAL SITES Available Industrial Sites www.dealready.com

City of Shelbyville 201 N. Spring St. Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-2691 www.shelbyvilletn.org/ Shelbyville.htm

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Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce 100 N. Cannon Blvd. Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-3482 www.shelbyvilletn.com

imagesbedfordcounty.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

GOVERNMENT OFFICES Bedford County Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office One Public Square Suite 101 Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-7944 www.bedfordcountytn.org/ countymayor.html

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OWNER: EARL DAVENPORT

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Distribution Center #6062 Here at Wal-Mart Distribution Center #6062, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our associates make the difference for our stores and our community.â&#x20AC;? The DC services 94 Wal-Mart Supercenters and Neighborhood Markets. This past year the Distribution Center processed over 42 million cases of freight and shipper over 25,000 trailers, traveling over six million miles. Our associates contributed to many charitable organizations in Shelbyville and other areas throughout Bedford County and Middle Tennessee. 285 Frank Martin Rd.Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 680-3408Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Fax (931) 680-3404

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Education

Moving Forward NEW FACILITIES MAKE WAY FOR PROGRAMS, GROWTH

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wo new schools are opening in Bedford County – a sign of both the tremendous growth in the area and the commitment of civic leaders to accommodate that growth. Learning Way Elementary School is the first non-replacement school to be built in Shelbyville since the 1950s. It will be equipped with new technology, including wireless Internet access throughout the building, extra classrooms to accommodate future growth, and auxiliary spaces for programs such

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as music and special education. Community High School, a new facility in Unionville, about 12 miles outside of Shelbyville, will be similarly equipped. Both schools are expected to open their doors for the 2009-2010 school year. “We went from 5,000 students in the district to more than 7,000 in very short order,” says Superintendent Ed Gray. “Now we not only have the space to accommodate our students, we have room to grow.”

With the new additions, Bedford County’s public school district consists of 13 schools, a vocational annex and Bedford County Learning Academy, which houses alternative learning programs. These schools serve approximately 7,650 students and are staffed with about 950 employees, according to the Bedford County Department of Education. The school district is expanding to meet the changing needs of the community, which has grown from a small, rural area to a more diverse region that now includes suburbanite commuters, professionals and new residents working in local business and industry. As more young families move to the area, Gray says a top priority was the new Learning Way Elementary School. The 80,000-square-foot school – a K-5 school – will house 500 students, and an addition could be built to bring capacity up to 750 if necessary. The school is being built beside the new Harris Middle School and near the newly renovated and expanded Shelbyville Central High School. Along with the new Community High School in Unionville, the education facilities “really make an attractive addition to our community,” Gray says. “They’re both well designed, well planned, and they add to the county’s overall image.” The schools received funding through bond initiatives. The $11.2 million elementary school and the $16 million Community High are part of a 10-year master expansion plan, which also includes $3.2 million for an elementary school addition near Bell Buckle and $21 million for renovations and additions at Central High. – Anita Wadhwani BEDFORD COUNT Y


Sports & Recreation

Celebrating 50 Years in Style RIVER BEND COUNTRY CLUB IMPROVES GREENS, BUILDS FAMILY-FRIENDLY PROGRAMS

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ime can take its toll on a golf course, but River Bend Country Club’s much-loved 18-hole course is looking healthier – and prettier – than ever as it celebrates its 50th birthday. Widely considered one of the finest small club courses in the state, the George Cobb-designed course boasts improved greens and the return of its popular pro, Randy Helton, to River Bend. “It’s your typical member-friendly golf course that’s in good condition with good putting surfaces,” says Helton, who returned from nine seasons at Stones River Country Club in 2008 to work on rebuilding club programs – such as ladies golf and junior golf – to make the traditional country club a family-friendly place to spend time. “We want to have something for everyone – juniors, seniors, ladies, as well as your mainstay golfers,” says Helton. “In a few years our junior program will be second to none.” As a full-service country club, River Bend offers more than good golf, a fully stocked pro shop, putting green, driving range and lessons. Members can also enjoy a large swimming pool and kiddie pool, two lighted tennis courts and an outdoor lounge and grill for informal dining. Chef Antonio Thompson presides over what Helton describes

as “the best food in town” in a more formal setting in the banquet room or smaller dining room. The club, which has 200 golfing members and just over 300 other members, enjoys a busy schedule of tournaments and events from April through September, but it keeps its members’ needs in mind. “We try to keep most of our tournaments in conjunction with regular play,” says Helton. “There’s nothing worse than coming out ready to play and having the course be shut down.” The player-friendly course “doesn’t have a whole lot of trouble, even though we can make it hard depending on the mood our superintendent is in when he wakes up,” he jokes. “Members are going to be happier if they come out shooting 70 rather than 90, but it’s still challenging.” River Bend is one of the first clubs in the area to install Ultra Dwarf hybrid Bermuda grass on its course, a heat- and water-loving surface that does uniquely well in this area in both winter and summer. “I’ve been fortunate in my 25 years in this business to play on a lot of courses,” Helton says. “For a town of this size, I can say it’s the best golf club in the state. You have to travel a long distance to find a better-conditioned, more fun golf course.” – Laura Hill

What’s Online e Go to imagesbedfordcounty.com and click on “Recreation” to read more about Bedford County’s sports and recreational activities.

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Health & Wellness

Patients Can Breathe Easier SMOKING-CESSATION PROGRAM AT HERITAGE MEDICAL IGNITES NATIONAL INTEREST

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creating a breakthrough smoking cessation program. Now based at Heritage Medical Center in Shelbyville, the program is drawing national attention for its unprecedented success rates in beating the notoriously hard-to-overcome addiction. The Health-Status Improvement Program helps patients addicted to cigarettes or chewing tobacco quit for good. It has an unprecedented 85 percent success rate after six months, validated

PHOTOS BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

fter serving for many years as an accomplished lung care specialist, Dr. Frederic Seifer felt he could do more. Voted the best physician in his community and landing several regional awards, Seifer, nevertheless, says he “started feeling like I was just doing Band-Aids.” He wanted to help people before they reached the Intensive Care Unit.” So Seifer channeled his energy into

Dr. Frederic D. Seifer, creator of a successful smoking cessation program

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by chemical testing, Seifer says. Key to his program is establishing a “dynamic dialogue” that is often missing between patients and busy doctors. Seifer establishes this the moment a patient walks into his office. “I say I’m going to do my job,” Seifer says. “I’m not going to give up on you. I’m going to stand there at the batter’s mound and keep pitching as long as you want to keep hitting.” That moment of establishing trust – and convincing patients that he will not give up on them – is key to any smoking cessation program’s ultimate success, he says. Seifer tells patients that they are inhaling 4,000 chemicals with each cigarette puff. Only one of these chemicals – nicotine – is actually addictive. He suggests for the first week they switch to a lower-nicotine cigarette brand and smoke all they want. The second week, he might suggest an even lower nicotine brand, or medication. By the time Seifer and his patient set a quit date, he is reasonably confident the patient is ready to physically and psychologically kick the habit. Seifer has been practicing at Heritage Medical Center since early 2009. A new chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or lung disease, screening tool created by Dr. Seifer for the general population is being piloted in Shelbyville and soon may be used by hospitals across the country, he says. Dr. Seifer and other physicians have been drawn to Shelbyville’s new $52 million medical center. “This really is the right size canvas for me to do what I want to do,” he says. “There’s no reason Shelbyville can’t be known for pencils, walking horses – and as a leader in health care.” – Anita Wadhwani BEDFORD COUNT Y


Arts & Culture A mosaic sculpture honoring Bedford County women is in the works at the Fly Cultural Arts Center uptown.

Heart of the Arts MOVIES, PLAYS, EXHIBITS DRAW VISITORS UPTOWN

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ith plenty of live music, movies, visual arts and theater, Shelbyville offers a range of ways to enjoy the arts. The uptown area boasts two major attractions: the Capri Theater – a restored Art Deco theater that shows first-run movies – and the Fly Cultural Arts Center, offering arts activities ranging from holiday dinner theater to art classes and live music, including Nashville Symphony performances. “We have special events like our BEDFORD COUNT Y

community theater productions, youth theater and summer theater programs in the summertime, and it’s all local people,” says Janice Cole, director of the Fly Cultural Arts Center. “But we pull people in from Tullahoma, Manchester and other communities to audition for our productions as well as attend them. We’ve made a name for ourselves with our theater programs in particular.” The Fly highlights a different artist every month or so, and it also hosts dances every third Saturday, including

the annual luau in May and the Blue Jean & Goblin Ball in October. There’s a Festival of Trees before Thanksgiving, and an annual dinner theater production during early December. Other Fly programs include an art workshop, led by Bell Buckle mosaic artist Sherri Warner Hunter, that will culminate in the creation and display of a three-sided mosaic statue – to be called Vision, Action, and Prayer – honoring the women of Bedford County. “We are a cultural anchor for the area as far as visual art, and we’re always looking to do different things,” Cole says. “We have visitors who come in from all over, many of whom are coming to see our county history museum at the Fly. We’ve always got something new going on.” Entertainment buffs also enjoy the ambiance at the Capri, which still has many of its original Art Deco amenities, including illuminated signage throughout the interior, steel railing on the staircase and the exterior marquee that has become a Shelbyville landmark. These days, owners Ray and Beth Rhoton are working on installing new seats and doing other renovation work. “We’re doing the seats and drapes over the summer, but we’re always trying to keep everything up,” Ray Rhoton says. “Everything’s going really well for us here, so we try to keep working on the building while maintaining its atmosphere.” The movies, plays and other events continue to draw people to the historic downtown area, where the activity helps restaurants and retail stores thrive. Also uptown, 50’s & Fiddles Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor recently got in on the entertainment action, opening a live music venue in the back of its ’50s-style diner on Depot Street. – Joe Morris I M AG E S B E D F O R D C O U N T Y. C O M

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Community Profile

BEDFORD COUNTY SNAPSHOT With picturesque rolling hills, a growing number of manufacturing businesses and an excellent quality of life, Bedford County is one of the fastest-growing counties in the state – and it’s welcoming new economic development all the time. The county attracts about 200,000 people from across the country each year with its signature event, the Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration.

EDUCATIONAL OVERVIEW MEDICAL SERVICES OVERVIEW Bedford County Medical Center’s brand-new facility opened in June 2008 with a new CEO, upgraded technology, more efficient processes and a whole new approach to customer service. The $50 million, 100,000square-foot medical center on U.S. Highway 231 in the Airport Business Park replaces a nearly 60-year-old structure in a different location. The new Community Health Systems-owned hospital is a non-smoking campus, and all staff members – whether they’re nurses or maintenance workers – wear uniforms. Processes have been streamlined to cut down on patients’ paperwork, and new technology makes for faster, more convenient service.

Bedford County offers quality public and private school education opportunities, along with a Tennessee Technology Center campus. Additional higher education options nearby include Middle Tennessee State University and Motlow Community College.

CLIMATE OVERVIEW

sunny days for people to enjoy the great outdoors. Winters are generally mild, and snowfall tends to be very light.

10 F January Low Temperature

71 F January High Temperature

57 F July Low Temperature

Bedford County has a moderate climate, with enough annual rainfall to keep plants lush and green and enough

94 F July High Temperature

MORE EO ONLINE imagesbedfordcounty.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

visit our

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(931) 684-9112 508 Cannon Blvd. Shelbyville, TN 37160 Experience Matters! – Since 1973

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www.craigwheeler.com

Ascend Federal Credit Union www.ascendfcu.org

Motlow State Community College www.mscc.edu

Bedford County www.bedfordcountytn.org

Southern Floors www.southernfloors.net

Craig & Wheeler Realty & Auction Company www.craigwheeler.com

State Farm Insurances www.statefarm.com

Duck River Electric Membership Corporation www.dremc.com

Tennessee Technology Center www.ttcshelbyville.edu The Webb School www.thewebbschool.com

Heritage Medical Center www.heritagemedicalcenter.com

Town of Wartrace www.wartracemusicfest.org

Jostens www.jostens.com

Wal-Mart Distribution Center #6062 www.wal-mart.com

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Ad Index

C 4 A s c e n d Fe d e r a l C r e d it U n i o n

1 B e d fo r d Co u n t y

2 8 C r a i g & W h e e l e r R e a lt y & Auc ti o n Co m pa n y

C 2 Duc k R i v e r E l ec t r i c M e m b e r s h i p Co r p o r ati o n

17 H e r itag e M e d i ca l C e n t e r

2 J os t e n s

2 M ot low S tat e Co m m u n it y Co l l eg e

2 3 S o u t h e r n Flo o r s

C 3 S tat e Fa r m I n s u r a n c e s

C 3 T e n n e s s e e

T ec h n o lo gy C e n t e r

2 1 T h e W e bb Sc h o o l

1 6 Tow n o f Wa rt r ac e

2 3 Wa l- Ma rt D i s t r i bu ti o n

C e n t e r # 6 0 62


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SHELBYVILLE

Building Skills Guiding Careers Meeting the Needs and Demands of the Community and Industry Online Soft Skills and Computer Training

For more information or a campus visit, call: (931) 685-5013 1405 Madison St. Shelbyville, TN 37160 www.ttcshelbyville.edu

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at SHELBYVILLE

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Images Bedford County, TN 2009-10