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2010 | IMAGESASHEVILLE.COM

ASHEVILLE NORTH O CAROLINA CA O A

What’s Online ine ne Video of scenes around Asheville’s vibrant downtown

ALL POINTS LEAD HOME Diverse neighborhoods offer wealth of living choices

HOW’S THE WEATHER?

Nature’s Kitchen

Institutions lead the front on climate data and research

Restaurants keep menus fresh with local produce

SPONSORED BY THE ASHEVILLE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


Offering more listings, the largest network of professionals, the best service and the most trusted name in Western North Carolina real estate, you can count on the knowledgeable folks at Beverly-Hanks to ďŹ nd exactly what you’re looking for. For more information and to receive your complimentary relocation kit, contact the folks whose focus is your complete satisfaction.

866-858-2257 beverly-hanks.com relocate@beverly-hanks.com


2010 EDITION | VOLUME 8

ASHEVILLE ®

NORTH CAROLINA

CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S

ASHEVILLE BUSINESS 26 How’s the Weather? A mine of data and key strategic alliances place the region on the leading front of climate research.

8 ALL POINTS LEAD HOME Diverse neighborhoods in every direction offer a wealth of living choices.

12 NATURE’S KITCHEN Local restaurateurs rely on homegrown ingredients for their innovative menus.

16 GREEN DEVELOPMENT BLOSSOMS The new Biltmore Park Town Square community grows steadily and sustainably.

34 A CURE FOR WHAT ALES YOU Beer City USA’s microbrew industry barrels right along.

40 DYNAMIC DESTINATIONS Biltmore, Pack Square and The Health Adventure unveil fresh features for 2010.

30 Biz Briefs 33 Economic Profile

D E PA R TM E NT S 6 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Asheville culture

20 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Asheville

38 39 45 47 49

Arts & Culture Education Sports & Recreation Health & Wellness Community Profiles: facts, stats and important numbers to know

All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

ON THE COVER Wild-caught tuna with garden fresh vegetables at Nine Mile restaurant Staff Photo

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PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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imagesasheville.com THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

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What’s Onl Online nllin

SENIOR EDITOR LISA BATTLES COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITOR JESSY YANCEY STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS DANNY BONVISSUTO, ANNE GILLEM, RANDY JOHNSON JOE MORRIS, ELIZABETH SIMS DATA MANAGER CHANDRA BRADSHAW INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER JOLENE MCKENZIE SALES SUPPORT MANAGER CINDY HALL SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN McCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, J. KYLE KEENER PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT MANAGER ANNE WHITLOW CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS MELISSA BRACEWELL, KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER CANDICE SWEET GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, JESSICA MANNER, JANINE MARYLAND, MARCUS SNYDER WEB IMPLEMENTATION DIRECTOR ANDY HARTLEY WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR FRANCO SCARAMUZZA WEB CONTENT MANAGER JOHN HOOD WEB PROJECT MANAGER YAMEL RUIZ

PICTURE PERFECT

WEB DESIGN LEAD LEIGH GUARIN WEB PRODUCTION JENNIFER GRAVES COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN ALISON HUNTER AD TRAFFIC MARCIA MILLAR, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY

We’ve added even more of our prize-winning photography to the online gallery. To see these photos, click on Photo Gallery.

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN

RELOCATION Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./SALES TODD POTTER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS V.P./CUSTOM PUBLISHING KIM NEWSOM MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS BILL McMEEKIN MANAGING EDITOR/COMMUNITY KIM MADLOM MANAGING EDITOR/TRAVEL SUSAN CHAPPELL PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS

VIDEOS

RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY SIMPSON

In our Interactive section, watch quick videos by our editors and photographers featuring people, places and events.

DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR YANCEY TURTURICE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE SALES SUPPORT RACHAEL GOLDSBERRY SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR RACHEL MATHEIS EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

FACTS & STATS

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

Go online to learn even more about: • Schools • Health care • Utilities • Parks • Taxes

LOCAL FLAVOR From the simple to the sublime, the delicious offerings here are guaranteed to satisfy every appetite.

Asheville is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce 36 Montford Ave. • Asheville, NC 28801 Phone: (828) 258-6101 • Fax: (828) 251-0926 www.ashevillechamber.org VISIT ASHEVILLE ONLINE AT IMAGESASHEVILLE.COM

ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Asheville gives readers a taste of what makes Asheville tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts. “Find the good – and praise it.”

– Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

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Almanac

Built for Beauty

Tops for Just About Everything Almost every time cities are ranked and rated, you don’t have to scan far down to find Asheville in the mix. The most recent praise has come from a variety of sources in 2009. AmericanStyle magazine ranked the city No. 2 on its list of the Nation’s Top Arts Destinations. Backpacker Magazine gave the city an 11th-place nod on its list of 25 Best Cities to Raise an Outdoor Kid. In March, Forbes.com rated Asheville as No. 6 on its list of Best Metro Places for Business and Careers. And for those who’ve paid their professional dues and are looking to retire, Asheville is a top spot for that, too. Best Boomer Towns this year named Asheville among its 21 Best U.S. Towns for Baby Boomers’ Active Retirement.

Did you know that Asheville has more Art Deco architecture than any other southeastern city outside Miami? Check out architect Douglas Ellington’s designs exemplified by Asheville City Hall, the S&W Cafeteria Building on Patton Ave., First Baptist Church of Asheville, the Buncombe County Courthouse and Asheville High School. There also are many other styles present, from the Romanesque revival Drhumor Building on Patton Avenue, to the neoGothic Jackson Building on Pack Square, to the Spanish Renaissance revival style of the Church of St. Lawrence on Haywood Street.

Sure, We’ll Help You Move It has been said that moving day is one of those times that can make or break friendships: A true friend will help. The Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce is here for you, too. The Chamber’s Complete Asheville Area Relocation Kit includes a phone book, relocation magazine, area map, visitor guide and real estate information. Other publications in the kit feature information on banking, storage, insurance and schools. The kits are available for $24.95 online at www.ashevillechamber.org.

Connect With Tradition, Craft a Collection Since 1947, the best of regional fine arts and crafts has come together twice a year in Asheville. The Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands, presented by the Southern Highland Craft Guild, is held over four days each spring and fall at the Civic Center downtown. The Craft Fair is an event where connoisseurs and novices alike come to craft a collection, connect with tradition and invest in regional culture. More than 200 artisans fill the center’s two floors, and visitors may buy art, enjoy live music, watch demonstrations and participate in workshops.

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Spectacular Spare Bedrooms Before you worry too much about readying that spare bedroom for guests, consider one of ours. Thanks to more than 70 bed-and-breakfast inns throughout the area, there are hundreds of cozyas-home beds from which to choose. Inns range from turn-of-the-century, Victorian homes with elaborate woodwork in Asheville’s historic Montford neighborhood near downtown to a mid-1800s farmhouse in artsy Weaverville, just 10 minutes north of Asheville. Many of these establishments have joined to create two associations, Asheville Bed and Breakfast Association and Asheville Legendary Inns, to collectively promote the amenities and special offerings of each member.

Asheville At A Glance

Fast Facts

POPULATION (2008 ESTIMATE) Asheville: 74,543 Buncombe County: 229,047

Q The Blue Ridge Parkway marks its 75th anniversary in 2010. It includes 270 overlooks along a 469-mile route through the Southern Appalachians and attracts more than 20 million visitors annually.

LOCATION Asheville is in Western North Carolina, tucked away in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Two major interstates, I-40 and I-26, intersect just outside the city limits.

FOR MORE INFORMATION Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce 36 Montford Ave. Asheville, NC 28801 Phone: (828) 258-6101 Fax: (828) 251-0926 www.ashevillechamber.org

BEGINNINGS Asheville was incorporated in 1797 and named in honor of North Carolina Gov. Samuel Ashe.

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What’s Online e Take a virtual tour of Asheville, courtesy of our award-winning photographers, at imagesasheville.com.

Q Asheville’s temperate climate makes year-round living a breeze. Its average annual snowfall is only 13 inches. Q Renowned designer Donald Ross designed the Buncombe County Municipal Course, the course at the The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa, the Country Club of Asheville and Biltmore Forest Country Club.

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All Points Lead

HOME DIVERSE NEIGHBORHOODS OFFER WEALTH OF LIVING CHOICES

STORY BY ELIZABETH SIMS

North North Asheville encompasses some of the most beautiful older homes and tree-lined streets in the city, from the stately homes in the vicinity of The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa, to the established neighborhoods surrounding Beaver Lake and the Country Club of Asheville. Further north is a growing community with the addition of the luxurious homes on Reynolds Mountain. Closer to downtown is the historic Montford neighborhood, filled with family-oriented Victorian homes with large porches and plenty of sidewalks. Throughout the Charlotte Street area near Grove Park, you’ll find arts and crafts cottages flanking the streets.

Up-and-coming West Asheville is home to a varied mix of people, lifestyles and businesses. Sturdy bungalows are predominant throughout the area.

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ative son Thomas Wolfe may have proffered that it’s hard to go home again, but his hometown of Asheville is one of the most soughtafter small cities in the country with its desirable climate, natural beauty, remarkable arts community and excellent health care availability. Asheville offers abundant choices and rich diversity in its neighborhoods, lifestyles and dwelling options – from historic to hip to high-end. Every direction presents a different and distinctive vibe, and the amenities of the city, with its richness of culture, heritage, access to outdoor activity, and entertainment are readily available regardless of where you reside.

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Above: The streets are made for strolling in West Asheville. Left: North Asheville has stately homes near The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa.

ANTONY BOSHIER

West If Asheville were New York, West Asheville would be its Brooklyn, with its diverse mix of people, lifestyles and businesses. From bohemian to quaint and sturdy bungalows, this up-andcoming community is home to working artists, entrepreneurs, young families and the city’s fun and funky River District. Malvern Hills offers older established homes with shady lawns and parks, a community recreation center and streets made for strolling. East Take your pick of lifestyles in East Asheville, from impressive mountaintop vistas from Town Mountain’s homes and condominiums, just a few minutes from downtown, to the friendly family neighborhoods in Haw Creek, with its central recreational park and ranch-style homes with large yards perfect for gathering the kids together. Chunn’s Cove’s beauty is its mix of farms, townhouses and wooded neighborhoods that feel much more removed from the lively Tunnel Road corridor than their true proximity.

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South South of downtown offers the options of a charming older home in Kenilworth’s shady, welcoming neighborhoods just minutes from the city’s center, to the elaborate homes in the wooded neighborhood of Biltmore Forest established by Edith Vanderbilt in the 1920s. Historic Biltmore Village adds charm, remarkable architecture and exciting retail and restaurants. Further south are older subdivisions convenient to great shopping, dining and businesses along Hendersonville and Sweeten Creek Roads.

City Center Downtown Asheville is vibrant and buzzing with exciting nightlife, art galleries, live music, one-of-a-kind shops and excellent restaurants. The downtown area offers a variety of lofts and condominiums with city and mountain views and easy access to all that the city center has to offer. It’s a terrific walking town and easy to navigate. The new Pack Square Park in the city’s center is alive with activity year-round, and Grove Arcade and the Wall Street and Battery Park areas are filled with al fresco cafes and bars. ASHEVILLE


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Downtown Asheville has a variety of lofts and condos, as well as many dining, shopping and entertainment options.

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Farm to Fork

FEASTS RESTAURANTS RELY ON HOMEGROWN INGREDIENTS STORY BY DANNY BONVISSUTO

What’s s e Online

Watch an interview with Bouchon owner and chef Michel Baudouin at images asheville.com.

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rom tomatoes to potatoes and corn to country ham, Asheville’s farmers and culinary artisans produce some of the best crops in the country. And when they take their products to local farmers markets and the back doors of independent restaurants in the area, everybody wins. “Back in 2005 when we opened, chef Bill Klein went to the farmers markets and incorporated his finds into nightly specials,” says Treavis Taylor, who owns fig bistro with his wife, Traci. “He built relationships with the farmers, and now they know what we need and bring it to us regularly.” One of many independent restaurants in Asheville that draws heavily on local resources, fig gets its rainbow trout from Sunburst Trout Farm in Canton, its haricot verts, or green beans, from an organic grower nearby, and its mushrooms from a forager.

“They just stop at our back door and say, ‘Hey, look what I’ve got,’” Taylor says. Taylor, who grew up on a farm in eastern North Carolina, says he knows first-hand the benefit of supporting local farmers and bringing things full circle as much as possible. “If in any town, you were to try to eat only local food, you’d have a hard time, but we use local as much as we can,” Taylor says. “Ninety-five percent of our produce is definitely local; we don’t even put tomatoes on our hamburgers in the wintertime because they’re not available locally.” Homegrown ingredients also matter to patrons, who gravitate to dishes that weren’t imported from parts unknown. “We get the comment a lot that the food just tastes better,” Taylor says. Though its seafood is flown in fresh from Maine, The Lobster Trap serves local foods ASHEVILLE


BRIAN M C CORD

whenever possible, including produce, Ashe County cheddar cheese in the Oyster House beer cheddar soup and Three Graces Dairy chèvre on the grilled North Atlantic salmon. At Fiore’s Ristorante Toscana, chef and owner Anthony Cerrato insists on “fresh, local, seasonal products that are prepared simply and artfully.” At French comfort food restaurant, Bouchon, local smoked trout and goat cheese are used in the salade fumé, just one example of their many homegrown options. Asheville fixture The Market Place has earned national attention for

Rainbow trout from fig restaurant Right: Fiore’s Ristorante Toscana chef and owner Anthony Cerrato

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Local Tomato Pie INGREDIENTS 4 tomatoes, from Seasonal Produce Farm in Canton 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 6 thick bacon slices from Hickory Nut Gap Farm in Fairview 1 bag fresh spinach from Mountain Produce in Asheville 1 cup goat cheese from Three Graces Farms in Marshall 3/4 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil from Blue Heron Farm in Leicester 2 green onions, thinly sliced from Seasonal Produce Farm in Canton 1 garlic clove, chopped 9-inch frozen unbaked deepdish piecrust shell, thawed

its menus imbued with Appalachian goodness, thanks to the efforts of chef Mark Rosenstein, who recently passed the torch to a new owner after owning the restaurant for 30 years. At the Blue Ridge Dining Room at The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa, chef Denny Trantham currently works with 13 local farms within 100 miles of his restaurant. “The foods we get are fresher and better priced,” Trantham says. “We’re definitely reducing our footprint and cutting down on transportation. It’s for the greater good. My goal is 100 percent sustainability, but it is a challenge.” Trantham, a western North Carolina

native, gets fresh microgreens and salad greens from Jolley Farms in Canton; country ham from Watauga Farms in Boone; free-range chicken breasts from Tanglewood Farms in Winston-Salem; stone-ground yellow grits from Logan Turnpike Mill in Blairsville, Ga.; apple products from Henderson’s Best Produce in Hendersonville; and herbs from Blue Heron Farm in Leicester. “I’m proud of my roots, and I know there are a lot of good, quality food products in this area,” Trantham says. “As a chef, it’s a win-win to help the environment, support the local economy and give our customers what they want.”

1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese

PREPARATION

Recipe courtesy of Chef Denny Trantham of the Blue Ridge Dining Room at The Grove Park Inn

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LYNNE HARTY

1. Cut tomatoes into 1/2-inch slices. Place on a paper towellined wire rack. Sprinkle tomatoes with salt. Let stand 20 minutes. Pat dry with paper towels. 2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cook bacon in a large skillet over medium-high heat 8 to 10 minutes or until crisp; remove bacon, and drain on paper towels. Crumble bacon. 3. Sauté spinach in olive oil and season. Drain spinach well, pressing between paper towels. Combine crumbled bacon, spinach and next six ingredients in a large bowl until well blended. 4. Spread 1/4 cup spinach mixture on bottom of piecrust. 5. Layer with half of tomato slices; top with half of remaining spinach mixture. Repeat layers once. Cover loosely with aluminum foil. Add Cheddar cheese to top of pie. 6. Bake pie, covered, at 375 degrees for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake 20 to 25 minutes. Let stand 15 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature. A longtime leader in the local farm-to-table movement is chef Mark Rosenstein, who owned The Market Place restaurant for 30 years.

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Asheville Area Farmers and Tailgate Markets ASHEVILLE CITY MARKET Saturday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 18 – Dec. 19 161 S. Charlotte St.

FRENCH BROAD FOOD CO-OP SATURDAY TAILGATE MARKET Saturday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 12 – Oct. 25 90 Biltmore Ave.

NORTH ASHEVILLE TAILGATE MARKET Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon April 18 – Dec. 20 1 University Heights (near UNCA’s Owen Hall)

RICEVILLE TAILGATE MARKET Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon May 23 – Sept. 19 2251 Riceville Road

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON DOWNTOWN TAILGATE MARKET Wednesday, 2 – 6:30 p.m. April 29 – Dec. 23 76 Biltmore Ave.

WEST ASHEVILLE TAILGATE MARKET Wednesday, 3:30 – 6:30 p.m. April 15 – Oct. 28 757 Haywood Road

BIG IVY TAILGATE MARKET Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon May 5 – Oct. 24 540 Dillingham Road, Barnardsville

BLACK MOUNTAIN TAILGATE MARKET Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon May 9 – Oct. 31 130 Montreat Road, Black Mountain

WEAVERVILLE TAILGATE MARKET Wednesday, 2:30 – 6:30 p.m. April 29 - late October 60 Lakeshore Drive, Weaverville

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Peppers and other produce from Gaining Ground Farm in Leicester on sale at one of Asheville’s many tailgate markets

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Green

Development

Bl ssoms BILTMORE PARK TOWN SQUARE THRIVES

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The Biltmore Park mixed-use development includes shops, a movie theater and more than 274 residential units.

STORY BY JOE MORRIS

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n addition to building the legendary Biltmore Estate, George Vanderbilt had another large-scale development in mind. He envisioned a community that would provide a place to both live and work, with recreational and cultural amenities as well as office space and businesses. That idea has taken root and blossomed with the realization of Biltmore Park Town Square. Developed by Biltmore Farms LLC, the 42-acre community off of Interstate 26 near the airport is home to upwards of 200,000 square feet of office space and more than 274 residential units. Its retail and restaurant space includes a P.F. Chang’s, 131 Main Restaurant, Brixx Oven Pizza, REI and Barnes and Noble. The development also includes the Regal Biltmore Grande Stadium 15, the city’s first stadium-style movie theater. Besides providing residents with shopping and entertainment, guests to the community receive the redcarpet treatment – or perhaps that should be green-carpet ASHEVILLE

treatment: The newly opened 165-room Hilton Asheville hotel is among the first in the nation with a solar hot-water system. The system eliminates 60 tons of carbon dioxide per year – the equivalent of planting 18,000 trees. The hotel’s environmentally conscious design is in line with Biltmore Park Town Square’s participation in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – Neighborhood Development program, an effort that studies how developments can reduce sprawl, encourage healthy living, protect the environment and reduce dependency on automobiles. It’s a lot packed into a set amount of space, which required some crossed fingers early on. “This town center was planned more than 10 years ago, and the foundations for it were put into place then,” says Paul Szurek, chief financial officer for Biltmore Farms. “When we were able to get Volvo Construction Equipment located there, and then the YMCA, we had the nucleus of key tenants in place that justified the higher density that the project would I M AG E S A S H E V I L L E . C O M

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a year,” Frank says. “We do a lot of business in this building, so having the entertainment complex, the restaurants and the hotel is really beneficial to us.” Frank also points to the Reuter Family YMCA as a great benefit, noting that several dozen Volvo employees make daily use of the facility. That’s not news to Mary Michael, the Y’s executive director, who knows she’s sitting on a hot property. “Biltmore Park is really the ideal of a healthy, sustainable community, so they’ve always understood the value of having us here,” she says. The Y has been able to bring in several other healthfocused partner organizations, as well. “We’ve got plenty of room, and we’re ready for the growth that’s going to be coming as more people move into Biltmore Park,” Michael says. “We’re in a fantastic place.”

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require. But it’s become a great living and working environment, and a great attraction for new businesses to the area.” As one of the first tenants on the ground, Volvo Construction Equipment North America saw the potential and wanted in early, says Tim Frank, senior vice president of operations and strategy. “When we moved in here a few years ago there was just a bank, a running shop, a sandwich shop and another building next to the YMCA,” Frank recalls. “There’s been a lot of growth since then.” Volvo has about 225 employees in its Biltmore Park offices, and with about 700 more around the world who come in and out of Asheville frequently, the increasing amenities near the office are very welcome indeed. “We’re the sales and marketing hub for North America, so we bring about 15,000 people into Asheville over the course of

Biltmore Park’s shopping and recreational amenities include a new REI store and the Reuter Family YMCA.

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Portfolio

Hotel Shows How Suite It Is NEW GRAND BOHEMIAN FITS NICELY INTO ITS LUXURIOUS SURROUNDINGS

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Grand Bohemian’s luxurious appointments include spectacular chandeliers and a Bösendorfer piano that was built from a single piece of wood.

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f you want to experience some of the finer things in life, step into the Grand Bohemian Hotel Asheville. The Tudor-inspired hotel, which is only a few steps away from the gates of the famous Biltmore Estate, was just completed in 2009 but fits almost seamlessly into Historic Biltmore Village. The brand new structure was developed to offer a taste of Old World elegance and charm set in the comfortable, rustic ambiance of the mountain environment. The 104-room Grand Bohemian boasts an award-winning restaurant called the Red Stag Grill, which has a full-time executive chef who oversees a menu of steak, seafood, chicken and pasta. It’s a popular destination for business lunches, as well. Also on site is a 5,000-square-foot Poseidon Spa that includes a fitness center with cardio machines outfitted with personal TV screens. The spa has treatment options such as hot stone massages and age antidote facials. Meanwhile, the hotel is also home to a Grand Bohemian Gallery that showcases more than 100 works of art by local, regional and internationally recognized artists. Besides paintings, the artwork inside the interesting gallery includes glass, ceramics, jewelry and sculpture. The hotel’s guest rooms and private suites are luxuriously appointed with amenities such as lush Egyptian matelassé linens along with in-room DVD players, high-speed Internet access and LCD flat screen TVs. Most of the rooms also offer four-section bathrooms that have separate areas for the vanity, shower, toilet and oversized soaking tubs. The hotel incorporates stone flooring, marble accouterments and antique fixtures throughout its spacious lobby and sitting areas, along with several pieces of hand-carved wooden furniture. Unlike most upscale hotels, the management of the Grand Bohemian allows guests to have pets accompany them in their rooms. – Kevin Litwin ASHEVILLE


Moogseum To Salute Synthesizer Pioneer

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he Beatles often used one on stage, and so did bands like the Rolling Stones, The Doors, The Beach Boys and The Monkees. Today, thousands of bands and musicians use synthesizers. Former Asheville resident Robert Moog invented the Moog synthesizer in the early 1960s. His daughter is trying to raise $3 million to establish an Asheville Moogseum in her father’s honor. Robert Moog (rhymes with vogue) passed away in 2005. “My dad was a brilliant inventor, but his brilliance didn’t spill over to the business world,” says daughter Michelle Moog-Koussa. “He never patented his synthesizer, so he never made big money from it. That’s why The Bob Moog Foundation has been set up to raise money for the Moogseum project.” Moog-Koussa says tentative plans are for the Moogseum to open in late 2012, either in downtown Asheville or in the city’s River Arts District. The attraction is envisioned as a place where visitors will be able to experience the intersection of music, science and innovation. “The synthesizer has impacted people’s lives around the world through electronic music,” Moog-Koussa says.

“The synthesizer allows you to generate and manipulate sound through electronic means, and you can get thousands of sounds emanating from the instrument. And it has become so advanced that music stores today offer hundreds of synthesizer options to choose from.” Planned attractions at the Moogseum will include Bob Moog’s massive archives as well as an extensive historical collection of instruments, including original synthesizers that the

public will be welcome to play. There will also be a performance auditorium on site. “The Bob Moog Foundation recently received a lead grant of $600,000 from the Buncombe County Tourism Development Authority, but we need more money to reach our $3 million goal,” Moog-Koussa says. “If anyone is interested in contributing to this highly interactive music museum, visit www.moogfoundation.org.” – Kevin Litwin

Michelle Moog-Koussa plays one of her father’s later model synthesizers.

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Portfolio

Here’s a Toast to E.W. Grove T

he clever public relations team at The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa has put a historic twist on its recent efforts to promote the property, calling upon the spirit of founder E.W. Grove. Grove was a pharmacist in the late 1800s who became a millionaire by selling bottles of tonic elixirs. His Grove’s Tasteless Tonic was an instant hit in 1890 for people looking for a way

to feel rejuvenated and energetic. Following the success of his elixir, Grove further capitalized on the rejuvenation theme and constructed a luxurious hotel here where people could enjoy a relaxing vacation. The result was The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa, which opened in 1913 and today is on the National Register of Historic Places. “The feel-good elixirs and the

beautiful vacation getaway went hand in hand, so in 2008 we started a marketing campaign to have elixirs return to the inn,” says Deborah Potter, public relations manager for The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa. “The elixirs are actually special cocktails that our bartenders have mixed up. We call the campaign Magical Elixirs 2.0 since this is the second go-round for the drinks, after E.W. Grove started it all.” The cocktails have names such as Rejuvenation Libation, Energizer, Romance on the Mountain, and Summer’s a Comin’. The drink is brought to a customer’s table in an old-time elixir bottle along with an appropriate martini or highball glass,” Potter says. “The guest pours their own elixir drink into their glass, then can keep the small bottle as a souvenir of their vacation here.” As for the inn itself, a total of 10 U.S. presidents have stayed there during its 97-year history. Barack Obama booked rooms for a week in 2008 and used the inn’s grand ballroom as a mock stage in preparation for a national debate in Nashville. – Kevin Litwin

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Cultures Unite Through Music V

acations for many people can mean a few days at the beach or a theme park. For 126 students at A.C. Reynolds High School, it meant traveling 12,500 miles by plane to visit Beijing in the People’s Republic of China. Students from the school’s Symphonic Winds and Chorale music departments participated in a 10-day cultural performing arts trip from April 9-18, 2009. The U.S.-China Cultural & Education Foundation, whose officials happened to hear the school’s symphony perform at a North Carolina state competition, coordinated the adventure. “The Chinese high school students who we met were fluent in English, so the A.C. Reynolds kids and the Chinese kids got along great throughout the entire trip,” says William Bryant, A.C. Reynolds band director. “There was a total of four concert performances, but we did so much more.” The A.C. Reynolds group spent each night in Beijing, but during the day traveled to view renowned attractions such as the Great Wall, Tienanmen Square and the Forbidden City. But the favorite part of the trip was when the A.C. Reynolds students spent an entire day at Public School 80, a high school in Beijing. “All of the kids played soccer together, the Chinese kids taught our kids kung fu, the A.C. Reynolds students attended classes with the Chinese students, then the day culminated with a fantastic concert,” says Janis Bryant, A.C. Reynolds choral director. “There were many bonds formed during the entire trip. If the rest of the world could behave the way all of the high school students behaved, we would all be in a lot better shape.” Bryant says songs performed by A.C. Reynolds musicians in Beijing included American Salute as well as a Chinese composition that all of the students in attendance appreciated. “The East and West certainly got closer thanks to this trip,” she says. “It was a wonderful experience in so many ways.” – Kevin Litwin ASHEVILLE

A.C. Reynolds High School’s Symphonic Winds Ensemble and Chorale participated in a 10-day cultural performing arts trip to Beijing in 2009.

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Portfolio

Going to Extremes

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here are easy hikes all around Asheville – but the Southern Appalachians contain no shortage of extreme challenges. That attracts the area’s most rarefied residents, people like Anne Riddle Lundblad. The Warren Wilson College counselor routinely runs races longer than the 26.2 miles that humble many marathoners. Lundblad has won 10 United States Track and Field national titles since 2001 in distances ranging from the Trail Marathon to the 100 km Road Race. She’s been selected six times for the US team at the world championships of ultramarathoning, winning the silver medal in Japan in 2005. She also holds local course records, among them in the Mount Mitchell Challenge, 40 miles from the town of Black Mountain to the summit of the east’s highest peak and back. Lundblad and two of her friends, Rebekah Trittipoe and Jenny Anderson, “were looking for a different challenge,” she says, when they “stumbled across the South Beyond 6000.” Stumbled, indeed. The goal is to climb all 40 6,000-foot mountains in Western North Carolina, 15 of which have no marked trails. Most of the 170 walkers who have reached the summits took a year to do it. One man had done it in a continuous 260-mile trip, but no women had yet done so. The trio started last June in the Great Smoky Mountains and ran for up to 15 hours a day between campsites set up by family and friends. After an astonishing six days, 13 hours and 31 minutes, Lundblad and her ultrafriends kissed their final summit marker near Roan Mountain. Lundblad moved to the area from Boulder, Colorado, another world-class outdoor town, in 1993. “I wanted to return east,” she says, “but I also wanted a place that was conducive to my outdoor lifestyle. Here, I found just what I was looking for.” – Randy Johnson ASHEVILLE

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Business

How’s the

Weather? SCIENTISTS, ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS PARTNER TO STUDY CLIMATE CHANGE

STORY BY ANNE GILLEM

climate, and also for both its distance from Washington, D.C., for security reasons, and its proximity, so data would be accessible. Today, those assets and access are more important than ever, and Asheville is favorably positioned. An increasing global awareness about the relationship between climate change and the environmental implications is yielding more investment in this type of research. One of the newest ventures for climatic research, the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, or CICS, was launched here in October 2009 as a partnership between NOAA, North Carolina State University and the University of Maryland.

The office view of George Briggs, executive director of the North Carolina Arboretum and the Centers for Environmental and Climatic Interaction

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STAFF PHOTO

S

ince the days of our founding fathers, notably Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, Americans have been fascinated with weather – watching it, experiencing it and recording their observations. Over the past half-century, Asheville has played a key role in the collection, storage and analysis of such data – including some from Jefferson and Franklin – as the home of the National Climatic Data Center, or NCDC, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. Asheville has been a repository for climatic data since the post-World War II era, selected because of its

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Business

Researchers examine a data visualization at UNC Ashevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Renaissance Computing Institute.

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Hunter M. Goosmann monitors data at the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville.

CICS Asheville, directed by Dr. Otis Brown, is using satellite observations to study and forecast climate change and its effect on the environment. “I see, and my partners see, that NCDC is one of the foundational elements in this because of its perspectives and data holdings,” Brown says. “But we also saw that not one academic institution – or three or four – have a corner on all the expertise it’s going to take in terms of research and education to deal with climate change. So that’s why we put together a broadbased national consortium. We recognized up front that this was going to have to be a partnership to deal with all the research and societal challenges associated with climate change.” Dr. Scott Hausman, deputy director ASHEVILLE

of NOAA’s NCDC, says historically, academia and the private sector have had more success attracting top scientific talent than NOAA, so this new cooperative institute will benefit them, as well. “Dealing with the challenges of a changing climate will require new sets of skills in jobs that haven’t even been defined yet,” adds Eileen Shea, chief of the Climate Services and Monitoring Division at NCDC. “We’re hoping that this gives us an opportunity to help educate, train and bring up the next generation of scientists who can work across multiple scientific disciplines – scientists and communicators who can help people who are not in the scientific community understand how climate is changing and address questions such

STAFF PHOTO

as: what does it mean for me and the way I live my life, and what can I do to both change my lifestyle to manage the risks we’re facing, but also what can I do to be better prepared for what the future is bringing in our direction?” Modern technological tools enable scientists to simultaneously study a wide range of up-to-date data across many fields, but the value of historical information can’t be discounted. “For me, the Thomas Jefferson records are an inspiration,” Shea says. “He encouraged the nation to invest in monitoring weather in part for very public reasons – transportation, safety, commerce and national security. Being reminded of Jefferson reminds me of why we’re in this business. We’re in this business to help people.” I M AG E S A S H E V I L L E . C O M

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Business

Biz Briefs BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE ASHEVILLE’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

$2,069,684 Retail sales ($1000)

$29,279 Retail sales per capita

$391,428 Accommodations and food service sales ($1000)

9,224 Total number of firms Source: U.S. Census QuickFacts

HOTEL INDIGO/THE RESIDENCES AT 151 Biz: hotel and condominiums Buzz: Hotel Indigo/The Residences at 151 opened in downtown Asheville in late fall 2009. Located near the iconic Grove Arcade, the boutique hotel has 100 rooms, with the top four floors containing The Residences at 151, which are 12 luxury condominiums. www.valcour.com/asheville.htm

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NINE MILE Biz: restaurant Buzz: Located in Asheville’s historic Montford neighborhood, Nine Mile features a vegetarianfriendly menu, Caribbean-inspired and traditional pasta dishes, rice dishes and locally made desserts, plus a special of the day. You’ll also find a carefully selected wine list and a good selection of local microbrews. www.ninemileasheville.com

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HANDMADE IN AMERICA Biz: crafts industry organization Buzz: Founded here in 1993, this nationally recognized institution primarily serves as a support system for craftspeople and the craft industry. It formed on the belief that economic revitalization and development can be accomplished by promoting the area’s rich artistic heritage. www.handmadeinamerica.org

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GO MINI’S ASHEVILLE Biz: portable moving and storage Buzz: This authorized dealer for Go Mini’s specializes in portable moving and storage solutions and was named 2009 Dealer of the Year. Owner Robie Campbell was named 2009 Small Business Leader of the Year for a company of 15 employees or less by the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce. www.gominis.com

ASAP Biz: advocates for local food Buzz: ASAP creates and expands local food markets to preserve the area’s agricultural heritage, provide access to fresh, healthy food and support local farmers. It publishes the Local Food Guide, operates an outreach in schools, publicizes local markets and offers grants, using food to reconnect people. www.asapconnections.org

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Business | Economic Profile

ASHEVILLE BUSINESS CLIMATE Asheville has both low unemployment and strong job growth. Fueling the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound business climate are stable population growth, a healthy housing market, expanding professional services, robust small business and healthcare industry growth, and a steady tourism industry.

TAXES

2.5% County Sales Tax

4.25% State Sales Tax

7.75% Total Sales Tax

$.945/$100 Residential Property Tax

$1.5/$1,000 Commercial Property Tax

TRANSPORTATION Asheville Regional Airport 61 Terminal Dr., Ste. 1 Fletcher, NC 28732 (828) 684-2226 ww.flyavl.com Asheville Transit 360 W. Haywood St. Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 253-5691 Mountain Mobility 2000 Riverside Dr., Suite 17 Asheville, NC 28804 (828) 258-0186 www.buncombecounty.org

Asheville Greyhound Station 2 Tunnel Road Asheville, NC 28805 (828) 253-8451 www.greyhound.com

ECONOMIC RESOURCES

HIGHER EDUCATION

3 Number of 2-Year Colleges

10,779 2-Year College Student Total

Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce 36 Montford Ave. Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 258-6101 www.ashevillechamber.org Economic Development Coalition for AshevilleBuncombe County 36 Montford Ave. Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 258-6101 www.ashevillechamber.org Advantage West Economic Development Group 134 Wright Brothers Way Fletcher, NC 28732 (828) 687-7234 www.advantagewest.com

INDUSTRIAL SITE LINKS www.ncsitesearch.com www.wnccpe.com

3 Private 4-Year Universities

3,197 Private 4-Year University Student Total

1 Public 4-Year Universities

3,639 Public 4-Year University Student Total

MORE EO ON ONLINE imagesasheville.com shevi More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

gis.ashevillenc.gov

Norfolk & Southern Railway (404) 529-1591 www.nscorp.com Southeastern Stages (404) 591-2750 www.southeasternstages.com

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A

Cure for What

ALES

You

MICROBREW INDUSTRY BARRELS RIGHT ALONG

STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN

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STAFF PHOTOS

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eer City USA. That’s just one of many recent national nods Asheville has earned thanks to its growing craft brewing community and its constantly evolving offerings. The honor, bestowed in a 2009 Examiner.com poll, tied Asheville only with Portland, Ore., long known throughout the world for its prowess in the industry. Of 16,000 votes, each city received approximately 6,000 votes. It only solidified the marketing efforts of the recently formed Asheville Brewers Alliance, a local coalition of industry businesses cooperating to raise awareness of the area’s burgeoning beer scene. Five years ago, there were only three craft brewers within the city limits, and now there are eight, plus three additional microbreweries in the surrounding area. “We formed the ABA knowing that the Asheville microbreweries are in individual competition with each other, but as a unified group we can market

Barley’s Taproom is one of 11 microbreweries in the Asheville area.

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fantastic beers, and the word continues to get out.” As for Asheville Brews Cruise, it has been popular ever since the tour company was founded in June 2006. For $40 a person, beer enthusiasts ride in a roomy 12-passenger van to tour three local microbreweries in the span of 3 1/2 hours. “Participants sample about 14 or 15 different microbrews during that time, with each beer sample only about four ounces,” says Mark Lyons, owner of Asheville Brews Cruise. “It is a beertasting journey where participants drink the equivalent of about four full beers during the entire trip.” And the microbrew industry will get an exciting addition in early 2010 with the opening of Pack’s Tavern, located downtown adjacent to the new Pack Square Park. The tavern and restaurant are located in a renovated building that was constructed in 1907. “Our tavern has dedicated three beer taps each for all eight of the microbreweries in Asheville,” says Tom Israel, manager of Pack’s Tavern. “The microbrew industry is indeed popular and well known in Asheville, and we are happy to now be a part of it.”

ANTONY BOSHIER

JEFF ADKINS

ourselves very well to attract the brew tourist,” says Mike Rangel, president of the Asheville Brewers Alliance and owner of Asheville Pizza & Brewery. “We aren’t necessarily marketing to tourists who visit places like Biltmore; we target the tourist who actually makes visiting a microbrewery a priority.” For the local craft beer enthusiast, there has perhaps never been a more compelling reason to become a tourist in your own town. The eight microbreweries within the city limits are Asheville Pizza & Brewing, Craggie Brewing, French Broad Brewing, Green Man Ales, Highland Brewing, Lexington Avenue Brewing, OysterHouse Brewing and Wedge Brewing. The three breweries affiliated with the ABA but located outside of Asheville are Catawba Valley Brewing in Morganton, Heinzelmännchen Brewing in Sylva and Pisgah Brewing in Black Mountain. “We also have a couple other ABA members that are not breweries but have a passion for beer, such as Bruisin’ Ales and Asheville Brews Cruise,” Rangel says. “The craft beer industry dates back to 1994 in Asheville and is really starting to blow up. We make

Pisgah Brewing in Black Mountain and French Broad Brewing in Asheville are among 11 area breweries affiliated with the Asheville Brewers Alliance.

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Arts & Culture

Getting to the Pointe TERPSICORPS THEATRE OF DANCE SHOWCASES WORLD-CLASS PERFORMERS

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sheville’s arts scene is lively year round, but summertime holds special offerings thanks to the Terpsicorps Theatre of Dance. The company began in June 2003, when founder Heather Maloy noticed that most major ballet corps tended to have a slow period in the summer. By bringing many of their dancers together during that time, she was able to

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quickly build a company that has become inked in on local art patrons’ must-see event calendars. “I had been dancing for the North Carolina Dance Theatre in Charlotte for 13 years, and over the last five of those was progressively starting to focus more on choreography,” Maloy says. “The best way to build a repertoire as a choreographer is to start your own

company and form a group of dancers who understand and are inspired by your work, so I took the leap.” Launching a year-round operation required financial and other resources out of her reach, so Maloy hit upon the summer-season route. “With this format, I could hire exactly the kind of dancers I was looking for during the time of year that they are on hiatus from their full-time jobs,” she says. “This means a much smaller budget with the same highquality product.” Asheville quickly became her launching pad because of her familiarity with the city. In the years since, the company has not only become firmly fixed but has also begun outreach programs catering to kids. “Terpsicorps typically does two sets of performances in Asheville; one in June and one in August,” Maloy says. “We also have an outreach program that corresponds with the final two weeks of rehearsal leading up to each set of shows. Our outreach director, Joseph Curry, visits local community centers and works with children from low-income neighborhoods, teaching about the choreographic experience.” The company has added an annual set of performances in Winston-Salem in July, and the staff spends the rest of the year raising funds, planning the upcoming repertoire, finding new dancers and working with other local artists and art organizations. “Much of our work is collaborative. We utilize local musicians, visual artists and projection artists within our performances, supplying work to talented people who may not have a lot of opportunity to be involved in the more traditional performing arts,” she says. “Asheville is known as an arts destination, and that is a great part of what attracts people to both visit and relocate to this region. People from large cities are always shocked when they see the quality of art that can be produced in a city as small as Asheville.” – Joe Morris ASHEVILLE


Education

Steep Grades Ahead LOCAL PRIVATE SCHOOL STUDENTS EXCEL IN ACADEMIC PURSUITS

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doesn’t exist often anymore at high school campuses throughout the United States, and it makes Asheville School a tight-knit community in and of itself.” Many of the private schools in Asheville have a somewhat outside-thebox way of teaching, and Asheville School is no different. For example, it has a humanities program that brings music, art, English and history teachers into one classroom to instruct students. In addition, for everything that is taught at Asheville School, educators strive to make students proficient in four distinct areas – critical thinking, problem solving, careful analysis and written communication. “Our entire curriculum focuses on having students take responsibility for their own learning, to become independent learners and critical thinkers who are persistent in the face

Asheville School is the oldest private school in the region.

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of something difficult,” Montgomery says. “We train them not to give up, learn resilience and communicate effectively when working in groups.” Montgomery adds that all of the students at Asheville School are involved in after-school activities. “We are a small school, so we need kids to participate or else we couldn’t have a football team, mountaineering team, string orchestra, dance troupe, field hockey team, debate club and so forth,” he says. Montgomery adds that attending any of the private schools in Asheville has many distinct advantages, but it can be an expensive undertaking for parents. “That’s why we, and the other private schools in Asheville, offer significant financial aid packages,” he says. – Kevin Litwin

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t Hanger Hall, the all-girls middle school has an average of 27 students and nine faculty members, and all of the girls are A or B students. At Christ School, a boarding school for 175 boys in grades eight through 12, students may choose among 22 honorslevel and 13 advanced placement courses. And at Carolina Day School, its 650 students are privy to 20 advanced placement courses, and nearly 100 percent of all its students enter college. These schools are just a few of the many private education options in the Asheville area, with several offering a faith-based curriculum. Among them are Asheville Catholic, Carolina Christian, Emmanuel Lutheran, Nazarene Christian and North Asheville Christian schools. Others that are known for incorporating high standards with regard to academics, conduct and values include Orton Academy & Learning Center, and Rainbow Mountain Children’s School. Meanwhile, the oldest private school in the region is Asheville School, which was established in 1900. Classes are held six days a week for approximately 250 coed students in grades nine through 12. “We have students from 30 states and 10 foreign countries, which makes our campus unusual,” says Arch Montgomery IV, head of Asheville School. “But what also makes us special is that 80 percent of our students live on campus, while the other 20 percent commutes. That kind of ratio just

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Dynamic

Destinations ICONIC CONIC INSTITUTIONS UNVEIL FRESH FEATURES

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STORY BY DANNY BONVISSUTO

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sheville is defined by its spirit of innovation, known for constantly building on the area’s rich cultural heritage with new experiences. In 2010, three destinations – Pack Square Park, Momentum Science & Health Adventure Park and Biltmore – offer more than ever before. A gathering place for more than 200 years, the land that is now Pack Square Park has always been recognized as the heart of Asheville, according to Donna Clark, communications director for the Pack Square Conservancy. Named after George Willis Pack, a lumber baron who retired to Asheville and donated generously to many city endeavors, the new park comprises 6 1/2 acres and is separated into three sections: Pack Square, Reuter Terrace and Roger McGuire Green. In late summer 2009, Pack Square installed a new fountain made of stone and bronze created by local sculptor Hoss Haley. “It’s so creative and unusual,” Clark

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Luther Hollifield enjoys the dizzy room at The Health Adventure.

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Clockwise from top: Fountain by sculptor Hoss Haley in Pack Square Park. Eli Forrells plays at The Health Adventure. Momentum Science & Health Adventure Park’s Turner Tree House. Visitors to River Bend Farm at Biltmore watch a woodworking demonstration. Milas Trull enjoys the Lego table at The Health Adventure.

says. “Water animates a space so much, and people are drawn to it.” In addition to a small stage and paved courtyard, a new 4,600-squarefoot pavilion in Reuter Terrace is scheduled to open in mid 2010. Opened last fall in Roger McGuire Green, Splasheville is another water feature in the park, featuring 21 spouts welcoming kids to run through and play. Expected to cost about $20 million 42

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when complete, Pack Square Park has something for every outdoor lover. “We’ve struck a nice balance between changing the area and preserving it historically,” Clark says. Making its debut in late 2010, Momentum Science & Health Adventure Park is the new and improved home of the The Health Adventure. The park will be a 39,000-square-foot facility in a LEEDcertified building with health galleries,

an outside amphitheater, a tree house with its own classroom and exhibit space, and North America’s first pedalpowered monorail. “It’s like a paddleboat on a rail,” says Paige Dickens, president and CEO. “When we started this project, we wanted an iconic element, not an amusement attraction that would use a lot of fossil fuel. This fits perfectly with our mission of health, wellness and the environment.” ASHEVILLE


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JEFFREY S. OTTO

Think you’ve seen all there is to see at the Biltmore? Think again. Located near the Inn on Biltmore Estate, the new Antler Hill Village connects the winery and River Bend Farm and includes The Biltmore Legacy, an exhibit space devoted to the Vanderbilt family’s interests, past and present; the Village Green and bandstand; the Outdoor Adventure Center, where guests can participate in activities like fly fishing; Cedric’s Tavern, named for

one of the Vanderbilt family’s pets; a creamery serving shakes, floats, gourmet coffee and pastries; and Traditions, a shop focusing on contemporary décor and local crafts. And that’s not all. In April 2009, four new rooms in the Biltmore House – the Louis XV Suite – opened to the public. “This is the culmination of a threeyear restoration project of a suite of rooms on the floor above the library,” says LeeAnn Donnelly, senior public

relations manager for the Biltmore Estate. “These were the most grand rooms in the house, and when George Vanderbilt wanted to impress his guests, he’d have them stay there. Also, they’re historically significant in that two generations of Vanderbilts were born there. Edith Vanderbilt, George’s wife, had her only child, Cornelia, in the Louis XV room, and Cornelia had her two children in that room. There’s so much to take in; it’s a feast for the eyes.” I M AG E S A S H E V I L L E . C O M

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A comfortable, down-home gathering place for special events, located just 10 minutes from the center of Asheville, NC. (828) 667-0666 info@thefarmpartybarn.com www.thefarmpartybarn.com

Kensington Place Apartments Located six miles south of the Biltmore Estate on Hwy. 25A (Sweeten Creed Rd.).

200 Kensington Place

For a Lifestyle You Deserve 1, 2, 3 beds (garages available) Corporate units available

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Asheville, NC 28803 (828) 687-0638 (866) 232-9534 Toll-free www.kensingtonplaceapts.com

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Sports & Recreation

Ready Oar Not PLENTIFUL RIVERS AND STREAMS PROVIDE GENTLE GLIDES AND WILDER RIDES

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drawn to the way the river speaks to them,” she says. “I’m pretty sure everyone has a very personal reason for why they do it. It’s also something special you can share with people you love.” In spring 2010, NOC is set to open its second outdoor store at the Gatlinburg, Tenn., entrance to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. During peak season in June and July, NOC has around 500 employees, and the action is nonstop. “If you took all the guests that rafted all of the rivers in 2008, it would be 849,000 miles – or 22 trips around the earth,” she says. Trips range in price from $25 a person to $175 a person, depending on the river and the type of outing. The season runs from March to October, also depending on the river. Other area outfitters include Wildwater Ltd., in business since 1971, with whitewater trips on a handful of rivers; Diamond Brand Outdoors, with locations in Arden and Asheville; Huck Finn Rafting Adventures in Hot Springs, with more than a quarter-century of experience, and Southern Waterways. “I just love the community that has been built up here over the years,” Rodichok says. “Everyone here enjoys being in the outdoors and wants to be here. You never have one season that’s exactly like the one before it.” – Anne Gillem

JEFFREY S. OTTO

hether you prefer a gentle glide down a peaceful stream or riding the rapids of a lively river, there’s fun to be had on the water in Western North Carolina and the surrounding area. Expert outfitters have the gear and the knowledge to equip those of all skill levels for kayaking, rafting, tubing, canoeing and more. For nearly 40 years, the Nantahala Outdoor Center has been a pacesetter in the world of whitewater rafting. Located in North Carolina near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, NOC guides trips on the Chattooga, Cheoah, French Broad, Nantahala, Nolichucky, Ocoee and Pigeon rivers. “Each river is a little bit different, and we have seven rivers that we run trips on, spread out between North Carolina, Tennessee and South Carolina,” says Barbra Rodichok, spokeswoman for NOC. “The fact that we have seven different rivers to choose from gives us a lot of opportunity to find a river that’s going to fit with everyone’s personality. “For example, the Nantahala, where our headquarters is located, is a very beginner-friendly river. And then, if you decide you really like it and you’re looking for a little bit more adventure, a little more action, we have other rivers that you can progress up to.” The appeal of being on the river is universal, but has different alluring aspects for everyone, Rodichok says. “Some people just like to be outside; some people are

Rafters enjoy a guided trip provided by Nantahala Outdoor Center through the Nantahala Gorge.

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Health & Wellness

Chamber Challenge 5K

Keeping Businesses Running ANNUAL 5K EVENT ENCOURAGES HEALTHY HABITS AMONG CHAMBER MEMBERS

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ere is an odd starting time for an organized 5K run – Friday afternoon at 4:30 p.m. But when you consider that’s approximately the time when the race’s participants usually loosen up a bit each week, it makes perfect sense. The Chamber Challenge 5K is an annual five-kilometer fitness run for employees who work for any businesses throughout Asheville and Buncombe County. The fourth annual event is tentatively scheduled to take place June 4, 2010, and is sponsored each year by the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce. Ben Van Camp, director of communications for the Asheville Chamber, says the Chamber Challenge is much different from the average 5K. “It is entirely work-focused, with runners grouped in teams of four, often with coworkers teamed together,” he says. “For example, a group of dental hygienists might participate as one team. There might be a team of lawyers, a team of construction workers and so forth. And because it is work-focused, that’s why the starting time was chosen. It’s an excellent and healthy way to wrap up a work week.” Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Rick Lutovsky says the race was a natural fit for the organization. “The Asheville Area Chamber has always encouraged the financial health of our membership, and the Chamber Challenge 5K allows us to help our members and their employees be personally healthy as well,” Lutovsky says. “Having healthy employees means reduced sick time, increased productivity and lower healthcare costs, which is

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something any company can be excited about.” The Chamber Challenge is promoted as a fitness run, but participants can also walk the course. “There are several competitive runners who participate, but the majority of people are average folks just looking to get a bit more healthy and fit,” Van Camp says. The event is organized each year in partnership with Mission Hospitals, which holds an annual weight-loss competition called Lighten Up 4 Life. “Participants lose weight from Jan. 1 until the beginning of June, and our 5K race is the culminating event of that program,” Van Camp says. The road course for the Chamber Challenge begins in front of the chamber offices on Montford Avenue. Runners proceed through the historic Montford neighborhood, which is graced with more than 600 structures built between 1846 and 1920. “Several of the streets are tree-lined to provide plenty of shade,” Van Camp says. “It’s really a nice place to spend a half hour or so while exercising for three miles.” Van Camp says prizes are awarded for the fastest male runner, fastest female runner and the fastest team. “Teams are also encouraged to dress up in costume to make the challenge even more interesting,” he says. “For example, four staffers from the local YMCA arrived at the run one year dressed like [singing group the Village People]. That kind of participation adds to the fun of the Chamber Challenge.” – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S A S H E V I L L E . C O M

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visit our

advertisers Asheville Bed & Breakfast Association www.ashevillebba.com Asheville City Schools www.asheville.k12.nc.us Asheville Dental Associates www.ashevilledentalassociates.com Asheville School www.ashevilleschool.org Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College www.abtech.edu Beverly Hanks & Associates www.beverly-hanks.com Biltmore Farms LLC www.biltmorefarms.com Biltmore Management www.residencesatbiltmore.com Carolina Day School www.cdschool.org Carolina Mornings/Asheville Cabins www.carolinamornings.com Christ School www.christschool.org Deerfield Episcopal Retirement Community www.deerfieldwnc.org DRA Living www.draliving.com Dragonfly Design www.dragonflydesignproperties.com Four Seasons www.fourseasonscfl.org Givens Estates www.givensestates.org GPI Ventures LLC www.thefitzgerald.info Grovewood Gallery www.grovewood.com Hickory Furniture Mart www.hickoryfurniture.com Kensington Place Apartments www.kensingtonplaceapts.com Legerton Architecture www.legertonarchitecture.com MAHEC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Family Health www.mahec.net MAHEC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; OB/GYN www.mahec.net MAHEC Dental Health Center www.mahec.net McKinney Insurance Agency www.mckinneyinsuranceservices.com Mission Hospitals www.missionhospitals.org Sensibilities Day Spa www.sensibilities-spa.com The Farm www.thefarmpartybarn.com

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Ad Index 24 A S H E V I L L E B E D & B R E A K FA S T A S S O C I ATI O N 2 5 A S H E V I L L E C IT Y S C H O O L S 24 A S H E V I L L E D E N TA L A S S O C I AT E S

21 CHRIST SCHOOL 24 D E E R FI E L D E P I S CO PA L R E TI R E M E N T CO M M U N IT Y 4 8 D R A LI V I N G 32 D R AG O N FLY D E S I G N

C4 ASHEVILLE SCHOOL 4 6 FO U R S E A S O N S 3 1 A S H E V I L L E- B U N CO M B E T EC H N I C A L CO M M U N IT Y CO L L EG E

4 4 G I V E N S E S TAT E S 2 G P I V E N T U R E S L LC

1 B E V E R LY H A N K S & A S S O C I AT E S

5 G ROV E WO O D G A L L E RY

C 2 B I LT M O R E FA R M S L LC

32 H I C KO RY FU R N IT U R E M A RT

2 2 B I LT M O R E M A N AG E M E N T

4 4 K E N S I N GTO N P L AC E A PA RT M E N TS

3 8 C A RO LI N A DAY S C H O O L C 3 L EG E RTO N A RC H IT EC T U R E 2 3 C A RO LI N A M O R N I N G S/ ASHEVILLE CABINS

4 6 M A H EC – FA M I LY H E A LT H


Ad Index (cont.) 4 8 M A H EC – O B/GY N 4 6 M A H EC D E N TA L H E A LT H C E N T E R 32 M C K I N N E Y I N S U R A N C E AG E N C Y 4 4 M I S S I O N H OS P ITA L S 4 6 S E N S I B I LITI E S DAY S PA 4 4 T H E FA R M


Community Profile

ASHEVILLE SNAPSHOT As a resort and therapeutic health center since the late 1880s, Asheville has long been a destination for people searching for a mountain escape, its population climbing to nearly 30,000 seasonal residents in 1890. More Art Deco architecture built in the late 1920s and early 1930s can be found in downtown Asheville than in any other southeastern city outside of Miami.

COMMUNITY RESOURCES CLIMATE

25.8 F January Low Temperature

62.7 F July Low Temperature

83.3 F July High Temperature

GOVERNMENT OFFICES City of Asheville 70 Court Plaza Asheville, NC 28802 (828) 251-1122 www.ashevillenc.gov Buncombe County Administration 205 College St. Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 250-4100 www.buncombecounty.org

Asheville Public Works Department 161 S. Charlotte St. Asheville, NC 28802 (828) 259-5935 Asheville Fire and Rescue 100 Court Plaza Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 259-5636 Asheville Police Department 100 Court Plaza Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 252-1110 North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles - Driver's Services and Vehicle Services www.ncdot.og

Asheville Citizen-Times 14 O. Henry Ave. Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 252-5610 Mountain Xpress 2 Wall St. Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 251-1333

MORE EO ON ONLINE imagesasheville.com shevi More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

MEDIA OUTLETS Asheville Daily Planet 224 Broadway Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 252-6565

THIS SECTION IS SPONSORED BY

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Asheville, NC: 2010  

As a resort and therapeutic health center since the late 1880s, Asheville has long been a destination for people searching for a mountain es...