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2010 | IMAGESBARTLETT.COM 2010 IMAGESBARTLETT.COM ®

What’s s e Online Video of historic Davies Manor Plantation

BARTLETT AND NORTHEAST SHELBY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

DOWN AT THE STATION Improvements energize historic commercial district

VIEW FROM THE TOP Public schools rank among best in state

Relax and Stay Awhile Bartlett emerges as hospitality center of the Midsouth

SPONSORED BY THE BARTLETT AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


imagesbartlett.com THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

2010 EDITION | VOLUME 5 ®

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What’s On Online nl BARTLET T AN D NORTH E AST S H E LBY COU NT Y, TE N N E SS E E

th anniversary issue

PICTURE PERFECT We’ve added even more of our prize-winning photography to the online gallery. To see these photos, click on Photo Gallery.

CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S 6 RELAX AND STAY AWHILE

RELOCATION

Bartlett emerges as the hospitality center of the Midsouth. Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

FACTS & STATS Go online to learn even more about: • Schools

10 DOWN AT THE STATION Improvements energize Bartlett’s historic commercial district.

27 VIEW FROM THE TOP Shelby County public schools rank among the state’s best.

D E PA R TM E NT S 2 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Bartlett and Northeast

• Health care

Shelby County’s culture

• Utilities • Parks

15 Local Flavor

• Taxes

16 Portfolio: people, places and events that define

Images Bartlett and Northeast Shelby County, Tennessee is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com.

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce 2969 Elmore Park Rd. • Bartlett, TN 38134 Phone: (901) 372-9457 • Fax: (901) 372-9488 www.bartlettchamber.org VISIT IMAGES BARTLETT AND NORTHEAST SHELBY COUNTY, TENNESSEE ONLINE AT IMAGESBARTLETT.COM ©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

20 Business Feature 23 Chamber Report 24 Biz Briefs 26 Economic Profile 28 Sports & Recreation 29 Health & Wellness 30 Arts & Culture 31 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

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Member Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce EDITOR REBECCA DENTON ON THE COVER CUPOLA ATOP BARTLETT PUBLIC LIBRARY PHOTO BY J. KYLE KEENER

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Bartlett and Northeast Shelby County’s

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Almanac

Always Something To Celebrate Opportunities for free family fun abound in Bartlett and Northeast Shelby County. The annual Bartlett Festival & Car Show is a favorite event in September featuring carnival rides, a classic car show, hot air balloons, live music, concessions and more at W.J. Freeman Park. Nearby Arlington celebrates its small-town friendliness with Arlington in April – a popular event traditionally held the last weekend of April in the downtown Depot Square area. Sponsored by the Arlington Women’s Club, activities include live bluegrass‚ craft booths‚ children’s games and more. Also in the spring is the Pickin’ Picnic Bluegrass Festival at the Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center, produced in cooperation with The Lucy Opry. The twoday festival features free outdoor music.

Made in the Shade

Making the Grade Getting a college degree is more convenient than ever at Southwest Tennessee Community College, which offers an array of degree and certificate programs, noncredit and continuing education courses at its eight area campuses – not to mention the ongoing workshops and seminars of interest to the community. The college also works to meet employment needs by communicating with local business leaders and developing new and evolving areas of study, including programs in biosciences, allied health, business and technologies. Recent developments include more online courses, educational opportunities for unemployed workers, and expanded weekend and evening programs. Visit www.southwest.tn.edu for more information.

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Bartlett is a community that values its trees, and the city has the national recognition to prove it. For the second year in a row, the Arbor Day Foundation has named Bartlett a Tree City USA community for its commitment to “community forestry.” In a nutshell, this means Bartlett meets four standards: having a tree board or department, a tree care ordinance, a comprehensive community forestry program and an Arbor Day observance. The abundance of healthy trees also makes Bartlett more beautiful. Visit www.arborday.org for more information about the program.

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Sign Me Up A wide range of classes and activities at the Singleton Community Center in Bartlett provide education, exercise, enrichment and a whole lot of fun for the young and the young-at-heart. Dance classes – tap, ballet, hip hop, clogging, line dancing, belly dancing and more – are hugely popular, and so are the visual arts, which range from preschool classes to drawing and painting lessons for adults. Music lessons and martial arts classes such as karate and Kendo, the art of Japanese fencing, are also available. Preschool programs, summer mini-camps, exercise programs and classes – including drivers’ education, financial planning, literature for children and more – are just a sampling of the many offerings. Visit www.cityofbartlett.org for more information.

Feeding the Nation Agribusiness – or the production, processing and distribution of food products – plays a major role in the prosperity of the Bartlett area. In fact, the Northeast Shelby County corridor is home to some major players in the agribusiness industry, including Kraft Foods, ACH Food Companies Inc. and Stratas Foods – a joint venture of ACH and ADM, with sales of more than $1 billion. Kraft Food Ingredients in Bartlett is one of Kraft’s main R&D facilities, and ACH – best known for its brands Fleischman’s Yeast, Mazola and Old Tyme – is headquartered in the Bartlett area. Brim’s Snack Foods, one of the country’s leading producers of pork rinds, also calls the Bartlett area home. Rich’s Foods, distributed by AmeriCold Logistics, is yet another processor with a major presence here.

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Fast Facts Q Money magazine recently named Bartlett among the Top 100 Best Places to Live in America, and Sports Illustrated has named Bartlett among the Best Sports Towns in the United States. Q Bartlett opened a $3.7 million, 20,000-squarefoot library in 2008. Q The city was known as Union Depot before it incorporated as Bartlett in 1866. It was the last major way station along the stagecoach route westward from Nashville. Q Golfers can choose from Quail Ridge Golf Course in Bartlett, Stonebridge Golf Club in Lakeland, and the newly opened, LEED-certified Mirimichi Lakes golf course near Millington. Q Stanky Creek trails in Bartlett's Nesbit Park are some of the best mountain biking trails in west Tennessee.

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CITY OF BARTLETT A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE, WORK, RAISE A FAMILY AND RETIRE

MAYOR A. KEITH MCDONALD BOARD OF ALDERMEN W.C. (Bubba) Pleasant | Emily Elliott | David Parsons | Bobby Simmons | Jack Young | John Barzano

City of Bartlett | 6400 Stage Rd. | Bartlett, TN 38134 | (901) 385-6400 | www.cityofbartlett.org

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Almanac

High Tee Golfers in Shelby County can take their pick of stellar courses. Quail Ridge Golf Course in Bartlett is a par-70 championship course that stands out for its rolling terrain. Stonebridge Golf Club in Lakeland is a par-71 championship course designed by George Cobb, architect of Augusta National’s famed par-3 mini-course. Yet another championship course is Colonial Country Club. Located in Cordova, it boasts two courses, an Olympic-sized swimming pool and six tennis courts. Both of Colonial Country Club’s golf courses were designed by Joe Finger.

Bartlett At A Glance Bartlett POPULATION Bartlett: 50,034 Northeast Shelby County: 245,000

BEGINNINGS Bartlett was named for Major Gabriel M. Bartlett, a wealthy businessman and one of the largest landowners in the area during the mid-1800s. The town was incorporated in 1866. FOR MORE INFORMATION Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce 2969 Elmore Park Road Bartlett, TN 38134 Phone: (901) 372-9457 Fax: (901) 372-9488 www.bartlettchamber.org

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Mason Bra ARK ANS AS

LOCATION Bartlett is in southwest Tennessee, adjacent to Memphis and 25 miles east of the Mississippi River. It is the geographic center of Shelby County.

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What’s Online e Take a virtual tour of Bartlett, courtesy of our award-winning photographers, at imagesbartlett.com.

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Relax

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What’s Online e Take a virtual tour of the historic Davies Manor in our quick video. Visit imagesbartlett.com.

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Awhile BARTLETT EMERGES AS MIDSOUTH’S HOSPITALITY HUB

STORY BY JESSICA MOZO PHOTOGRAPHY BY J. KYLE KEENER

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he South has long been synonymous with hospitality, and Bartlett makes it easy to understand why. Stretching for more than 15 miles along busy Interstate 40, Bartlett and Northeast Shelby County are home to the highest concentration of hotels and motels, restaurants, entertainment and shopping venues in the Midsouth. Visitors often use the Bartlett area as a home base for exploring the region, including Memphis. “Bartlett is a great destination for those who want to relax and enjoy the many small-town community and family events the city has to offer,” says Kim Taylor, city planner for the city of Bartlett. “One of the great things about visiting Bartlett is that it’s located in the

Municipal Center Park, with a tree-lined, half-mile walking trail, is among the city’s 29 public parks.

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“Bartlett has coined the phrase that the city is a ‘great place to live, work, raise a family and retire.’” center of Shelby County, within minutes of everything that attracts visitors to West Tennessee. So you can relax in Bartlett, enjoy its quaint restaurants and shop in the Bartlett Station Town Area, or you can venture to Memphis to shop at the regional mall or visit national attractions.” But you don’t have to leave Bartlett to find great entertainment. The city and surrounding area offer hiking and camping, water recreation, nightclubs, music heritage, museums, Civil War history, sports and casinos. One popular family attraction is Bartlett Lanes bowling alley, recently voted the No. 1 Family Fun Place in Bartlett by Commercial Appeal readers. “In today’s economy more than ever, families are looking for inexpensive ways to entertain themselves,” says Robert Luckett, general manager of Bartlett Lanes. “Bowling is a year-round activity that’s inexpensive and can become a lifetime sport. We have youth programs, cosmic bowling, birthday parties, a snack bar, full-service cocktail lounge and game room. Some of our league bowlers come from as far as Dyersburg.” Bartlett Lanes has been part of the community since 1975. Luckett has been working there for 15 years. “I’ve gotten to know so many people, and it’s really fun to see people enjoy themselves,” he says. “I graduated from Bartlett High School and grew up here, and I love Bartlett’s small-town feel.” With so many positive qualities, it’s not surprising CNN’s Money magazine

listed Bartlett among the 100 Best Places to Live in 2007. In 2003, Sports Illustrated named Bartlett the No. 1 sports town in Tennessee for its overall attention to sports and recreation. The city boasts 29 parks, including the 350-acre Nesbit Park – a haven for birders, hikers, nature-lovers and mountain bikers. It’s also a short drive from Shelby Farms, one of the nation’s largest urban parks with 4,500 acres of open fields and hardwood forests. “Bartlett also offers a variety of community festivals, children’s plays and community theater featuring nationally recognized entertainers,” Taylor says. “The Bartlett Festival and Car Show, the Catfish and Jazz Festival, the Fourth of July Fireworks Extravaganza and the Pickin’ Picnic Spring Bluegrass Festival are just a few of the popular events.” With a growing population of 50,000 residents, Bartlett is geographically extending its boundaries with 17 square miles of reserve area to add to its existing 27 square miles of incorporated land. The city is also developing its medical industry with the expansion of the Saint Francis Hospital – Bartlett campus as well as other new medical offices. Despite its growth, don’t look for Bartlett to lose its appeal and devotion to hospitality any time soon. “Bartlett has coined the phrase that the city is a ‘great place to live, work, raise a family and retire,’” Taylor says. “Those who live in Bartlett know it’s true.”

Clockwise from top: Bartlett Lanes features cosmic bowling five nights a week; musician Richard Johnston plays on Beale Street in Memphis; Rudy Williams, known as the “Mayor of Beale Street,” performs in Memphis.

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Down at the

Station IMPROVEMENTS ENERGIZE CITY’S HISTORIC COMMERCIAL DISTRICT

STORY BY CAROL COWAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY J. KYLE KEENER

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ochelle McMahan, who owns The Busy Bakery with members of her family, absolutely loves her location on Stage Road in the heart of historic Bartlett Station. McMahan learned to bake as a girl at her mother’s side, and for years she and her mother would drive by the storefront with the big picture window that her bakery now occupies. “My mom would say, ‘That’s a cute place. It would make a good bakery,’” McMahan recalls. She and her family baked professionally from their homes, but business was growing and they needed more space. “Then the place came open,” McMahan says. “Before she died, my mom encouraged us to get the bakery. We opened in November 2008, and we’re getting busier and busier. We love this little shopping center. We feel safe here. And everyone’s been so helpful – the chamber, the city – everybody’s friendly here in Bartlett.” The Busy Bakery illustrates how Bartlett Station – once a

stop along the stagecoach route and later the rail line – is gradually transforming into a bustling, pedestrian-friendly city center with character that reflects the community’s roots. “The city has made a substantial commitment to keep this older commercial area from becoming run down,” says Terry Emerick, director of the Bartlett Planning and Economic Development Department. He cites the establishment of the new municipal center in an old Bartlett Station church building and the location of the new library nearby as evidence of the city’s efforts to increase traffic to the area. “Over the past 10 years, the work of the city and the Bartlett Station Commission is generally considered successful in preventing a downturn and even uplifting and revitalizing Bartlett Station,” Emerick says. “There’s still a lot to do, but it’s got a good track record.” You don’t have to look far to see the progress. Elegant, pavilion-style monuments with welcome signs mark the boundaries of Bartlett Station. New curbs, gutters, sidewalks

Recent improvements to the Bartlett Station Historic District include new period-style street lights.

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STAFF PHOTO

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and trees line Bartlett Road and Shelby Street, and period streetlights have been installed on Stage Road and Court Street. Businesses and services in the district include a movie theater, grocery store, drug store, pet store, wall-covering store, karate studio, bakery supply, insurance offices, an engineering firm, restaurants and antique shops. More are moving in all the time, and existing businesses are getting facelifts, thanks to financial incentives offered by the Bartlett Station Commission. Three different incentive programs reward new tenants, encourage brokers to bring in new businesses and fund façade improvements to existing facilities. “Through the façade grant, exterior improvements can receive a 50 percent grant match – up to $35,000,” Emerick says, referring to one of the programs. “It’s been well used, and it is considered a real advantage to businesses in Bartlett Station.” Events such as the annual Catfish and Jazz Festival also help draw folks to Bartlett Station, and the commission is looking at more ways to attract companies and customers. “One idea is to form a merchants’ association that will promote collaborative activity like sidewalk sales and special events among Bartlett Station business owners,” Emerick says.

Michael Knox puts the finishing touches on a cake. Below: Mother and daughter co-owners of The Busy Bakery, Rochelle McMahan, left, and Christina Hogan

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Local Flavor

The Name Says It All FRESH SLICES SIDEWALK CAFÉ FOCUSES ON FOOD AND SERVICE

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What’s Online e Hungry for more? Sink your teeth into other stories about Bartlett’s local flavor in the food section at imagesbartlett.com.

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the salmon Caesar salad and coconutencrusted tilapia. Logan has much experience in the food industry, having served as a top chef for restaurants in Memphis and New Orleans, and he worked 20 years as director of operations for the national Bennigan’s restaurant chain. “When I left Bennigan’s, next thing you know I was suddenly in a full-blown restaurant of my own in Memphis,” he says. “Being a long-time chef gave me knowledge

of food, and being with Bennigan’s gave me knowledge of running a successful business.” Logan and his wife, Willie M.T., and his daughter, Tasha, pretty much run all three locations, and they all enjoy the restaurant business, Logan says. “We love Memphis and are learning to love Cordova and Bartlett, too,” he adds. “In fact, my wife and I are thinking of buying a house in Bartlett because it’s such a nice city.” – Kevin Litwin

J. KYLE KEENER

ke Logan says people who visit his Fresh Slices Sidewalk Café restaurants in Bartlett, Cordova and Memphis are more than customers. They’re his guests and his friends. “I’ve had my Memphis restaurant since 2004 and the Cordova neighborhood café since 2007, and both are packed all the time,” Logan says. “The Bartlett location opened in February 2009, and business continues to get better there as well. I’m lucky to have three thriving establishments.” Logan says all three of his Fresh Slices locations put an emphasis on food and fair prices. “Everything at Fresh Slices is as fresh as can be, like our name says,” he says. “I won’t ever be rich, but I will be happy serving my customers the way they should be served. For example, you come into my restaurant for a 10-ounce steak with all the fat trimmed away, and you’ll get a baked potato, mixed vegetables and a dinner salad all for $13.95.” Besides steak, the extensive menu at Fresh Slices includes pasta dishes, seafood, veggie paninis, made-toorder pizzas, turkey and corned beef reubens, and much more. Customer favorites include the sweet potato fries,

Ike Logan, co-owner of Fresh Slices Sidewalk Café in Bartlett Left: Salmon Caesar salad is a customer favorite at Fresh Slices Sidewalk Café.

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PHOTOS BY J. KYLE KEENER

Portfolio

Homes, Sweet Old Homes HISTORIC BUILDINGS ABOUND THROUGHOUT NORTHEAST SHELBY COUNTY

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istory buffs, rejoice. Shelby County is home – no pun intended – to a number of historic houses that all date back to the 1800s. In fact, two of them are so majestic that they are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. One of those is the Davies Manor Plantation House in Bartlett, which is the oldest furnished log home in Shelby County. When and who built the original one-room log cabin is unknown, but additions to the house were made between 1831 and 1837, and a kitchen was added in 1860. The historic Davies Manor landmark is open to the public from

mid-March through mid-November, and tours are available by appointment in the off-season. Also in Bartlett is Gotten House, which is listed on the National Register as well. Farmer and small businessman Nicholas Gotten built the white frame structure in 1871 in a New England saltbox style. It underwent a $100,000 renovation in 2007 and today includes the Bartlett Museum, which is a local history archive operated by the Bartlett Historical Society. Gotten House and its museum are open to the public every first and third Sunday of the month from 2 p.m.-4 p.m.

Other Shelby County historical attractions include the Rachel H.K. Burrows Museum, a tiny, one-room former bank building in Arlington that showcases local memorabilia and historical items. It is open from April to September on the first Saturday of each month from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Blackwell House in Bartlett is a two-story building where circuit court was held during the years 18701885. It then became Courthouse School with an enrollment of 100 students in 1887, when the population of the town was only 300 people. Today, legend has it that Blackwell House is haunted.

Gotten House, built in 1871 by prominent Bartlett resident Nicholas Gotten, is home to Bartlett Museum.

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Viewing Bartlett in 3D S

ee here: An old fad from not-solong-ago is making a comeback in a big way. The advancement of 3D technology has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years, with 3D glasses being used for more and more movies. Disney and other production studios have taken the plunge, and Sports Illustrated has added 3D inserts to its magazines. So what does all this have to do with Bartlett? Plenty, since American Paper Optics in Bartlett is the world’s largest manufacturer of 3D glasses in the industry. John Jerit started the company in 1990 with only one main product, and today it manufactures 12 different types of specialty paper 3D glasses in more than 70 different frame shapes. In its 20-year history, APO has manufactured more than one billion 3D glasses for movies, television, Web sites, theme park attractions, laser light shows and fireworks displays, and today it has 15,000 active customers throughout the world.

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Portfolio

Cities Offer Variety, Lifestyle Choices I

t’s not a city, but it sure is large enough to be one. The community of Cordova has about 50,000 people living in it, which makes Cordova as large in population as Bartlett. Cordova has always been a retail hub in northeast Shelby County, and it remains a major retail and residential area to this day. “Cordova is not incorporated and is not a city – it is technically a part of Memphis because the city annexed a large portion of it several years ago,� says John Threadgill, president and CEO of the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce. “But for the longest time,

land and greenways,� Threadgill says. Arlington is the eastern-most municipality in Shelby County. Rich in history and heritage, it’s in the midst of vibrant growth. The town of 4,000 residents has excellent schools and many community activities, and it has remained quiet and rural for the past two centuries. Millington is home to Memphis Motorsports Park, and the municipality was granted the title “Flag City Tennessee� by the Tennessee state legislature. Millington is also known for being the hometown of singer/ entertainer Justin Timberlake. “As for Bartlett, it was a lone stagecoach stop in the 1830s and now it is Tennessee’s 10th-largest city,� Threadgill says. “Northeast Shelby County is conveniently located on the Interstate 40 corridor, and we are simply a good place to conduct business and raise a family.�

people have referred to it simply as the Cordova area, and they still do to this day.� All of Northeast Shelby County is quickly becoming known for its great quality of life and a laid-back existence. For example, Lakeland has low commercial and residential development, and it fosters a sense of country living. The city of 8,000 residents is graced with lakes, ponds, streams, parks and other recreational opportunities. “Lakeland has a beautiful 65-acre park with hiking trails, and the city requires developers to set aside park

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PHOTOS BY J. KYLE KEENER

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Germantown Parkway is the main thoroughfare in Cordova, where shopping opportunities abound.

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Nice Doing Business With You

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ational recession? Not so much in Bartlett. Business growth in the Bartlett area increased by $114 million in capital investment during 2008, and nearly 750 jobs were created during the year. “The year 2008 was actually the first year that we started tracking capital investment, so we picked a pretty good year to start,� says Clay Banks, director of economic development for the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce. Banks says Bartlett is economically lucky on a couple of fronts. It is attracting new businesses, and it also sees local, existing companies expanding their current facilities and workforces. “It’s always great to have new companies move in, but it is also important to encourage growth and profitability among the existing local companies,� he says. “Existing companies are our bread and butter. As far as they are concerned, growth in 2008 was especially impressive in the light industrial areas, which includes distribution and light manufacturing.� Some of the Bartlett region’s success stories in recent times include Impact Logistics, which opened a new 50,000-square-foot facility in 2008; American Paper Optics, which expanded and moved into a new facility in 2009; and Audiographic Masterworks, which built a new manufacturing facility in 2008. In addition, Akron Hardware has a new building, Engineered Medical Systems has added additional employees and new equipment, and Odyssey Medical has just moved into this market. Banks says Bartlett’s selling points include an educated workforce, safety and a great location. “A good quality of life in a clean, safe community means a lot to businesses nowadays,� he says. “Bartlett is that kind of a clean, safe community.� – Stories by Kevin Litwin BARTLETT

Impact Logistics has a new 50,000-square-foot facility in Bartlett.

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Business

Going for the

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Green BARTLETT COMPANIES PROMOTE ENERGY-EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGY

STORY BY JESSICA MOZO PHOTOGRAPHY BY J. KYLE KEENER

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ommunities across the country are finding ways to go green, and several Bartlett area companies are doing the same. “Bartlett is known for its entrepreneurial spirit, and we’ve seen a lot of successful companies start up here in people’s garages,” says Clay Banks, director of economic development for the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce. “A lot of those entrepreneurs are seeing green technology as the wave of the future, and many are coming to us for help getting started. We’re seeing all aspects of green technology covered.” Kele, Inc. is a leading international supplier of HVAC temperature controls and interface products for building automation and energy management systems, and it employs more than 200 people at its two Bartlett locations. The company represents 250 different product manufacturers in its 1,000page catalog, and all the products are BARTLETT

designed to make buildings more energy efficient. “Our whole business is about energy efficiency, saving money and being green,” says Jim Wadlington, vice president of marketing at Kele Inc. “We distribute the parts installers need for high-rise buildings, universities and the like to help automate those buildings by computers. For instance, if you want the lights to go on at 8 a.m., nobody has to go around and turn them all on. The computer does it for you.” Kele celebrated its 25th year in business in 2008. “The nature of the building automation industry is to help building owners save resources by having a ‘smart’ building,” Wadlington says. “Using an automated system to monitor and schedule all facets of the building not only saves dollars, but also resources used.” Evaporcool is another Bartlett area company that’s helping businesses reduce their energy and maintenance I M AG E S B A R T L E T T. C O M

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Business

costs. The company employs 20 people and uses patented technologies to extend the life of commercial HVAC systems and minimize their impact on the environment. “We have wonderful letters from our customers about how our product is saving them money and energy,” says Stanley Elster, a salesman for Evaporcool. “This is the best business I’ve ever been in because it does something good for the world. Energy costs will continue to climb, but we’re here to help curtail those costs.” Ecos Innovation is also making headlines with its energy-efficient LED streetlight. Bartlett entrepreneur Carlos Ecos of Peru has ties to the

Mexico City-based company and is looking to establish its presence in the Memphis/Bartlett area. Ecos hopes to be manufacturing the streetlight in Shelby County by 2010, eventually creating many new jobs. At least one local “green” building is in the works. The new La Quinta Inn & Suites, under construction on New Brunswick Road by the Wolfchase Galleria, will be the first LEED-certified hotel in the Memphis area. The property will include more than 120 solar panels covering the entire roof, a windmill, water-efficient fixtures, LED lighting, low-VOC paints, and other energy-efficient and green elements that will reduce the building’s

impact on the environment. In addition, 50 percent of proceeds from the hotel will be donated to charity for education. Protecting future generations, it seems, is the motivation behind many entrepreneurs’ commitment to promoting energy efficiency. “I have grandchildren, and it’s not their fault our country and world are in this position with energy today,” Elster says. “I remember paying 19 cents a gallon for gasoline – you could get 10 gallons for $2. Today we’re paying $2 and $3 for one gallon. It’s our responsibility to help our grandchildren overcome these problems – and to some degree, we’re winning.”

Below left: Carlos Ecos, president of Ecos Innovations, with his company’s LED streetlight Below right: Products manufactured and distributed by Bartlett-based Kele, Inc. are designed to make buildings more energy efficient.

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BARTLETT


Business | Chamber Report

J. KYLE KEENER

Chamber President John Threadgill, seated front; back row from left, Mary Crone; Judy Summers; John Cox; and Clay Banks. Not pictured is Jessica Smith.

Keeping an Eye on the Big Picture CHAMBER INITIATIVES LINK MEMBERS, GENERATE BUSINESS

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oes the thought of striking up a conversation with a total stranger set your knees knocking, or does networking come naturally to you? Either way, the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce has got you covered. With an eye on the big picture and an array of initiatives to help businesses succeed, the Chamber links members with one another – and mutual benefits inevitably result. “Networking is what it’s all about,” says John Threadgill, president and CEO of the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce. “The Chamber of Commerce offers a better portal into the community than any other organization. Companies’ impetus to join the Chamber is to network, and the Chamber sponsors networking events that bring people together to meet other people.” Not only that, but – for the wallflowers among us – a consultant at the Chamber’s monthly meetings offers tips on how to start conversations and improve networking skills. BARTLETT

Members get an opportunity to practice those skills at chambersponsored events such as the monthly morning Business Networking Coffee and Chamber Mixer After Hours – an evening gathering held at various member venues around town. The annual Bartlett a la Carte, a dinner and silent auction sponsored by the Chamber in partnership with the Rotary Club, brings people together and showcases member restaurants, with proceeds benefiting Youth Villages. Another ongoing Chamber focus is member-to-member discounts. “With the Hot Deals program, we are trying to get members to realize the value of doing business with other members,” Threadgill explains. “We have designed posters to go into the break rooms of members to make their employees aware that they also are eligible for these member-tomember discounts. “About 20,000 employees work for member businesses,” he says. “And that’s a lot of discounts.” The annual BACC Golf Tournament

and the Bartlett Business Expo are always successful, and the Chamber’s August membership drive encourages companies to take full advantage of joining the Chamber. Member benefits include the value of meeting new clients, attending events such as the Bartlett Business Expo, marketing and promotion among members, receiving discounts, and being listed in the Chamber directory and on the Chamber’s Web site. “The Chamber is the organization that is working diligently toward keeping our local economy vital,” Threadgill says. “You’ve got to have somebody out there who’s looking at the big picture, and that’s what we do.” That includes knowing what industry clusters thrive here – namely life sciences, agribusiness and hospitality services – and promoting Bartlett as an ideal business location. “We are active in economic development,” Threadgill says. “We’re trying to attract investment, create jobs and enhance retail sales.” – Carol Cowan I M AG E S B A R T L E T T. C O M

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Business

Biz Briefs

BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE BARTLETT AND NORTHEAST SHELBY COUNTY’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

$624,283 Retail sales ($1,000)

$14,933 Retail sales per capita

$54,914 Accommodation and food services sales ($1,000)

3,539 Total number of firms Source: U.S. Census QuickFacts

AVE MARIA IN BARTLETT Biz: Licensed, long-term care facility Buzz: The Ave Maria Home is a specialized residence for individuals needing adult day care, assisted living or a nursing facility. This licensed, long-term care facility offers the Assisi Adult Day Program, assisted living and a 75-bed nursing home. www.avemariahome.org 24

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BARTLETT


VARSITY SPIRIT FASHIONS IN BARTLETT Biz: Cheerleading uniforms and apparel Buzz: Varsity Spirit Fashions is the world’s largest designer and manufacturer of cheerleading uniforms. Based in Memphis, the multi-faceted Varsity company has a location at 3131 Appling Road in Bartlett. www.varsity.com LAWN SOLUTIONS IN ARLINGTON Biz: Lawn and shrub care Buzz: Locally owned Lawn Solutions offers year-round lawn and shrub care, including balanced fertilizer with pre-emergent and post-emergent weed control, flea and tick control, fire ant control, grub worm control and fungus and disease control. The tree-shrub program includes fertilization, disease and insect detection and treatment, and control of wintering insects. The company constantly continues its education in the green industry. www.lawnsolutionsinc.net

Bartlett Lanes

A2H IN LAKELAND Biz:Full-service firm of engineers, architects and planners Buzz: Askew Hargraves Harcourt & Associates Inc. – or A2H Inc. – is a full-service firm of engineers, architects and planners based in Lakeland. Since 1986, A2H has been a leader in providing quality planning, design and construction service for a wide variety of clients. www.a2h.com SHELBY CENTER HOSPITAL FOR ANIMALS IN MEMPHIS Biz: Full-service pet care facility Buzz: The Shelby Center Hospital for Animals is a full-service pet care facility that includes in-house laboratory services and state-of-the-art diagnostics. The dental and surgical services have been doubled to provide a more comprehensive health-care program for pets. www.shelbycenter.com BARTLETT

Open Every Day Cosmic Bowling U Birthday Parties Corporate Parties U Adult & Child Leagues Fund-raisers & League Bowling (901) 386-7701 U 6276 Stage Rd. www.bartlettbowling.com

I M AG E S B A R T L E T T. C O M

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Business | Economic Profile

BARTLETT AND NORTHEAST COMMUNITYSHELBY COUNTY BUSINESS CLIMATE The Body local economy is diverse, with service being the largest single Pro sector. The largest subsectors include health services, business services, and education and social services. Primary industries serve a major role in the region's economic strength. Numerous industry clusters have evolved, including medical device manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, health care, hospitality, agribusiness, food processing, IT service and general electronics.

TAX STRUCTURE

2.25% County Sales Tax

ECONOMIC RESOURCES

INDUSTRIAL SITES LINKS

Planning & Economic

www.bartlettchamber.org

Development Department 6400 Stage Road (901) 385-6417

7%

www.cityofbartlett.org

State Sales Tax

Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce

9.25% Total Sales Tax

2969 Elmore Park Road Bartlett, TN 38134-8309 (901) 372-9457

TRANSPORTATION

www.bartlettchamber.org

Delta HRA Transportation 915 Hwy. 51 S. Covington, TN 38019 (901) 475-1460 www.deltahra.org

GOVERNMENT OFFICES

Memphis Greyhound Station 203 Union Ave. Memphis, TN 38103 (901) 523-9253 www.greyhound.com

Bartlett, TN 38134

Memphis Area Transit Authority 444 N. Main St. Memphis. TN 38103 (901) 523-8134 www.matatransit.com Memphis/Shelby County International Airport 2491 Winchester Road, Ste. 113 Memphis, TN 38116-3856 (901) 922-8000 www.memphisairport.org Amtrak 545 S. Main St. Memphis, TN 38103 www.amtrak.com

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DEMOGRAPHICS

Bartlett, TN 38134

City of Bartlett 6400 Stage Road (901) 385-6400 www.cityofbartlett.org Shelby County Administration Building 160 N. Main St., Suite 801 Memphis, TN 38103 (901) 545-2745 www.shelbycountytn.gov

I-40 & Germantown Pkwy. Intersection (2006 Estimate) POPULATION: 3-mile radius, 61,993 5-mile radius, 134,013 10-mile radius, 370,247 HOUSEHOLDS: 3-mile radius, 24,007 5-mile radius, 50,628 10-mile radius, 142,818 MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: 3-mile radius, $73,456 5-mile radius, $69,809 10-mile radius, $62,903 AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME: 3-mile radius, $87,347 5-mile radius, $82,116 10-mile radius, $83,123 PER CAPITA INCOME: 3-mile radius, $33,844 5-mile radius, $31,411 10-mile radius, $32,310

MORE EO ONLINE imagesbartlett.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

BARTLETT


Education

View From the Top SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOLS RANK AMONG THE BEST IN THE STATE

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hen it comes to education, Shelby County is earning straight A’s. With more than 47,000 students, 38,000 active parent-teacher association members and 56 schools, the Shelby County school district is among the largest school districts in the nation. In this case, “big” has meant not just “better” – but the best. For three years in a row, Shelby County Schools has received all A’s on the annual report card of school performance issued by the Tennessee Department of Education. It is only one of three school districts in Tennessee to hold that record, out of a total of 136 school districts in the state, says Mike Tebbe, director of communications. “Considering the other two school districts who received that recognition have just two or three schools in their systems, we consider this a major accomplishment and a credit to our excellent teachers, an involved business community and our public leaders.” Tebbe says. Education leadership in Shelby County is a collaborative effort among parents, teachers and community leaders – a diverse and committed

BARTLETT

group effort that school officials have dubbed the “A-Team.” In Bartlett, for example, the city shares its public athletic fields with the local schools, and local businesses team up with schools in fundraising efforts. The district requires that each school in the system has an active PTA, and Shelby County is now home to an astounding 38,000 PTA members – a third of all the PTA members in the state of Tennessee. The district is the only large system in the nation to have 100 percent PTA involvement, Tebbe says. College-bound students have access to a wide range of advanced placement classes. The county’s special education program has drawn accolades for its effectiveness with special-needs

children, and the county continues to draw the best and brightest new teachers from across the country, Tebbe says. “We believe in our teachers,” he says. “That’s why we have the highest salary schedule for teachers in the state of Tennessee.” While Tebbe says the state isn’t investing as much money in schools as it should – Tennessee ranks 45th in the nation for school funding, for example – Shelby County schools remain a notable success story. “That we’ve managed to achieve this high level of performance – even with limited funding – and still maintain the highest salaries for teachers … we think it’s a pretty extraordinary story.” – Anita Wadhwani

I M AG E S B A R T L E T T. C O M

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Sports & Recreation

J. KYLE KEENER

Boris Combest, 6, practices his tennis game at W.J. Freeman Park.

A Walk in the Park GREEN SPACES ABOUND IN NORTHEAST SHELBY COUNTY

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ot every city can make this enviable claim: Most Bartlett residents live within a halfmile of a park. That’s close enough to walk, and many people do walk to and through the city’s parks. They also bike, play ball, picnic and generally enjoy the green spaces that the Bartlett Parks and Recreation Department carefully maintains. “We’re very proud of our parks,” says Debbie Morrison, director of community relations for the City of Bartlett. “People come from all over – even from out of town – to enjoy them. We have a great parks and recreation department that goes over and beyond to give our citizens something special

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for everyone in the parks, whether it’s playing ball, walking, riding bikes or just sitting on a bench reading a book.” Bartlett’s 29 parks encompass more than 500 acres, and additional land is set aside for parks that are yet to be developed. Within the city limits, 100acre W.J. Freeman Park is the largest and most-used multipurpose park. It features a fitness trail, lighted tennis courts, athletic fields, a playground, picnic tables and restrooms. Other city parks range from the 0.6-acre playground and picnic tables at Sugartree Park to the 82-acre Bobby K. Flaherty Municipal Center – the site of the Bartlett Justice Center, Bartlett Performing Arts Center, Bartlett Recreation Center, a half-mile fitness

trail and a lake where the annual Children’s Fishing Rodeo is held. There’s also the 11-acre Bartlett Boulevard Soccer Park, the newly renovated Dixon/Brewer Park in Bartlett Station and the 10-acre Easthill Park, which has athletic fields and a handicapped-accessible playground – and many more. In keeping with its mission to provide diverse and quality facilities that encourage community involvement, the Bartlett Parks and Recreation Department established Veterans Park in the area adjacent to W.J. Freeman Park. “This is a memorial park that we’ve done for our veterans,” Morrison says. “There’s a star made with brick pavers that can be purchased in honor of a veteran. We fly flags for every branch of the military, and we hold ceremonies there. It’s very emotional, and it’s quite different from other parks.” Just outside the city in the annexation reserve area, Nesbit Park is a 350-acre haven for birders, campers, hikers and nature-lovers of all kinds. But this park is perhaps best known for its off-road biking trails. “There are 11 miles of mountain bike trails in Nesbit Park,” says David Thompson, director of the Bartlett Parks and Recreation Department. That includes the renowned Stanky Creek trails, which mountain bikers claim are the best in west Tennessee. Bartlett’s newest offering is a greenbelt biking and walking trail that begins at Arthur Byrd Park and runs all the way to Highway 70. – Carol Cowan

What’s Online e Take a virtual tour of Bartlett's many parks in our quick video. Visit imagesbartlett.com.

BARTLETT


Health & Wellness

A Prescription for Growth BARTLETT’S IDEAL LOCATION, RISING POPULATION SPARK A MEDICAL OFFICE BOOM

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hen the Gastroenterology Center of the MidSouth opened a Bartlett location in January 2009, the move was yet another affirmation that the community offers an attractive list of benefits for medical offices and outpatient facilities. “Other areas are landlocked, whereas Bartlett has room to grow,” says David Harano, the GI Center’s executive director. “We actually built that office for four physicians. Yet our plans show that we could add an addition onto our office and have four more physicians. So we’re expecting that area to grow even more.” The GI Center boasts five clinics and two surgery centers, and Bartlett is its newest location. With 20 physicians, the practice is the largest gastroenterology group in a multi-state region.

The GI Center purchased 5.6 acres on North Germantown Road near Saint Francis Hospital-Bartlett and divided the property into three tracts, with plans to sell two. The first was quickly purchased by a nephrologist, who is constructing a new office and dialysis center on the site. The final tract is being marketed for further medical office development, Harano says. Both Harano and Clay Banks, director of economic development for the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce, credit Saint Francis Hospital-Bartlett with fueling the community’s medical office boom. Open since 2004, the 100-bed hospital plans to begin construction in 2010 on an 84,000-square-foot addition, nearly doubling its number of patient beds. One medical office building is already on the campus, and a local development

A home where the heart lives

firm is building a four-story professional building there. Yet another medical office development is the Yale Road Office Park. Banks notes that physicians look for office locations with easy access to a thriving hospital. “The more time they’re behind a windshield, the less time they’re making money,” he says. “Accessibility is a key factor, and the roads in and out of Bartlett are simple with low traffic.” Further cementing Bartlett’s reputation as an ideal locale for medical offices was the June 2009 opening of the new headquarters for Covenant Dove, an operator of nursing and rehabilitation facilities. The company also opened a new nursing home here. Banks says a growing elderly population is another reason many doctors are choosing the city. – Sharon H. Fitzgerald

Ave Maria Home Care Services Personal Supportive Services Delivered in the Comfort of Your Home.

Celebrating 100 Years of Service to the Memphis Community A modern 108bed nursing care facility offering comprehensive nursing care at all levels.

• • • • • • •

All private rooms Cable provided – no charge 120-seat dining hall Computer-accessible lounges Two beauty parlors State-of-the-art bathing systems Outpatient physical therapy unit

The King’s Daughters & Sons Home 3568 Appling Rd. • Bartlett, TN 38133 (901) 272-7405

BARTLETT

Affordable, Caring and Convenient.

A Tradition of Christian Care For more information, please contact: 2805 Charles Bryan Road Bartlett, TN 38134 (901) 386-3211

I M AG E S B A R T L E T T. C O M

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Arts & Culture

Acting Like a Kid BPACC OFFERS A VIBRANT FAMILY PERFORMANCE SERIES

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concert by the Bartlett Community Concert Band and a free piano recital program featuring local pianists. Tickets for the family series cost about half the regular price, so parents and grandparents can have an affordable way to introduce young people to the live performance experience, Jewell says. In addition, BPACC hosts kids’ drama camps for five weeks during the summer. Each weeklong camp is built around a different script, but the central curriculum – which teaches a range of drama skills – remains the same. “Each participant gets a part,” Jewell explains. “The kids choose their own costumes from the instructor’s costume trunk. They help put the scenery together in an arts-andcrafts component. On the final day, they put on a showcase performance of the play they’ve been working on all week. The camps are all about having fun in the theater and learning drama basics along the way.” In fact, all of BPACC’s offerings are carefully planned with the families of the local community in mind. Owned and operated by the city, BPACC features meeting facilities and a 350-seat theater. The multipurpose venue provides space for social, civic and business gatherings in addition to the performing arts. – Carol Cowan

J. KYLE KEENER

artlett Performing Arts & Conference Center is the place to go in Bartlett for events of all kinds – from concerts by big-name entertainers to business events and receptions. But some of the most popular events at BPACC are for children. Among the highlights are the Missoula Children’s Theatre performances, which feature an entire cast of local children in fun and creative professional productions. Missoula Children’s Theatre is based in Montana, and its Missoula Children’s Theatre International Tour Project visits cities across the country with a goal of helping children develop life skills through participation in the performing arts. “Three times a year, we bring in the Missoula Children’s Theatre to do productions with our local kids,” says Ron Jewell, BPACC director. “They bring in the sets, costumes, everything except a piano accompanist and the kids. They hold auditions on a Monday afternoon, rehearse all week with the 50 to 60 kids selected to participate, and on the following Saturday, they put on a performance. It’s a very popular program. We’ve been doing it as part of our family series for nine years out of the 10 we’ve been in existence.” Other events that make up the center’s family series include a concert by the Memphis Youth Symphony, a family

From left, theater camp alumni Kelsey Harding, Jasmine Stewart, Kyle Van Frank, Rebecca Davis and Collier Bickel

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BARTLETT


Community Profile

BARTLETT AND NORTHEAST COMMUNITYSHELBY COUNTY SNAPSHOT Strategically Pro Body located within the heart of Shelby County, the city of Bartlett has a rich history. The town was a lone stagecoach stop by the 1830s. Now Shelby County's second-largest city and Tennessee's ninth-largest city, Bartlett still preserves its small-town spirit with a well-balanced approach that includes rural and industrial development, churches and city amenities.

EDUCATIONAL OVERVIEW Money magazine has recognized Shelby County Schools as one of the Top 100 School Systems in the United States. For nine consecutive years, the system has been honored by School Match Inc. with the What Parents Want Award. Shelby County Schools PTA has the largest membership in Tennessee. Two private, four-year colleges and the University of Memphis are within a 10-mile radius of Bartlett.

CLIMATE OVERVIEW

warmest month of the year is July, with an average maximum temperature of 91 degrees Fahrenheit. The coldest month of the year is January, with an average minimum temperature of 28 degrees Fahrenheit. The annual average precipitation in Bartlett is 53.63 inches. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year. The wettest month of the year is November, with an average rainfall of 6 inches.

31.3 F January Low Temperature

HOUSING

$223,200 Average Home Price

13.25% Home Turnover Percentage

MORE EO ONLINE imagesbartlett.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

48.6 F January High Temperature

72.9 F July Low Temperature

Bartlett summer temperatures are normally in the 80s; temperatures drop to the 40s during the winter. The

BARTLETT

92.1 F July High Temperature

I M AG E S B A R T L E T T. C O M

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visit our

advertisers Ave Maria Home Care Services www.avemariahome.org Bartlett Lanes www.bartlettbowling.com Bartlett Performing Arts & Conference Center www.bpac.org City of Bartlett www.cityofbartlett.org Crye-Leike Realtors www.crye-leike.com EDCO Title & Closing Services www.edcotitle.com First South Credit Union www.firstsouth.com First Tennessee www.ftb.com Hampton Inn & Suites Memphis Wolfchase Galleria www.hamptoninn.com/ hi/mem-wolfchase Hollywood 20 Cinema www.moviepage.com

Let us set the stage for your next big night out!

King’s Daughters & Sons Home www.kdshome.com Methodist Healthcare North Hospital www.methodisthealth.org Roller Funeral Homes www.rollerfuneralhomes.com St. Ann Catholic Church & School www.stannbartlett.org St. Francis Hospital – Bartlett www.saintfrancisbartlett.com Youth Villages www.youthvillages.org

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Conveniently located off I-40 on Appling Rd.

Bartlett Performing Arts and Conference Center Great performances and memorable events. Mid-South’s most acoustically intimate concert hall. The affordable alternative for your next corporate event.  rXXXCQBDDPSH

BARTLETT


Ad Index 29 AVE MARIA HOME CARE SERVICES

31 HOLLYWOOD 20 CINEMA

25 BARTLETT LANES

29 KING’S DAUGHTERS & SONS HOME

32 BARTLETT PERFORMING ARTS & CONFERENCE CENTER C2 METHODIST HEALTHCARE 4 CITY OF BARTLETT 4 CRYE-LEIKE REALTORS 18 EDCO TITLE & CLOSING SERVICES

NORTH HOSPITAL

32 ROLLER FUNERAL HOMES

19 ST. ANN CATHOLIC CHURCH & SCHOOL

27 FIRST SOUTH CREDIT UNION 17 FIRST TENNESSEE

C4 ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL – BARTLETT

C3 HAMPTON INN & SUITES MEMPHIS WOLFCHASE GALLERIA

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Images Bartlett & Northeast Shelby County, TN: 2010  

Strategically located within the heart of Shelby County, the city of Bartlett has a rich history. The town was a lone stagecoach stop by the...

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