Page 1

GO TEXAN • AGRICULTURE IS YOUR CULTURE •

A RICH WAY OF LIFE Roots of agriculture run deep in Texas

COTTON IS KING

Follow the journey of the state’s top crop

LEADING THE NATION

COMMUNITY AG PROGRAMS INSPIRE YOUNG TEXANS Commissioner Todd Staples // Texas Department of Agriculture // TX-agriculture.com // 2014


TABLE OF CONTENTS

7 Welcome Letter 8 Texas Agriculture 12 A Way of Life

Texas families have deep roots in farming and ranching

Crops, Plants & Forestry

2014

GO TEXAN • AGRICULTURE IS YOUR CULTURE •

18 A Texas Staple

Lone Star State ranks first for cotton production

24 From Field to Fiber

Follow the journey of the Texas cotton crop

27 Rows of Success

Learn more about other row crops grown in the Lone Star State

28 Produce It All

Texas-grown specialty crops range from pecans to onions

32 Business Is Blooming

Texas horticulture industry generates $18 billion

36 Standing Solid

Best management practices improve forestry sustainability, economic impact

12

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

3


TABLE OF CONTENTS

GO TEXAN 2014

Animals, Livestock & Seafood 42 Cattle Drive

Beef industry dominates Texas economy

48 The Legendary Longhorn

Texas cattle breed fueled ranching industry

50 Sold on Seafood

Get on board with Texas wild-caught shrimp and fish

Agricultural Education 52 Boots, Spurs & Cowboy Hats

Rodeos and livestock shows positively impact Texas youth

58 GROWing Leaders

Texas students get schooled in agriculture while preparing for future careers

Economic Development

Local Food 66 The Secret Ingredient

Texas chefs look to local foods

69 GO TEXAN

Statewide program encourages local movement

70 Cafeteria Connections

Texas students dine on Texas-grown foods

71 Valued Vines

Texas economy benefits from state’s growing wine industry

Innovation in Agriculture 72 Green by Design

Red Caboose Winery combines profitability, sustainability and innovation

On the Cover Siblings Ben and Railey Mikeska of Dripping Springs exhibit beef cattle at livestock shows across the state. PHOTO BY FRANK ORDOĂ‘EZ

62 A Changing Landscape

Agriculture looks to strength of communities for success

18

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

5


A LOOK INSIDE

Visit us online at

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

Welcome to

ANIMALS, LIVESTOCK & SEAFOOD

Cattle Drive Beef industry dominates agricultural economy

Texas caTTle ranchers

continue to feel the heat as drought dried up most of the state’s pastures through early 2013. But Texas didn’t become the country’s leading cattle state without meeting challenges, and each segment of the industry is positioning for recovery. “The beef cattle industry in Texas has three main segments,” says Tom

Hairgrove, a veterinarian and program coordinator for Texas A&M AgriLife Extension.

THREE INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

Cow-calf producers raise the calf from birth to weaning age, which is when the calf no longer nurses from the cow. Stockers and cow-calf producers grow the weaned calf on pastures to a heavier weight. Cattle feeders, or

feedlots, raise cattle from stocker weights to harvest. “Producers usually focus on one segment, but even though they’re independent, they rely on each other,” Hairgrove says. One quarter of the nation’s fed cattle are raised here in Texas. Cow-calf and stocker operations are located statewide, with much of the state’s cow herd concentrated in the eastern part

PHOTO BY RUSSELL A. GRAVES

42

//

GO TExAN

Tx-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

43

Digital

GO TEXAN

Edition

OPTIMIZED FOR ONLINE Each article can be read online, as a web article or in our digital magazine.

SHARE THE CONTENT

Easily share an interesting article, stunning photo or useful advertisement via Facebook, Twitter or e-mail.

HAVE A BLOG OR WEBSITE? Embed our digital magazine in your website to offer compelling information about Texas agriculture to your site visitors.

Read on the Go

The digital magazine is available for tablet and phone viewing.

2014

GO TEXAN Visit us online at

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

Welcome to the GO TEXAN magazine!

The roots of agriculture run deep in Texas and not just in the fields of our farmers and ranchers. At this very moment, Texas agriculture is helping feed and clothe our families, build our homes and drive innovation. Plus, it provides a $100 billion boost to our state economy. Agriculture contributes to science, medicine, education and fashion. It keeps us healthy. It adds color to our state and the world. It’s a dynamic industry that reaches across the farmer’s fence and into our daily lives. Much of our state’s history, culture and pride can be traced back to our agricultural roots. One out of every seven working Texans is employed in an ag-related job. That’s what makes GO TEXAN magazine so special. It is a tribute to the men and women who nurture our lands and make Texas agriculture known throughout the world. I invite you to explore the GO TEXAN magazine and take an insider’s look at how Texas agriculture is influencing the people and products of our great state. Find out how your favorite pair of jeans or comfy cotton t-shirt makes its way from the field to store shelves or how restaurants are looking to local farms for their culinary inspiration. Texas agriculture is as diverse as the vast lands that make up the Lone Star State. Agriculture is critical to the life of every Texan. I am confident that soon you will love and value Texas agriculture as much as I do. I believe we really do things bigger and better in Texas. Remember, it’s not bragging if it’s the truth. Enjoy the GO TEXAN magazine! Sincerely,

Todd Staples Texas Agriculture Commissioner

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

7


OVERVIEW

Texas Agriculture Everything is bigger in the Lone Star State, including agriculture Cowboys and endless blue

skies are one of Texas’ claims to fame. Both can often be seen from the 144 million acres of rural land spanning across the state. Within its population of 26 million people, 12 percent of Texas residents live in rural areas, and one out of seven Texans rely on agriculture for their livelihood. An astounding 98.5 percent of the 247,500 farms and ranches are family farms or familyheld corporations. The Lone Star State boasts a variety of topographical and climate features. This variety allows Texas to support numerous crops and products. Plains, coastlines, mountains and basins make up the landscape, and the state is so vast that it contains approximately 1,100 different types of soil. Agriculture is the second-largest industry in the state. The economic impact of the food and fiber sector is more than $100 billion annually. Cash receipts from agriculture totaled $22.7 billion annually during 2011, and revenue from agricultural exports totaled more than $7.6 billion in 2011. Texas is the top producing state in the country for a number of

8

//

Go Texan

agricultural commodities. Cattle, cotton, sheep and goats, wool and mohair, and hay are some the state’s most-produced commodities. True to its reputation, Texas is No. 1 in the nation for cattle production. There are about 149,000 cattle operations in the state with 11.3 million head of cattle. Beef and veal exports alone were worth $961 million in 2011. Hides and skins brought in another $472 million on the international market. Texas produces 13.3 percent of the meat in the U.S., which accounts for 50 percent of the state’s agricultural income. Although the cattle industry dominates the public perception of Texas, fiber production is an integral part of the state’s economy. In 2012, farmers produced 5 million bales of cotton. Not to be overlooked, wool and mohair also are popular fibers. In 2012, 700,000 sheep and lambs produced 2.3 million pounds of wool. Needless to say, Texas has an agricultural industry befitting its size. With millions of acres producing countless commodities, agriculture provides jobs, food and income for Texans and others across the globe. – Hannah Patterson

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES TOTAL

$7.6B

.

The Texas food and fiber industry generates more than $100 billion for the economy annually.

98.5% OF TEXAS FARMS AND RANCHES ARE FAMILY FARMS, PARTNERSHIPS OR FAMILY-HELD CORPORATIONS.

What’s Online Access more agriculture facts at TX-agriculture.com.


1 out of every 7 working Texans is in an agriculture-related job.

TEXAS LEADS THE NATION WITH

247,500 farms and ranches COVERING 130.4 MILLION ACRES.

Texas has approximately

1,100

different soils within its borders. Rural lands, including privately-owned forests, total 144 million acres. That’s 86 percent of the state’s total land area.

Texas leads the nation in:

CATTLE

COTTON

HAY

SHEEP AND WOOL

GOATS AND MOHAIR

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

9


Top Agriculture Products Texas’ top commodities, based on cash receipts CATTLE AND CALVES The Lone Star State’s cattle industry ranks No. 1 in the nation. This commodity contributed $10.5 billion to the state’s economy in 2012.

COTTON Texas ranks No. 1 in the nation for cotton production. In 2012, cotton production generated $2.2 billion in agricultural income for the state.

DAIRY PRODUCTS Texas is No. 6 in milk production in the U.S., generating $1.8 billion in 2012. The state’s dairy products include milk, butter, cheese, yogurt and ice cream.

BROILERS Generating $1.7 billion in production value in 2012, Texas raised 605,500 broilers. That equaled 3.5 billion total pounds of poultry produced.

GREENHOUSE & NURSERY Trees, plants, shrubs, flowers and other horticultural products contributed $1.3 billion to the state’s economy in 2012.

CORN In 2012, Texas farmers planted 1.9 million acres of corn. Corn production generated $1.2 billion in farm income in 2012.

GRAIN SORGHUM Texas represented 45 percent of the total grain sorghum produced in the U.S. during 2012, which is valued at $703 million.

WHEAT Texas producers planted 5.7 million acres of winter wheat in 2012. A total of 96 million bushels were harvested, a value of $ 653 million.

VEGETABLES AND MELONS Texas is the nation’s eighth largest producer of fresh vegetables, generating $439 million in 2012.

CHICKEN EGGS In 2012, Texas produced $439 million worth of chicken eggs. The state’s egg industry generated 1,890 jobs in 2009.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

11


HERITAGE

A Way of

Life

Texas families nurture deep roots in farming and ranching

Bill Selman and his son Wes Selman represent the sixth and seventh generations to operate their family’s ranch along the Guadalupe River in Gonzalez, Texas. PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK ORDOÑEZ

12

//

Go Texan


TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

13


Texas farmers have strong

values — family, land, tradition, conservation, responsibility — and so does the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA). That’s why TDA created the Family Land Heritage Program, which recognizes farms and ranches that have been in continuous agricultural operation by the same family for more than 100 years. Since the Family Land Heritage Program began in 1974, it has recognized more than 4,800 farms and ranches in 239 counties across the state. Through farming or raising livestock on the same soil as previous

generations, these families have a unique sense of pride in the land and feel a responsibility for using that land to produce food to feed the world’s growing population. “The Family Land Heritage program recognizes the hard work of Texas farmers and ranchers who always strive to get the most out of their land, but also to leave it in the best possible shape for the next generation,” says Texas rancher Jim Selman. And Selman, 82, knows about land being passed down through the generations.

SELMAN RANCH

In 1861, Selman’s great-greatgrandfather purchased 300 acres of

land. Since then, every generation has added to it, and now, Selman runs a cow-calf operation on 2,029 acres in Gonzales County and leases out 1,000 more acres. Selman grew up on the ranch, but had to work off the farm as an agricultural extension agent from the 1950s until 1986 because of severe drought conditions – something all Texas farmers can understand. “All this time I was still ranching, but I had to do it at a distance in order to keep my property,” Selman says. “My goal was always to get back to the ranch full time.” Throughout his life, Selman has always believed he had an obligation

STAFF PHOTO

Bottom Left: A ranch sign celebrates its Texas heritage. Bottom Right: Gonzales County rancher Ray Wilson raises beef cattle on land that’s been in his family sine 1861.

14

//

Go Texan


to raise food for the world’s growing population, and through estate planning, he is ensuring that his land will be kept together and hopefully used for that purpose long after he can’t raise cattle anymore. “People don’t realize how important it is to keep land in production,” he says. “We’ve been feeding the world all these years, and now we have less and less acreage available. Land is priceless; we’re not making any more of it.”

RAY WILSON RANCH

Ray and Faye Wilson feel the same way. “Land is the only thing we’ve got on earth that remains unchanged,”

THE AVERAGE TEXAS FARMER OR RANCHER IS

59

Texas leads the nation in total value of farm and ranch real estate.

YEARS OLD.

Land is the only thing we’ve got on earth that remains unchanged.



– RAY WILSON

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

15


Bill Selman vaccinates his beef cattle herd. A proactive vaccination program is important to keep the cattle healthy and disease-free.

16

//

Go Texan


says 87-year-old Ray Wilson, a retired university chemistry professor and Family Land Heritage Program honoree. “If the person who owns the land doesn’t raise food, people are going to starve.” Wilson, who served in the United States Navy during World War II, went on to become the first AfricanAmerican male to earn a Ph.D. from the University of Texas in 1953. No matter what he pursued in life – whether it was joining the Navy, earning his Ph.D., getting a law degree, teaching college students or selling real estate – he never abandoned his land or farming. He’s raised cattle and hogs and grown peanuts, corn and hay. He says his newest farming venture will be certified organic fruit and vegetable production. The Wilson family originally owned 114 acres, which was given to Ray’s great-aunt, Mattie Wade, after she was liberated from slavery. Ray bought more land throughout his life, and he now owns more than 400 acres near Giddings and Fort Bend. Ray started working on the farm early in his childhood. “Daddy started me farming at 5 years old,” he says. “At age 7, I was driving a tractor and everything. Farming is a character you carry along with you. It’s what my mother and dad did, and it’s what I do.” Although Ray had job offers at universities across the country when he earned his Ph.D., he and his wife Faye decided to stay in Texas. “Farming made my husband who he is,” says Faye, who didn’t grow up on a farm, but has embraced the lifestyle wholeheartedly. “I believe in the farming, but it’s a hard life. It’s in his bones. He loves to do hard work. I’ve learned a lot, and as a matter of fact, I enjoy it, too.” – Jill Clair Gentry

What’s Online Learn more about the Texas Family Land Heritage program at TX-agriculture.com

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

17


CROPS, PLANTS & FORESTRY

A Texas

Staple

18

//

Go Texan


Lone Star State ranks first for cotton production In Texas, the future of

cotton isn’t about growing more, it’s about growing it better. Texas is already the best in the nation at growing cotton, producing roughly one-third of the U.S. cotton crop. “Historically, East Texas was the primary cotton-producing region,” says Darren Hudson, director of the Cotton Economics Research Institute at Texas Tech University. “Cotton is still grown over there to some extent, but over time, cotton production has gravitated westward and to some extent southward.

Cotton has always been, and still is, grown in the Coastal Bend and along the Upper Coast. But today, the High Plains is the big producer of cotton.” The total economic impact of cotton in Texas is more than $24 billion, with approximately five million bales of cotton produced annually. Hudson says that figure won’t likely change in the future, but technology and biotechnology will continue to improve efficiencies and genetics. “That means cotton is going to be a viable crop and one of the biggest cash crops we’re going to have in Texas,” he says.

FARMING MORE EFFICIENTLY

Fourth-generation cotton farmer Jon Whatley says advancements in technology and biotechnology have already impacted his business. “The biggest transition since I started farming has been the advent of technology allowing us to farm more efficiently and with less trouble,” Whatley says. “In the last 15 years, we’ve substantially changed how we operate. Biotechnology has allowed us to apply fewer chemicals and increase the health of the plant. We have newer varieties available that work better regionally, and that

STAFF PHOTO

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

19


PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK ORDOÑEZ

The Whatley family represents the third, fourth and fifth generations to grow cotton in the Coastal Bend region of Texas.

has increased our yields.” Whatley’s cotton is grown on his 5,000-acre farm located in Odem, Texas. “We have created a niche in the Coastal Bend region thanks to the quality of our cotton,” he says. “It matches some of the varieties grown in Arizona and California, but ours comes off a couple of months earlier, so we’re able to fill that market need.”

COTTON INDUSTRY’S FUTURE

Whatley sees a bright future for the cotton industry. “It’s a natural fiber, and that’s what people want,” he says. “Texas is going to benefit from the demand for cotton because we grow so much of it. The industry has its ups and downs, but it’s still thriving through technology and research.” The supply chain from the farm to a department store is a complex world. “A pair of jeans has about two pounds of cotton,” Hudson says. “It’s amazingly small, but from a margin perspective, it’s important. Farmers are always dealing with cost pressures, and technology helps with that by giving productivity gains.”

In 2012, Texas farmers harvested 5 million bales of cotton, a

43% increase

from the droughtreduced 2011 crop.

Top Texas Cotton Counties: 1. Lubbock 2. Hale 3. Gaines 4. Crosby 5. Floyd

FARMERS HARVESTED COTTON FROM

3.9 million acres WITH AN AVERAGE YIELD OF 615 POUNDS PER ACRE IN 2012.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

21


NEW MARKETS

Prior to the collapse of the textile industry, approximately 70 percent of the cotton produced in Texas was milled in the U.S. Today, nearly all cotton produced in Texas goes into the global market. Market change resulted in a need to transform the product itself, says Dr. Dean Ethridge, managing director of the Fiber and Biopolymer Research Institute (FBRI) at Texas Tech University. “The best cotton is going to be the longest, the strongest and the finest,” Ethridge says. “FBRI’s mission is to add value to cotton. One way of achieving that goal is the use of sophisticated instruments to measure fiber properties that are being bred into new seed lines.” Hudson also notes that work at FBRI has changed the cotton industry in Texas and across the country. “Research is developing droughttolerant varieties,” Hudson says. “Biotechnology, technology and water management are the focus going forward. We’ve got challenges, but cotton has been a good thing for us in Texas, and it will continue to be a good thing. We have turned our attention to technology and management practices that will allow us to meet the production challenges ahead.” – Kim Madlom

Left: Father-son farm team Robert and Jon Whatley inspect cotton bolls. Right: Jon Whatley utilizes tractors and other equipment daily on the farm.

COTTON PRODUCTION

Texas ranks as the top U.S. state for cot ton production, with 2.2 million more bales yielded than the No. 2 state, Georgia, in 2012. Texas: 5 million bales Georgia: 2.75 million bales Arkansas: 1.3 million bales California: 1.2 million bales North Carolina: 1.2 million bales

22

//

Go Texan

TEXAS PRODUCES ABOUT

34%

OF THE ENTIRE U.S. COTTON CROP.


Texas ChrisTmas Tree Growers

Caring for families Memories are made at Texas Christmas Tree Farms as families choose and cut their own Christmas trees.

Caring for the land Texas Christmas trees are renewable, recyclable resources that are grown close to home.

Caring for Texas

The members of the Texas Christmas Tree Growers Association are family farmers who help keep agriculture close to the people.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

23


CROPS, PLANTS & FORESTRY

From Field to Fiber Follow the journey of the Texas cotton crop

1

1. Soil Preparation

Before planting can begin, farmers test the soil to determine what additional nutrients are needed. Different areas in the field are tested to determine the necessary amount to fertilize and with the ultimate goal of adding only what’s necessary to grow a good crop. Cotton farmers, like all crop producers, utilize best management practices when making soil preparation decisions.

2

3

24

//

Go Texan

2. Planting

Planting can begin as early as February in South Texas and continue into late May or early June in the High Plains. Before planting can begin, the seedbed is prepared, according to the planting method the farmer will use. Some farmers till the soil to plow up any weeds that would compete with the cotton plant for nutrients and to form ridges, or rows. Many other farmers utilize no-till or reduced-tillage practices, which minimizes the overall impact on the field. The seeds are then planted with mechanical planters that can cover as many as 10 to 24 rows at a time, and it takes about 5 to 10 days for the seedlings to emerge.

3. Irrigation and Water Management

Water is one of the most important factors necessary to grow a good cotton crop. Physiologically, a cotton plant can endure periods of drought, but it responds favorably to optimum water, which results in a better crop. Many farmers utilize irrigation systems to supplement the water needs of their cotton crop, and in 2012, some 2.2 million cotton acres in Texas were irrigated, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. These technologically advanced systems allow the farmer to apply specific water quantities to the fields based on need. Other farmers rely on Mother Nature to provide the necessary rainfall to produce a good cotton crop.


4

4. Pest management

Cotton is highly susceptible to aphid, mite, bollworms, boll weevils, thrips, white flies and other pests. Identifying problems requires multiple checks of the fields throughout the growing season, which is often done by crop consultants who spend up to 30 hours a week checking cotton fields for various farmers. Many Texas farmers have an integrated pest management system that uses both predator insects and insecticides.

5

5. Harvesting

The cotton boll is the green pod left behind when the cotton flowers mature and fall off. Inside the boll, fibers grow and push out. When enough bolls have turned brown and opened naturally, a defoliant can be applied by air or ground application to speed up the maturation process. This ultimately helps more bolls open and the leaves fall off. Farmers use mechanized cotton pickers to pull the fiber from the plant; then the cotton is usually packed into modules, or bale-like units, before it is delivered to the gin.

6

7

6. Ginning

At the gin, the modules are broken down, and the cotton fiber is separated from the seed. The fiber is now referred to as lint and is packed into bales. A standard bale of cotton fiber is 55 inches tall, 28 inches wide and 21 inches thick, weighing approximately 500 pounds. This is enough to make 325 pairs of denim jeans. The lint is shipped to textile mills or exported, while the seed is transported to cottonseed oil mills or used for livestock feed.

7. Processing

The bale is transported to a textile mill for processing. The fibers are mechanically carded, or pulled in the opposite direction, to ensure they are parallel. Combing machines remove impurities in the fiber before it’s pulled thinner and wound onto bobbins that are ready to be spun into yarn. The yarn can be used for knitting or weaving into fabric to make garments, furniture coverings and more.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

25


CROPS, PLANTS & FORESTRY

Rows of Success Learn more about other row crops grown in the Lone Star State

Corn producers harvested 202 million bushels in 2012, a 47 percent increase from the prior year.

W

hile cotton ranks No. 1 among Texas row crops, the state’s diverse geography also encourages the growth and success of other crops. Corn, sorghum, rice, peanuts, soybeans, wheat, vegetables, melons, citrus, peaches, grapes and pecans all grow well in various regions of the state, depending on soil type, topography, rainfall, drainage and other factors.

2012 WAS A BANNER YEAR FOR GRAIN SORGHUM. THE STATE’S PRODUCTION MORE THAN DOUBLED, COMPARED TO 2011, RANKING TEXAS AS THE NO. 1 STATE IN THE COUNTRY.

The Texas peanut industry is worth more than

1.55 million acres of corn were harvested in 2012.

$1 billion

to the state’s economy. Peanut farmers, shellers, equipment dealers, manufacturers and labor make up a portion of the industry that has become so valuable to Texas.

Yield averages for Texas-grown crops:

CORN

SORGHUM

SOYBEANS

RICE

PEANUTS

130 bushels/acre

59 bushels/acre

26 bushels/acre

8,370 pounds/acre

3,500 pounds/acre

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

27


CROPS, PLANTS & FORESTRY

Produce It ALL Texas-grown specialty crops range from pecans to onions

STAFF PHOTO

28

//

Go Texan


STAFF PHOTO

Left: Pecan trees are native to Texas, but commercial producers also plant trees in orchards. Above: Texas is the country’s second-largest grower of onions.

Texas ranks among the

top 10 states for specialty crop production, shipping produce nationwide. However, much of the fruits, vegetables and nuts grown in Texas stay in Texas. “Texas is a market in itself,” says J Allen Carnes, president at Winter Garden Produce in Uvalde. A third-generation vegetable producer, Carnes says his family’s farm, which ships onions and cabbage across the country, has benefited from growth in the Texas market. “In the last four or five years, there has been a huge emphasis on buying local,” he says. As more Texans seek out produce grown nearby, the state’s specialty crop farms still emphasize providing fresh produce for the rest of the country. Like fresh onions: Texas is the country’s second-largest grower, harvesting 120,000 to 220,000 tons annually, according to the U.S.

THE PECAN TREE IS THE STATE TREE OF TEXAS. Texas ranks No. 3 for pecan production, with 75 million pounds harvested in 2012. The majority of U.S. pecans are sold shelled. Only about 20 percent of the national pecan crop is sold in-shell. 

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

29


Department of Agriculture (USDA). “Texas has always provided a mild onion, which is what consumers want,” says Carnes, whose farm counts between 800 and 1,000 acres of onions among its 2,500 acres of vegetables. “We saw demand for our onions pick up in grocery stores during the economic downturn, and now we’re seeing greater demand from restaurants and food service.” Texas also is among the top four cabbage-growing states, harvesting 6,000 acres in 2012. Growers here can ship field-fresh produce around the country for the important St. Patrick’s Day market. Texas green cabbage also ships year-round, with later shipments often preserved in slaw and sauerkraut.

PHOTO BY FRANK ORDOÑEZ

RESEARCH BREEDS IMPROVEMENTS

30

//

Go Texan

Texas usually plants more watermelons than any other state, with 29,000 acres of watermelons planted in 2012, which were grown on both dry land and irrigated acreage. Like other specialty crops, the Texas watermelon industry has received funding for research and market development through Specialty Crop Block Grants, a program mandated by Congress in the 2008 Farm Bill. One grant, which is administered by the Texas Department of Agriculture, funded Texas A&M University researchers’ evaluation of growing irrigated watermelons alongside wheat and barley, and finding ways to combat the buildup of potentially harmful salts in irrigated soil. Cindy Wise, executive vice president of the Texas Pecan Growers Association, says that 2012 specialty crop grants also funded the development of Good Agricultural Practice guidelines for pecans and research to combat cotton root rot, which can devastate pecan plantings. Preserving pecan orchards is important, as the industry benefits from domestic and international demand. “Since about 2008, China has taken an incredible interest in in-shell pecans, and that’s opened up a whole new market for producers,” says Wise. U.S. pecan exports totaled 152 million pounds in 2012, a 45 percent increase from 2011.


THE STATE’S WATERMELON CROP RANKS

No. 4

NATIONALLY, AND TOGETHER WITH CALIFORNIA, FLORIDA AND GEORGIA, REPRESENTS 65 PERCENT OF TOTAL U.S. PRODUCTION.

The first citrus orchards were established along the Texas Gulf Coast in the 1880s.

Texas produced 16 percent of the U.S. pecan crop in 2012; only Georgia and New Mexico harvested more. Pecans are one of the state’s highestvalue crops per acre of production. Depending on nut prices, the value of Texas pecan production ranged between $75 and $160 million from 2010 to 2012, according to the USDA. High-yield pecan orchards account for the bulk of the Texas pecan crop, but about one-fourth of the state’s production comes from native pecan trees along rivers, often cultivated alongside other crops. Wise says U.S. consumers continue

to choose nuts as a healthy snack and food ingredient. “There’s a huge consumer focus on health,” she says, “and pecans are high in healthy fats and very high in antioxidants.” That interest in eating healthier is one thing that ties Texas fruit, vegetable and tree nut producers together as they improve specialty crop production. “Growing these crops is costly. It takes a lot to produce them,” says Carnes. “But we are making it easier and easier for people to buy fresh, healthy food.” – Matthew Ernst

Top Left: Watermelons are grown on nearly 29,000 acres in Texas. Bottom Left: The state is well known for growing red grapefruits. The red color comes from the lycopene in the fruit, which is also an antioxidant.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

31


CROPS, PLANTS & FORESTRY

Business Is

Blooming Texas horticulture industry generates $18 billion From M arch to M ay, one of the prettiest

flowers in Texas – a state rich with plants, flowers and trees – is the Lady Bird Johnson Royal Bluebonnet. The robust plant with cobalt blue flowers is one of the Texas Superstars, a designation given to plants that do well in Texas weather and soil with minimal work. Strong, healthy plants contribute to Texas’ economy. In 2011, total horticulture and green industry sales, which includes growing, landscaping and retailing, exceeded $15.6 billion, up 8.7 percent from the prior year, according to a report by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. Factor in all aspects of the green industry, including manufacturing and equipment sales, and the economic impact increases to nearly $18 billion. “The sales figures are strong, but the overall economic impact of the industry is even more impressive,” says

Amy Graham, president of the Texas Nursery and Landscape Association. “You can’t buy sod or turf without also buying fertilizer and mowers.”

LANDSCAPE AND FLORAL

Two key segments of Texas’ green industry are landscaping and floral. “Production has increased over the last few years,” Graham says. “We represent more than 200,000 jobs in the state of Texas, and that’s a pretty exciting number.” Graham expects retail sales to continue to rise as city residents become more interested in growing plants. “Our industry has a cooling effect on urban heat centers,” she says. “Just as people are migrating to urban centers, so is horticulture. We’re seeing increases in rooftop gardens, container gardens and urban community gardens. In addition, interest in edible plants is

Indigenous to Texas, bluebonnets are the state’s official flower. The distinctive flowers have a short, but lush blooming season each spring.

32

//

Go Texan


expanding as more people are trying to grow their own food, and that’s great for our industry, people’s health and the environment.”

INDUSTRY CHALLENGES

PHOTO BY RUSSELL A. GRAVES

Even so, Graham says labor remains a challenge for the industry. “It’s not just the immigration issue, it’s also the need to encourage young people to pursue higher education in the industry. We want people to understand that they can make a good living in the green industry,” she says. Dianna Nordman, executive director of the Texas State Florists’ Association (TSFA), notes the concerns surrounding available workers for the industry. “The industry as a whole is very healthy,” Nordman says. “What we lack are qualified employees and future owners. Our association is working to educate teachers and students about opportunities in the floral industry.” TSFA has taken an important step to address the lack of workers by partnering with the state to develop the Texas High School Floral Certification program. More than 800 high school students across the state have achieved level one design certification, which qualifies

them to create the basic designs used in a florist shop on a daily basis. The organization also is working to protect and strengthen sales for local florists all across the state, including addressing a relatively recent trend. “Obituaries are including the phrase ‘in lieu of flowers’ along with encouragement to make a donation to honor the loved one,” she says. “Our association is very supportive of people making donations, but what’s happening is that people are going to funerals and memorial services and not seeing the display of flowers that represent thoughtfulness and love. We’re working with funeral directors on that message.” Graham believes plants and flowers should be part of every environment and occasion. “We don’t consider plants a luxury purchase,” she says. “Studies have shown that plants increase the quality of peoples’ lives. People who garden are happier. They have scabby knees, but happy hearts.” One of Texas’ most renowned citizens and flower gardeners would agree. Lady Bird Johnson herself once said, “Where flowers bloom, there is hope.” – Kim Madlom

A worker moves bedding plants at a Texas nursery. The state’s green industry represents about 200,000 jobs in Texas.

34

//

Go Texan


THE TEXAS GREEN INDUSTRY INCLUDES SOD, ANNUALS, PERENNIALS, SHRUBS, ORNAMENTAL TREES, GRASSES, LANDSCAPING SERVICES AND MORE.

The green industry’s total economic impact is nearly $18 billion.

In 2011, total horticulture and green industry sales, including growing, landscaping and retailing, increased by 8.7 percent to a total of

$15.6B

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

35


CROPS, PLANTS & FORESTRY

Standing SOLID

Best management practices improve forestry sustainability, economic impact John Warner, an urban district forester with the Texas A&M Forest Service, manages the forests at the W. Goodrich Jones State Forest in Conroe, Texas.

36

//

Go Texan


PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK ORDOÑEZ

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

37


When it comes to the

forestry industry in Texas, there are two types of impacts that draw the attention of officials and observers. First, there’s the impact on the economy, which includes large, impressive numbers like $23.7 billion in economic impact and 117,000 forestry jobs throughout the state. Then there’s the impact where less is considered more. That’s the goal of those in the industry concerned about the environment – where the lesser effect on water, soil and other elements of the ecosystem, the better. Through the use of forestry best management practices (BMPs), the state’s timber industry is able to demonstrate high productivity at a low cost to natural resources. BMPs are methods such as leaving a buffer zone of trees next to a stream, installing a culvert to cross a waterway or establishing grass on forest roads to prevent erosion. “Best management practices are scientific principles that have been validated through research to be proven effective for protecting soil and water resources when applied correctly,” says Hughes Simpson, program coordinator for the Texas A&M Forest Service’s Water Resources and Ecosystem Services division. “We can continue to manage our forest resources sustainably when we use these practices.”

CRITICAL TRAINING

The Texas A&M Forest Service, which is part of the Texas A&M University System, has been managing all aspects of the state’s forestry industry since 1915. The forest service owns five relatively small forests for research and demonstrations, and its employees work closely with the Texas Forestry Association, a nonprofit trade association with more than 3,000 members. The two organizations work together to ensure the sustainability of Texas’ commercial forests, most of which are located in the eastern part of the state. “If you look at East Texas from a perspective of how much wood or fiber we are growing versus how much we are harvesting, we are growing more than we harvest,” says Burl Carraway, department head of Texas

Trees are one of Texas’ top renewable resources, and the state’s foresters utilize best management practices to determine when trees are ready for harvest.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

39


STAFF PHOTO

Freshly cut pine trees are hauled to a storage facility in Diboll, Texas, where they will be be kept until being processed into building products.

A&M Forest Service’s Sustainable Forestry. “The ratio is now about 1.1-1.2 to 1.” The state’s forestry industry has been using BMPs for more than two decades. The practices are nonregulatory in Texas, but are strongly encouraged. “A large portion of the mills do require their contractors or suppliers to be trained in these practices,” Simpson says. “Basically it has kind of evolved into a marketing mechanism to where if you’re not trained or certified through this program, then you have limited markets for your products.” Working with the Texas Forestry Association, Simpson and his staff train loggers and others in the industry through four main courses: maintaining safe operations; wildlife and endangered species; wetlands, natural forest ecosystems and the wildlife that inhabit them; and business management and communications. Once certified, participants must complete an additional six hours of training each year.

Despite suffering a considerable setback from the 2011 summer drought, extremely high temperatures and the state’s worst wildfire season, the forestry industry remains an integral part of Texas agriculture.

MAJOR ECONOMIC DRIVER

Timber is seventh among all agriculture commodities in the state. Texas forests produce lumber, structural panels, paper and treatedwood products, and primary mill and logging residue. “That’s fairly significant considering almost all timber activity is in East Texas,” Carraway says. “In 25 of the 43 East Texas counties, the forest sector is either the No. 1 or No. 2 top manufacturing employer. It’s a big contributor to East Texas certainly, but also statewide.” Of the 12 million acres of forestland in East Texas, about two-thirds are owned by individuals or families, and another 25 percent by private investors. Eight percent is publicly-owned, with most being national forests. – John McBryde

The N UM B E R S: The Texas forestry industry represents

$23.7B in economic impact.

Forestry provides

117,000 direct jobs throughout Texas.

The Texas A&M Forest Service owns

5

relatively small forests for research and demonstrations.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

41


ANIMALS, LIVESTOCK & SEAFOOD

PHOTO BY RUSSELL A. GRAVES

42

//

Go Texan


Cattle Drive Beef industry dominates agricultural economy

Texas cattle ranchers

continue to feel the heat as drought dried up most of the state’s pastures through early 2013. But Texas didn’t become the country’s leading cattle state without meeting challenges, and each segment of the industry is positioning for recovery. “The beef cattle industry in Texas has three main segments,” says Tom Hairgrove, a veterinarian and

program coordinator for Texas A&M AgriLife Extension.

THREE INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

Cow-calf producers raise the calf from birth to weaning age, which is when the calf no longer nurses from the cow. Stockers and cow-calf producers grow the weaned calf on pastures to a heavier weight. Cattle feeders, or feedlots, raise cattle from stocker weights to harvest.

“Producers usually focus on one segment, but even though they’re independent, they rely on each other,” Hairgrove says. One quarter of the nation’s fed cattle are raised here in Texas. Cow-calf and stocker operations are located statewide, with much of the state’s cow herd concentrated in the eastern part of the state. However, many of the state’s largest ranches, covering the

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

43


STAFF PHOTO

Once calves are weaned, they are often sold to cattle feeders at auction. The cattle are sorted into groups, based on size and other characteristics.

most area, can be found in West and South Texas. In a display of cooperation between Texas farmers and ranchers, more than 1 million cattle annually graze wheat pastures in North and West Texas. Feedlots also can be found across the state, with most located near abundant feed supplies in the Panhandle and South Texas. “In South Texas, we’re utilizing our locally-grown products to feed cattle a balanced, healthy feed,” says Jay Gray, general manager at Graham Cattle & Land in Gonzales. “We use products from cotton, peanuts, corn and soybeans for protein and roughage.” Texas hay, corn and grain sorghum are widely used by the industry’s three segments. Cattle feed requires rain, and the recent drought drove home the industry’s interdependence between sectors. “Without grass in the pastures, it is very difficult to raise cattle numbers,” says Gray. In 2013, there were more than 4 million beef cows kept by Texas cow-calf producers, down 24 percent since 2007. However, there are modest signs of expansion in the state’s beef cow herd, with 50,000 more beef

STAFF PHOTO

FEED CHALLENGES

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

45


PHOTO BY JEFF ADKINS

A cow and her calf graze a pasture in Winona, Texas. Cow-calf operations raise calves from birth to weaning age.

46

//

Go Texan


TEXAS RANKS NO. 1 IN THE NATION IN THE TOTAL NUMBER OF CATTLE AND CALVES.

13 percent of the total U.S. cattle inventory is in Texas.

replacement heifers reported in 2013 than 2012. “There’s this mystique to ranching in Texas, but the reality is we’re still a pretty rural state that can accommodate a lot of cattle,” says Jason Cleere, beef specialist with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension. Dealing with extended drought has forced Texas ranchers to become even better producers. “We’ve been talking about ‘precision farming’ for a long time; now we need to have ‘precision ranching,’ ” says Cleere.

PRECISION RANCHING

That means precisely measuring nutrient content in soils and forages, and evaluating the genetics that help make Texas beef world-famous. Improving beef production profits is always a concern, and Texans have found ways to add more value to their beef. Nolan Ryan’s Beef is speciallyfed and aged to increase tenderness, palatability and vitamin E content. “A lot of the Nolan Ryan’s Beef product stays in Texas at restaurants and food service,” says Jay Gray, whose company has finished cattle according to Nolan Ryan’s Beef guidelines.

Other Texans have focused on intensive grazing to produce an entirely grass-fed beef.

MORE THAN JUICY STEAKS

Texas cattle hides are used by Toyota and other automakers for seat leather. Even that use depends on cooperation between cattle industry segments. “We require animals coming into our feedlots to be identified with brands in locations that will not affect the hides,” says Gray. In 2013, Texas A&M hosted a major cattle industry event themed “Rebuilding the Cow Herd.” Tom Hairgrove and Jason Cleere say topics addressed included herd health, pasture and forage management, and genetics – all issues concerning to every type of Texas beef producer, whether cow-calf, stocker or feeder. – Matthew Ernst

What’s Online Learn more facts about the Texas cattle industry at TX-agriculture.com.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

47


ANIMALS, LIVESTOCK & SEAFOOD

The Legendary Longhorn

Texas cattle breed fueled ranching industry

48

//

Go Texan

PHOTO BY JEFF ADKINS

S

paniards first brought cattle to Texas in the 1500s. Some of those cattle escaped or were released into the range. They are the first ancestors of the legendary Texas Longhorn. “Feral herds of Texas Longhorns underwent several centuries of natural selection in Texas,” says David Hillis, professor of integrative biology at The University of Texas at Austin. Early Texas cattle developed disease resistance, including immunity to the tick-borne “Texas fever.” Feral longhorns also developed longevity, ease in calving and thrived on native vegetation, all while surviving droughts. And those horns – long, even spiraling racks that can span up to six feet. “Long horns were important for defense against predators, so cows with long horns left more offspring than did cows with short horns,” Hillis says. Wild longhorns began to mix with English cattle breeds in the early 1800s. By the 1850s, Texas cattle were following trails to markets in New Orleans and California. Cattle were first shipped by rail to Chicago from Abilene, Kan., in 1867. Longhorns gained weight on the trail north from Texas. “Before the widespread availability of supplemental feed or water from windmills, the only cattle that could thrive in Texas were longhorns,” says Hillis, who keeps a longhorn herd at Double Helix Ranch.

According to the Texas Historical Association, 5 to 10 million longhorns were trailed out of Texas for about 20 years after the Civil War, which provided a huge boost for Texas’ economy. However, the longhorn’s natural advantages became less of a necessity as Texas ranchers established artesian wells and managed grazing with barbed wire. Average horn spans on longhorns even declined in the late 1800s, likely from fewer older animals in the population, says Hillis.

Longhorns had nearly disappeared in the 1920s, when Congress established a national longhorn herd in Oklahoma, helping save the breed from extinction and preserving the breed that was vital in launching the Texas beef industry. Today, some Texas ranches maintain longhorn herds to provide stock for rodeos and meat that satisfies a new type of consumer who craves ultralean, “heritage” beef. – Matthew Ernst


Our tradition. Your opportunity.

TO LEARN MORE: (936) 261-2540 www.pvamu.edu/cahs


ANIMALS, LIVESTOCK & SEAFOOD

Sold on Seafood

Get on board with Texas wild-caught shrimp and fish

50

//

Go Texan

PHOTO BY BRIAN MCCORD

T

exas wild-caught shrimp are so prized that, for about 60 days from May 15 to mid-July, the shrimp boats along Texas’ Gulf Coast stay docked. It’s a unique state program that allows the small migrating shrimp population time to grow and repopulate the local supply. “This program fundamentally supports our goals of protecting this important resource,” says Carol Huntsberger, owner of the 75-year-old Quality Seafood Market in Austin. The program demonstrates the value Texas places on its seafood industry, which generates nearly $850 million in sales and provides more than 14,000 jobs in the state. “Year after year, the waters of the Gulf of Mexico have provided a distinctive lifestyle for Texas fishermen,” says Bobby Champion Jr., state coordinator for shrimp marketing at the Texas Department of Agriculture. “This industry feeds a nation hungry for premium wildcaught seafood. It’s a unique part of Lone Star history. The Texas seafood industry is a continuing story of innovation and preservation.” Texas shrimpers are responsible for approximately one-third of all shrimp harvested from the Gulf of Mexico each year. Brown, white and pink shrimp are the most common species in Texas waters. Premium brown shrimp offer the boldest flavor, while white and pink shrimp varieties have a sweeter, lighter taste. “People in Texas are proud of our state and like to use products that are local, domestic and sustainable,” Huntsberger says. “The bonus is that Texas wild-caught shrimp are some

of the best in the world.” Texas also produces oysters, snapper, tuna, mahi mahi, flounder and other seafood for retailers and consumers around the nation. Quality Seafood also sells “thousands and thousands” of pounds of black drum, which is akin to redfish. “Black drum is one of the best fish on the market,” Huntsberger says. “It is so versatile because it’s easy to blacken, fry and grill,

and it holds up in a soup. It’s a mild white fish and very clean. It’s a great fish for people who are looking to add fish to their diets.” Huntsberger advises consumers new to eating fish to experiment. “Be bold,” she says. “Find a fishmonger who knows about cutting fish and talk with them about likes and dislikes. There really is a fish for every taste.” – Kim Madlom


Opportunity to research.

Opportunity to learn.

Opportunity to achieve.

Prairie View A&M University is designated by the Texas Constitution as one of the three “institutions of the first class.� Prairie View A&M University will be breaking ground on a state-of-the-art building in the fall of 2014, housing the College of Agriculture and Human Sciences along with the College of Business. { W e b S i t e } GF3A


Our tradition.

Prairie View A&M University is dedicated to excellence in teaching, research and service. It is one of three universities written into the Texas Constitution.

Your opportunity.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

Boots, Spurs Cowboy Hats

&

Rodeos and livestock shows make a positive impact on Texas youth

Livestock shows and rodeos are a long-standing Texas tradition, and there’s a lot more to them than glitz, glamour and cowboy boots. Texas livestock shows and rodeos have a huge impact on the state’s economy, as well as consumers’ views and knowledge of agriculture. They also play an important role in helping young Texans gain life skills through livestock and equine projects, raise money for college and develop a lifelong love for agriculture.

SHOWING LIVESTOCK

Brother and sister duo Ben and Railey Mikeska of Dripping Springs have both been showing beef cattle since the age of 9 through 4-H, an educational hobby passed along to them by their father Roger and mother D’Ana who both enjoyed it in their youth. “It taught us responsibility, the value of hard work and to have compassion for animals, and it helped provide money for us to go to college,”

Roger says. He and D’Ana both grew up on cattle ranches and met at Texas A&M University. “Showing livestock is truly a family sport,” Roger says. “The kids are leading steers around at shows when they’re age 9 or 10, and mom and dad are there to drive them and support them.” The Mikeskas travel to the big livestock shows in Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio and Austin, but they also compete locally.

Siblings Ben and Railey Mikeska of Dripping Springs show livestock throughout Texas. Both believe that their livestock projects have positively impacted their futures.

52

//

Go Texan


PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK ORDOÑEZ

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

53


Showing animals has taught me responsibility since the animals’ feed, water, health and safety are in my hands, both at home and on the road.



– BEN MIKESKA Sixteen-year-old Ben had the grand champion steer two years in a row at the Hays County Livestock Expo and the champion Hereford steer at the 2012 San Antonio Stock Show. He received a $10,000 college scholarship.

LEARNING BY DOING

“Showing animals has taught me responsibility since the animals’ feed, water, health and safety are in my hands, both at home and on the road,” Ben says. “It also has allowed me to make lifelong friends from across the state, and it has made my family very close because we all work together toward a common goal.” Working with livestock also has taught Ben that “food doesn’t come from a grocery store.” “There’s a lot that goes into it before it hits the shelves. I think the 4-H and FFA youth of Texas and the rest of the country will lead the way in

Top: Ben Mikeska washes one of his show steers. Ben works with his show animals every day to prepare them for competition, and he says the hard work pays off when his animals are named champions.

feeding the world in the future,” he says. “In addition to showing animals, I play football and lacrosse, which I love, but there is no better competition than in a show ring, and no better feeling than seeing your hard work pay off there.” Thirteen-year-old Railey shows steers and rabbits. “I only have the rabbits for a month or two, but the steers are a year-round project, and they both require a lot of work every day,” she says. “Showing animals has taught me to work hard and to keep a positive attitude, even when I don’t come out on top. I love the competition and the friendships that come with showing, and I really love the animals. I think this experience will lead me into veterinary medicine or another animal-related field.”

RODEO IMPACTS

Rodeos have an equally important TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

55


PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK MATSON

Miss Rodeo Austin Princess, McKenna Greene, and Miss Rodeo Austin, Alex Ingram, wave to the crowd during the Star of Texas Fair and Rodeo.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK MATSON

impact on young people, far beyond the bronco riding, calf roping and steer wrestling. Twenty-year-old Alex Ingram from New Braunfels won a $16,000 college scholarship in January 2013 after being crowned Miss Rodeo Austin. “I grew up on a ranch, and my dad was a team roper, so I took an interest in rodeo queen contests,” Ingram says. “I’ve gained so much from competing in the pageants. I’ve learned how to interview, and increased my public speaking and horsemanship skills. I think rodeo is the best sport there is because it’s so family-oriented, patriotic and faith-oriented. It’s also helped me make connections by traveling to rodeos across Texas.” Student successes of all types, including artistic talents, are recognized at Texas fairs and events.

56

//

Go Texan


Roger Mikeska, at right, hopes he has instilled a love of agriculture in his children, Railey and Ben.

Rodeo Austin awarded $484,000 in college scholarships to 45 students in 2013. “Rodeo Austin is so generous, and I’m proud to be a representative of it,” Ingram says. “I’m entering my junior year at Texas A&M, and I’m majoring in agriculture communications. It’s my goal to work in the rodeo world.” – Jessica Mozo

What’s Online Share your own Texas fair and rodeo experiences at TX-agriculture.com.

Major Texas livestock shows hold auctions for the top animals exhibited at the show, generating millions of dollars for scholarship funds that help send Texas students to college each year.

IN THE LAST 10 YEARS, THE TOP FIVE TEXAS LIVESTOCK SHOWS HAVE RAISED MORE THAN

$110M FOR EDUCATION.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

57


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

GROWING

Leaders Texas students get schooled in agriculture while preparing for future careers Texas has more farms

than any other state in the U.S., and it leads the nation in cattle and cotton production. Helping young people recognize future careers in agriculture is especially important in the Lone Star State. Students across the state learn about agriculture and prepare for careers in the industry through programs such as 4-H and FFA, as well as agricultural education courses both in high school and at Texas colleges and universities. The Texas Department of Agriculture recognizes middle and high school student leaders who demonstrate excellence in their

pursuits in and out of the classroom with the GROW Award, which Gives Recognition for Outstanding Work.

WELL-ROUNDED TEENS

Seventeen-year-old Adam Morton of Louise, Texas, is one of the eight GROW Award recipients for 2012-13. A senior at Louise High School, Morton lives on a cattle farm and shows steers at the Wharton County Youth Fair. He is active in 4-H, FFA, student council and athletics, including powerlifting. He competes in state, national and international powerlifting competitions and holds a state, national and world record in


Adam Morton of Louise, Texas, works on his family’s ranch. He also helps his neighbors harvest corn, rice and soybeans each summer. PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK ORDOÑEZ

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

59


his weight class for dead lift and bench press. “I like staying busy. I help people who live around us harvest corn, rice and soybeans every summer,” Morton says. “I was hauling hay at 8 years old.” Morton serves as a junior deacon at his church and volunteers at community events and beautification days. He loves the outdoors and enjoys hunting and fishing with his family. He plans to attend Texas A&M University and major in wildlife biology. “I grew up hunting and learning

about wildlife, and I would like to become a game warden with Texas Parks and Wildlife,” Morton says. “I want to help protect animals for future generations, so when my future kids have kids they can enjoy hunting like I do.”

LEARNING TO BE A LEADER

Sixteen-year-old Angie Pascarella of Harper, Texas, was another GROW Award recipient for the 2012-13 school year. A junior at Harper High School, Pascarella is a National Honor Society member, participates in FFA

and student council, and manages the volleyball and track teams. “It’s rare today to see kids step up and be leaders who take charge and know what to do,” Pascarella says. “I want to be looked at differently by adults, not looked at as the stereotypical teenager.” Pascarella lives on a ranch where she grew up around ostriches, quail, goats, chicken and sheep, so her involvement in FFA came naturally. “I joined FFA for the speaking events because I’ve always loved public speaking. I did agriculture

In addition to his agricultural interests, Adam Morton of Louise, Texas, holds a world record in his weight class for dead lift and bench press.

60

//

Go Texan


advocacy my sophomore year, and I was secretary of our chapter,” Pascarella says.

FOCUS ON SERVICE

After attending a leadership camp in seventh grade, Pascarella was challenged to create a service project in her community. She started a Junior Librarians Club, recruiting middle schoolers to volunteer their time at the Harper Library, where they hosted a summer reading club for children. She also hosted a reception to honor library donors

and volunteers at fundraisers held by the Harper Volunteer Fire Department. Pascarella plans to attend college after high school and major in business. “I will definitely continue supporting agriculture in my lifestyle by doing things like buying local,” she says. “I love living in Texas because you always see farms, wineries and produce stands right around the corner. It’s refreshing to be surrounded by agriculture.” – Jessica Mozo

Adam Morton fixes an electric fence on his family’s ranch in Louise, Texas.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

61


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

62

//

Go Texan


A Changing Landscape Agriculture looks to strength of local communities for success

There was a time when many rural communities in Texas may not have existed if it weren’t for agriculture. The very notion of “rural” often meant that a small town was made up of farmers, ranchers or others in agriculture, and it was these producers that primarily provided for a town’s economic livelihood. How times have changed. “The rural communities at one time were dependent on agriculture,” says Becky Dempsey, state director of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) programs for the Texas Department of Agriculture’s (TDA) Office of Rural Affairs. “Communities were formed as a result of a group of agricultural producers, and the town provided the resources needed by the producer.” Dempsey continues, “New technologies and mechanization, along with government programs to maximize production, have resulted in fewer farmers

producing the majority of food and fiber in the U.S. “As a result, the tables have turned somewhat in that the producers are dependent on rural communities to provide another source of income. Innovative rural communities have begun to think strategically about how they will keep their community vibrant. Attracting new companies to rural areas has resulted in a great deal of success, as well as innovative new programs such as agritourism and historical trails.”

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

TDA’s Office of Rural Affairs works with rural communities to ensure that the economy and quality of life in rural Texas remains vital. The office uses available federal funds and a statewide outreach network to help rural communities with matters such as attracting and retaining businesses, maintaining public infrastructure TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

63


IN TEXAS, AGRICULTURE ACCOUNTS FOR NEARLY

13%

OF THE JOBS IN RURAL COUNTIES, COMPARED TO LESS THAN

1%

OF THE JOBS IN METROPOLITAN AREAS. Agricultural cooperatives, which provide everything from livestock feed to apparel, are vital to rural economies in Texas, providing 20,000 jobs and $1.7 billion in sales.

PHOTO BY JEFFREY S. OTTO

Source: Texas AgriLife Extension Service

64

//

Go Texan

and providing quality health care. The office also provides financial assistance to agricultural producers, which is particularly beneficial to young farmers and ranchers. “It takes many resources to fund economic or community development programs, and TDA has a few of the tools necessary to assist with projects,” Dempsey says. “We’re all passionate about rural Texas, and everyone on the team is committed to making a difference in the communities we serve.” Another means of helping rural communities is through the CDBG program, which uses funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). While HUD funds go directly to larger cities, smaller towns and counties must apply for the money through the Texas CDBG program. “The grants are based on competitive, objective scoring,” Dempsey says. “We try to structure our programs not only to provide some benefit to the communities where the money will ultimately end up, but also to meet the national objectives as determined by HUD.”

POWER TO THE COMMUNITIES

The Texas Electric Cooperative (TEC) also is instrumental in the development and sustainability of the state’s rural communities, going beyond providing power. Established in 1941 as a coalition of electric cooperatives to improve leverage with power suppliers, the Austin-based TEC includes 64 distribution, and 11 generation and transmission cooperatives. “We were created to improve the quality of life of people in rural communities in Texas,” says Mike Williams, CEO and president of TEC. “Providing reliable, safe and affordable electricity is the most visible demonstration of that. That’s our core business, but we do so much more for the communities. The real key is that we’re part of the community.” Among several services, cooperatives assist rural communities with economic development; provide infrastructure that can improve quality of life; support various organizations such as volunteer fire departments, schools and local governments; and fund scholarships and sponsor youth leadership programs. – John McBryde


STAFF PHOTO

Rural communities across the state, like Ferris, Texas, rely on agriculture for much of its economic livelihood.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

65


LOCAL FOOD

The

SECRET

Ingredient Texas chefs look to local foods

66

//

Go Texan


PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK ORDOÑEZ

Left: Searsucker in Austin is one of many Texas restaurants that sources local products for its dishes, including this Redfish Black and Blue entree. Above: Seraffin Campos, a server at Chisos Grill in Bee Cave, Texas, displays two of the restaurant’s specialty entrees that feature locally grown ingredients.

The local food movement has taken hold

in Texas, especially in Austin, and it’s expanding rapidly to Houston, Dallas and even into the more rural areas of the state. “We used to think of sourcing food locally as a trend, but now it has become the norm,” says Wendy Womack, coordinator for marketing for the Texas Department of Agriculture, which promotes Texas food and beverage products through its GO TEXAN program. “Good chefs have always focused on cooking what’s in season, but now they are focusing on sourcing food from their farming neighbors.” GO TEXAN member Chad Jones is chef and co-owner of Chisos Grill in Bee Cave, just outside of Austin. Jones is one chef who has made locally-sourced food the centerpiece of his menu. “We make a conscious effort to source our menu ingredients locally,” Jones says. “That philosophy stems from our belief that locally-farmed products will lead to fresher, higher quality food served to our customers.” A lifelong resident of Texas, Jones has been in the restaurant business for almost 20 years. He says sourcing

food locally, with the help of the GO TEXAN program, is the right choice for his customers, his community and Texas businesses.

LOCAL FOODS FIRST

“At the end of the day, outsourcing products based on cost means you lose quality and freshness, and those things are priceless,” he says. “It’s a noticeable difference. When we use fresh, properly raised produce and meat, it makes a real difference in what’s on the plate. Sourcing locally also allows us to focus on natural products. We don’t use any processed foods in our restaurant, and we make everything from scratch.” Jones first looks for food products ranched or farmed within a 20-mile radius of his restaurant. “We get our quail from Lockhart, our tomatoes from Marfa and our beef from Rockdale,” he says. “With a menu of about 85 items, unfortunately, we can’t get everything right here; but for me, local means as close as I can get it. The Gulf Coast of Texas is as close as I can get seafood, with 80 percent of what we serve coming from that region, including wild-caught Gulf shrimp, redfish and oysters.” For those foods Texas doesn’t produce, Jones uses TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

67


local food distribution companies as providers. “We are committed to supporting local businesses,” he says.

LOCAL BEVERAGES, TOO

At Chisos Grill, more than the food has a Texas address. “Texas is a very large producer of wine, beer and spirits,” Jones says. “Ninety percent of our bar items are sourced from inside the state.” Chisos’ Ghost Bar offers 30 beers, 25 spirits and 20 wines produced in-state. In fact, Womack just partnered with Jones to organize wine, beer and spirits tastings at Chisos Grill to celebrate the 2013 GO TEXAN Restaurant Round-Up week. Together, they contacted and scheduled a different GO TEXAN wine, beer and spirit member to visit the restaurant each day for that week. Womack says locally-produced craft beers and wines continue to be a growth market. Meats, including cured products and specialty items, also are gaining in popularity. “Chefs are showing interest in sourcing whole animals,” Womack says. “We’ve also seen an increase in demand for local lamb and goat. For example, GO TEXAN recently helped a rancher who wanted help sourcing up to 10 lambs to local restaurants each month. We were able to help link that producer to chefs looking for his product.”

A GROWING TREND

Chad Jones, co-owner and executive chef of Chisos Grill in Bee Cave, Texas, checks the quality of the locally-grown tomatoes and other ingredients he uses in the day’s menus.

68

//

Go Texan

Locally-sourced food is moving beyond restaurant kitchens and into the marketplace. “We’ve noticed the focus on local food is trending in retail as well,” Womack says. “Even stores are interested in having local products on their shelves. Texas retailers are making an effort to offer Texas products, and that’s good news for our producers.” The demand for local food fits into a global world, according to Womack. “As the world becomes more global, people are looking to reconnect to their local communities in a hyperlocal way. The fact that we’re so globally connected makes us want stronger local connections, and food meets that need.” – Kim Madlom


Server Kyle Nathan prepares for a busy dinner service at Searsucker in Austin, one of the many restaurants that focuses on serving Texas-grown ingredients.

GO TEXAN There is no pride fiercer than that of a Texan. Just seeing the outline of this great state is enough to swell emotion in the heart of any Texas native. The GO TEXAN program, with its signature mark in the shape of Texas, celebrates, promotes and supports the business savvy and plainspoken grit Texas agriculture is known for throughout the world. The Texas Department of Agriculture is dedicated to cultivating local entrepreneurs, farmers and restaurants in the Lone Star State through the initiative, meaning that Texans can trust labels, signs and brochures emblazoned with the GO TEXAN certification mark. Texas business owners, farmers and restaurateurs are encouraged to enroll in the GO TEXAN program. With customizable membership levels, GO TEXAN offers a wide range of benefits for participants. Businesses are connected with their consumers, and can also network and promote themselves amongst other colleagues. For more information about the program, visit gotexan.org. The GO TEXAN mobile app allows users to easily identify participating wineries, farmers markets, restaurants, retailers, other local businesses and products. You can locate, map and share any GO TEXAN product or location on the app. Recipes, events and coupons also are available in the palm of your hand. This app can be useful for everyone, including Texas natives, transplants and visitors. The app is available for free in the App Store on iTunes and on Google Play for Android devices. Eating fresh, local and being Texas-proud is just a click away with the GO TEXAN app. – Hannah Patterson

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

69


LOCAL FOOD

Cafeteria Connections Texas students dine on state-produced foods

70

//

Go Texan

PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTGOMERY ELEMENTARY

S

tudents in Texas’ 1,200 school districts are learning more about the farms behind the food they eat thanks to the Texas Department of Agriculture’s (TDA) Farm to School initiative. The statewide effort helps school nutrition professionals and educators incorporate Texas agriculture products into school meals, increase agricultural education and teach students more about the importance of the state’s agriculture industry. TDA’s Farm to School coordinator, Alyssa Herold, says she uses several models to help schools and agricultural producers show children the connection between farms and forks. “Sometimes I’m contacted by a producer who wants to sell products to schools in their county or city,” Herold says. “Other times, I’m contacted by a school’s nutrition administrator looking to incorporate local products into their school meals. I connect them with local farmers and encourage them to teach students in the process, through a field trip to the farm or a ‘Meet the Farmer’ day.” The educational component of Farm to School is just as important as helping schools and agricultural producers establish purchasing relationships. That’s why TDA supports schools in any way they want to participate. Along with using fresh foods from local farmers in lunches, some schools also have started growing their own produce in educational gardens. Susan LeBlanc, child nutrition director at Barbers Hill Independent School District in Mont Belvieu, Texas, started an educational

Students at the Montgomery Elementary School learn about food by helping with a school garden.

gardening program at each of the district’s three campuses. “The kids have been so excited about this project,” she says. “I knew students would enjoy the hands-on experience, but it has been amazing.” Students in second, fifth and seventh grades can help plant, tend to and harvest crops in the school’s garden with LeBlanc. Texas students clearly benefit from the program, but Herold says it’s ideal for producers as well. “Selling products to schools gives producers an opportunity to diversify. Schools can act as a

consistent buyer.” Most schools look for fresh produce from farmers, though there are still some that use protein and eggs as well. Herold hopes that as the initiative continues to grow, students will be able to enjoy as many local Texas products as possible, while also learning the importance of agriculture and its potential for a future career. For more information on Texas’ Farm to School initiative, visit www. squaremeals.org/FarmtoSchool. – Rachel Bertone


LOCAL FOOD

Valued Vines

Texas economy benefits from growing wine industry

PHOTO BY JEFF ADKINS

T

exas may be known for its cattle and cotton, but the Lone Star State knows a thing or two about grapes. According to the Texas Wine and Grape Growers Association, as the No. 5 state in the nation for wine production and No. 7 for wine consumption, Texas’ wine industry contributes $1.8 billion to the state’s economy, and the state boasts approximately 4,400 acres of vineyard-producing farmland. “Texas wineries are getting more recognition because they grow certain varietals very well,” says Debbie Reynolds of the Texas Wine and Grape Growers Association. “They increase the acreage of crops grown every year.” The state’s industry took off in the early 1970s, when three state educators formed the Texas Grape Growers Association to help farmers learn how to produce a successful crop. At the end of the decade, Texas had approximately eight wineries that were producing wine. In the years since, the industry has steadily grown. Today, there are 273 commercial wineries in Texas, some of which have been recognized internationally. More than delicious wines, Texas’ wineries and vineyards are incorporating agritourism into their venues as well, offering events such as jazz nights, Sangria Thursdays, festivals and more. Reynolds says when she goes to visit, wineries are usually packed on weekends. “The Texas Hill Country is the second most visited wine destination in the United States,” Reynolds says. “Many go strictly for wine tours and tastings, and wineries are starting to see loyalty from these customers. They’re starting wine clubs, where visitors

can subscribe to have a certain number of bottles sent to them every month, and even guests from out of state are having their wines shipped from Texas.” To further agritourism efforts, Reynolds says that the Association is planning to launch a mobile marketing app, where visitors can virtually “check-in” at wineries across the state and earn points for free merchandise such as t-shirts, wine glasses and more. Some of Texas’ most popular varietals that keep visitors coming back to the wineries include Tempranillo and Sangiovese for reds, and Blanc du Bois, Moscato

and Viognier for whites. Reynolds says that Texas’ grape growers are getting better every year, learning how to deal with environmental elements such as an early freeze. “They’re very prosperous and learn what works best because they’ve had to deal with these fights each year,” she says. She adds that the state’s industry will continue to grow and provide economically for Texas. “Every day someone calls us saying they have some extra land and want to get into the commercial winery business.” – Rachel Bertone

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

71


INNOVATION IN AGRICULTURE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK ORDOÑEZ

72

//

Go Texan


Green by DESIGN Red Caboose Winery combines profitability, sustainability and innovation R ed Caboose Winery has two goals:

make great wine and do it using green principles. Located just 90 miles southwest of Dallas, the Meridian, Texas, winery is achieving both. Wines produced by Red Caboose have been earning awards in competitions around the country, including recent selection by Wine Business Monthly for its prestigious list of “The Top Ten Hottest Brands in 2012.” “We feel good about what we’re doing with

the wines,” says owner Gary McKibben, who is in business with his son Evan, the winemaker. Together, they produce 5,000 cases of wine each year, and that number is expected to double next year. The pair, who had no prior experiences in winemaking, are pleased with the success of their business, but they feel even better about their efforts to be environmentally-friendly. McKibben, a commercial architect who has always focused on sustainability, says it was

Gary McKibben, owner of Red Caboose Winery, stands on the solar-top roof that provides electricity for the 16-acre winery in Meridian, Texas.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

73


74

//

Go Texan


a top priority for him from the very beginning.”

A STRONG PHILOSOPHY

“Our winery design philosophy is green,” he says. In practice, that philosophy is an interesting combination of simplicity and advanced technology. Red Caboose uses geothermal cooling and heating, solar energy, rainwater harvesting, composting and recycling. “We designed the winery to be energy efficient and sustainable,” McKibben says. The Red Caboose is the only winery in Texas, and perhaps the country, to cool, refrigerate and chill with geothermal, which means they are using the earth’s energy.

THE WATER ISSUE

The winery harvests rainwater and keeps about 20,000 gallons in tanks on site. “All of that comes from our roofs,” McKibben says. McKibben says that most of the winery’s water comes from wells. During a normal summer, the collected rainwater supplements the irrigation needs and eases the stress on the wells. During a drought, the rainwater collection system becomes even more vital. The availability of water is a growing issue in agriculture across the country. McKibben has done the math and knows that, in the past nine years, more than 8.8 million gallons of water have fallen on the winery’s roofs. “We’re going to start saving even more of that water,” he says. “That not only saves money on our irrigation, but it saves money on electricity to pump water, and the grapes get a good source of highnitrogen, neutral-pH water. It’s better than well water.” Gravity moves the rainwater from the storage tanks through the irrigation system. “We do the same thing in our winemaking,” he says. “We transfer Left: Large tanks store rainwater that’s been collected from the roofs of the winery buildings. The rainwater is used to supplement irrigation systems and reduce pressure on their wells.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

75


Left: Cabernet grapes grow at Red Caboose Winery in Meridian, Texas. Right: The winery’s storage barrels are reused in order to be more eco-friendly.

Red Caboose Winery is the most energy efficient and sustainable winery in Texas. It uses

100%

geothermal heating and cooling, and collects all its rainwater. All barrels are recycled, and all waste is composted.

IN AN AVERAGE RAINFALL YEAR, THE ROOF OF THE RED CABOOSE WINERY COLLECTS NEARLY 226,000 GALLONS OF WATER, WHICH IS STORED AND USED IN THE VINEYARDS. 76

//

Go Texan

our wine through gravity, which preserves the quality of the wine.”

CHILLING AND HEATING

Using the earth to chill and the sun to provide electricity may be a high-tech approach, but it’s also a simplistic approach, McKibben says. In fact, when McKibben first began researching the art of winemaking, he found himself inspired by the earliest principles of wine-making. He read antique books and looked into the methods used more than 100 years ago. “Electricity has only been around 130 years, but wine has been around for 6,000,” he explains. “That’s where we got started. We went back to the basics of making wine and focused on growing the healthiest, best quality grapes we can possibly grow. You can make wine without electricity, but you can’t make a good bottle of wine with bad grapes.” – Kim Madlom


We designed the winery to be energy efficient and  sustainable.

– GARY MCKIBBEN

TALL will create a cadre of Texas leaders to help ensure effective understanding and encourage positive action on key issues, theories, policy and economics that will advance the agriculture industry. tall.tamu.edu

grow, cook, eat, learn

Serving up recipes, tips and food for thought

farmflavor.com

Texas Sheep & Goat Raisers Association www.tsgra.com

Representing all sheep and goat producers throughout Texas. Large and small producers, working together, making a difference.

TX-AGRICULTURE.COM

//

77


AD INDEX

10 AG-POWER INC. 1 AGTEXAS FARM CREDIT SERVICES

44 SOUTHWESTERN EXPOSITION

& LIVESTOCK SHOW

54 STEPHEN F. AUSTIN

20 BAYER CROPSCIENCE LP

51 DAIRY MAX

C4 FARM CREDIT BANK OF TEXAS

26 TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY

31 LONE STAR AG CREDIT

75 TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE

47 NATIONAL CUTTING

38 TEXAS A&M FOREST SERVICE

61 TEXAS A&M KINGSVILLE

77 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL LIFETIME

HORSE ASSOCIATION

49 PRAIRIE VIEW A&M UNIVERSITY

STATE UNIVERSITY

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION

& HUMAN SCIENCES

6 PRIEFERT 78 SOUTH TEXANS’ PROPERTY

RIGHTS ASSOCIATION

C3 TEXAS & SOUTHWESTERN CATTLE

RAISERS ASSOCIATION

23 TEXAS CHRISTMAS TREE

GROWERS ASSOCIATION


AD INDEX

C1A TEXAS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES 35 TEXAS PECAN GROWERS ASSOCIATION 2 TEXAS PORK PRODUCERS

ASSOCIATION INC.

40 TEXAS POULTRY FEDERATION 77 TEXAS RICE COUNCIL 77 TEXAS SHEEP & GOAT

RAISERS ASSOCIATION

4 WEST TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY


GO TEXAN 2014 EDITION, VOLUME 1

JOURNAL COMMUNICATIONS INC. Content Director JESSY YANCEY Agribusiness Content Team RACHEL BERTONE, HANNAH PATTERSON, LISA SCRAMLIN Proofreading Manager RAVEN PETTY Contributing Writers MATTHEW ERNST, JILL CLAIR GENTRY, KIM MADLOM, JOHN MCBRYDE, JESSICA MOZO Senior Graphic Designers STACEY ALLIS, LAURA GALLAGHER, JAKE SHORES, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLIAMS Graphic Designers JACKIE CIULLA, KACEY PASSMORE, MATT WEST Senior Photographers JEFF ADKINS, BRIAN MCCORD Staff Photographers WENDY JO O’BARR, MICHAEL CONTI, FRANK ORDOÑEZ, MICHAEL TEDESCO Color Imaging Technician ALISON HUNTER Ad Production Manager KATIE MIDDENDORF Ad Traffic Assistants KRYSTIN LEMMON, PATRICIA MOISAN Chairman GREG THURMAN President/Publisher BOB SCHWARTZMAN Executive Vice President RAY LANGEN Senior V.P./Operations CASEY HESTER Senior V.P./Agribusiness Publishing KIM NEWSOM HOLMBERG Senior V.P./Agribusiness Sales RHONDA GRAHAM V.P./External Communications TEREE CARUTHERS V.P./Sales HERB HARPER Controller CHRIS DUDLEY Accounts Receivable Coordinator DIANA GUZMAN Sales Support Project Manager SARA QUINT IT Director DANIEL CANTRELL Web Creative Director ALLISON DAVIS Photography Director JEFFREY S. OTTO Creative Services Director CHRISTINA CARDEN Creative Technology Analyst BECCA ARY Integrated Media Managers RICHARD KINCHELOE, KATIE NEWBERN

Go Texan is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed by the Texas Department of Agriculture. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by email at info@jnlcom.com.

TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE: Commissioner TODD STAPLES Deputy Commissioner DREW DEBERRY Chief of Staff SHANNON RUSING Director of Communications BRYAN BLACK Special thanks to all Department staff for their support. For more information about the Texas Department of Agriculture, contact: Bryan Black, Director of Communications 1700 N. Congress, 11th Floor, Austin, TX 78701 (512)-463-7664 or by email at bryan.black@texasagriculture.gov. No public funds were used in the publishing of this magazine. © Copyright 2013 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member Member

78

//

The Association of Magazine Media Custom Content Council

Go Texan

P.O. Box 397 Falfurrias, TX 78355 361-348-3020 T 361-348-3121 F www.stpra.org

Whether it is border security and immigration reform, groundwater regulation or landowner liability, South Texans’ Property Rights Association (STPRA) serves as a catalyst for finding solutions to some of the important challenges that exist for South Texas property owners and managers. Visit our website at www.stpra.org and become a part of an organization that makes a difference for property owners and future generations. Our Land. Our Lives.

Visit Our

advertisers

Ag-Power Inc. www.ag-power.com

Texas A&M Forest Service www.texasforestinfo.com

AgTexas Farm Credit Services www.agtexas.com

Texas A&M Kingsville www.tamuk.edu

Bayer CropScience LP www.bayer.com

Texas Agricultural Lifetime Leadership Foundation http://tall.tamu.edu

Dairy Max www.dairymax.org Farm Credit Bank of Texas www.findfarmcredit.com Lone Star Ag Credit www.lonestaragcredit.com National Cutting Horse Association www.nchacutting.com Prairie View A&M University College of Agriculture & Human Sciences www.pvamu.edu/cahs Priefert www.priefert.com South Texans’ Property Rights Association www.stpra.org Southwestern Exposition & Livestock Show www.fwssr.com Stephen F. Austin State University http://atcofa.sfasu.edu/contact-us

Texas & Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association www.tscra.org Texas Christmas Tree Growers Association www.texaschristmastrees.com Texas Electric Cooperatives www.texas-ec.org Texas Pecan Growers Association www.tpga.org Texas Pork Producers Association Inc. www.texaspork.org Texas Poultry Federation www.texaspoultry.org Texas Rice Council www.usriceproducers.com

Tarleton State University www.tarleton.edu

Texas Sheep & Goat Raisers Association www.tsgra.com

Texas A&M AgriLife www.agrilife.org

West Texas A&M University www.wtamu.edu


Go Texan 2014  

A guide to the state's farms, food and commerce.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you