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From President Alger

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A M E EC ENGAGED FOR IMPACT – THAT’S WHY MADISON! You may notice that this annual report opens differently than most university annual reports. Absent are the breathless claims about groundbreaking research or famous faculty or shiny new facilities. Sure, we possess such attributes. But we are totally focused on the positive impact our work has on the lives of our students. The conclusive evidence from Gallup that JMU alumni possess a greater sense of purpose and personal well-being than their peers from other universities is a direct byproduct of our remarkably concise mission statement: We are a community committed to preparing students to be educated and enlightened citizens who lead productive and meaningful lives. Simple as that. Madison ranks highly for providing strong value because we stay focused on teaching and learning, and focused on students. The Gallup results affirm our approach. You will see in this report that 2015-16 was another great academic year at JMU. It was the second year since we issued The Madison Plan, our strategic plan for 2014-20. And the aligning effect the plan is having in our academic community and on our operations is clear. By proclaiming in the plan that our new vision is to be the national model for the engaged university: engaged with

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President Alger on his listening tour in fall 2012

ideas and the world, programs of every kind at Madison

than ever before. I firmly believe it is because they see

are now working with a more commonly understood pur-

their experiences reflected in The Madison Plan’s empha-

pose. For years we’ve been great at engaging students,

sis on student engagement, and they support it.

as proven by the recent Gallup results. But with this bold

Finally, you will notice that this report is divided into

new vision — and a precise definition of engagement

chapters such as B ͞ oosting Innovation and Discovery,͟͞

(see Page 4) — we’ve harnessed a great power for the

Renewing Civil Society͟ and C ͞ ompeting in Business.͟

benefit of our students and for society.

Because our main focus at Madison always has been

When I took office just over four years ago, I imme-

on students, we know that they go on to live lives with

diately went on a national and international listening

purpose and meaning. While this is a worthy goal in

tour. In small groups and in large halls, alumni described

itself, the larger impact is that citizens who live lives

for me why they believed James Madison University

with purpose and meaning positively affect society.

had made such a positive difference in their lives.

With every new Madison graduate, the positive multi-

Overwhelmingly, the majority believed it was their close

plier effect this can have on every sector of our world is

relationships with faculty, staff and their fellow students

vitally important.

that helped shape their perspectives and their careers. Immediately after the listening tour, we conducted our six-year strategic planning process, which was influenced

Sincerely,

heavily by what we heard on the tour. The process yielded The Madison Plan in 2014, and not only has it had an aligning effect on our campus, but also private support to the university jumped and has sustained since it was published. This past year, more alumni gave to the university

Jonathan R. Alger P R E S I D E N T, J A M E S M A D I S O N U N I V E R S I T Y

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What is Engagement at Madison? By clearly defining engagement in three forms, Madison established the basis of a system that propagates engagement across campus and creates a framework for assessing and measuring its value in teaching and learning, leading to targeted improvements.

ENGAGED LEARNING at Madison is developing

But knowing why engagement matters is just as

deep, purposeful and reflective learning, while uniting

important as understanding what engagement is.

campus and community in the pursuit, creation, application and dissemination of knowledge.

At its most basic level, intentional engagement con-

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT at Madison is advancing the

stantly exposes students and faculty to situations in which the first question to be asked is, “What is possi-

legacy of James Madison, the Father of the Constitution,

ble?” And this question is the fundamental first step of

by preparing individuals to be active and responsible

innovating and creating. That’s how students and faculty

participants in a representative democracy dedicated to

in every discipline can become creative problem-solvers.

the common good.

Nurses, political scientists, engineers, musicians, biolo-

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT at Madison is fostering mutually beneficial and reciprocal partnerships,

gists, teachers — every discipline can be injected with a spirit of possibility that animates innovation and a fidelity to results. That’s why engagement matters.

ranging from local to global, that connect learning to practice, address critical societal problems and improve quality of life.

The convergence of the three types of engagement forges enlightened citizens who lead productive and meaningful lives.

Civic Engagement

Community Engagement

Engaged Learning

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Gallup research results show Madison alumni outperform their peers. Madison alumni were surveyed by Gallup in 2016

The Gallup results describe a JMU alumni body

and compared to their peers who graduated from all

uniquely equipped to live productive and meaningful

other universities, including a subset who gradu-

lives and improve the world around them. And you

ated from the top 100 schools in U.S. News & World

will see in this report how Madison students, faculty

Report rankings. The results below are stunning.

and alumni positively affected the world in 2016 by …

Employed Full Time

Work Engagement

Purpose Well-being

Social Well-being

Financial Well-being

Community Well-being

Physical Well-being

JMU

U.S. NEWS top 100

Overall (National)

81%

74%

71%

48%

57%

59%

49%

54%

39%

41%

49%

49%

41%

44%

32%

39%

ADVANCING CULTURE

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BOOSTING INNOVATION & DISCOVERY

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COMPETING IN ATHLETICS

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IMPROVING HEALTH CARE

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LEADING IN BUSINESS

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REFORMING EDUCATION

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RENEWING CIVIL SOCIETY

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INCREASING ACCESS

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Financials

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48%

47%

37%

42%

31%

Thriving on above 5 Elements

13%

8%

7%

JMU prepared me well for life outside of college

42%

30%

27%

My education from JMU was worth the cost

57%

50%

44%

(Source: The 2016 James Madison University Graduate and Undergraduate Alumni Report, Year One Report, Gallup)

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Advancing Culture FURIOUS FLOWER POETRY CENTER JMU IS HOME

to the Furious Flower

Poetry Center, the first academic center in the nation devoted to African-American poetry. Dedicated to cultivating, honoring and promoting the diverse voices of African-American poets, the center was established following a groundbreaking conference in 1994 that drew black poets from across the country. It has since showcased outstanding established and emerging African-American poets at two subsequent national conferences. Between these once-a-decade events, the center spotlights poets at readings, panel discussions, concerts and art exhibits; produces materials on African-American poetry; and holds an annual youth poetry camp. In April, in celebration of National Poetry Month, the center galvanized JMU students, faculty and staff to build “JMU’s Longest Poem,” a communal poem on the topic of civil discourse.

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THE PROMISE OF PEACE AS A FOUNDING MEMBER

— and current president —

of the International Network of Universities, JMU sent students to Japan in August for the observance of the 70th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima. The INU Global Citizenship and Peace Conference begins annually with students attending the Peace Memorial Ceremony at Ground Zero in the city. From that somIn the 2015-16 edition of the Institute of International Education’s Open Doors, JMU ranked third nationally in the total number of students studying abroad and moved from fourth to first place among its peers in the number of students in short-term programs.

ber observance, students then study, eat, collaborate and forge bonds together during the conference. “That’s the notion behind the whole conference,” says John Scherpereel, JMU political science professor and a conference organizer. “The thinking behind the conference stems from the recognition that international peace is built through concrete partnerships and concrete friendships.”

THE ART OF FINDING THE BEST SOLUTION IN LOOKING FOR

creative solutions

to problems — from business to technology, health care to urban renewal, education to social crises — there’s an increasing recognition of the power of a multidisciplinary approach. At JMU, arts integration is central to the myriad

‘IVS provides experimental space for exploration, and that, in turn, sparks creativity.’ — DAV I D E H R E N P R E I S , IVS director

efforts to expose students to cross-disciplinary opportunities and foster their ability to be innovative critical-thinkers. As a member of the Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities, JMU challenges students and faculty to explore the connections among art, science and technology. The university’s Institute for Visual Studies offers a space and a philosophy for such collaboration. In its 2015 review of best practices for arts integration in higher education, the Mellon Research Project cited the Institute for Visual Studies at James Madison University as an “exemplar of best practice in the fusion approach to curricular integration.”

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Boosting Innovation & Discovery

A SPACE NUT’S DREAM I T ’ S A S PAC E N U T ’ S D R E A M :

working on a

project for NASA to remove an obstacle to sending astronauts into deep space. In the fall of 2015, three undergraduate engineering majors at JMU began researching, planning and building a prototype device for sterilizing medical equipment on manned missions to Mars and beyond. JMU professor Jacquelyn Nagel first connected with NASA representatives at a conference, and the agency expressed interest in JMU’s unique two-year engineering capstone model. NASA specifically is looking for a cold plasma-based sterilization system that is compact, low-power and low-volume. Upon completion, the undergraduate students will present a working prototype to NASA to be tested and finalized.

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The JMU Engineering program was invited to join the KEEN Entrepreneurial Network, comprising the 24 best engineering programs in the country that seek to graduate engineers with an entrepreneurial mindset.

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have partnered with entrepreneurs from NOVALabs, an all-volunteer mak-

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erspace in Northern Virginia, to teach a 15-week interdisciplinary course on drone technology

known as the “JMU Drones Project.” Undergraduate students from seven majors, including the arts, humanities and sciences, come together to learn the theory and hands-on execution of drone technology. In 2015-16, six teams developed real-world applications for the technology in areas such as pollution, riverbed restoration, first response, aerial imaging and unexploded landmines. The teams showcased their work in JMU’s X-lab facility, proving that collaboration and innovative drone technology can address global issues.

‘I think most of us are space nuts, so we’ve been reading about NASA … the whole time we were growing up.’ — JAMES WATKINS, engineering major

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THE CHALLENGE OF DRONES

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BREATHING EASIER A I R Q UA L I T Y I S

traditionally monitored by fixed stations. But

if air-quality sensors were mobile, even wearable, data could be collected at various locations and times. JMU industrial design, computer science and engineering students developed a prototype using 3-D printers that measures ozone and particulate matter and uses GPS to monitor its location and an accelerometer to measure its movement. The project was funded by a $15,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency, and in April the students presented their work at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington.

BRIGHT FUTURE FOR WIND INDUSTRY FUELS WIND ENERGY CENTER JON MILES,

professor of inte-

grated science and technology and director of the Virginia Center for Wind Energy at JMU, is working with officials in several southwest Virginia counties that have been approached by energy companies seeking to build wind farms. JMU’s efforts to support the wind industry began with the organization of a working group, the Virginia Wind Energy Collaborative, in 2002. Today, the collaborative falls under the umbrella of the Virginia Center for Wind Energy, which is involved in a number of research, education and outreach endeavors. The center operates the Small Wind Training and Testing Facility on East Campus. The facility is used to train students on collecting data and other aspects of the wind industry, including turbine installation.

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ON THE TRAIL OF HERNANDO DE SOTO IN 2016,

professor Dennis Blanton and JMU anthropology students continued

to excavate and analyze samples from the Glass Site in south central Georgia to fill in an important chapter in our nation’s history and to fulfill Blanton’s commitment to his students to provide authentic archaeological experiences in the lab and in the field. Through careful excavation and analysis, they are rewriting the story of 16th-century Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto’s trail through the American Southeast.

‘This is what makes archaeology both incredibly interesting and exciting, but also complicated, even maddening. We have introduced new questions.’ — D E N N I S B L A N TO N , professor of anthropology

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ESPN COLLEGE GAMEDAY FOR ONE GLORIOUS WEEKEND

in October, the eyes of the

college football world were on JMU as the cast and crew of ESPN’s “College GameDay” rolled into town for Homecoming 2015. Harrisonburg was off the beaten path for the traveling college football preview show, but senior coordinating producer Lee Fitting (’96), a JMU alum, convinced his colleagues that the FCS school and its fans could deliver the goods. JMU Nation didn’t disappoint. A large crowd turned out to welcome the GameDay bus to campus Thursday evening, and fans packed the Quad for live broadcasts Friday afternoon and Saturday morning, holding signs and showing their Purple Pride for a national television audience. ESPN cameras panned overhead to capture breathtaking views of campus. JMU trended nationally in social media throughout the week, and the number of page views on jmu.edu and jmusports.com spiked.

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“THAT WAS THE GREATEST SCENE WE’VE EVER HAD FOR THE SHOW, EVER.” — L E E F I T T I N G ( ’ 9 6), senior coordinating producer ESPN College GameDay


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HALEY ENSHRINED IN PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME I N AU G U S T,

five-time Super Bowl champion Charles Haley (’87)

became the first JMU student-athlete to be enshrined in a major sports hall of fame as he took his rightful place alongside other pro football greats in Canton, Ohio. For 12 seasons in the NFL, Haley was a defensive force, winning two Super Bowls with the San Francisco 49ers (1989 and 1990) and three more with the Dallas Cowboys (1993, 1994 and 1996). At JMU, Haley was named an All-American as a senior and never missed a game during his career with the Dukes.

‘It’s not about individuals, it’s about team. That’s the only way you can have success.’ — C H A R L E S H A L E Y (’ 87 )

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PERFORMANCE AND HEALTH A NEW

Integrated Health and Sports Performance Model is commit-

ted to helping student-athletes realize their full potential, minimize risk of injury, achieve competitive excellence and have an exemplary student-athlete experience. The model combines key components of performance and wellness — sports medicine, strength and conditioning, sports nutrition, sport psychology and clinical psychology/ mental health — in a shared setting. Coaches, advisers, trainers, nutritionists and other staff meet regularly to review what may be impacting the lives of student-athletes in a particular program, along with their physical and mental health.

‘When you look at everything going on in our student-athletes’ lives, you can lose sight of why someone is tired all the time or why their performance is flat in practice. Having everyone around the table allows us to start having those conversations.’ — TO M KU S T E R , associate athletic director for integrated health and sports performance

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A GREAT RUN TH E JM U SOF TBALL TE AM

began the 2016 campaign ranked No.

19 in the country and climbed as high as No. 6. Along the way, the Dukes, led by All-Americans Jailyn Ford and Megan Good, beat six teams in the Top 25, won the CAA regular-season and conference titles, and hosted NCAA Regionals and Super Regionals. The team ended the season with a program-best 50 wins.

JMU won 66 percent of its athletics contests in all sports during the 2015-16 school year. That’s the winningest record among Virginia universities regardless of conference, and the best in the Colonial Athletic Association.

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‘We’ve brought together people from different disciplines — from Applied Behavioral Analysis, from psychology, occupational therapy, and speech and language pathology. We can do the merged treatment at one time … which is not a traditional approach, but this is the creative part of what we do.’ — T R E VO R S TO K ES , professor of graduate psychology and a licensed Applied Behavioral Analyst


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with autism. These different approaches converge in the university’s Inter-

professional Autism Clinic, which offers blended services to the autism com-

munity as well as an experiential learning environment for JMU students who will eventually work with children on the spectrum. One such opportunity was JMU’s 2016 summer autism camp, an annual program run by JMU occupational therapist Liz Richardson and Marsha Longerbeam, a speech and language pathologist. Other services at Madison include Occupational Therapy Clinical Education Services and the Applied Behavioral Analysis clinic as well as a Speech-Language-Hearing Applied Laboratory that is part of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders.

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a broad network of services and opportunities for individuals

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HOPE FOR AUTISM

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NEIGHBORS IN NEED AT A T I M E

when integrating behavioral health services with primary care in

rural settings is gaining momentum, JMU serves as a model. For more than a decade, Madison’s graduate psychology faculty and students have been providing counseling services in neighboring Page County in consultation with local physicians. More than 200 clients received services in 2015-16.

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The Health Administration Program received the 2016 American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) Higher Education Network Award, in the undergraduate category, for the highest level of ACHE engagement.

SUITCASE CLINICS DELIVER HEALTH CARE TO THE HOMELESS A N I N N OVAT I V E A P P R OAC H

to

delivering primary care services to a vulnerable population, JMU’s suitcase clinics are designed to help break the cycle of homelessness by providing care at area shelters and helping residents move one step closer to permanent housing. Clients, many of whom suffer from chronic illness, substance abuse and mental health issues, report a high level of satisfaction with the program. More than 80 percent surveyed in 2015-16 said it kept them out of the emergency room.

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Leading in Business THE HEART OF THE HARTS G . J . ( ’ 8 4) A N D H E AT H E R H A R T ’ S

gift to JMU to name the Hart School of Hospitality, Sport and Recreation Management — the first named school at JMU — is much more than a large donation. Their gift’s greatest impact is the partnership it creates among a philanthropist, a corporate executive and a university. G.J. is the CEO of California Pizza Kitchen and Heather is the driving force behind CPK’s Inspired Acts, an organization within the company that is described as “high-impact community service.” The Harts have involved dozens of JMU students in Inspired Acts to give them hands-on education in their corporate leadership philosophy and giving spirit.

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MADISON TRUST PA I R I N G J M U I N N OVAT I O N

with potential investors, including alumni

and friends of the university, is the goal of the Madison Trust. Spearheaded by entrepreneur Don Rainey (’82), JMU alumnus and former Board of Visitors member, the Madison Trust has engendered partnerships among investors and innovators to benefit not just JMU, but our broader communities and society as a whole. The third round of Madison Trust presentations took place in May 2016 as 10 groups of JMU faculty and staff members pitched their ideas in support of the university’s core values and planning priorities. The projects ranged from a brewing and distilling center, to a community music lab, to student opportunities to combat Salmonella.

GOOGLE ONLINE MARKETING CHALLENGE JMU’S INTERNET

Marketing Practi-

cum students have compiled an impressive record in the Google Online Marketing Challenge since the competition’s inception in 2008. In 2015, a JMU team won the AdWords Business Award in the Americas region in the Social Impact category. Google donated $10,000 to the Calvert Marine Museum, the team’s client in the competition. A requirement of the class, participation in the Google Online Marketing Challenge provides students experiential learning and a chance to discover the significance of their work. Google has invited JMU students to its Googleplex in Mountain View, California, multiple times to recognize their outstanding performance in the competition.

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COB 300 JMU’S UNIQUE COB 300

curriculum fosters integration among disciplines

taught in the College of Business. Students learn to approach business as a process made up of different skill sets, different functions and different activities that all come together as they strive to reach goals and make a difference in their organizations, local communities and the global community. In March 2016, 38 students competed in the 14th annual Jackson-Rainey Business Plan Competition, the final rite of passage for the COB 300 course. Beyond the opportunity to win cash prizes and scholarships, the competition provides students with professional experience in a setting that resembles a venture capital fair in which aspiring entrepreneurs pitch ideas to potential investors.

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Reforming Education BRAIN TRUST JOHN ALMARODE,

professor of early, elementary

and reading education, translates the work of neuroscientists and contributes educators’ own research from the realm of pedagogy to benefit scientists and educators alike. “My goal is to focus on how we best develop environments that optimize K-12 learning in science, technology, engineering and math. The foundation for that is brain science. That’s the mantra I operate under. What I do is take the body of neuroscience and make sure I have credible, reliable colleagues and sources on brain science. And then I try to figure out what, if anything, might apply to the K-12 classroom.” In 2015-16, Almarode was recognized for his work with the first award from the Sarah Miller Luck Endowed Professorship for Excellence in Education.

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‘We help our candidates understand that their students can get all A’s but still flunk life.’ — P H I L L I P W I S H O N , dean of the College of Education

The Center for Online Education ranked the JMU Educational Technologies Master’s Program at No. 11 in their 2016 assessment of “Best Online Master’s in Education Degree Programs.”

REIMAGINING REFORM C O L L E G E O F E D U C AT I O N

Dean Phillip Wishon believes that JMU prepares future

teachers to raise the intellectual quotient of their students and the ethical, just and moral quotient of professional practice, civil discourse and civic responsibility. “We help our students understand that along with helping their future students become accomplished in the fields of communication arts, mathematics, science, technology and the social sciences, they must also help them learn to think critically, ethically and creatively about events and circumstances that imperil their relationships with others, with other of the planet’s inhabitants and with the planet itself.” Recently, the Department of Early, Elementary and Reading Education worked with Harrisonburg City Public Schools to design and implement a set of high-impact immersive experiences that provide for more significant and robust preparation of elementary-school teacher candidates.

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Renewing Civil Society ETHICAL REASONING IN ACTION JA M E S M A D I S O N U N I V E R S I T Y

has consistently valued and promoted

integrity within its community, yet the complex society that our graduates enter provides an impetus to do more. The Madison Collaborative: Ethical Reasoning in Action answers this call through curricular and co-curricular opportunities that employ an eight-question ethical reasoning framework applied in three domains: personal, professional and civic life. The framework provides accessible, common language to talk about the ethical considerations of an issue or decision. The ethical reasoning initiative is an integral part of the JMU campus. For instance, 2015 Orientation activities included “It’s Complicated,” a program designed to provide all 4,000-plus incoming freshmen with a tangible illustration of putting ethical reasoning into practice. The Madison Collaborative complements the university’s mission as it

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YEAR OF SERVICE “ S E R V I C E I S A PA R T

of your DNA,”

Virginia first lady Dorothy McAuliffe (shown above with President Alger) remarked as she welcomed college and university administrators from across the commonwealth to the President’s Summit for the Service Year at James Madison University on Feb. 9. Virginia is the first state in the nation where the higher education community has come together to commit to integrating service years on their campuses. The summit culminated with the signing of a compact formally declaring a commitment to the service year. In accordance with the Service Year Initiative Compact, JMU moved expeditiously to create the JMU Engagement

KEEPING PROMISES

Fellowship Program, which provides

COMMITMENTS CAN BE HARD

three outstanding graduates with the

more than a decade after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast,

opportunity to experience a trans-

JMU students, alumni, faculty and staff are honoring a commit-

formational year of public service

ment to help the region recover. Back in 2005, it was brutally

working on projects designed to

apparent that recovery would not occur overnight. The JMU Alter-

advance their capacity for engaged

native Break Program made a commitment to the recovery effort,

learning, community engagement or

initiating an annual May Break dedicated solely to rebuilding in the

civic engagement.

Gulf Coast region. In November 2015, they added a special trip to

to keep. So it is remarkable that for

New Orleans during Thanksgiving to commemorate that first trip a decade ago. Current JMU students are just as interested in rebuilding New Orleans as their counterparts were in 2005. At the core of the commitment is JMU’s culture of service-learning and focus on community engagement – connecting learning to practice while addressing societal problems.

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The JMU Debate Team finished eighth in the National Debate Tournament’s and Cross Examination Debate Association’s National Sweepstakes rankings in 2016, the eighth consecutive year that the team finished in the top 10.

WORKING TO IMPROVE LIVES AROUND THE GLOBE C E L E B R AT I N G I T S

20th anniversary in 2016,

the Center for International Stabilization and Recovery at JMU is recognized as a global leader in international efforts to combat the effects of landmines and explosive remnants of war, including rehabilitating post-conflict societies. The center provides training, develops technical tools and conducts field research in cooperation with JMU faculty, and students with a passion for international humanitarian work play an integral role in many CISR functions. The center’s director, Ken Rutherford, professor of political science and a landmine survivor, spearheads relationships with the United Nations, global foundations, U.S. government bureaus and other institutions involved in post-conflict economic and social activities. Rutherford co-founded the Landmine Survivors Network, and is a renowned leader in the Nobel Peace Prize-winning coalition that spearheaded the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty and the global movement that led to the 2008 Cluster Munitions Ban Treaty.

‘CISR is committed to standing with communities until peace is achieved.’ — K E N R U T H E R FO R D, CISR director

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A RETURN TO CIVILITY TOO OF TEN,

public dialogue on the important issues of our day

degenerates into shouting matches, name-calling and a cry for the elimination of opposing viewpoints. As the university named for the Father of the Constitution, James Madison University has made a serious commitment to modeling and encouraging civil discourse. The Institute for Constructive Advocacy and Dialogue at JMU embraces the Madisonian ideal of civility and respect as it bridges the gap between the university and the community through outreach, service, research and scholarship. The public face of the institute is 4C: Campus Community Civic Collaborative, which trains passionate and impartial student communicators to design and facilitate public conversations, both at JMU and in the community. In August 2015, as part of the ongoing Harrisonburg Summit series, 4C students facilitated discussions with community members on issues and opportunities to address the high rate of recidivism in Harrisonburg.

MODELING THE WORLD F U E L E D BY I N T E N S I V E

research

and public speaking practice, JMU students are learning the arts of diplomacy, debate and compromise

‘We want to infuse the spirit of James Madison, the man, and the ways that he thought and engaged in public life, into this university.’

in five simulations modeled on the African Union, Arab League, European Union, United Nations and Moot Court. JMU’s newest model simulation team, the Model African Union, was formed in October 2015 to participate in the 14th annual National Model African Union, held in Washington in February. Student participation in the annual model simulations hones understanding of complex international bodies and their deliberations as well as legal matters. While other universities have model simulations, “It is unusual that there be this many at JMU,” said Chris Blake, professor of political science, the academic department that sponsors most of the JMU model simulation teams.

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— LO R I B R I T T, ICAD director


HANGING OUR SHINGLE IN D.C.

Semester, which supports JMU students in internships with White House, State Department, Congress, C-SPAN, U.S. Trade Representative, Amnesty International and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. The new space offers an active

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such prestigious organizations and governmental offices as the

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on the political science department’s 20-year-old Washington

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as a space for the entire university, the Washington Center builds

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the Washington Center, which opened in August 2015. Envisioned

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the Washington Semester led the university

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D.C.-area alumni base a place to interact with current JMU students and to serve as mentors and networking contacts.

‘We are bringing a part of JMU to Washington. We want to host JMU scholars who can share their expertise and present their research with the Washington area. We want to encourage other JMU units to use the new space and to consider launching their own Washington-based academic programs.’ — DAV I D A . J O N E S , professor-in-residence, Washington Semester program

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Increasing Access

VALLEY SCHOLARS WITH ITS SECOND COHORT

aboard in fiscal

year 2016, JMU’s Valley Scholars program provides academically motivated and less-advantaged local youth the prospect of a guaranteed academic scholarship to attend JMU after they graduate from high school. Each cohort of students, who progress together from eighth grade through JMU graduation, regularly participates in activities on Madison’s campus that help foster successful college students and build enlightened citizens. While eighth-graders explore the academic and career worlds open to them through a college education, ninth-graders focus on the college-bound knowledge and skills necessary to ensure they meet JMU’s rigorous admissions criteria. President Jonathan Alger established Valley Scholars as a pathway to success for local students and as an investment in the economic future of the Shenandoah Valley.

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For the 2015-16 academic year, 34 percent of in-state freshman applications to JMU were submitted by students from under-represented populations.

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— PRESIDENT JONATHAN R. ALGER

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‘Through the Valley Scholars program, we seek to give not just the gift of an education, but also the gift of hope for a bright future.’

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Financials 2015-16

JMU FY 2016 Total Revenue (Millions) Student Tuition and Fees

$ 202

Auxiliary Enterprises

178

State Appropriations

87

Grants and Contracts, including PELL

37

Net Capital

69*

Other Total

5 $ 577

* Includes funds raised through private philanthropy

JMU FY 2016 Total Expenses

Instruction

(Millions)

Auxiliary Activities

132

Academic Support

43

Operation and Maintenance - Plant

41

Depreciation

40

Institutional Support

32

Student Services

17

Public Service

13

Student Aid

9

Interest Expense

8

Research

3

Payment to State

3

Increase in Net Position

Total

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$ 153

82

$ 577


JA M E S M A D I S O N U N I V E R S I T Y

continued its tradition of operating efficiently in 2016. Given that Madison

is known for providing students with personally engaging experiences, it should come as no surprise that instruction and academic support receive the most funding of all university activities. Of course, as is true across higher education, how Madison funds its operations continues to evolve. While the university relies heavily on support from the Commonwealth of Virginia, public appropriations continue to shrink as a percentage of overall revenue. As a result, tuition and fees have risen, and we have placed greater emphasis on raising funds through private philanthropy.

State General Fund To Operating Expenses (Excluding Depreciation and Auxilary)

50%

Percent of university budget

40%

30% 28%

20%

10%

2000

2005

2010

2011

2012 Year

2013

2014

2015

2016

35


Establishing a culture of philanthropy

PRIVATE SUPPORT FOR JMU CONTINUES UPWARD MOMENTUM James Madison University set a record with more than $18.7 million in total funds raised through private philanthropy during fiscal year 2016, which ended on June 30, 2016. The total eclipsed $18 million for a second consecutive year after averaging $10.1 million during the previous three years. In addition, a record 20,859 donors gave to the university, including 8,610 JMU alumni, also a single-year

university, engaged with ideas and the world. Total giving increased in virtually all types of gifts to

record. A total of 6,530 donors made their first gifts

the university. Individual major gifts totaled more than

ever to JMU during the year.

$8.4 million, up from $8.2 million the previous year.

Highlights of the year included the unveiling of the first

Major gifts from organizations increased to nearly $3.8

named school at JMU; a $2.5 million gift to the university’s

million from $3.5 million, and the university’s annual

engineering program; the launch of a new scholarship initia-

giving totals improved to nearly $5.9 million from $5.2

tive; and an exceptionally successful, inaugural Giving Day

million in FY2015.

that netted 2,840 gifts to JMU in a 24-hour period. This historic giving success comes on the heels of JMU

Planned giving fell from $1.3 million to just over $617,000. However, the university recorded more than

President Jonathan Alger’s Why Madison? Listening Tour,

$20.2 million in conditional pledges that were not

which garnered input for what became The Madison Plan.

included in the fiscal-year totals. Conditional pledges,

Released in 2014, the plan serves as Madison’s strategic

which include donor-advised funds, certain bequests and

roadmap for future success and sets forth the university’s

other conditional commitments, increased more than

vision to become the national model for the engaged

five-fold over FY2015.

36


— NICK L ANGRIDGE (’00, ’07M, ’14PH.D.), vice president for University Advancement

E

C

2016

R I T B

A LE R

A

T

HE YE

‘These back-to-back record years immediately following the president’s listening tour and the release of JMU’s strategic plan show how strongly our donors believe in the university’s direction.’

ME CA

New Commitments by Fundraising Program

2016

2015

2014

2013

Prior 3 FY’s Avg YTD

Current FY vs Prior 3 FY’s Avg

$ 5,895,134

$ 5,248,240

$ 5,028,992

$ 5,126,277

$ 5,134,502

14.8%

Individual Major Gift

8,436,773

8,210,088

1,899,420

1,528,740

3,879,415

117.5%

Organization Major Gift

3,799,814

3,537,978

1,734,859

4,179,628

3,150,821

20.6%

617,089

1,376,250

2,220,163

274,100

1,290,170

-52.2%

$18,748,810

$18,372,556

$10,883,434

$11,108,745

$13,454,908

39.35%

$ 20,255,001

$ 3,855,007

$ 2,545,340

$ 2,392,684

746.5%

Fundraising Program

Annual Giving

Planned Gift

Total

Conditional Pledges

$

777,708

37


Giving Day MARCH 15, 2016,

will long be remembered for the won-

derful outpouring of support from alumni, students, parents, faculty, staff and Dukes from all around the globe. The overwhelming response during the 24 hours of JMU’s first-ever Giving Day once again affirms that something very special is happening at JMU.

2,840 $ 338,964 901 3,342 Total gifts (5x the original goal of 568)

Total raised

First-time JMU donors

12:02:11 a.m. (time of first gift) 11:59:58 p.m. (time of last gift)

Social media posts

38


A Visionary $2.5 Million Investment in a Different Kind of Engineer ROOTED IN THE UNIVERSIT Y’S

interdisciplinary education and in the College of Integrated

Science and Engineering’s philosophy of innovation and real-life problem-solving, JMU produces engineers who design with people in mind. And this signature engineering program just got one huge vote of confidence. When alumnus Jeff Tickle (’90) learned about JMU’s innovative approach to engineering, he wanted to be a partner in its success. “When I was working for the family business, there was always a struggle for good engineers.” Not just any engineers, he emphasizes, “but those who can understand process — how to do things. … The way [JMU engineering] is structured is unique. They are producing the kind of engineers that manufacturing needs,” he says. “And manufacturing is the backbone of the American economy.” His $2.5 million unrestricted gift represents a long-term investment in Madison’s engineering program.

‘Jeff’s gift is going to impact much more than engineering. … This gift will resonate nationally amongst engineering programs. It’s going to allow us to send more of these interdisciplinary engineers out into society and to bring their problem-solving skills, their initiative, their creativity to bear on all manner of society’s problems. The gift will echo far into the distance and long into the future.’ — BOB KOLVOORD, dean of the College of Integrated Science and Engineering

A Dukes Family Pays It Forward G I V I N G B AC K

is what inspired Mike (’76, ’77M) and

Kathy Mueller Thomas (’78) to make a multimillion dollar gift commitment to JMU and to establish JMU’s new Dukes Pay It Forward scholarship initiative, which will make it possible for future students to go to Madison. They see their gift as just the beginning. The couple wants alumni to further the cause by creating their own Dukes Pay It Forward scholarship or by contributing to existing scholarships so that many more students can achieve their dreams of attending JMU.

The Battle Plan A GIFT FROM

the Battle family — Mike (’81, ’83M); JMU senior

Michaela; Steven; and Cecelia — consists of a $500,000 commitment to support the construction of a new JMU Convocation Center and an additional $100,000 to create an endowment for experiential learning opportunities for student-athletes through an emerging leadership program. Their gift recognizes the importance of balancing athletics with scholarship.

39


JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION $100 Million in Sight for JMU Foundation’s 50th JA M E S M A D I S O N U N I V E R S I T Y ’ S

endowment has grown

from less than $40 million to almost $80 million during the last decade, while the JMU Foundation’s net assets grew by more than $6 million during fiscal year 2016. JMU’s endowment trajectory, driven by groundbreaking years of philanthropic giving and conscientious investment, puts the endowment on pace to reach $100 million by 2019. As the champion for the university’s endowment, the foundation has set that goal to coincide with the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scholarships for academics (52 percent) and scholarships for athletics (7 percent) together constitute the largest designation of JMU’s endowment, which says a lot about Madison. True to the university’s focus on the student, donor investment in scholarships benefits students, first and foremost.

Endowment Growth 80,000,000

60,000,000

40,000,000

20,000,000

0

2008

40

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016


EA R CL

R I T

B

A M E EC

(as of June 30, 2016)

Consolidated Balance Sheets

Consolidated Statements of Activities

June 30, 2016

$

2016

A

JMU Foundation Financial Statement

Cash and Cash Equivalents

E

E Y TH

3,559,716

June 30, 2016

June 30, 2015

$

3,121,732

Contributions

$

17,652,258

June 30, 2015

$

13,356,230

Contributions Receivable

10,585,246

5,849,983

Investment Income (Loss)

- 3,114,161

2,737,306

Investments at FMV

98,312,354

97,344,507

In-Kind Support from JMU

3,527,132

3,725,684

Land Held for Future Use

6,264,640

6,420,710

Other Revenue

800,431

782,042

Property and Equipment, Net

4,845,603

4,990,552

Total Revenue and Support

$ 18,865,660

$ 20,601,262

Collection of Historical Artifacts

100,591

100,591

Educational and General Programs

$

$

Other Assets

281,513

166,704

Auxiliary and Support Programs

Total Assets

$ 123,949,663

$ 117,994,779

Management and Administrative

Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

$

$

224,634

Fundraising

528,241

528,241

1,984,444

2,141,111

589,102

611,137

Deferred Revenue Long-Term Debt Annuity and Compensation Obligations

167,502

Total Liabilities

$

3,269,289

$

3,505,123

Unrestricted

$

16,135,319

$

16,682,361

Temporarily Restricted

42,041,305

40,999,483

Permanently Restricted

62,503,750

56,807,812

Total Net Assets

$120,680,374

$114,489,656

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$ 123,949,663

$ 117,994,779

6,607,663

7,254,761

1,016,942

887,512

528,874

509,986

4,521,463

4,445,414

Total Expenses

$ 12,674,942

$ 13,097,673

Change in Net Assets

$

$

Net Assets, Beginning Net Assets, June 30

6,190,718

7,503,589

114,489,656

106,986,067

$ 120,680,374

$ 114,489,656

41


NEW FACILITIES

Health and Behavioral Studies Building T H E N E W H E A LT H

and Behavioral Studies Building

houses four of the college’s seven departments: communication sciences and disorders, health sciences, nursing, and social work. The $45.6 million structure is located adjacent to the Student Success Center and boasts spaces specifically designed for teaching and research. Among the amenities are 13 research laboratories; 17 classrooms; 19 teaching laboratories; two lecture halls with seating for 165; a speech, language and hearing clinic; a food-production laboratory; and a patient simulation laboratory.

42


UREC J M U ’ S U N I V E R S I T Y R E C R E AT I O N C E N T E R

unveiled a

major addition and renovation. In January 2016, a new addition was opened that nearly doubled the size of the facility, and offers students new weight, fitness and cardio spaces, six group fitness studios, gym and court spaces, an indoor track, a fitness/instructional pool and spa, and an outdoor courtyard. Since then, the existing UREC facilities have undergone extensive renovations, and now give students access to an adventure center with a free-standing climbing wall, new instructional and training spaces, a squash court and expanded parking, among other amenities.

43


B OA R D O F V I S I TO R S 2 01 6 –2 017

VANESSA M. EVANS-GREVIOUS (’93, ’97M), Rector WA R R E N K . C O L E M A N (’79, ’81M), Vice Rector M I C H A E L B . B AT T L E (’81, ’83M) W I L L I A M T. B O L L I N G J E F F R E Y E . G R A S S (’92) M AT T H E W A . G R AY (’05) M A R I B E T H H E R O D (’82) L U C Y H U T C H I N S O N (’06) M A R I A D . JA N KO W S K I

VICE PROVOSTS

D E B O R A H T. J O H N S O N (’78)

M A R I L O U J O H N S O N (’80) Academic Development

L A R A P. M A J O R (’92) E D WA R D R I C E J O H N C . R O T H E N B E R G E R (’88) M I C H A E L M . T H O M A S (’76, ’77M) C R A I G B . W E L B U R N (’96) A DAO M A O K A F O R (’17), Student Member D O N N A L . H A R P E R (’77, ’81M, ’86ED.S.), Secretary PRESIDENT

J O N AT H A N R . A L G E R S E N I O R A D M I N I S T R AT O R S

A . JERRY BENSON Provost and Senior Vice President, Academic Affairs M AG G I E B U R K H A R T E VA N S Executive Assistant to the President BRIAN CHARETTE Special Assistant to the President, Strategic Planning and Engagement A R T H U R T. D E A N I I (’93, ’99M) Executive Director, Campus & Community Programs for Access and Inclusion D O N N A L . H A R P E R (’77, ’81M, ’86ED.S.) Vice President, Access and Enrollment Management CHAR LE S W. KI N G J R . Senior Vice President, Administration and Finance N I C K L . L A N G R I D G E (’00, ’07M, ’14PH.D.) Vice President, University Advancement M A R K J . WA R N E R (’79, ’81M, ’85ED.S.) Senior Vice President, Student Affairs and University Planning SUSAN L . WHEELER University Counsel and Special Assistant Attorney General

L I N DA C A B E H A L P E R N University Programs Y VO N N E R . H A R R I S Research and Scholarship DEANS

CYNTH IA M . BAU E R LE Science and Mathematics JIE CHEN Graduate School M A R Y A . G O WA N Business DAV I D K . J E F F R E Y Arts and Letters R O B E R T A . KO LVO O R D Integrated Science and Engineering S H A R O N E . L OV E L L ( ’85) Health and Behavioral Studies A DA M L . M U R R AY Libraries and Educational Technologies G E O R G E E . S PA R K S Visual and Performing Arts PHILLIP M. WISHON Education A L U M N I A S S O C I AT I O N O F F I C E R

H E AT H E R H E D R I C K (’00), President PA R E N T S C O U N C I L C H A I R S

C H R I S and K I M B I G G E R S H AY E S (’14P, ’17P)

2015-16 ANNUAL REPORT Produced by James Madison University Design by Journey Group Printing by Progress Printing Photography by Diane Elliott (’00), Larissa Gallaher, Buddy Harlow (’17), Eugene Hoshiko/AP, Tommy Koehler, Cathy Kushner (’87), Christine Letsky-Anderson, Chase Maszle, Mike Miriello (’09M), Tiffany Showalter, Holly Veenis, Don Wright/AP Additional contributions from Bormay & Co., N.Y. /Library of Congress, J. Maca/Library of Congress, Special Collections


2015-16 FACTS Student-faculty ratio

16:1

(Source: JMU Office of Institutional Research)

Graduation rate

82% SPINE WIDTH = 0.171”

National average = 42% (Source: College Scorecard)

Public regional university in the South

2

#

(Source: U.S. News & World Report’s 2017 Best Colleges rankings)

Most Innovative Schools among regional universities in the South

3

#

First-year students

4,525 Representing 38 states and 35 countries

JMU students who study abroad

31%

(Source: JMU Office of International Programs)

JMU undergraduates who participate in research, an internship or a practicum

80%

(Source: JMU Career and Academic Planning)

Salary after attending (8 years out)

55,036

$

(Source: U.S. News & World Report’s 2017 Best Colleges rankings)

Average Virginia public institution = $51,383 (Source: College Measures)

Increase in diversity

Students who return after their first year

38%

As a percentage of overall enrollment from 2011 to 2015

92%

National average = 68% (Source: College Scorecard)


C

6 1 0 2 T B R I

M E CA E

AR E L

800 S Main St Harrisonburg, VA 22807

2015-16 Annual Report

A

T YE E H

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

HARRISONBURG, VA 22801

PERMIT 4

U.S. POSTAGE PAID

Profile for James Madison University

James Madison University 2015-16 Annual Report  

2015-16 Annual Report of James Madison University, "The Year It Became Clear."

James Madison University 2015-16 Annual Report  

2015-16 Annual Report of James Madison University, "The Year It Became Clear."

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