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2007-08 | IMAGESBEDFORDCOUNTY.COM | VIDEO TOUR ONLINE TM

OF BEDFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE

GOUDA, EDAM AND SWISS Cheese shop strives for better cheddar

LABOR OF LOVE OR LOVE OF LABOR? Training walking horses is a year-round effort

You’ve Come a Long Way, Bedford Yearlong celebration marks two centuries

SPONSORED BY THE SHELBYVILLE-BEDFORD COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


Some homes waste nearly as much energy as they use At Duck River Electric we do everything in our power to ensure you always have an affordable, reliable source of energy. We also work hard to make sure all our members understand the latest and best ways to be more energy efficient. We have hundreds of things that you can do to save energy, simple things to make sure you get the most out of the electricity you use. We’re all in this together. Visit our website: www.dremc.com for more information about how you can use electricity more efficiently. You can even conduct an on-line energy audit for your house and receive immediate results.

(931) 684-4621

www.dremc.com


2007-08 EDITION | VOLUME 9 TM

OF BEDFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE

CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S

BEDFORD COUNTY BUSINESS 8 CONNECTED TO THE LAND Bedford County is producing a valuable new crop – agri-tourism.

26 Gouda, Edam and Swiss Bedford Cheese is committed to selling better cheddar.

28 Biz Briefs

12 YOU’VE COME A LONG WAY, BEDFORD

30 Chamber Report

A yearlong celebration marks the county’s bicentennial.

31 Economic Profile

14 DELICIOUS DESTINATION Restaurants here run the gamut from upscale eateries to casual cafés.

19 LABOR OF LOVE OR LOVE OF LABOR? Training walking horses is a year-round effort.

33 GEARING UP FOR GROWTH The school system is beginning a largescale building and renovation program.

D E PA R TM E NT S 4 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Bedford County culture

24 Image Gallery 35 Arts & Culture 36 Health & Wellness 41 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

39 A BIT OF ANGLING HEAVEN The Duck River is a fisherman’s paradise.

ON THE COVER Bedford County Courthouse Photo by Brian McCord

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ACTION! ADVENTURE! “IT KEPT ME ON THE EDGE OF MY LAPTOP!”

“ BEDFORD COUNTY LIKE IT’S NEVER BEEN SEEN BEFORE!”

IMAGES OF BEDFORD COUNTY

THE MOVIE

STARTS TODAY!

WORLD WIDE WEB SHOWTIMES VALID MONDAY-SUNDAY 24/7

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT ANY RESEMBLANCE TO PLACES, EVENTS OR QUALITY OF LIFE IN BEDFORD COUNTY IS PURELY INTENTIONAL!

AT IM AGESBEDFORDCOUNT Y.COM


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ONLINE CONTENTS More lists, links and tips for newcomers O F B E D FO R D CO U NT Y SENIOR EDITOR REBECCA DENTON COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, SUSAN CHAPPELL, KIM MADLOM, ANITA WADHWANI STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN, JESSICA MOZO DIRECTORIES EDITORS AMANDA KING, KRISTY WISE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LINDA BRYANT, BILL LEWIS, JOE MORRIS, AMY STUMPFL ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER TODD POTTER AD PROJECT MANAGER LORIE WARDELL SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR SARA SARTIN STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS WES ALDRIDGE, ANTONY BOSHIER, MICHAEL W. BUNCH, IAN CURCIO, BRIAN M CCORD PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT JESSY YANCEY CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR SHAWN DANIEL PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS ASST. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR HAZEL RISNER SENIOR PRODUCTION PROJECT MGR. TADARA SMITH PRODUCTION PROJECT MGRS. MELISSA HOOVER, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS GRAPHIC DESIGN JESSICA BRAGONIER, CANDICE HULSEY, LINDA MOREIRAS, DEREK MURRAY, AMY NELSON WEB DESIGN RYAN DUNLAP WEB PRODUCTION JILL TOWNSEND DIGITAL ASSET MANAGER ALISON HUNTER COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN CORY MITCHELL AD TRAFFIC SARAH MILLER, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./PRODUCTION & OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING SYBIL STEWART EXECUTIVE EDITOR TEREE CARUTHERS MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS MAURICE FLIESS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS, JACKIE YATES RECRUITING DIRECTOR SUZY WALDRIP DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH IT SYSTEMS DIRECTOR MATT LOCKE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR NICOLE WILLIAMS CLIENT & SALES SERVICES MANAGER/ CUSTOM MAGAZINES PATTI CORNELIUS

Images of Bedford County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce 100 N. Cannon Blvd. • Shelbyville, TN 37160 Phone: (931)684-3482 • Fax: (931)684-3483 E-mail: bedfordchamber@bellsouth.net www.shelbyvilletn.com VISIT IMAGES OF BEDFORD COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESBEDFORDCOUNTY.COM ©Copyright 2007 Journal Communications Inc., 361 Mallory Station Road, Ste. 102, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

Magazine Publishers of America

Member Custom Publishing Council Member Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce

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IMAGESBEDFORDCOUNTY.COM

MOVING PICTURES Take a video tour of Bedford County at imagesbedfordcounty.com.

GET SMART ABOUT LOCAL SCHOOLS Find listings and links to schools, colleges and universities.

SEE HOW THE GARDENS GROW Get the dirt on growing seasons, soils and common challenges.

WHAT DO THE LOCALS EAT? Discover what makes cuisine in this region so deliciously different.

NO PLACE LIKE HOME Search for a new home, plus get moving tips and more at www.realtor.com.

A B O U T TH I S M AGA Z I N E Images of Bedford County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is sponsored by the Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce. In print and online, Images gives readers a taste of what makes Bedford County tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts.

“Find the good – and praise it.” – Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

jnlcom.com

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Almanac

The Webb Feet Yes, it’s true. All sports teams at The Webb School in Bell Buckle are nicknamed the Feet. The private school for grades 6-12 was founded in 1870, with the facility originally opening in Culleoka, Tenn. It was moved to its presentday, 100-acre campus in 1886. By the way, one of its notable alums is actor Wayne Rogers, who played Trapper John on the long-running “M*A*S*H” television show. The school hosts the annual Webb School Arts & Crafts Festival, which features more than 120 artists displaying and selling pottery, jewelry, paintings, photography, ironworks and more. Voted one of the top 50 arts and crafts shows in the nation, it also includes live music, storytellers and a cultural food court. The festival takes place the third weekend in October.

Poetic Justice Pass the word: Tennessee’s poet laureate now has a garden that honors her in Bell Buckle Park. A “Poet’s Garden” was planted in the park in 2007 to recognize Margaret Britton “Maggi” Vaughn, a Bedford County native who has written 12 books and was designated poet laureate of Tennessee in 1989. The garden consists of 80 plants, a swamp white oak and two concrete benches, and there are plans to erect a sign commemorating the garden and Vaughn. Besides her poetry, Vaughn has written songs for Ernest Tubb and Conway Twitty, and she published the book 50 Years of Saturday Nights that commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Grand Ole Opry.

Can I Have Your Autograph? Celebrities sign many of their autographs with Sharpie permanent markers – manufactured at Sanford Corp. in Shelbyville. The company announced in 2004 that the popular writing instruments would be manufactured in and distributed from Shelbyville, and today the Sanford Corp. plant has 900 employees. Besides Sharpie, Sanford also produces brand-name pens and markers such as Paper Mate, Parker, Waterman, uni-ball, Prismacolor, Accent highlighters, Expo dry erase markers and Liquid Paper.

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48-Inch Moon Pie The world’s largest Moon Pie – along with the crowning of the Moon Pie Queen and Moon Pie King – are all part of the annual RC and Moon Pie Festival. Every June, more than 20,000 people travel to Bell Buckle to celebrate the combined taste treat of a Moon Pie washed down with a Royal Crown Cola. Events include a parade, Moon Pie eating competitions, live music, craft displays and children’s activities. There is also the cutting of the world’s largest edible Moon Pie, which measures four feet in diameter and is 14 inches thick.

Healthy Families Whatever is best for the family is what the Center for Family Development is all about. The organization – located on the east side of the public square in Shelbyville – has been in operation since 1995, when a Healthy Families initiative was launched. Healthy Families provides first-time parents with support and educational materials in order to help them create a safe, nurturing environment for their children. The center also helps people who are seeking to adopt children. It offers information on how to begin the adoption process, how much it will cost, and how long before the selection process takes place for placement of a child.

Bedford County | At A Glance POPULATION (2005 ESTIMATE) Bedford County: 43,413 Shelbyville: 18,648

Bedford County Murfreesboro

LOCATION Shelbyville is in south-central Tennessee, 58 miles from Nashville and 25 miles from Murfreesboro.

70S

BEGINNINGS Shelbyville was established in 1809 by an act of the Tennessee legislature. Respected community leader Clement Cannon donated 100 acres of land where Shelbyville now stands.

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Bell Buckle

41A

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Wartrace

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FOR MORE INFORMATION Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce 100 North Cannon Blvd Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-3482 Fax: (931) 684-3483 www.shelbyvilletn.com

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Shelbyville 41A

Normandy

L Lewisburg

BEDFORD Tullahoma om 23 231

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RiverBend Country Club Golfing, swimming, tennis, social activities and fine dining • George Cobb designed 18-hole golf course • PGA professional with full golf shop • Clubhouse with excellent dining & lounge • Competitive & fun member events & tournaments • Family, individual & out-of-town memberships

RiverBend Country Club • Shelbyville, TN • (931) 684-7300

TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY CENTER AT

SHELBYVILLE

Building Skills Guiding Careers Meeting the Needs and Demands of the Community and Industry Online Soft Skills and Computer Training

For more information or a campus visit, call (931) 685-5013 1405 Madison St. Shelbyville, TN 37160 www.ttc.shelbyville.edu

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Almanac

Clip-Clopping Since 1939

Fast Facts

It creates a $35 million annual impact on the regional economy, and it occurs over 11 days and nights in late August and early September. The Celebration is the ultimate competition in the Tennessee Walking Horse industry, with the festivities taking place each year in Shelbyville. More than 150,000 people pass through the gates of the 105-acre Celebration grounds, which include a 4,500-seat Calsonic Arena. Meanwhile, the Walking Horse Trainers Association with its 700 worldwide members is headquartered in Shelbyville, as is The Walking Horse Report, a weekly online and print publication for Tennessee Walking Horse breeders and enthusiasts.

■ Wartrace is known as the “Cradle of the Tennessee Walking Horse.” ■ According to historians, Shelbyville was named for Indian fighter Col. Isaac Shelby, who later became prominent in state and national politics. ■ Historic Bell Buckle is a well-known tourism destination for artisans and other folks seeking antiques, art, crafts, good food and music.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TWHNC

■ Bedford County has more than a dozen industries that employ at least 100 workers, led by CalsonicKansei North America (879), Tyson Foods (1,000) and Sanford Corp. (900).

Honors Graduates The multimillion-dollar company Jostens Inc. – a name known throughout the country for its yearbooks, class rings and other graduation products – is headquartered in Minneapolis, but it runs a busy production facility in Shelbyville. The Shelbyville site on Union Street primarily provides commercial printing services that specialize in high school and college graduation announcements, and it prints a million diplomas each year. One of the country’s oldest printing presses – built sometime between 1894 and 1904 – is still in use today at the plant because of its ability to produce large engraved documents. The Shelbyville facility has been in operation for nearly 50 years, and it currently has about 550 employees.

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■ Shelbyville Municipal Airport accommodates 100 flights each day and houses more than 50 planes.

SEE MORE ONLINE | For more Fast Facts about Bedford County, visit imagesbedfordcounty.com.

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AGRICULTURE PRODUCES A BOUNTIFUL CROP OF TOURISTS STORY BY BILL LEWIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN McCORD

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n addition to being one of Tennessee’s top producers of traditional farm products such as wheat, corn, beef and poultry, Bedford County is producing a valuable new crop – agri-tourism. The county’s traditional farms are among the most productive in Tennessee, turning out crops and livestock valued at $80 million in 2006. Only two counties produced more. Some landowners see agri-tourism as a way to increase that bounty. “Agriculture gives people a way to afford to live in the countryside,” says John Teague, the University of Tennessee agricultural extension agent for Bedford County. “People say, ‘This is where I want to live and where I want my children to grow up.’ It’s a way of life.” Bobby Potts and his three sisters share that sentiment. They successfully combine traditional farming and agritourism at their historic family farm, Valley Home Farm, at 310 Potts Road in Wartrace. The farm is open to the public during the pick-your-own strawberry season from mid-April to early June each spring. While Bobby Potts concentrates on growing seasonal crops and raising livestock and poultry, sisters Linda Potts Williams and Vickie Potts Pyrdum operate Valley Home Foods and make and market the farm’s strawberry, peach and blackberry jam and baked goods. Vickie’s husband, Billy, operates the seasonal farm market. Bobby Potts, his wife, Janet, and his sister Nancy Potts Edwards, raise and market the farm’s specialty crops – strawberries and the honey from 35 bee colonies that thrive on the farm. Visitors can purchase Valley Home’s tempting treats at the farm store, located on the 350-acre property, or go to the farm’s Web site at www.valleyhomefarm.com for ordering options. “We feel very fortunate to have found ways to preserve our family farm, keep it productive in today’s changing agricul-

Vannatta Farms has been operating since 1850.

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Cayuga grapes at Tri-Star Vineyards & Winery

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tural environment and keep our family actively working together – now the fifth generation – on the farm,” Bobby Potts says. Each of the sisters has a career outside the farm, but they say the land keeps the family together. Farming has kept the owners of Vannatta Farms in Bell Buckle together since 1850. “I’m the seventh-generation farmer in the family,” says Tracy Vannatta, who operates the family business with his father, Bobby. “My sons may become the eighth generation. They have a good idea of the farming life, and they enjoy it. I’m encouraging them to get their college degrees so they’ll have options.” The Vannattas own 1,050 acres and lease about 1,000 more on which they produce crops, cattle and poultry. “As the county grows, farming is still extremely important,” Tracy Vannatta says. “When you get off the highways you can really see it.” Agri-tourism is providing Elaine Casteel and her husband, Perry, the opportunity to own their own business after years

of pursuing separate careers – he in the mining industry and she as an employee of an airline. Today, they operate the county’s only winery, Tri-Star Vineyards & Winery, on Scales Road, seven miles north of Shelbyville off U.S. 41A. About 2,000 guests – some from as far as Australia and South Africa – tour the five-acre winery each year and watch as grapes from 2,200 vines are made into Tennessee wine. The winery also makes fruit and berry wines, including blackberry, apple, strawberry, plum and cherry. Tri-Star sells its products directly to its visitors at the winery. “Any time someone wants to have a tour, we’ll do it. We enjoy our guests,” Elaine Casteel says. Guests are also welcome at Farris Volunteer Nursery in Shelbyville for pick-your-own blackberries, peaches and more. The joy of spending time in the countryside, either as a resident or as a visitor, attracts many people to Bedford County, Teague says. “They are coming to beautiful Middle Tennessee and want to experience the country,” he says.

Valley Home Farm in Wartrace, owned by the Potts family, is open to the public for strawberry picking each spring.

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You’ve Come a Long Way,

Bedford

Bedford County Courthouse in downtown Shelbyville Right: A bicentennial T-shirt is one of several commemorative keepsakes.

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YEARLONG CELEBRATION RECOGNIZES 200 YEARS OF PROGRESS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

STORY BY AMY STUMPFL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN McCORD

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ooking around Bedford County today, it’s hard to imagine that this burgeoning industrial center was once little more than a rough settlement carved out along the Duck River. But Dec. 3, 2007, marks Bedford County’s bicentennial, and the community planned a yearlong celebration to honor its rich history. “It has been a wonderful year so far,” says Dixie Parker, chair of the Bedford County Bicentennial Committee. “A lot of work has gone into the celebration, but it has been worth every minute.” Parker says the planning started in fall 2006 with a small gathering of citizens in the archive room of the Bedford County courthouse in downtown Shelbyville. “It started out as a brainstorming session, and took off from there,” says Parker, who has lived in the community her entire life. “The response has been incredible. Everyone was eager to make this a special year for Bedford County.” And what a year it has been. Beginning in December 2006, the county has hosted a wide range of events – from a traditional Fourth of July celebration to a special performance of the Nashville Symphony at Calsonic Arena. “It’s all just good, old-fashioned fun, with music festivals, chili suppers and car shows,” Parker says. “Each community has gotten involved in some way. And even those events that take place every year have incorporated some special twist around the bicentennial.” Bedford County Mayor Eugene Ray agrees, noting the importance of representing citizens throughout the area. Ray made a little history himself in 2006 by becoming the first African-American BEDFORD COUNT Y

to be elected Bedford County mayor. “A lot has changed over the years, and I’ve seen many barriers broken down,” he says. “But one constant has been the people. We have some of the finest people around, and it’s been so nice to see them come together for this historic event.” Ray finds it particularly satisfying to see so many young people involved in the festivities. “We knew we wanted the schools to participate. We had coloring contests, essay contests – you name it.” In fact, the official bicentennial T-shirt features the artwork of three Southside Primary School students. The Bicentennial Committee and various community partners also came out with a series of special commemoratives, including coins, medallions and key chains. Other special keepsakes include a pictorial history book compiled by the Shelbyville Times-Gazette newspaper and an official county history book

written by county historians Tim and Helen Marsh. Natives of nearby Lincoln County, the Marshes traveled the world before settling down in Shelbyville. The couple started out researching their own family histories and later branched out into local and regional records. They have written more than 75 books, including various genealogical, historical and reference guides. “There are so many stories to tell – the history in this area is just so rich,” Helen Marsh says. “I’m glad that we are taking time to pay tribute to our ancestors and those who built this community.” Parker agrees, stressing the significance of the bicentennial. “This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime event,” she says. “Like a lot of local families, my roots are planted firmly in Bedford County. This celebration is an opportunity for me to honor this wonderful community.”

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Delicious Destination RESTAURANTS HERE RUN THE GAMUT FROM UPSCALE EATERIES TO CASUAL CAFÉS

STORY BY JESSICA MOZO | PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN McCORD

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f dining out is your idea of a good time, you’ll never get bored in Bedford County. Restaurants here run the gamut from upscale eateries to casual, down-home cafés – and everything in between. David Hazelwood describes his fine-dining restaurant, Cortner Mill, in Normandy as “elegant country.” “It’s kind of an oxymoron,” he says with a chuckle, “but the country part is we’re out in the middle of nowhere in a rustic 1825 grist mill. The elegant part is our menu – we feature things people consider special, like quail, rack of lamb, Cornish hen, grilled duck breast and trout. And we serve with some formality – white tablecloths and cloth napkins.” Located near Wartrace on a 300-acre farm, Cortner Mill is a place Bedford County residents go to treat guests from out of town or to celebrate special occasions such as weddings, anniversaries and marriage proposals. The Hazelwood family has owned it for 15 years, though the restaurant has been open to the public since 1982. “We use a number of family recipes, and we create our own,” Hazelwood says. “For example, most people do duck a l’orange, but we don’t want to do it like everybody else. So we use a muscadine sauce instead of orange sauce.” One of Cortner Mill’s most requested dishes is lamb chops. “They’re so sweet and tender, you’d think you were eating a Popsicle,” Hazelwood says. “We grill our rack of lamb with mint and rosemary.” Cortner Mill is open by reservation only for dinner Tuesday

Bell Buckle Café is known for its down-home Southern meals. Right: The popular eatery is on Railroad Square.

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Pope’s Café in downtown Shelbyville is a local mainstay. Right: Cortner Mill in Normandy specializes in “elegant country” fare, including quail, lamb, duck and trout.

through Saturday and a champagne brunch on Sundays. Although quite different from Cortner Mill, Bell Buckle Café is another hotspot in Bedford County’s dining scene. Located on Railroad Square in the tiny historic town of Bell Buckle, Bell Buckle Café has been known to attract diners from every walk of life, including country music artists and other stars. “Our smoked grilled pork chops are really good, and we smoke our own barbecue,” says Hillary Parker, manager of Bell Buckle Café. “We also make fresh-squeezed lemonade and homemade oatmeal cake with caramel topping.” Fried biscuits with apple butter are another specialty. “They’re kind of like a donut,” Parker says. The food isn’t the only reason people flock to Bell Buckle Café. It hosts live bluegrass and country music on Friday and Saturday nights, a live radio show on Saturdays and a songwriters night on Thursdays. In Shelbyville, a number of locally owned restaurants are making names for themselves. Charleston on Main is a tearoom that serves soups, salads, sandwiches, casseroles and homemade desserts. “We’re known for our hot chicken casserole, quiches, chicken salad and congealed frozen salads,” says Barbara Smith, who owns Charleston on Main with business partner Becky Staton. They opened the tearoom eight years ago. “I love to entertain, and it was something I’d always wanted to do,” Smith says. Though the word “tearoom” often strikes fear in men at first, they enjoy Charleston on Main as much as the ladies. “Once men come in, they’re hooked,” Smith says with a laugh. Other locally owned eateries with a loyal following include Bocelli Gourmet Pizza & Pasta Shoppe, The Coffee Break, Pope’s Café and Uncle Sonny’s Bar B Que. Chain restaurants such as Legends, Chili’s and Ruby Tuesday are also plentiful in Bedford County, as well as several authentic, independently owned Hispanic restaurants. 16

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Proudly Making our “Mark” in the Shelbyville-Bedford County Community

One Sharpie Way • Shelbyville, TN 37160 • www.sanford.com

Bemis Flexible Packaging Milprint Division A proud member of the Bedford County business community since 1991.

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emis Company, Inc. is the largest flexible packaging company in North America and a major manufacturer of pressure sensitive materials used for labels, decoration and signage. Bemis common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol: BMS.

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Portfolio

Horses graze at Waterfall Farm in Shelbyville.

PHOTO BY WES ALDRIDGE

Training All the Pretty Horses PREPARING WALKING HORSES FOR THE NATIONAL CELEBRATION IS A LABOR OF LOVE

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ore than 2,000 horses and 150,000 spectators converge on Shelbyville in August for the 11-day Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration. But for the many walking horse trainers who live and work in Bedford County, preparations have been under way all year long. “You start from the day a horse is born to get them ready for the celebration,” says Bill Bobo, who has been a horse trainer since 1967 and was named the Walking Horse Trainers Association’s Trainer of the Year in 1989, 1993 and 2003. “You’ve got to really enjoy the horses because there are no holidays or vacations – it’s just all horsin’.” The Walking Horse Trainers Association is based in Shelbyville and has 700 members worldwide. BEDFORD COUNT Y

Mickey McCormick, another trainer from Shelbyville, runs McCormick Stables, a public training operation with a steady client base. He has been training horses since 1978. “I grew up around walking horses, and my dad raised colts,” McCormick says. “We’re a training facility for anybody who chooses to bring us their horses.” Training walking horses primarily involves “a lot of riding,” McCormick says. And a little luck. “They’re like any athlete – they have to have talent and the heart to do it,” he says. “If they don’t want to do it, there’s nothing you can do.” Most clients bring their horses to McCormick when the horses are 18 or 20 months old.

“Hopefully you’ll get a good twoyear-old out of the bunch to take to the show,” he says. Most trainers in Bedford County train between 30 and 40 horses at a time and have six or seven employees. “The horse industry generates several million dollars for our economy,” McCormick says. Walking horses range in price from $1,000 to more than $1 million. “A competitive show horse usually runs in the six figures,” McCormick says. Like most trainers, McCormick looks forward to the celebration when his year-round efforts count most. “Seeing all the people coming to town and getting around all the excitement and competition gets your adrenaline pumping,” he says. I M AG E S B E D F O R D C O U N T Y. C O M

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Portfolio

Painting the Town S

The art gallery at Jerry Ward’s renovated downtown building in Shelbyville

WRIGHT PAVING CONTRACTORS, INC. 372 Shelbyville Hwy. Fayetteville, TN 37334 (931) 433-7938 Fax (931) 433-5966

Driveways • Parking Lots • Free Estimates Equal Opportunity Employer

CUSTOM STONE, LLC 196 L. Fisher Rd. • Shelbyville, TN 37162 (931) 684-9133 • (931) 685-9144

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helbyville artist Jerry Ward certainly knows the art of spinning straw into gold. In 2005, he purchased a dilapidated building on the square and in one year transformed it into a classy combination art studio, gallery and living space. Ward’s ambitious project sparked interest among other Shelbyville citizens to re-energize the square. “It took six weeks just to get all the debris out of the building,” Ward says of his new residence, which formerly housed a men’s clothing store that burned. “After I bought this hole in the wall, the building next door sold, and upstairs condos started going in. Someone just had to set a precedent.” Ward’s tastefully furnished live-work space is painted in soothing greens and beiges and features simulated windows in areas where real windows don’t exist. He lives downstairs with his 81-yearold mother, and his art gallery, studio and study are upstairs overlooking the courthouse. Ward loves the location for its convenience – several restaurants and businesses are a short walk away. “I’d like to see more life on the square,” he says. “I hope other people will follow and put in mom-and-pop businesses down here. Eventually we may have a drug store and a small grocery on the square.” A Shelbyville native, Ward has been creating private commission paintings since 1963. His techniques vary from impressionism to realism and abstract, and his gallery features all three types of work. “Impressionism is my favorite, because it gives you a license to be more free,” Ward says. In 1990, Ward was commissioned to paint the First Dog, Millie, for President George Bush. Another of his paintings hangs prominently in the Bedford County Courthouse in the center of the square. “A lot has changed for the better [on the square] in the last year,” Ward says, “and 10 years from now, it will be even better.” BEDFORD COUNT Y


ugene Ray made history when he became the first black Bedford County mayor in September 2006, but making history wasn’t on his mind at the time. “I just thought about doing the best job I could and putting Christ first, my family second and the office third,” Ray says. “I had a tremendous amount of support all across Bedford County.” Ray, a native of Bedford County, began his political career by serving as county commissioner for 28 years. “My daddy was an alderman in Chicago for 20 years, so I guess I inherited it from my father,” he says. Before being elected mayor, Ray also served as president of the ShelbyvilleBedford County Chamber of Commerce and chaired the Economic Development & Tourism division and the Babe Ruth League. “About 20 years ago, they named a Shelbyville baseball field after me, and I’m real proud of that,” Ray says. Ray was approached by a group of supporters who encouraged him to run for county mayor, the highest-ranking office in the county. He hesitated at first but eventually agreed. He was elected in August 2006, becoming the first black person to be the highest elected official in their jurisdiction in all of Middle Tennessee and the second black mayor in the state. Bedford County residents are already seeing Ray’s goals come to fruition. “I ran on the platform that if I was elected, we’d pass a financial management act that would create one major accounting system for the whole county and make the county more responsible for every dollar it spends,” he says. “We passed that in November.” As chairman of the Bedford County Commission, Ray led the passage of a $44 million building program for the school system to build new schools, and he’s having inmates clean up and beautify the courthouse. “I think some of the greatest people in the world live here in Bedford County,” Ray says. “It’s a great place for kids to grow up.”

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN M C CORD

Eugene Ray: History in the Making E

Mayor Eugene Ray has a local baseball field named after him.

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Portfolio

Riding for a Cause W

Raymond Pimental leads trail rides to raise money for various charities.

World Class Automotive Supplier

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Corporate Headquarters One Calsonic Way Shelbyville, TN 37162 www.calsonic.com

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artrace resident Raymond Pimental gets teary-eyed when he talks about the charitable causes his annual equestrian Trail Rides have benefited – a set of 5-year-old twin boys who have leukemia, for example, and a single mom with two kids whose house burned down. Pimental, a Bermuda native who raises chickens for Tyson, has been organizing and leading Trail Rides on horseback through Bedford County for nine years as fundraisers for people in need. The rides take place in May and October and are open to anyone who can provide their own horse. “The first ride we did, we had 55 riders, and now we average 330 riders,” Pimental says proudly. Rides last four-and-a-half hours and begin in Wartrace. Riders travel 14.3 miles through property owned by four different families. “The trees and colors on the farms bring a lot of riders out in the fall – it’s gorgeous,” Pimental says. “We leave at 10 a.m. and ride through wide open spaces, woods, a creek and even through an old barn.” Riders break for lunch in the countryside at noon. Lunch is included in the cost of the ride, which ranges from $10 to $15 per person. “Last year we cooked 65 gallons of chili, 500 hot dogs and 750 homemade dessert squares,” Pimental says. “A bluegrass band plays, and we have about 300 horses tied up all around us. We have a super time.” One hundred percent of the proceeds from the Trail Rides go to charities such as Horse Play Inc., a nonprofit corporation that provides therapeutic riding experiences for the mentally and physically challenged, or to individuals with specific needs. Though preparing for the rides requires a lot of time and energy, Pimental doesn’t plan on stopping any time soon. “I’m going to keep doing it as long as my health lets me,” he says. BEDFORD COUNT Y


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ichard Talley has been doing bodywork on cars since he was 13, so it’s appropriate he ended up as the Auto Body Technology instructor at the Tennessee Technology Center at Shelbyville – a position he’s held for 21 years. “My uncle was a body man, and he offered me $20 a week and bought me dinner to work for him,” Talley recalls. “And that was a lot better than hauling hay.” Before becoming an instructor, Talley owned Talley’s Body Shop in Shelbyville for nearly two decades. He enjoys teaching because it allows him to share his skills and knowledge with others interested in the field. “You can teach students to accomplish certain tasks and watch them be proud of it,” Talley says. “A lot of guys go into business for themselves after they graduate, and we have students working in most of the body shops around town and in Murfreesboro.”

Eighteen students are currently enrolled in the program, which takes two years, or 2,160 hours, to complete. They learn skills such as frame repair, fiberglass and painting. “Some of the exceptional students may also want to learn custom painting, like painting flames on a car,” Talley says. Upon graduation, students receive an auto collision technology diploma. With the diploma and a few years experience, “they can make $40,000 to $60,000 a year,” Talley says. Local auto body shops often partner with the program to give students their first job experience. Some even earn credits while working at area shops. Several years ago, one of Talley’s classes restored a 1958 Chevrolet. “Current classes do upkeep and maintenance on it, and we enter it in car shows,” he says. – Stories by Jessica Mozo

PHOTOS BY BRIAN M C CORD

Repairing Cars, Building Futures

Richard Talley with a 1958 Chevrolet restored by one of his classes

Excavation Utility Construction Commercial Industrial Pre-engineered Metal Buildings Certified in Explosives Handling & Usage

Lee Adcock Construction Co., Inc. 826 North Jefferson Street • Shelbyville, TN (931) 684-1771 • Fax (931) 684-4044 • www.leeadcock.com

VIAM Tennessee in Manchester, TN

“We build our reputation from the ground up.” BEDFORD COUNT Y

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Image Gallery

Horses graze at a Shelbyville farm

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN McCORD

The Duck River at Fisherman’s Park in downtown Shelbyville

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Business

Committed to Better

CHEDDAR BEDFORD CHEESE STORE FOCUSES ON FINE PRODUCTS AND PERSONAL SERVICE

STORY BY AMY STUMPFL PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN McCORD

A

lot has changed since Joe Madeo first opened Bedford Cheese in 1984 – but not its commitment to quality. Situated just off Shelbyville’s historic downtown square, the charming shop has earned a reputation for excellence and good customer service. “We sell thousands of pounds of cheese each week, and we always want to be sure our customers are satisfied,” Madeo says. The bustling retail business offers a huge selection of fine cheese products, including everything from traditional cheddars and Swiss to Gouda, Edam and a spicy jalapeno pepper jack.

Martha and Joe Madeo own Bedford Cheese in Shelbyville.

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Top of Its Game SHELBYVILLE RANKS AMONG STATE’S TOP 25 FOR BUSINESS CLIMATE

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Bedford Cheese offers a large selection, from cheddar to spicy jalapeno jack.

Customers can also choose from a delicious assortment of locally made products, such as gourmet salsas, salad dressings, sauces, jams, jellies and even cakes. Bedford Cheese also offers a variety of specialty kitchen accessories, including precision knives, cutting boards and more. “People really seem to like the gift baskets and variety packs,” says Madeo, who graduated from the University of Tennessee with a degree in dairy production and dairy management. “We sell a lot of those around Christmastime.” A true family affair, Madeo manages the business with the help of his wife, Martha, and two of their children. “We generally employ about 14 workers, but that figure goes up during the holiday season,” he says. Madeo says the company’s Web site, BEDFORD COUNT Y

www.bedfordcheese.com, has been

instrumental in growing the business, attracting customers from as far away as Georgia and Florida. The son of a military man, Madeo says that he came to Bedford County after spending five years in the service himself. “I always say I’m not from anywhere because we lived all over the place when I was a kid. I never had a place to call home,” he says, “but I guess I do now.” When he’s not minding the shop, you’re likely to find Joe at the family’s 600-acre cattle farm in Bell Buckle. “I guess I just like to keep busy,” he says with a chuckle. With this solid work ethic and a continued commitment to quality, Bedford Cheese is sure to be busy for years to come.

hen the Tennessee Center for Policy Research announced its annual ranking of the state’s most businessfriendly communities for 2007, Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce CEO Walt Wood was delighted to see Shelbyville in the top 25. Delighted – but not surprised. “We scored well in all categories,” Wood says. “We’re thrilled by the report. It validates all the work we’ve done.” Wood credits strong local leadership with the community’s continued growth and success, citing a strong business climate and diverse industrial base. “Our local government is very supportive of our new and expanding industries,” he says. “The fact that so many longtime businesses continue to grow and expand here says a lot.” With its business-friendly tax structure and outstanding quality of life, Bedford County is home to a number of big corporate names – including Sanford, Tyson Foods, Jostens, Calsonic North America and Wal-Mart Distribution. “Our employment base has grown by more than 1,300 between January 2006 and March 2007,” Wood says. “We’ve seen strong investment in plastics, retail, call centers, manufacturing and distribution.” To address growth, the Bedford County School System has embarked on a major building program, and Bedford County Medical Center is in the midst of building a new facility at Airport Business Park. – Amy Stumpfl

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BRIAN M C CORD

Business | Biz Briefs

A catfish platter is just one of the delicious down-home dishes served up at Martins’ Sweet Aroma in Unionville.

SWEET AROMAS IN UNIONVILLE Martins’ Sweet Aroma is a new restaurant with an old-fashioned theme. The “meat and three” cafe, about 12 miles from Shelbyville in the Unionville unincorporated community, was launched by husband-and-wife team Robert and Trudy Martin in February 2007. It didn’t take long before the joint was jumpin’, Robert Martin says. “It’s like the center of universe in the middle of nowhere,” he adds with a chuckle. A full breakfast, lunch and dinner menu is available in the 1,700-squarefoot restaurant that seats about 70 people. It has already become a popular spot for locals, especially on Monday nights when entire families come out to join the fun during karaoke singa-longs. The menu at Sweet Aroma is primarily Southern comfort food. Robert 28

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Martin does much of the cooking, and he makes many items from scratch – meat loaf, white beans, pinto beans, turnip greens and cornbread. Panini sandwiches and sweet potato fries are a big hit, too. The Martins work long hours, but they say the time spent concocting traditional Southern fare is fun and rewarding. “Our motto is ‘family serving families,’” Robert Martin says. “That’s really the main thing – the family atmosphere.” SHOPPING THE SHELBYVILLE WAY Shopping at Merchant’s Walk on Main in Shelbyville is radically different from traipsing through a suburban mall with long rows of chain stores. That’s just the way Carolyn Matusek wants it. The lifelong Bedford County resident has been in business for 51 years. In 1999, she took a big step and stopped

doing business on the square in downtown Shelbyvillle and branched out with a new idea. Matusek linked two side-by-side preWorld War II homes on North Main Street and created a shopping destination that includes four businesses. One of the buildings is the family home Matusek grew up in and rented out for 30 years. She purchased the other home to make her dream come true. “I really wanted to create something truly unique and unusual,” Matusek says. The businesses at Merchant’s Walk on Main include Carolyn’s, Matusek’s clothing store; Lowery Jeweler’s, a classic jewelry store owned by Billy Lowery; The Knit Kit, owned by Francis Farrar; and Charleston on Main, a restaurant owned by Barbara Smith and Becky Staton. ‘It’s just a great setup,” says jeweler Billy Lowery. “The closest mall is 25 miles away.” BEDFORD COUNT Y


FASTEN YOUR CUFFLINKS Erick Larson is flying high. The aviator is happy about his new job flying passengers to destinations all over the country from the Shelbyville Municipal Airport, and he has totally fallen for Bedford County. The former Californian moved to he county this year to head up a branch of Executive Air Express at the Shelbyville Municipal Airport. After 25 years in the Golden State, Larson and his wife packed up and moved here with a lifetime of possessions – and 45 horses. “It’s just a fantastic place,” Larson says of his new home. Executive Air Express, which has its headquarters in Smyrna, offers travelers access to a small fleet of private planes. Whether traveling for business or personal reasons, customers can call a 24-hour customer center and let the company iron out details such as aircraft and crew, catering, ground transportation and hotel accommodations. The price structure for flights is customized. Although a chartered trip to a destination such as Destin, Fla., might sound expensive at about $3,000, that price includes room for four to six passengers and other personalized amenities. “There’s been tremendous growth in the air charter business,” Larson says. “You can be on your own timetable. You leave when you want to come back.”

the service was just terrible,” Denise Stevens says. “When you are pampering yourself, you shouldn’t ever feel you’re getting bad service.” Ashley Stevens, 23, a licensed massage therapist, offers many different therapeutic techniques – from a relaxing Swedish massage to a “hot stone” massage that uses water-heated basalt stones. Denise spends two to three hours a night researching the Internet for unique retail items to stock in the store. As a result, The White Door offers many organic products not typically found in Tennessee. CHANGING WITH THE TIMES KA Display Solutions Inc. is the new name for the former K&A Crylics Inc., a company in the Wartrace community that’s been producing customized display fixtures for retail outlets all over the country for 27 years. The family enterprise is the brainchild of Kevin and Allen Wright, two business-minded brothers with family

roots in Wartrace that go back to the turn of the century. Store displays were usually made of acrylic when K & A Crylics started in 1980, but since that time other materials have become common in the competitive market. As a result, the brothers now make display creations from other materials, too. “In manufacturing, you’d better find a niche,” Allen Wright says. “Right now, we are really advancing our abilities with metal and wood.” The company’s display devices are used at national companies including Kohl’s, LifeWay, Genesco and Target. The Wrights are both dedicated to the business, but they bring different qualities to the mix. Allen Wright says he’s the aggressive competitor and describes his brother as possessing the people skills necessary to lead important departments such as human resources. “We meet in the middle on all the major decisions,” Allen Wright says. – Linda Bryant

A RELAXING RETREAT Denise and Ashley Stevens have designed a little piece of vintage Paris in a modern strip mall in Shelbyville. For the past four years, the mother and daughter duet have been operating The White Door, a family business that combines therapeutic massage services with a retail store that offers hard-tofind spa products. The spa and store are decorated in white and blue colors and historical designs that suggest the Paris at the turn of the century. Denise, 50, says inspiration for business came from a desire to offer better customer service than the mother-daughter team had found in other places. “We’d been to several places where BEDFORD COUNT Y

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Business | Chamber Report

Chamber: Information Central QUESTIONS? THESE STAFFERS PROBABLY KNOW THE ANSWER – OR THEY’LL FIND IT

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chamber offices, and Kim Taylor and April Stout have learned to be prepared. “You never know what you’re going to find out or learn at work,” says Stout, who joined the chamber as secretary in October 2006. “It’s hard to believe the questions we get sometimes.” Taylor – an administrative assistant who’s been on staff for 10 years – and

BRIAN M C CORD

ant to know what kind of rocks can be found in Bedford County (several)? Or if there’s horse racing in the area (there isn’t)? Chances are the staff of the ShelbyvilleBedford County Chamber of Commerce will know – or can find out. The phones ring constantly at the

Chamber staff members April Stout and Kim Taylor have the answers.

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Stout wear a lot of hats. Information provider, greeter, fact-finder, research librarian, it’s all part of the job. But they say it can be a lot of fun – and a challenge. “It really depends on the time of year,” Stout says. “If we’re getting ready for the horse show celebration, people will be calling in to see about renting out their house, and others will want to know about rentals. If the holidays are coming, they’ll want to know about our mixers and other events.” The horse events in particular generate a lot of questions, which still comes as a surprise to Taylor, a lifelong area resident. “Some people want to know if we have races, and some want to know just exactly what a horse show is,” she says. “I’ve heard just about everything you could hear about horses.” When she began at the chamber in the mid-1990s, the Internet was only available on one computer, and the chamber was in the early stages of getting its Web site up and running. Now, looking back, Taylor says she doesn’t know how her predecessors ever handled the requests. “There are so many questions asked of us that we refer to the Internet for information, and some of it is really off the wall,” she says. Whatever the question, however, Taylor and Stout remain firm in their commitment to find an answer – even if it takes a while. “We don’t ever want to tell people we don’t know,” Taylor says. “We’ll get their name and number, and it may take all day, but we’ll eventually find the answer they’re looking for.” As the area and the chamber grow in size, the queries will continue to come in. But whether it’s referring someone to a member business or helping out a Realtor who’s looking for available commercial property, the chamber staff can handle it. “We work together here, so if we really get overrun we can help each other out,” Taylor says. – Joe Morris BEDFORD COUNT Y


Business | Economic Profile

BEDFORD COUNTY BUSINESS CLIMATE Bedford County boasts a strong and qualified workforce, filling more than 4,000 manufacturing and related jobs.

or book value of property owned or used in Tennessee Unemployment tax New employers, 2.7% of first $7,000

TRANSPORTATION Airports Shelbyville Municipal Airport (931) 684-1669 Nashville International Airport (615) 275-1675 Railroads Walking Horse & Eastern Railroad (931) 684-6368 Ports Nashville is the nearest port facility, 55 miles Cumberland River

DISTANCE TO OTHER CITIES

INCOME Per Capita Personal Income $22,931 (2002) Estimated Household Income (2002) $25,000-$34,999 13.65% of households $35,000-$49,999 17.12% of households $50,000-$74,999 21.18% of households $75,000-$99,999 8.32% of households $100,000-$149,999 4.32% of households

HOUSING UNITS (2005) Murfreesboro, Tenn., 25 miles Nashville, Tenn., 58 miles Chattanooga, Tenn., 75 miles Huntsville, Ala., 50 miles

TAXES Property tax (per $100 assessed property value) City, $1.41 County, $2.27 Local sales tax, 2.75% State sales tax, 7% (6% on food for human consumption) Income tax Tennessee has no personal income tax. There is a 6% income tax on interest and dividends.

16,505

LABOR MARKET (2006) Civilian Labor Force 22,000 Employment, 20,560 Unemployment, 5.2% Labor Market Area Civilian Labor Force, 111,810 Employment, 104,090 Unemployment, 6.8%

RETAIL TRADE (2003) Apparel and Accessories Shops, $3,957,146 Automotive Dealerships $79,139,832

Corporate excise tax 6.5% on net earnings

Automotive and Home Supply Stores $7,068,085

Franchise tax 25 cents per $100 net worth

Eating and Drinking $26,351,356

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Food Stores, $69,093,544 Furniture and Home Furnishings, $7,559,667 Home Appliance, Radio & TV Stores $4,574,554 Gasoline Service Stations $18,940,806 General Merchandise $28,055,830 Department Stores $23,584,676 Hardware, Lumber and Garden Stores $19,985,898

MAJOR EMPLOYERS Company

Number of Employees

Tyson Foods Calsonic North America

1,200 879

Sanford LP

900

Jostens Inc.

590

National Pen Corp.

500

Wal-Mart Distribution Center

425

Alcan Packaging Inc.

300

Nationwide Express

250

Bemis Custom Products 225 Corsicana Bedding Inc.

192

FOR MORE INFORMATION Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce 100 N. Cannon Blvd. Shelbyville, TN 37160 Phone: (931) 684-3482, (888) 662-2525 Fax: (931) 684-3483 www.shelbyvilletn.com bedfordchamber@bellsouth.net

Sources: www.shelbyvilletn.com

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Education

Renovations to Shelbyville Central High School include new classrooms, an expanded library, an enlarged cafeteria and a new theater.

Paving the Way for Progress SCHOOL SYSTEM IS BUILDING, RENOVATING TO MEET BURGEONING STUDENT POPULATION

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hen they say the Bedford County school system is building for the future, they’re not kidding. As part of the county’s 10-year master plan, the system is in the first phase of a large-scale building and renovation program. The system has been experiencing overcrowding due to the area’s booming population, and the expansions are meant to handle that growth as well as what’s expected in the coming years, says Superintendent Ed Gray. “Our enrollment has grown by 26 percent over the last five years,” Gray says. “People are moving here from Williamson and Rutherford counties, as well as other places. We’ve got a tremendous school board and county commission, though, and they saw what was happening and funded this building program.” The first phase of the $44 million program will include renovations at the 30-year-old Shelbyville Central High School, which was built for 750 students and has a current enrollment of closer to 1,500. The school is getting new classrooms, an expanded library, enlarged cafeteria and a new theater, which will be available for community activities as well as school functions. The enhancements, which are being constructed while the building is being used, are set for completion in 2008. In addition, a new K-5 elementary school is on the books, as well as a new high school in nearby Unionville. They are scheduled to open in 2009.

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Phase two of the ambitious effort will include a new high school near the cities of Wartrace and Bell Buckle, and elementary schools in the county’s north and south regions. Along with the new buildings, current schools are being expanded wherever possible. The new schools also are being designed with an eye toward expansion, should the populations in their service areas dictate the need. At Shelbyville Central High, the renovations were a chance to take a stillserviceable building and breathe new life into it, Gray says. “We estimated that the school has about $5 million in existing athletic facilities on the property, so we certainly weren’t going to walk away from that,” he says. “The renovation gives us a chance to make it better, like adding the theater and turning the old auditorium into a band room with existing practice rooms.” For Gray, a native who’s been with the school system for 22 years, the changes are both exciting and challenging. “The projections are that this phenomenal growth will keep up,” he says. “Two different studies said that we would eventually need 11 schools, so that’s what the plan is. What has really impressed me throughout this process is that how well the school board and county commission have done all this – it really shows what you can do when you’re working together, and for us that’s been extremely important. Both of these bodies have shown a lot of foresight.” – Joe Morris I M AG E S B E D F O R D C O U N T Y. C O M

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BEDFORD COUNTY NURSING HOME “Caring People Touching Lives” SERVICES I NCLUDE • Skilled & Intermediate Care • Dually Certified Medicare/ Medicaid Beds • Speech, Occupational & Physical Therapy • 24-hour Nursing Care • Private Pay Rates Available • Private Insurance Accepted

Wayne Schumann, Administrator and resident Frances Lynn

680-2300 www.bcnhtn.org

Segroves Nelson Real Estate 202 Lane Parkway Shelbyville, Tennessee 37160

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835 Union Street • Shelbyville, TN 37160

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Arts & Culture

A Spotlight on Local Talent ARTS CENTER IN SHELBYVILLE SOARS WITH VISUAL AND PERFORMING ART OFFERINGS

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each year from March through May.” For visual art enthusiasts, the center offers a youth art camp every summer for students in grades one-six. Campers learn the concepts of drawing, painting, print-making, clay sculpting and craft-making. Meanwhile, the well-attended weekly art classes for adults convene every Thursday at 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. “We also feature exhibits in our gallery each month that showcase regional artists,” Cole says. A large art project in the works – to be displayed inside the Fly when finished – is a 7-foot mosaic statue honoring the women of Bedford County. The statue is the work of Bell Buckle artist Sherri Warner Hunter, and the unveiling is scheduled for early 2008. The statue will be a three-sided image of a woman, with the sides representing vision, action and prayer. The base of the statue will be a mosaic including real artifacts from Bedford County women, past and present. “For example, somebody’s aunt might have loved to crochet, so one of the aunt’s knitting needles would be attached to the base,” Cole says. “It’s an interesting project that the center is excited about, especially since the statue will forever be on exhibit here at the Fly.” Find a full schedule of the Fly’s events and classes at www.flyculturalartscenter.com. – Kevin Litwin

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he classic play To Kill a Mockingbird will be staged in October 2007, and a dinner theater presentation of Smoke on the Mountain will debut in late November. And so much more is taking place these days at the Fly Arts Center, which is home to the Bedford County Arts Council. The Shelbyville-based council had only a handful of members when it formed 25 years ago, and today the performing arts group has grown to 150 members. In addition, hundreds of non-members from Bedford County and beyond participate in the organization’s numerous artistic offerings, which include youth theater summer camps and Thursday evening art classes for adults. “The Bedford County Arts Council is headquartered in the former Fly Manufacturing Co. building that is now called the Fly Art Center – or affectionately known as the Fly,” says Janice Cole, center director. “The building features a theater that seats 120, as well an art studio for classes and exhibits. It’s nice to see that the arts are alive here in Bedford County.” On the performing arts side, the council schedules four adult plays and two children’s plays each season. “For our younger audiences, in July 2007 we put together a play called Do-Wop Little Red Riding Hood for children in grades one-six, and in August 2007, we did the play Godspell for grades seven-12,” Cole says. “The Fly also hosts an acoustic concert series with four performances

Kayden Fletcher, 6, watches Emily Crabtree, 7, draw during an art class at the Fly Arts Center.

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Health & Wellness

Committed to Healthy Growth NEW HOSPITAL WILL OFFER IMPROVED SERVICES AND SUPPORT TO THE COMMUNITY

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ealth-care options in Bedford County are about to get even better, thanks to a brand-new hospital set to open in late summer 2008. Bedford County Medical Center broke ground in April 2007 on the $35 million, 100,000-square-foot facility, which will not only modernize the current hospital’s offerings but also allow for future growth, says Bill Macri, chief executive officer. “Our hospital has done well for the community, but it’s on its last legs,” he says of the existing 50-year-old structure. “We’ve gone as far as we can go here. The cost of renovating this building to bring it up to modern standards and codes would have been between 60 percent and 70 percent of the price of a new building. And we’d still have the same issues in terms of patient flow though the system, so it just didn’t make any sense.” The new hospital will be a bit larger than the current one but will drop from a 120-bed complement to around 60, reflecting an overall trend toward larger, private rooms and more outpatient treatment. The emergency area will double in size. “This building enhances what we’re doing, rather than

Building for the Future

offering a lot of major new services,” Macri says. “The new building will lend itself to accommodating more physicians and more specialties, and that’s something we’ve desperately needed here. Our old facility has made it difficult for us to recruit new physicians and employees, because it’s been a difficult environment to work in.” The new building also has been designed for expansion, and it will be able to go up and out as the need arises. “We’re not building new just to have new,” Macri says. “This was something the county commission recognized a need for a few years back. They realized we couldn’t continue to provide all the services we needed to in this building, so they selected Community Health Systems in 2005 to come in because the company committed to purchasing the existing building and building a new hospital.” The community had long been advocating for upgraded facilities, Macri says, so there’s no small amount of buzz around the area as the earthmovers roll onto the site. The hospital is being built on U.S. Highway 231 in the Airport Business Park, and new business already is finding its way there. First Community Bank is building a new branch nearby, and Harts Chapel Nissan already has relocated to the area. “Now that we’ve actually broken ground, and you can see that construction is going on, there’s a lot of excitement,” Macri says. “The community is very much interested in seeing this new facility, and I think they’ll be very proud of it.” – Joe Morris

With the construction of Bedford County Medical Center’s new facility underway, our commitment to the community is growing stronger than ever. And with our Grand Opening in 2008, we will be even better equipped to offer you the care you deserve – right

BRIAN M C CORD

here at home.

845 Union Street • 931-685-5433 • www.bcmctn.com

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Bedford County Medical Center is getting a new facility.

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Going Above and Beyond ‘HEALTHY WOMAN’ INFORMS, SUPPORTS

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s it prepares to move into a new building, Bedford County Medical Center is expanding its community outreach. One new effort that’s already quite popular is Healthy Woman, a comprehensive series of lectures, meetings and other events designed to help women meet today’s challenges and issues. Launched in early 2007, the program has caught on quickly, says Bill Macri, chief executive officer of BCMC. “We actually have two programs that are somewhat similar in terms of their presentation and focus,” he says. “One is Senior Circle, which we started in 2006. It focuses on people 55 and older who are nearing retirement or retired. Healthy Woman is designed to focus on women and the unique challenges they face in today’s society. What we’ve found is that a lot of women make health decisions for the entire family, so we wanted to provide information for them to help make those decisions.” Monthly health seminars and other events, along with regular e-mails, touch on topics ranging from women’s medical services to financial planning and other issues that affect women and their families. So far, about 200 women have signed up, and between 50 and 75 are attending the monthly sessions. The program’s popularity isn’t a surprise to Macri, who says it’s just one of many ways the hospital wants to start being more proactive in the community. – Joe Morris

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Look, a tall purple rectangle! OUR WORK ENVIRONMENT AND OUR EMPLOYEES

make t he difference!

Helping to celebrate important moments in people’s lives ... JOSTENS Graduation Products 1401 Union Street Shelbyville, TN 37160

When you talk to your child you build vocabulary, so everyday moments become learning moments. For more tips, visit bornlearning.org (931) 685-6500 • www.jostens.com

announcements • diplomas • accessories

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Sports & Recreation

A Little Bit of Angling Heaven DURING SUMMERTIME, THE RAINBOW TROUT FISHIN’ IS EASY ON THE DUCK RIVER

F

part to the efforts of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. The TWRA operates the Normandy Fish Hatchery and raises 12 species of fish – including rainbow trout and brown trout – then stocks rivers, lakes and reservoirs throughout Tennessee. “The Duck River below Normandy

ANTONY BOSHIER

ishing for rainbow trout on the Duck River, especially from May through July, can be a little bit of angling heaven for any outdoor enthusiast. Trout catches exceed most other fish catches on the Duck below Normandy Dam in Bedford County, thanks in large

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency helps stock the Duck with trout.

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Dam is great for trout fishing. I often wade the river in May, June and July because the water is so great,” says Walt Wood, an avid fisherman and CEO of the Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce. “I like to fly fish as well as use spinnerbaits, and I usually do pretty well with both.” There are numerous spots to fish the river in Bedford County, including within the community of Normandy itself. “You can park near the bridge in Normandy, then walk on a path along the river toward the dam, and there are all sorts of places to fish off that path,” Wood says. “Another good place to fish is near Cortner Mill. It’s ideal for catching trout, and perfect for wading.” Wood adds that the Duck is a little warmer than the other rivers that are stocked by the TWRA. “At the hatchery, the TWRA gets the trout accustomed to warmer water before they are released into the Duck, which makes for an ideal all-around situation for them to thrive,” he says. “I personally just like to catch and release the trout so they can come back again for another fisherman. I just enjoy the sport, and there is nowhere better than the Duck to practice it.” Wood says fishing by canoe along the river is also becoming more popular. “Canoeing offers good opportunities to catch trout, since a canoe allows a fisherman to access some of the best places on the river where the fish congregate,” he says. “There are several known access points along the Duck that are known as hot spots for trout, but you can only get to those points by canoe or small boat.” According to the TWRA, still-fishing with live bait is the most popular method to catch trout along the Duck River, followed by fly fishing as well as spin-fishing with artificial lures. “Honestly, trout fishing along the Duck River is a beautiful experience,” Wood says. “It is relaxing and challenging. I wish I was out there right now.” – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S B E D F O R D C O U N T Y. C O M

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FIRST COMMUNITY BANK of Bedford County Relocating to Bedford County? We can make establishing a banking relationship quick and easy.

207 Elm St. Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-5800 www.firstcommunitybanker.com

Visit Our Advertisers Argie Cooper Public Library www.acolibrary.com Ascend Credit Union www.ascendfcu.org Barr’s Inc. www.barrsfurniture.com Bedford Cheese www.bedfordcheese.com Bedford County www.bedfordcountytn.org Bedford County Medical Center www.bcmctn.com Bedford County Nursing Home

Community Minded™ Just like you

Bedford County Utility District www.bcud.net Bemis Custom Products www.bemis.com Bob Parks Realty www.bobparks.com Calsonic Kansei www.calsonic.com City of Shelbyville www.shelbyvilletn.org

If you’re looking for a banking relationship to last a lifetime, take a close look at all we have to offer. You’ll like what you see.

Clanton Paving Co. LLC Coldwell Banker www.diannearnold.com Country Hearth Inn www.countryhearth.com Craig and Wheeler Realty and Auction Co. www.craigwheeler.com Duck River Electric Membership Corp. www.dremc.com First Community Bank www.firstcommunitybanker.com Governor’s Books From Birth Foundation www.governorsfoundation.org

questions

answers

Jostens www.jostens.com Landers Tires Lee Adcock Construction www.leeadcock.com M & L Greenhouse Motlow State Community College www.mscc.edu National Pen Corp. www.nationalpen.com Riverbend Country Club Sanford Brands www.sanfordcorp.com State Farm Insurance www.statefarm.com Stor-N-Lock

©2002 American Cancer Society, Inc.

Tennessee Technology Center Vulcan Materials www.vulcanmaterials.com Wal-Mart www.walmart.com Webb School www.thewebbschool.com

8 0 0 . A C S . 2 3 4 5 / c a n c e r. o r g

Webbmason www.webbmason.com Winnett Associates PLLC www.winnettcpa.com Wright Paving Contractors

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Community Profile

BEDFORD COUNTY SNAPSHOT Shelbyville and Bedford County are home to the world-famous Tennessee Walking Horses. The Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration has been held every September for more than half a century. The 11-day event draws more than a quarter-million visitors to the region.

EDUCATION Bedford County Department of Education, 684-3284 www.bedfordk12tn.com Elementary Schools Cascade Elementary (K-5) 389-0031 Community Elementary (K-6) 294-2434 Eakin Primary (K-3)684-7852 Eastside Primary (K-3) 684-7112 Liberty School (K-8) 684-7809 Southside Elementary (K-3) 684-7545

Shelbyville Central High School (9-12), 684-5672

Annual average precipitation 56.73 inches

Other Schools

Annual average snowfall 4.8 inches

Adult Learning Center 684-8635 Alternative School, 685-1911 Bedford County Vocational School, 684-1889 Webb School (private, 6-12) 389-9322 Higher Education Middle Tennessee State University (615) 898-2300 Motlow State Community College, (800) 654-4877 Tennessee Technology Center at Shelbyville, 685-5013

Thomas Intermediate School (4-5), 684-6818

CLIMATE

Middle School Harris Middle School (6-8) 684-5195

Annual average temperature 59.2 degrees

High Schools Cascade School (9-12) 389-9389 Community High School (7-12) 294-5125

Monthly average low temperature (January) 29 degrees Monthly average high temperature (July) 89 degrees

UTILITIES Electricity Shelbyville Power System (city), 684-7171 Tennessee Valley Authority (county-source) Duck River Electric Membership Corp. (county-local distributor) 684-4621 Gas Atmos Energy, (615) 890-6749 Bedford County Utility District, 684-1667 Telephone AT&T, (888) 757-6500 Water Shelbyville Water System 684-7171 Bedford County Utility District 684-1667 or 294-5117 THIS SECTION IS SPONSORED BY

The area code for Bedford County is 931.

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WINNETT

Associates, PLLC

www.bobparks.com

www.bobparksauction.com

Professional Service with a Personal Touch 605 Delray St. Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 685-2010 Fax: (931) 680-0537

Certified Public Accountants and Consultants

514 Elm St., P.O. Box 745 Shelbyville, TN 37162 (931) 684-7142 Fax (931) 680-2954 admin@winnettcpa.com www.winnettcpa.com

www.acolibrary.com 100 S. Main St. • Shelbyville, TN 37160 • (931) 684-7323

Bedford County Utility District

“Since 1973”

Proud to support the Shelbyville-Bedford County community Serving over 6,300 customers water & natural gas 214 Bethany Lane • P.O. Box 2755 Shelbyville, TN 37162 (931) 684-1667 • www.bcud.net

www.craigwheeler.com 508 Cannon Blvd. • Shelbyville, TN 37160 •

Brakes Front-End Alignment Mufflers JASON ADREON

LANDERS TIRE 401 S. Cannon Blvd. • Shelbyville, TN 37160

(931) 684-4743 • (931) 684-TIRE Fax: (931) 684-0380

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Sales Representative • Shelbyville Location

VULCAN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS, LP 1683 Railroad Ave. • Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 680-9385 • CELL (615) 210-5313 FAX (615) 399-0167 adreonj@vmcmail.com www.vulcanmaterials.com

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Community Profile MEDIA Newspapers Shelbyville Times-Gazette (Monday-Friday and Sunday)

Bedford County Medical Center, Wartrace Clinic 507 Blackman Boulevard West Wartrace 37183 389-0600 www.bcmctn.com

684-1200 The Tennessean

NUMBERS TO KNOW

(Nashville-daily) Argie Cooper Public Library 684-7323

(615) 254-5661 (800) 342-8237 Radio Stations WZNG (1400 AM) WLIJ (1580 AM)

MEDICAL FACILITIES Bedford County

Bedford County Medical Center, 685-5433 Bedford County Sheriff’s Department (emergencies only) 684-1530 (non-emergency), 684-3232 Assessor of Property 684-6390

Medical Center 845 Union Street 685-5433

Bell Buckle Town Hall 389-9513

www.bcmctn.com

Clerk & Master, 684-1672

Shelbyville 37160

County Clerk 684-1921 County Mayor, 684-7944 County Trustee, 684-4303 Election Commission 684-0531 H.V. Griffin Parks & Recreation Center 684-9780 Register of Deeds 684-5719 Shelbyville City Hall 684-2691 Shelbyville Fire (non-emergency), 684-6241 (fires only), 911 Shelbyville Municipal Airport, 684-1669 Shelbyville Police (non-emergency) 684-5811 Wartrace Town Hall 389-6144

Much of downtown Wartrace is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places.

The area code for Bedford County is 931.

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Community Profile WEBB SCHOOL ART & CRAFT FESTIVAL

AUGUST

ANNUAL EVENTS

Bell Buckle Beautiful fall scenery is the backdrop of this juried art and craft show, which features photography, clay, wood, metal, iron works, jewelry, paintings baskets, glass and fiber works.

TENNESSEE WALKING HORSE NATIONAL CELEBRATION Shelbyville

JUNE RC/MOON PIE FESTIVAL Historic Bell Buckle The RC and Moon Pie Festival brings together two Southern staples – Moon Pies and RC Colas. A 10-mile run kicks off the festivities. The day continues with games, contests, a parade, coronation of an RC King and Moon Pie Queen, arts and craft booths, cloggers, country and bluegrass music. Don’t forget to try a deep-fried Moon Pie at one of the food booths. The day concludes with the cutting and serving of the World’s Largest Moon Pie.

The Tennessee Walking Horse National Celebration takes place each year during the 11 days and nights prior to Labor Day. It’s the premier event for the Tennessee Walking Horse. During the event, the breed’s World Grand Champion and some 20 World Champions are named.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Shelbyville-Bedford County Chamber of Commerce 100 N. Cannon Blvd. Shelbyville, TN 37160 Phone: 684-3482, (888) 662-2525 Fax: 684-3483 bedfordchamber@bellsouth.net www.shelbyvilletn.com

WARTRACE MUSICFEST Wartrace The popular Wartrace MusicFest takes place the first weekend in June, featuring plenty of live music, arts-andcrafts vendors, concessions and much more. Proceeds go back into the Wartrace community for special projects, including park improvements and downtown enhancements.

DISTRIBUTION CENTER #6062 Here at Wal-Mart Distribution Center #6062, “Our associates make the difference for our stores and our community.”

Sources: www.shelbyvilletn.com www.census.gov www.bedfordcountytn.org

Education for Life! w w w.mscc.edu

A TBR Institution

A teaching and learning communit y

Wal-Mart Distribution Center #6062 services 92 Wal-Mart Supercenters and Neighborhood Markets throughout Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama and Georgia. This past year the Distribution Center processed over 42 million cases of freight and shipped 24,173 trailers, traveling 6.3 million miles. Our associates contribute to many charitable organizations in Shelbyville and other areas throughout Bedford County.

Moore Count y Campus 393 -1520

285 Frank Martin Rd. • Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 680-3462 • Fax (931) 680-3404

M&L

GR EENHOUSE – LORAINE SUTTON –

199 Benford Rd. Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-5850

Serving Bedford County since 1979 111 DEERY ST. • SHELBYVILLE, TN 37160 (931) 684-5422

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Retail greenhouse & nursery | Landscape services | Deliveries to hospitals & funeral homes | Plants grown locally

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Welcome to Shelbyville and Bedford County

The Walking Horse Capital of the World. H OME

OF THE

Š 2004 Sharpie is a registered trademark of Sanford LLP

City of Shelbyville 201 N. Spring St. Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-2691

Bedford County Public Square Shelbyville, TN 37160 (931) 684-7944



Images Bedford County, TN: 2007-08