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FRIDAY • March 2 • 2018

Dean and Jeanine Otto of Barrhaven pose with the organizers before the start of the 11th Annual Maddy’s Gala at the Brookstreet Hotel. The gala, in memory of Madison Otto, a Jockvale Public School kindergarten student who passed away at the age of five from an inoperable brain tumour, raised more than $100,000 for Roger Neilson House. For the full story, see page 10. Derek Boehm photo

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Page 2 FRIDAY, March 2, 2018

The IndependentNEWS

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

Barrhaven Independent a finalist in annual OCNA newspaper awards Independent Editor a finalist for Ontario Community Newspaper Association Reporter of the Year Award While 2017 may have been a truculent year for community newspapers in Ottawa, it was a big year for the Barrhaven Independent. The Ontario Community Newspaper Association announced the three finalists in each category for its 2017 Better Newspapers Competition provincial awards Wednesday. The Independent and its sister publication, the Manotick Messenger, are a finalist in four editorial categories. There are close to 300 community newspapers that belong to the OCNA. “It’s icing on the cake for what has been a fantastic year for us,” said Independent editor and publisher Jeff Mor-

ris. “It’s something that we want to share with the people in the communities we serve. The Independent plays an important role for local residents and families as both a source of information and something that provides an emotional connection to the community.” The Nunavut News North, which is an OCNA member and covers all of Nunavut Territory, was the only newspaper to be finalists in three of the 22 editorial award categories. “It’s something we are very proud of,” Morris said. “There are only two of us here full time, and Gary (Coulombe) and I both work hard. We have a few

“There are some very talented people in this industry across the province, and it is an honour to be recognized as a finalist by our peers.” really good part time people, and we have some amazing contributors like Charlie Senack, Phill Potter, photographer Mike Carroccetto, and our councillors. For us to go head-to-head with some of the big corporate newspapers with more resources and more employees and come on top is a big accomplishment for us.” A story that ran in the Barrhaven Independent on Pierre-Savard high school basketball coach Daphne Mar-

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ghetis is up for Best Health and Wellness Story along with Collingwood Connection and Toronto Canadian Jewish News. In the story, Marghetis walked readers through her battle with cancer and how she used it as a teaching tool and rallying point for the high school girls team she coached. She also talked about winning the city high school championship in what would be the last game she would ever coach before her passing.

Another story up for an award for Best News Story was on how human remains were unearthed by workers building a deck at a new home off Prince of Wales Dr. just south of Barrhaven. That story is a finalist for Best News Story along with the Brockville Recorder and Times and Nunavut News North. The Manotick Messenger is also up for Best Arts and Entertainment Story for a feature story on local dancer Deirdre Barnes, who took a week off from being a part of Britney Spears’ Las Vegas show to come home and work with children at the Denise Smith School of Dance. Barrhaven Independent editor Jeff

Morris is also a finalist for the OCNA Stephen Shaw Reporter of the Year Award. It was the third time in the last decade that Morris has been a finalist for the award, Morris won the award in 2008 and was a finalist in 2010, is joined by Todd Vandonk of Peterborough This Week and Kim Zarzour of the Richmond Hill/Thornhill Liberal. “It’s very humbling,” said Morris. “There are some very talented people in this industry across the province, and it is an honour to be recognized as a finalist by our peers.” The Ontario Community Newspaper Association Annual Awards Gala is April 20 in Toronto.

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Page 4 FRIDAY, March 2, 2018

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

The IndependentCOMMUNITY

Parents of child who died from overdose working to raise awareness of opioids By Charlie Senack Hundreds came out to support local charities during the annual Kaleidoscope of Hope fundraiser that was held in the new ballroom of the Brookstreet Hotel in Kanata last month. Since the fundraiser started in 2011, their mission has been to help spread awareness on teen mental health. This year the funds earned went to We The Parents, a parent drug advocacy group, the Sens Foundation, and the Youth Services Bureau. Among those who helped put on the event was Steve and Natalie Cody of Barrhaven, who shared the story of their son, Nick, an OSU soccer player, and his struggle to battle an addiction to drugs. “It’s close to 6am (and) I got a knock on the bedroom door,” Steve said remembering the day Nick asked for help. “Our son said ‘I’ve done a lot of cocaine, I need help’.” That morning, the Cody’s ran around trying to find help for their son. They went to CHEO who told them they don’t deal with overdoses, and sent them to the Royal Ottawa. When they arrived there, they said they dont treat 16-year-olds with a drug addiction. They then turned to local politicians for support. They went to the office of Pierre Poilievre, the MP for their riding of Carleton who told them “it was a provincial issue, not a fed-

eral issue.” That’s when they went to Lisa MacLeod, the newly elected MPP for Nepean-Carleton at the time, who was eager to get them help, yet realized there was no help she could offer. “The Codys were the first to come into my office in 2006 when their son Nick was dealing with a drug addiction,” MacLeod said at an opioid forum in October. “That was the first time I realized we did not have the treatment or detox facilities in our city.” They then looked into the options of treatment facilities. The Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre is the only Centre in Ottawa that treats youth with drug addictions. It currently houses 24 beds, and has a three-month waiting list. “For us it didn’t end very well,” the Cody’s told the crowd. “Our son ended up passing in June 2013, and that’s extremely unfortunate. After he died, we started to say no for Nick.” Over the past few months, they have been working with NepeanCarleton MPP Lisa MacLeod, who has tabled a bill at Queens Park called Nick’s Law. The bill would take 10 per cent or around $5.6 million of the government’s marketing budget, and put it towards opioid awareness, something the Cody’s feel is very important. The Codys wanted to become advocates so

ROOFING

other parents would not have to go through what they went through, yet they did not have the emotional energy. “We always knew we wanted to help and give back, (but) we just didn’t have the emotional energy,” Steve said. “It took us three years to really get out life back together.” Now a year after the news of Ottawa’s opioid epidemic has surfaced, they plan to do everything they can to prevent overdose deaths in Ottawa. Ottawa Public Health has released stats that show there were at least 21 confirmed drug deaths in 2017 between the months of March and June, over half of what was seen in 2016. That report also showed that approximately 30 people are treated for overdoses in Ottawa hospitals every month, that’s not to mention the number of overdoses that we’re not reported. The Cody’s hope Nick’s Law will help lower the number of people using

Natalie and Steve Cody, with their son Darren Cody, are advocates for opioid awareness.

drugs, and will also help educate youth on the dangers of using. The bill has already gone through second reading, and they are confident it will be passed soon with the support of all parties. A petition to help get the law passed is up at nickslaw.ca.

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FRIDAY, March 2, 2018 Page 5

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT 

The IndependentCOMMUNITY John McCrae tops local high schools in annual provincial rankings

John McCrae Secondary School has been ranked as one of the top high schools in Ontario. The Fraser Institute released its annual Ontario secondary school rankings last week. The Fraser Institute ranks schools using objective, publicly-available data such as average scores on province-

wide tests. Among the 747 high schools ranked in the province, John McCrae came in tied at 25th. It was the third highest ranking for an Ottawa school, as Colonel By was tied for fourth, and West Carleton was tied for 19th. McCrae scored 8.6 out of 10 in the scoring system. Their aver-

age score over the past five years is 8.5, while their average ranking over the last five years in 22nd. St. Joseph Catholic High School also placed in the top 10 per cent of schools in the province, as they scored 8.3 to earn a ranking of 43rd out of 747 schools. The score of 8.3 matched their five-year average,

while 43rd was slightly lower than their fiveyear average ranking of 36th. Longfields Davidson Heights Secondary School also cracked the top 100 in Ontario, as they scored 7.7 to be ranked 97th. Their score was slightly lower than their five-year average of 7.8, and their ranking was down from

their five-year average of 70th. St. Francis Xavier High School in Riverside South scored 7.6 to be ranked 115th. Those results show a slight improvement from their five-year average of 7.5 and 120th. St. Mother Teresa showed a decline in their score and ranking. Their score of 7.2

was well below their five-year average of 7.9, and their ranking of 175th was well below their five-year average ranking of 61st. Barrhaven’s French language high school, Pierre Savard, also a decline. Their ranking fell from 314th to 413th, and their score of 6.0 was below their five-year average of 6.2

Ambassador program to give BIA eyes and ears in business community The Barrhaven BIA wants to have more eyes and ears in the business community. The BIA held a roundtable luncheon last week with several business owners. One of the topics of the roundtable was the establishment of an ambassadors program through the BIA. “With more than 500 members of the BIA, drop in visits for every business are not possible,” said BIA Vice Chair Jagdeep Perhar, who heads the BIA Property and Membership Engagement Committee. “Eyes and ears in the community would help us address the needs of the business community.” Businesses in Barrhaven are automatically members of the

BIA. Their dues are paid for out of property tax levies. The BIA was established in Barrhaven more than a decade ago to promote business in the community and to give business a voice at City Hall. There are now more than 20 active BIAs in Ottawa. The ambassadors program would designate business owners throughout Barrhaven to be a liaison between businesses in their immediate area and the BIA. The program would help keep businesses informed of the BIA’s ongoing initiatives while also letting the BIA know about some of the issues facing local business owners. The ambassadors program was just one

of the things discussed at the roundtable that will help the BIA assist local businesses. There were a number of other priorities and issues were discussed. “We have to be realistic,” said Andrea Steenbakkers, Barrhaven BIA Executive Director. “We are obviously not going to change Kathleen Wynne’s mind regarding minimum wage.” The recent wage hikes and labour changes brought in by the province have been a big issue for small businesses throughout the province. In Barrhaven, while some businesses have been minimally affected by the changes, others have been crippled by the minimum wage hikes and new rules put in place.

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It has added a tremendous amount to the overhead costs of Barrhaven businesses. “Leasing and overhead is a big issue,” added Steenbakkers. Many business owners in the community have expressed concern over commercial leas-

ing rates in Barrhaven, saying that they should not be paying lease rates on par with downtown Ottawa. One thing that has been a primary focus for Steebakkers over the last few years has been attracting corporate business with

career-level jobs to the community. The Citigate Business Park is opening this spring on Strandherd beside Costco. Tomlinson is the first big tenant at the campus, as they have relocated their head office to Barrhaven.

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Page 6 FRIDAY, March 2, 2018

IndependentEditorial

INDEPENDENT Editorial

Minimum wage hikes take their toll on local businesses All of the above. That is the only way to get an accurate answer as to what the biggest challenge facing Barrhaven businesses would be right now. A group of Barrhaven business people representing a good cross section met with the Barrhaven BIA last week to discuss obstacles they faced. The predictable issues were brought up. Landlords are charging rates for square footage that are too high for Barrhaven. Hydro rates are out of control. And then there are the new wage hikes and other labour rules that are crippling all small businesses. Those increases have hit everyone hard, but nowhere is it as vide-gripping as it is in the food industry. After a 22 per cent hike on Jan. 1, Ontario’s minimum wage is due to increase again to $15 an hour on Jan. 1, 2019. Fast food chains have increased prices, and we are seeing giant iPads at places like McDonald’s to take orders, and fewer people behind the counter. The challenge for businesses is how quickly wage hikes are being implemented. A 32 per cent increase in 12 months is simply irresponsible. According to Agriculture Professor Sylvain Charlebois, the grocery business is being affected by higher minimum wages but indicators are subtler. The price of tomatoes, he points out, jumped by more than 30 per cent in a month. This was likely because of minimum wage increases, since it’s unusual for the price of any fruit or vegetable to increase by even four per cent in a single winter month. Charlebois adds that for company’s like Loblaw, it’s a godsend to see food inflation rise again. It means it can tweak certain price points and increase margins without most people noticing. But the company will need to get very creative. StatsCan numbers confirm what many suspected: bread prices are dropping across the country. BMO stated earlier this year that bread prices were down 2.5 per cent since December, after Loblaw disclosed its involvement in the scheme. According to StatsCan, bread prices dropped 1.7 per cent in January alone. In fact, most bakery products seem cheaper than they were a month ago. “This may be a sign that grocers are trying to make amends with the public, since the story has garnered so much attention,” Charlebois says. “Only time will tell if the aggressive discounting we’ve seen in stores will continue. “But we do know that the Canadian food industry is facing increasing pressure on several fronts.”

BARRHAVEN

P.O. Box 567 Manotick, Ontario Tel: 613-692-6000 www.barrhavenindependent.ca

The Barrhaven Independent is published by Manotick Messenger Inc. biweekly at P.O. Box 567 in Manotick, Ontario. The Barrhaven Independent is not responsible for the loss of unsolicited manuscripts, photos, or other material used for publication purposes. Letters will be edited for length, clarity and libellous statements. Display, National and Classified rates are available on request.

Publisher: Jeff Morris Managing Editor: Jeff Morris Advertising and Marketing: Gary Coulombe Photographer: Mike Carroccetto

Phone: 613-692-6000 Fax: 613-692-3758 email: Advertising: advert@bellnet.ca Editor: newsfile@bellnet.ca News/sports: newsfile@bellnet.ca mike.carroccetto@gmail.com

DEADLINE FOR ALL ADVERTISING IS FRIDAY AT 4PM All layouts and composition of advertisements produced by employees of Manotick Messenger Inc. are protected by copyright invested in the publishers of the Barrhaven Independent.

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

A 30-year-old postcard from Calgary Over the last two weeks, we say many Olympic dreams come true. We cheered on the underdogs, or in the case of Virtue and Moir, our overdogs. But to me, the biting Olympic stories that are unforgettable happen when things go wrong. In 1988, I had only been in Calgary for a few hours when we headed to the oval to see the men’s 500m speed skating final. This was what I call my Forrest Gump moment of the Olympics. It was also one of the most heartbreaking moments I had ever seen. Dan Jansen was the world champion over 500m and 1000m. The morning of his first Olympic race, he talked to his sister, Jane, who was back in Wisconsin, hanging onto her life. Jane had leukemia. Just before his race, Jansen found out that she passed away. Jansen, who had dedicated his season to her, busted out of the gates and tried to channel all of his emotions into a world record. Sadly, he lost an edge, fell and slid into and wiped out Japanese skate Yosushi Kuroita. You may remember the clip. It has been played over and over again, and was even featured on a Visa commercial in 2010. Jansen fell into the foam wall into the photographers. One of the photographers lost his camera equipment and it spilled onto the ice. If you see the clip or watch it on You Tube, you will see the photographer beside him, wearing his white Carleton Ravens football sweatshirt. That was me. You see me saying something to the other photographer. I can tell you exactly what was said. “Dude, the cameras come with neck straps. You should try them out.” He wasn’t impressed. Sucks being him 30 years ago. A couple of days later, he was on pace for a world record in the 1000m race. Inexplicably, he fell again. Jansen, who had never fallen in practice, had now wiped out twice, costing him two gold medals. After that race, he left Calgary to go home for his sister’s funeral. Jansen got back to the Olympics in 1992, but finished fourth in the 500m and then placed 26th in the 1000m. In 1994, he had one more shot at a medal. He came into the Olympics as the world record holder and wold champion over 500 metres. He did not skate well, and he placed eighth. Jansen had one Olympic race left, but he was not considered a favourite as he had not been among the world’s best over 1000 metres. Somehow, he won the race, and he finally had his gold medal. While Jansen got closure, Pam Fletcher never did. Her Calgary ordeal was a moment

that pulled her lifelong dreams out from under her feet. Fletcher, who was 25 in 1988, had been waiting for this moment her entire life. She first put skis on at the age of 2, and very quickly, she and everyone around her knew that the Olympic Women’s Downhill was her destiny. Fletcher, who was just 5’2” and 132 pounds, had FROM THE just finished a warm up run. She was on a connecting trail approaching the chairlift at Nakiska. And then, boom! It was over. Fletcher collided by Jeff Morris with course volunteer Steve Louds, who had just finished putting up a fence on the course. He was returning to the volunteer tent for some refreshment. “I saw a racer coming at me at quite a rate of speed,” Louds recalled. “We were jostling to get by each other when it happened. We both went to the right side at the wrong time, and we ran out of room. We collided real hard. She blew me out of my skis.” Fletcher suffered a broken leg. Her Olympic dream was over. To make matters worse, the event was cancelled and rescheduled after just one skier, as wind gusts on the mountain were at 72 mph. Fletcher, recalled the incident in 2014 in an interview with wickedlocal.com. “He just skied away, didn’t apologize or anything,” said Fletcher, who is now 55 years old and lives in Westford, Massachusetts. “I try not to assign blame now for what happened. But I worked so hard for that dream and it was taken away in an accident. It was really tough.” Fletcher had gone into the Olympics as the top hope for a gold medal for the Americans. “I had to keep hanging onto what my family told me, about how lucky I was for making the U.S. Ski Team in the first place,” said Fletcher. “I try to pull the positive out of it,” said Fletcher. “It was hard to get over that for the few years after. I’m an Olympian and I’m proud of that.” Reading about Jansen and Fletcher and following their careers over the years, their Olympic disasters have made them deeper, more complete people. The character they have and they insight they gained is remarkable. I keep thinking about their stories and others like it as I watch this year’s PyeongChang Games. Winning gold may define an athlete for the rest of his or her life. But the real lessons in the Olympics are offered by those who overcome adversity on a world stage.

OTHER SIDE

Letters to the Editor welcome – email to newsfile@bellnet.ca


FRIDAY, March 2, 2018 Page 7

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT 

The Independent#DISCOVERBARRHAVEN

Crayon Occasion turning Barrhaven artists into future van Gogh’s Brooke Alexander sits in her dining room, which has been converted into a childrens’ art studio. She glances into the kitchen as she looks for the right way to describe the work her students do. As she looks at her appliances, it comes to her. “There is artwork that belongs on a fridge, and then there is artwork that belongs in frames,” she said. “The work that the kids do here belongs in frames.” Crayon Occasion is Alexander’s home-based business that is turning Barrhaven children into budding young artists. In fact, she has been so successful that she is now doing adult art classes as well. She got the idea while she was working for a business that did after school art lessons. She was approached by many parents about the possibilities of doing private lessons. “My classes are different from others,” Alexander said. “My students are exposed to and learn the classic methods of drawing and painting. They learn styles like impressionism and abstract and more.” Alexander smiles as she holds up a drawing of an old man’s face that

looks like it was done by a senior high school art student. “The student who drew this had just turned eight years old,” she said. “I teach the kids the techniques and they unlock what is already inside them.” The fact that Alexander does what she does in Barrhaven has an element of giving back to the community. Her family moved to Barrhaven when she was five. She went to school at Mary Honeywell, and was then accepted into the art program at Canterbury High School. She honed her passion for art at Canterbury, and earned a scholarship to Sheridan College. She received her Bachelor’s Degree in Art and specialized in illustration. She began Crayon Occasion three years ago, and she still remembers her first class. “There was one girl in the class, and I was really nervous,” she said. “The kiddo was really shy. Eventually, she had a friend come, and hat made it a little bit easier. The three of us became good friends, and she took lessons here for three years.” The classes, offered Monday through Friday,

run for 90 minutes. The students come once per week, and the classes are small – between two and six students per class. Because she is her “own boss,” she also has some flexibility if students are not able to attend their classes because of other commitments. She also has an adult class on weekends. She teaches the classes alone, but she does have a special helper who is a big part of the experience at Crayon Occasion. “The kids love Mia, and she is wonderful with kids,” she said of her seven-year-old dog. “She brings a warmth to the class, and she is very affectionate with the students.” Mia inspired Alexander to take on a special project. Little Mia’s Big Heart is a children’s book written and illustrated by Alexander. The book will show children that friendship can be found in the most unexpected places and how important it is to be kind to others and not judge those who seem odd. The story encourages children to be forgiving. “Because of the book, the kids see Mia as a bit of a celebrity,” she said. Becoming a good artist is only one of the benefits of the Crayon Occasion program. “We are studying real art and real techniques,” Alexander said. “This isn’t a class where you make a face out of paper plates. But what is really great is how the confidence grows in each child as they become better artists. There are some great friendships that are formed here. Kids meet other kids with common interests.”

Crayon continues on page8 Brooke Alexander’s dog, Mia, was the inspiration of her children’s book, Little Mia’s Big Heart.

Brooke Alexander has turned her dining room into the home of Crayon Occasion.

Parents give great testimonials to Crayon Occasion “We totally adore these class offerings, not just for the techniques and creations taught, but also for the support, guidance and self confidence bestowed on our son. It is also amazing to see development in skill and the pride in development. We also appreciate the flexibility to make up classes, and the understanding given when traffic prevents timely drop off or pick up and most importantly, the patience given to a student who struggles with self confidence, can be distracted, hard on himself and at times struggles with his emotions. Your support, friendship, mentorship and patience is so wonderful.” ~ Ottawa parent “Crayon Occasion delivered a fantastic- This drawing was done in a Crayon ally creative, fun-filled party for my seven- Occasions class by a student who year-old daughter, Lily. Since she wanted had just turned eight. a “mythical creatures” theme, Brooke created an original unicorn-and-dragon design that thrilled Lily’s guests. The kids were very engaged in their drawings and each child went home not only enriched with art instruction, but also with a frame-worthy drawing of their very own. Hiring Crayon Occasion definitely made for one of the best kids’ parties I’ve pulled off!” ~ Sonia Mendes, Ottawa mother of two


Page 8 FRIDAY, March 2, 2018

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

The Independent#DISCOVERBARRHAVEN McLellan says it’s all about building relationships at Edward Jones

While Edward Jones specializes in things like investment strategies, retirement savings strategies, divorce finances, and numerous other aspects of financial planning, Ryan McLellan likes to simplify it. “First and foremost, our business is about relationships,” said McLellan, who is the Edward Jones Advisor in the Edward Jones office on 10Green Street off Larkin and Greenbank Roads. “What adds value in our role is relationships. We get to know our clients and find out what is important to them. Then we can provide people with the advice that is right for them.” Edward Jones is a fullservice investment dealer with one of the largest branch networks in Canada. It is a member of the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada and the Canadian Investor Protection Fund, and a participating organization of the Toronto Stock Exchange. Edward Jones was founded in 1922 by Edward D. Jones Sr. After working a rural territory in Missouri and Illinois, Ted Jones, the son of the founder, positioned the company in the increasingly competitive market-

place as a specialist in providing investment advice to rural Americans. In the 1970s, Edward Jones expanded to serve the long-term individual investor, wherever they may live. By the 1980s, Edward Jones was expanding into metropolitan areas, starting with Chicago and Dallas. Edward Jones now conducts the majority of its business in urban and suburban markets. Despite expansion, their set of business principles retains the same focus. Firstly, their firm serves just one client: the serious, long-term individual investor. Secondly, their investment philosophy emphasizes quality and diversification. The Edward Jones brand appeals to a careful and considering kind of investor who prefers a long-term relationship with his or her financial services firm. This is why they believe that the personal relationship is integral to their way of business. For McLellan, becoming an Edward Jones Advisor was in his blood. His father works with Edward Jones in Barrie, and his wife is also involved at his office. McLellan has a history of involvement in the

community. He played an active role in the West Barrhaven Community Association, and he coaches his kids’ youth soccer teams. As an Edward Jones Advisor, he had a presence at last year’s Barrhaven Canada Day. “We hope to increase our presence in the community this year,” McLellan said, While volunteering and sponsoring events in the community are important to McLellan, another role in the community he plays is as an educator. He has worked with several local high schools and students to teach them about investments, how it works, and why it is important. “Education is a big part of this business,” McLennan said. “For a lot of people, their financial knowledge is staggeringly low. People can be exceptional savers, but many do not understand the how and why of investing.” McLellan said a big priority with his clients is eliminating the knowledge gap. “A lot of people come in and they know they need to do something to plan for their retirement or for their future,” he said. “Often, they aren’t sure where to start. They want to know how they can get

to where they want to be.” One thing that McLellan has initiated is a Finance Friday Coffee Club. They meet once a month at McLellan’s office on 10 Green Street, and they share ideas about current events, the economy and investing. While trends in the market come and go, McLellan said Edward Jones focuses on an established process that concentrates on quality investments with a level of diversification. The company’s success level is indicated by their distinction of winning the JD Power Award for investor satisfaction in Canada for the fifth straight year. “Being recognized by our clients and J.D. Power for five consecutive years is an honour,” says Patrick French, principal of client financial strategies with Edward Jones. “Our sole focus is making a difference in our clients’ lives. We do that by focusing on what’s important to them, using an established process to help them achieve their goals and partnering with them through their lives to keep them on track.” The study measures overall client satisfaction with full-service investment firms based on a number of performance

crayon continues from page 7 In addition to the classes, Crayon Occasion also does birthday parties. There is a minimum of four children per party, and children will draw their very own masterpiece with help from Alexander. She will walk them through the drawing, starting with pencils and finishing with pencil crayons. Everyone will create something unique and frame-worthy to bring home with them. “I can do them here or at their house, and we do drawing,” she said. “The kids love it and it’s a nice and easy party for the par-

ents. They can just put their feet up and relax for an hour and a half. At the end of the party, they have something special to take home.” Alexander said that working with children and watching their confidence grow as they improve as artists is very rewarding. However, there is one thing that stands out for her. “The best thing,” she says, “is when the parents come and the kids hold up their art work and are thrilled to show them what they have made. That’s the best feeling, to know that you helped them create

something that they are so proud of.” For more information on Crayon Occasion or to

register for children’s or adult art classes or to book a birthday party, visit www. crayonoccasion.com.

Ryan McLellan is the Edward Jones Advisor in the Barrhaven office located at 10 Green Street.

factors. With a score of 819, Edward Jones scored well over the industry average of 771. In addition to the highest score in overall satisfaction, Edward Jones also scored highest in the financial advisor, account information, investment performance, and product offerings study factors. “Edward Jones continues to invest in the areas that we believe support our branch teams’ ability to partner with clients to

create financial strategies that can be adjusted as life changes occur,” added French. “Our long-term investment philosophy and network of home office professionals, combined with our unique software platform, are examples of how we help our branch teams better serve our clients.” For more information or to set up an appointment, call Ryan McLellan at 613.823.3404.

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The IndependentCommunity

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

11th Annual Maddy’s Gala raises more than $100,000 for Roger Neilson House Jeanine Otto was a little bit worried when the microphone was hijacked by her daughter, Hannah. Jeanine had just poured her heart out in an emotional speech at the 11th annual Maddy’s Gala. The evening was a celebration of the life of her other daughter, Maddy, passed away in 2007 at the age of five. She awoke from a nap after swimming at the cottage, and was rushed to CHEO. There, Jeanine and Dean Otto got the horrific news that their youngest of two daughters had an inoperable tumor and had just a couple of days left to

live. While Jeanine was trying to direct traffic on stage and keep to the script in front of the crowd of more than 400, Hannah had a surprise for her mom. Jeanine’s two best friends from high school in New Brunswick, Collette Ryan and Tammy Pelletier, had made the trip to Ottawa and surprised Jeanine by joining her on stage. “Tammy and I are honoured, proud and excited to surprise the most loyal, caring and genuine friend we know,” Ryan said. Ryan and Pelletier had rallied the 1988 graduat-

ing class from Dalhousie Regional High School. “This year marks the 30th anniversary of our graduation and we wanted to do something special to celebrate our dear friend,” Ryan said. Ryan and Pelletier reached out to the graduating class from 1988 and asked them to make a donation to Roger Neilson House in memory of Maddy. Their goal was to raise $1,988 to commemorate their graduation year. “We surpassed our goal, because like a family, the grad class of 1988 reconnected to show our love in

support for Jeanine,” Ryan said. “We all witnessed something magical seeing donation after donation

coming in. The outpouring of kindness and generosity was surpassed only by the excitement of realizing

that we reached a grand total of $2,500.”

gala

continues on page 11

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For more information or to register, please email us at  pirouetterg@gmail.com  or visit: www.ottawapirouette.org Jeanine Otto, left, receives a cheque for $1,988 from Collette Ryan and Tammy Pelletier. The money was raised by Oto’s graduating class of 1988 from Dalhouse Regional High School in New Brunswick. Ryan and Pelletier were surprise guests at Maddy’s Gala.

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Achieving results for all Canadians and residents of Nepean Since taking office, our government has fulfilled many of its promises: • Passed the Middle Class Tax Cut to bring relief to more than 9 million Canadians. • Introduced the Canada Child Benefit • Simplified the Canada Student Loans • Repealed unfair provisions of Bill C-24 in the Citizenship Act • Strengthened the Canada Pension Plan • Invested $2.97 billion in public transit infrastructure in Ontario

In addition... • Created 77,000 jobs across the country, including over 200 in Nepean through the Canada Summer Jobs program. Our riding received $673,000 in funding! • Created the MP Chandra Arya Outstanding Achievement award and gave Kindle e-readers and $500 cash awards to graduating students at 23 elementary, middle and high schools in Nepean. Home Auto Life Investments Group Business Farm Travel

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FRIDAY, March 2, 2018 Page 11

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT 

The IndependentCOMMUNITY

gala continues from page 10 Ryan said that what brought everyone together was something they called it the Maddy effect. “Our graduating class from 30 years ago came together because a little five-year-old girl taught us how to open our hearts,” she said. When all was said and done, Maddy’s Gala raised more than $100,000 for Roger Neilson House, the children’s hospice on the CHEO campus that has played such an instrumental part of their lives since the day that Maddy passed away peacefully. She was in a room filled with family, friends, and most of all, love. “She was happy one day, and in a coma the next,” Jeanine said of Maddy. “And you know the rest. I think my

message tonight is to never take anything for granted. You just never know. Always give one more kiss, say ‘I love you’ one more time, and thank you for helping us turn something negative into something positive and for keeping Maddy’s spirit alive with us.” Dean Otto thanked the sponsors and organizing committee of the event, and thanked the attendees for their generous support and continued commitment to the event. He thanked everyone for making a difference in so many families’ lives, may it be bereavement counseling, grandparent bereavement counseling, counseling for siblings, or just to come to Roger Neilson House for children in need of their services.

“Every year I meet with families and hear their stories,” Dean said. “I tell them this is why we do what we do. It’s for them. We know the loss of a child, and we know the fog they go through, not knowing if you will laugh, smile, or have a good day again. I know if Madison was still alive, she would definitely be involved, helping us out, because that’s the way she was.” The evening also featured silent and live auctions. One of the highlights of the live auction was a gourmet dinner for eight prepared by Dean Otto, who is a chef, and Zack Smith of the Ottawa Senators. The dinner sold for $14,000 and was purchased by the newest member of the Ottawa Senators, Marian Gaborik.

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Page 12 FRIDAY, March 2, 2018

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

The IndependentNEWS Queensway Carleton faces capacity overload, asks for community support With 20 admitted patients waiting in Emergency for a bed, and all in-patient care space already filled beyond capacity, Queensway Carleton Hospital has declared an internal Code Orange. An internal Code Orange is a protocol put in place when the hospital has used all of its beds and all of its “surge” capacity and needs additional measures in place to ensure safe, quality care. This is the second time in its history that

QCH has used the internal Code Orange protocol. The first was in January of this year. The hospital is asking for the community’s support this weekend -- by saving the Emergency department for emergencies. Last Sunday, the QCH emergency room saw 272 patients, almost an all-time record. Over the last week, Emergency volumes have remained unusually high for this time of year. QCH is asking families

who come to Emergency to prepare for longerthan-usual waits or to explore whether they have alternative care options, such as walk-in clinics. There are two factors that are certainly having an impact on why there is a capacity challenge. First, QCH has seen an unusually high number of admissions for influenza this year – over 90 already. Secondly, we currently have an unusually high number of ALC patients – those re-

quiring “alternative levels of care”. While they do not need to be in an acute care hospital, they are not well enough to return “home”, and there is a long wait for a bed in a long-term care facility. On average, there are 38 ALC patients at QCH who could have been safely and appropriately cared for in an alternate setting. Currently there are 56, which is 21% of the hospital’s bed capacity.

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FRIDAY, March 2, 2018 Page 13

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT 

The IndependentFOCUS ON YOUTH LDHSS Student Senator kick starts school mental health initiative Name: Manreet Brar

FOCUS ON

Age: 17 School: LongfieldsDavidson Heights Secondary Grade: 12 Parents: Mom Hinderjeet Brar, Dad Harjit Brar Brother: Ranbir Brar (15), grade 11, LongfieldsDavidson Heights S.S Sister: Joyjyot Brar (7), grade 3, Berrigan Elementary School Pet Peeve: “People who take my food without asking, or ask as they’re taking some of my food!” Part-time Work: “I’m a waitress at the Barrhaven Court, an Atria owned retirement home.” Favourite Subjects: “Hands down, English and Biology are my favourite subjects!” What do you enjoy reading for pleasure? “Any historical non-fiction pieces or fiction, particularly classic literature and thriller.” LATEST AD!!!!!!!!!!!!_Diversitea Ad

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Accomplishments: “My academic achievements include being a Silver Medalist and part of the Honour Roll Society, as well as achieving Academic Excellence in Canadian History. I have also had two reviews (written for the Cappies program) published in The Ottawa Citizen.” Activities/Interests: “I’m involved with Student Council in my role as Student Senator. As Student Senator I have the opportunity of representing the student voice at the Ottawa Carleton District School Board level. Through my role with Student Senate, I have kickstarted a mental health initiative at the school which aims at reducing stigma and increasing awareness surrounding mental health disorders, and how to better one’s mental health. I was one of the dance heads last year through which I had the opportunity of planning two successful dances (Glow in the dark/Halloween 2/1/18 9:47 AM Page 1 and Casino Night themed). Myself and some peers

started Longfields’ first time, I developed skills that Model United Nations’ benefited in my academics Club, which gives students and saw personal developthe opportunity to debate ment. I became more disciin the perspective of an- plined and organized, and other country. We debate my communication skills a variety of topics, such as improved. As a whole, I benuclear arms, water priva- came more positive as an tization, global democra- individual, because I kept tization, etc. We’ve run this myself busy with things I club for the past two years, enjoyed. To this day, this all and through Model United holds true. Nations I have had the opI helped create the Modportunity to widen my el United Nations Club, world view, and diversify due to the fact that I saw a my perspective regarding lack in clubs that focused issues that pertain to a var- around the social sciences, iety of areas. particularly those focused Furthermore, I’ve been a around debating. Thus I Longfields-Davidson Heights student Manreet Brar and Cappies Critic for two years. worked with my friends to some of her friends started the LDHSS Model United Nations Club. She also plays on the LDHSS girls rugby team. Vera Mitchell_Ad copy 5/3/17 8:47 AM I’m now in With my third year, found the club, andPage give1 Phill Potter photo through which I view, and students a platform, if they then review high school wish to pursue the social Biology – particularly Life the University of Waterloo. productions across Ot- sciences.” Sciences. I plan on apply- I hope to get involved with tawa.” ing to the University of Ot- neurological research, after Career Goals: “I plan on tawa, Queen’s University, having finished my schoolWhy did you get in- pursuing a Bachelor’s in McMaster University, and ing.” volved in what you do? Science and a program in “Being involved is important for a variety of reasons. Personally, being involved keeps me on my toes and away from slipping into boredom. I like being BEFORE busy and being pushed to balancing school, work, and extracurriculars. But, there are so many other reasons I like to stay involved. I truly didn’t begin AFTER to get involved with clubs and sports until grade 10, and once I did begin to occupy myself with a variety of responsibilities, I saw a change in my attitude. Over

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Page 14 FRIDAY, March 2, 2018

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

The IndependentCOMMUNITY Lots of things to do with your kids during next week’s March Break

KIDSFEST Ottawa 2018

Be part of Ottawa’s largest and longest running parent and child consumer expo! on March 3rd and 4th, 2018. Advance tickets sales are going great! People are looking forward to beat their cabin fever and to come wiggle and giggle, discover and explore with us! Contact donna@kidsfestottawa.ca or call at 613.894.2015.

Top Shelf Youth 4 on 4 Ball Hockey Tournament

Top Shelf Youth 4 on 4 Ball Hockey Tournament will take place on Saturday May 26th, 2018 at the Cedarview Alliance church. This outdoor tournament is comprised of the following age categories: 7-8 years 9-10 years, 11-12 years, and Minor Bantam and Major Bantam divisions. There will be an 8 team maximum in each age division with a 6 player per team limit. This is a 3 game guarantee tournament. Take advantage of the EARLY BIRD rate in effect until Febru-

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BARRHAVEN by Jan Harder

ary 28th, 2018 of $150.00 per team: Registration is on-line @ www.topshelf4on4barrhaven.ca. If you are interested in sponsorship opportunities please visit the website: www.topshelf4on4barrhaven.ca All proceeds from the tournament go to supporting social and recreational opportunities in Barrhaven for youth. The tournament is hosted by the Salvation Army and the Nepean, Rideau and Osgoode Community Resource Centre.

March Break Activities

Canada’s Capital is a March Break mecca with its many cultural institutions, outdoor activities and indoor attractions and since Ottawa shares a provincial border with Gatineau, Quebec, much of the special programming is offered during both the Quebec March Break and the Ontario March Break. So gather the kids and come participate in some of the fun activities below during the school break!

Camp Fortune

How often can you access a downhill ski center within a 15-minute drive from a major city? This is what makes Camp Fortune, located in Chelsea, Que., so convenient - especially for Spring Break Lessons. Kids get a twohour lesson and then open skiing in the afternoon (the lift ticket is valid for the day). Choose from 3, 4, or 5-day programs during both the Quebec and Ontario March Breaks.

Mount Pakenham

Mount Pakenham is located about a 45-minutes

drive West from Ottawa in the town of Pakenham, Ont. From March 12 to 16, kids aged 6 to 14 can participate in a 3, 4 or 5-day ski camp that offers a minimum of three hours of ski instruction per day, plus other activities such as tubing, snowshoeing, movies and more!

Maple Syrup Fun

Maple taffy on snow, horse drawn sleigh rides, delicious pancake breakfasts or brunch - what’s not to love about maple season? Several sugar bushes and other sites located throughout Canada’s Capital Region offer programming during the 2018 maple season, which runs from late February to early April.

Canadian Museum of Nature

Canada’s natural history museum is always buzzing with special programming. At the Butterflies in Flight exhibit, which ends on Apr. 2, you can walk among hundreds of fluttering butterflies and luscious live plants in the museum’s solarium. (Admission to this popular exhibit is by timed entry, therefore it’s recommended to reserve tickets in advance on the museum website.) For more critter fun, there’s hands-on programming in the Activity Zone and the Amazon 3D movie in the museum’s theatre! The permanent galleries that explore subjects like the Arctic, water and fossils, are always a blast to visit as well.

Canada Agriculture and Food Museum

From Mar. 3-18, the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum celebrates all things spring during their Barnyard Break! Special programming is offered each day, including encounters with farm animals, kitchen demonstrations, maple taffy on snow,

children’s story time and creative crafts. It’s all free with the price of museum admission!

Canada Aviation and Space Museum

Participate in out-ofthis world activities during the All About Space March Break programming at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum from Mar. 3-18! Each day, kids get to focus on a different aspect of basic astronaut training while they learn about flight training, parachute training and more through fun, interactive activities. Watch daily demonstrations of Shaping the Future in Space, or take part in self-guided crafts. Activities are available for children of all ages and are free with the price of museum admission.

Canada Science and Technology Museum

Celebrate Canada’s rich history of scientific and technological achievements by exploring the all new state-of-the-art Canada Science and Technology Museum! From old favourites like the cherished locomotives and the Crazy Kitchen, to modern exhibitions and creative, inter-

active experiences like the ZOOOM - Children’s Innovation Zone and the Exploratek maker studio, the museum offers something for all ages!

Canadian Museum of History

Canada’s most visited museum is bustling with hands-on activities related to its engaging current exhibitions. DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition features special activities inspired by Madagascar 3, Trolls, How to Train Your Dragon and Shrek: circus skills, stilt walking, modelling clay, role paying and more. In honour of the exhibit Death in the Ice - The Mystery of the Franklin Expedition, you can try on replicas of the clothing worn by Arctic explorers and compare it with traditional Inuit garments. In addition, you can see what it’s like to be an underwater archaeologist searching for lost ships. Wind down by watching Mysteries of China 3D in the CINÉ+ theatre. Check the museum’s website for daily programming.

National Gallery of Canada

bec and Ontario March Breaks, the National Gallery of Canada is offering a range of art activities and games at the Artissimo kiosk, including Art Buddies, Who am I?, and Feely Boxes. Or have fun and get messy at the Artissimo Studio while experimenting with marble effect painting. These hands-on family programs are included with Gallery admission. While there, don’t miss the Canadian and Indigenous galleries and special exhibits!

Canadian War Museum

Build, play, create and learn as a family at the Canadian War Museum during the Ontario and Quebec March Breaks! Use Imagination Playground blocks to create engineering and architectural marvels. Challenge your family to a game of giant chess. Test your driving skills on a remotecontrolled tank course. Get crafty with some fun art projects. Check the museum’s website for daily programming.

harder

During both the Que-

continues on page 15

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March break is around the corner, what are your plans? Barrhaven empties during March break, traffic is light (only time of year I can ever say that), even hockey is on holiday! Some of you will take a week on either side of the actual week. Larry and I are heading south for a few days to join our oldest grandkids....yeehah....I can hardly wait. Whether you are enjoying a “staycation” or a getaway, have fun. Please check out my website! www.janharder. ca. If you’re not already an email subscriber to my E-Blast newsletter you can sign up online. I am always interested in what you have to say or if you have any Barrhaven questions. Please feel free to email me at Jan.Harder@Ottawa.ca any time with questions or if you need any help.


BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

The IndependentCOMMUNITY

FRIDAY, March 2, 2018 Page 15

harder continues from page 14 Ottawa Little Theatre

Canada’s oldest community playhouse hosts March Break Drama Camps and Workshops (Mar. 12-16) that teach kids acting skills, teamwork, self confidence and of course, how to have fun! Drama camp is for kids aged 9 to 11, and the workshops are for youth 12-14. Before and after care is also available.

Little Ray’s Nature Centre

special guests that rotate throughout the year.

Get up close and personal with some of the most famous reptiles in the world at Little Ray’s Nature Centre! Little Ray’s offers a hands-on and educational experience through encounters with bats, pythons, alligators, cobras, birds of prey and more. Many of the animals are permanent residents at the zoo, while others are

Haunted Walk of Ottawa

The cloaked guides from the Haunted Walk of Ottawa dare you to join them on their tours of the historic old Carleton County Jail! The Ghost and the Gallows tour (available separately in English and in French) focuses on the Jail’s reputation as one of the most

haunted buildings in North America. Tour the cellblock where inmates were once imprisoned and walk the steps from Death Row to the one of the last working gallows in Canada. The Crime and Punishment tour (available in English only) explores the jail’s incredible history including living conditions, prison escapes and executions. Both tours are offered select dates between March

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Escape Rooms

Nothing bonds a family and friends together like choosing to be locked up in a room and working together to escape! Escape attractions throughout the city like Escape Manor, Jigsaw Escape Rooms, and Room Escape Ottawa have rooms and themes that are suitable for all ages. If

your kids are older, you might even be able to create your own escape by sitting back and relaxing in the lounge areas (some of which have cash bars) while your kids have a blast solving clues and attempting to breakout. For even more ideas of what to do during March Break or anytime in winter, check out our Free or Nearly Free Ottawa in Winter suggestions!

Classified Advertising Rates 30 cents per word, $8.00 minimum

All Classified Advertising Payable In Advance

Classifieds will be accepted by telephone, fax or email Tel: 613-925-4265 Fax: 613-925-2837 email: classifieds@prescottjournal.com Deadline for Classified Advertising Friday at 4:00 pm Deadline for Display Advertising Friday at noon

EXTEND YOUR REACH - ADVERTISE PROVINCIALLY OR ACROSS THE COUNTRY! For more information visit www.ocna.org/network-advertising-program

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EMPLOYMENT OPPS. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! Indemand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

CELEBRATE THE BEAUTY AND HISTORY OF CANADA’s RIVERS 4, 5, 6, 7 night cruises on a replica steamboat World class ports and historic attractions Kingston, Ottawa, Quebec City *Spring Specials Available* INCLUDES: *All meals *Shore excursions *Nightly entertainment www.StLawrenceCruiseLines.com 1-800-267-7868 253 Ontario Street, Kingston, Ontario (TICO # 2168740)


Page 16 FRIDAY, March 2, 2018

The IndependentCOMMUNITY

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

Information and Comment Session for Longfields Dr. mixed use buildings There will be a public consultation regarding planning applications at 1012-1024 McGarry Terrace and 1034 McGarry Terrace / 1117 Longfields Drive submitted by FoTenn Consultants and Stantec. The applications are proposing two mixed-use buildings, and an apartment building, respectively. This will take place at the Chapman Mills Community Building at 424 Chapman Mills Drive on March 6th from 7:00-8:30pm. If you are unable to attend but would still like to submit your comments or would like more information, please email my office.

Barrhaven Transit Forum

Thank you to all of those who came out for the forum to discuss transit in Barrhaven on Tues-

GLOUCESTERSOUTH NEPEAN

WARD REPORT by Michael Qaqish

day February 27th 2018. Residents were given the opportunity to provide feedback on the issues surrounding transportation in Barrhaven. If you were unable to attend but would like more information, please contact my office at 613-580-2751 or michael.qaqish@ottawa. ca.

Carbon Monoxide Alarm Distribution

Ottawa Fire Services has distributed carbon monoxide alarms to my office for distribution to residents in need. The Ontario Fire Code requires that each dwelling

that has an attached garage, or fuel fired appliance or a fireplace has a working carbon monoxide alarm installed in the hallway in each sleeping area. If you would like our office to provide you with a carbon monoxide alarm, please contact my office michael.qaqish@ ottawa.ca.

#haveTHATtalk about Mental Health

Did you know that 1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental health problem at some point in their life? This could affect you or someone you care about. Let’s take action to reduce stigma, increase support and encourage people to get help sooner and have THAT talk. For more information, resources or ideas to get the conversation started, visit ottawapublichealth.ca.

Report Issues with Catch Basins on the Road

It is normal for water to pool around a catch basin in wet weather. Roads are designed to drain based on the sewer capacity. Please call 3-1-1 or report online to advise the City of a catch basin that is blocked or broken or if you see large pools of water or flooding on a road.

Local musicians invited to participate in 2018 edition of #ottmusik

If you are a local musician and looking for a great opportunity, you have a chance to showcase your music to a citywide audience. #ottmusik was introduced in 2015 and it meant that anyone on hold after calling the City of Ottawa would

hear local music while they wait. Between February 5th and March 12th singers, bands and musicians of all genres who live in Ottawa are invited to submit music samples for consideration. Since it began, #ottmusik has received more than 200 submissions and showcased 50 artists. For more information, including submission guidelines, please visit ottawa.ca/en/ ottmusik.

Aging in Your Community: Working Together to Address the Needs of Ethnocultural Seniors in Ottawa

The Social Planning Council of Ottawa is inviting you to take part in the 2018 Ethnocultural Seniors Forum – Aging in Your Community: Work-

ing Together to Address the Needs of Ethnocultural Seniors in Ottawa. The forum will take place on Wednesday March 14th from 8:30am – 12:30pm at the RA Center, located at 2451 Riverside Drive in the Clark Hall Room. The event will feature Key Note Speaker Susan Braedley, MSW PhD, Associate Professor School of Social Work, Carleton University. Breakfast will be provided and you are invited to stay after the event to network, enjoy the cultural celebration and view the many contributions and accomplishments our ethnocultural seniors have achieved in building the social, cultural and economic fabric of Canada. For more information, please contact Sybil Braganza at sybilb@spcottawa.on.ca

‘Barrhaven Bombshells’ off to Vegas for ultimate hockey road trip

Thelma and Louise have nothing on this group of Barrhaven women. The self-proclaimed “Barrhaven Bombshells” spent Mondays trade deadline day at the Bell Sensplex, watching the Sens practice and getting ready for their road trip to Las

Vegas to cheer on the Sens in Friday night’s game. The group of 10 ladies showed up at Monday’s Sens practice in their matching red jackets, which were made by Nancy Cathcart. Robbin Winter, who put the trip together with Lawrie Sweet, said that five

more women who now live in California will be meeting them in Las Vegas, bringing their numbers of to 15. “I started putting this trip together in August,” Winter said. “Pieces of this group have been on road trips before, but not hockey trips. We all play golf

together, and we all love the Senators. Some of us are season ticket holders.” A few of the women are pioneers in hockey, as they played for the McKellar Park Angels in the 1960s and 70s. The Angels were one of the most successful women’s hockey programs in an era when very few women were encouraged to play.

Lawrie Sweet, who helped organize the trip with Winter, was the captain of the team. Winter’s sister, Bonnie, is one of the women from California joining the group. Her Angels sweater, believed to be the only one remaining, is headed for the Women’s Hockey Hall of Fame. Winter said that the group is hoping to road

trip to each arena in the NHL over the coming years. They are looking forward to being loud and proud in Las Vegas. “Through the recent negativity toward the team, we want to show the team some love when they need it most,” said Winter. “And we are glad Erik Karlsson will be playing for our team and not theirs Friday night!”

An InvItAtIon

Recently RetiRed ? looking foR a meaningful expeRience? Consider becoming a volunteer at the Dickinson House Museum in Manotick. To learn more about what is involved, you are invited to a Volunteer Tea at Dickinson House,

1127 Mill Street, Manotick, 2:00 pm Wednesday, March 28, 2018.

The “Barrhaven Bombshells” are a group of 10 women who are headed to Las Vegas to cheer on the Ottawa Senators Friday night.

For more information, and to RSVP , call the Chair of the Dickinson House Committee, Brian Earl, at 613-692-2371.


BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT 

The IndependentSPORTS

FRIDAY, March 2, 2018 Page 17

Legault earns shutout, assists winning goal for Major Midget AA Raiders Major Atom AA

The Raiders headed to Spencerville Feb. 15 and came home with a 10-3 win in their Ontario Hockey East Major Atom AA playoff game. Harry Nansi had two goals and an assist and Zachary Venance had a goal and two assists to lead the Raiders’ offence. Tristan Boudreau, Ellard Slipacoff and Ricky Wilson each had a goal and an assist, with James Hughson, Andrew Pickering, Chase Hull and Jacob Warnes also scoring. Braden Ho, Gabriel Bergeron and Calum Hartnell all added assists. Darcy Murphy was the winning goalie. The win put the Raiders into the next round of the playoffs, where they would face the Gloucester Rangers. In the opener Feb. 21 at the Richcraft Sensplex in Orleans, the Raiders earned a 4-1 win. Tristan Boudreau had a goal and two assists, and Zachary Venance had a goal and an assist. Andrew Picker-

ing and Jacob Warnes also scored. Harry Nansi had three assists and Ricky Wilson added one. Andrew McKibbon was the winning goalie.

Minor Pee Wee AA

Henry Mews scored two goals and added an assist as the Raiders defeated Kanata 6-2 Mon., Feb. 12 at the Howard Darwin Arena. William Nicholl and Thomas Dickey each had a goa land two assists, Miller Kay had a goal and an assist, and Lucas Leblanc also scored. Andrew Fraser was the winning goalie. On Feb. 14, the Raiders beat Kanata 4-2 at Bell Arena to win their series. Henry Mews had a goal and an assist with Thomas Dickey, Lucas Leblanc and Liam Monaghan also scoring. Jack Paquette and Tyler Bell added assists. Andrew Fraser was the winning goalie. The Raiders advanced to the next round and won their

opener against the Ottawa Sting 3-2 Feb. 20 at the Minto Arena. Miller Kay scored an unassisted goal and Yahya Sheikh-Mohamoud scored from Kay and Thomas Dickey to give Nepean a 2-0 lead in the first. The Sting tied the game in the second, but William Nicholl scored the winner in the third from Ashton Proulx. David Egorov was the winning goalie.

Major Pee Wee AA

Treyson Dewar had two goals and an assist as the Raiders beat the Seaway Valley Rapids 4-3 at the Howard Darwin Arena Tues., Feb. 13. Jaidon Genereux had a goal and an assist for the Raiders, and Aidan Conroy also scored. Ben McMullen added as assist. Braeden Fancy was the winning goalie. The Raiders scored four goals in the first period and cruised to a 6-2 win over Seaway Valley at the Benson Centre in Cornwall Sat., Feb. 17. Matthew

Strong goaltending by Beaulne, Dunn lead Raiders past Gloucester Major Novice A

Brayden Bennett’s third period goal lifted the Nepean Raiders to a 1-1 tie with Gloucester in their Ontario Hockey East playoff game at the Fred Barrett Arena Feb. 21. Liam Hayes drew the assist.

Minor Atom A

The Nepean Raiders celebrated Valentine’s Day with a 2-2 tie against the Gloucester Rangers at the Walter Baker Centre. Max Mews and Xavier Tessier scored for the Raiders with Matas Bubelevicius picking up an assist. The Raiders headed to Canton, NY Sat., Feb. 17 and earned a 3-1 win

over the St Lawrence Steel. Trailing 1-0 in the second, Jacob Srdoc converted a feed from Matas Bubelevicius to tie the game, while Jaxon Hannon put the Raiders ahead just over a minute after scoring from Max Mews. Srdoc iced the win late in the third with his second goal of the game, scoring from Aidan Trimper. Holden Groen was the winning goalie.

Major Atom A

Matthew Larkin scored an unassisted goal as the Raiders tied the Ottawa Sting 1-1 at the Walter Baker Centre Tues., Feb. 20.

Minor Pee Wee A

The Nepean Raiders White bounced back from a 2-0 deficit to beat the Gloucester Rangers 3-2 Tues., Feb. 13 at the Howard Darwin Arena. Lucas DeBruyn scored twice with Connor Ronberg adding a goal and an assist and Ethen Hopkins adding one assist. Alex Beaulne was the winning goalie. On Feb. 21, Evan Dunne had the shutout as the Raiders beat Gloucester 2-0. Philippe Guimond and George Zouzoulas scored goals with Lucas DeBruyn, Ethen Hopkins and Vincent Belok adding assists.

3-2 by the Rideau-St. Lawrence Kings at the Howard Darwin Arena Mon., Feb. 12. Carter Smith scored from Justin Wammes in the first period, and Matthew O’Doherty scored from William Tario and Mario Peloso late in the third, but the Raiders were unable to score the equalizer. On Feb. 14, the teams met again in Cardinal, skating to a 2-2 tie. Sam Edwards scored from Matthew Stoppa and Luke Richardson in the first, and Connor Platt scored from Matthew O’Doherty and Marc Shaughnessy in the third. The Kings tied the score on Kyle Dagg’s goal with 45 seconds remaining.

Mercier, Gabe Kingsbury, Treyson Dewar, Caleb Jewell, Ben MacMullen and Jaidon Genereux all scored for the Raiders. MacMullen and Genereux each had two assists with one each going to Dewar, Declan McCarthy, Aidan Conroy, Daiwan Jia, Wade Boudrias and Mateo Mongeon. Zachary Renaud was the winning goalie. The win put the Raiders in the next round, where they opened their series against Cumberland with a 9-2 win Feb. 22 at the Minto Rec Centre. Treyson Dewar had three goals and an assist, Jaidon Genereux had a goal and three assists, Gabe Kingsbury, Aidan Conroy and Matthew Clement each had a goal and an assist, and Declan McCarthy and Mateo Mongeon also scored. Ben McMullen and Caleb Jewel each had two assists, with Matthew Mercier, Wade Boudrias and Kody Hull each scoring one. Zachary Renaud was the winning goalie.

The Raiders hosted the Rideau St. Lawrence Kings Tues., Feb. 13 at the Minto Rec Centre and dropped a 5-2 decision. Giulio Carulli and Bowen Gaceta scored for the Raiders with Costa Touliopoulos and Matteo Disipio earning assists.

Minor Bantam AA

Minor Midget AA

A third period comeback fell short as the Raiders were edged

Major Bantam AA

The Raiders faced Gloucester Feb. 22 and tied 2-2. Ma-

thieu Deroy scored from Noah Benoit and Nathan Lassenba, and Alex Urbisci scored from Jordan Falcone.

Major Midget AA

Josh Legault earned the shutout and also assisted the winning goal as the Raiders shut out the Ottawa Valley Aces 3-0 Feb. 13 at the Walter Baker Centre. Justin Graham scored the first goal of the game from Legault, and Kyle Dillabough and Stefanos Mellios also scored. Mellios, Sam Brown and Finn McSwiggan all had assists. The win gave the Raiders a ticket to the next round, where they opened their series against Gloucester with a 7-1 win at the Walter Baker Centre. Kyle Dillabough had two goals and an assist, Josh Lapierre and Michael Gallivan had a goal and two assists, and Connor Weatherhead, Justin Barstead and Cameron Mulholland each had a goal and an assist. Josh Manconi, Sam Brown, Finn McSwiggan and Lukas Henderson each added assists. Matthew Spinella was the winning goalie.

Drummond’s Sugarbush and Pancake House Open 8:30am to 4:30pm

Saturdays & Sundays March 3rd until April 15th Reservations not taken, so arrive early 3719 CR 21, Spencerville, Ont. 1-613-658-2188 Open Daily for Syrup Sales A Family Tradition for 216 Years - Our Third Century Sorry, Debit & Credit Cards Not Accepted.


Page 18 FRIDAY, March 2, 2018

The IndependentCOMMUNITY

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT

St. Pete knocks off LDHSS Ravens in NCSSAA AAA basketball championship The St. Peter Knights played a strong second half to knock off the Longfields-Davidson Heights Ravens 57-43 in the NCSSAA AAA senior boys basketball championship game at Carleton University Thurs., Feb. 22. The Knights trailed 2520 at the half, but came out on fire in the third quarter to pull away from the Ravens. “It’s been the story of our season, “said Longfields-Davidson Heights coach Doug Elliott. “We struggle to score and we can usually lock it down defensively and get a few buckets we need them, but our Achilles’ heel came back to bite us.” Kollie Soriba had 12 points for the Ravens while Haven Holder had

11 points and grabbed a game-high 14 rebounds. Ejad ElBhesey also hit double figures with 10 points. The Ravens struggled from the floor, making only one of 19 threepoint field goal attempts. Despite the loss, Elliott had nothing but praise for his team and the season. “We had a fun season,” he said. “We played a tough season. We travelled with these boys and they are a great, great group of kids. They are community kids from Barrhaven and they have been doing great things since Grade

7. I’m very proud to have coached this team.” Soriba and Zack Bowles, who are both hoping to play university basketball, are among the graduating players. Among the returning players are Holder and Cameron Elliott. The team also had great fan support from its student body. “The kids at school love to come out and support one another,” Elliott said. “They’re loud, their purple, and they’re very proud to be at that school.”

Ravens’ graduating player Kollie Soriba (bottom right) wears his heart on his sleeve as dejected teammates look on after Longfields-Davidson Heights lost the NCSSAA Senior Boy’s AAA Basketball Final at the Ravens’ Nest at Carleton University on Thursday, Feb. 22. St. Peter Knights’ won 57-43, and advanced to the OFSAA playdowns. Mike Carroccetto photo

John McCrae Bulldogs’ Tony Zhao (15) drives to the net and successfully drains an underhand lay-up against the St. Pius X-Men during senior boys Tier 1 quarterfinal high school basketball playoff action in Barrhaven last Tuesday (Feb. 20). A 79-68 loss eliminated the Bulldogs. St. Pius advanced to the semi-finals. Mike Carroccetto photo

Bulldogs’ unbeaten season ends after upset loss to St. Pius

The undefeated season at John McCrae Secondary School came to an untimely halt last Tuesday, as the Bulldogs lost their quarterfinal game to St. Pius 79-68 in Barrhaven. The loss brought an early and unexpected end to what had been, to that point, a perfect season. “Pius is a really athletic team, and we knew

it would be a challenge to keep them off the glass and out of the paint,” said McCrae coach Kris Dale. Shots weren’t falling for the Bulldogs, and they found themselves trailing. McCrae fought back into the game in the fourth quarter, but Pius had a couple of key baskets down the stretch to clinch the win.

“We weren’t able to get a couple of stops at the end, and a tip of the cap to them because they played an excellent game,” said Dale. “They looked like they wanted it more today.” Though they will lose some players to graduation, Dale said he will have a good core of Grade 11 students coming back for next year.


FRIDAY, March 2, 2018 Page 19

BARRHAVEN INDEPENDENT 

The IndependentSPORTS

On to Halifax Carleton Ravens’ forward Eddie Ekiyor of Barrhaven scored 20 points in last Saturday’s OUA quarterfinal victory over the Laurentian Voyageurs at the Ravens’ Nest. Ekiyor and the undefeated Ravens will be heading to Halifax next weekend to try and win their eighth straight national championship and their 14th in the past 16 years. Mike Carroccetto photo

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HOUSING HOUSING HOUSING TRANSPORTATION HOUSING TRANSPORTATION HOUSING TRANSPORTATION HOUSING HOUSING FOOD TRANSPORTATION FOOD HOUSING HOUSING HOUSING TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION FOOD TRANSPORTATION HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS TRANSPORTATION FOOD TRANSPORTATION FOOD HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS TRANSPORTATION FOOD HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS FOOD HOUSING HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS FOOD FOOD RECREATION HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS RECREATION FOOD HOUSEHOLD HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS OPERATIONS RECREATION HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS RECREATION TRANSPORTATION HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS CLOTHING RECREATION RECREATION OPERATIONS CLOTHING CLOTHING HOUSEHOLD RECREATION RECREATION CLOTHING FOOD RECREATION CLOTHING CLOTHING REFERRALS ARE CLOTHING RECREATION CLOTHING HOUSEHOLD OPERATIONS CLOTHING CLOTHING RECREATION

HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% EDUCATION 2.59% FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% EDUCATION 2.59% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% EDUCATION 2.59% FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% PERSONAL 2.10% CARE FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% EDUCATION 2.59% FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% EDUCATION 2.59% PERSONAL 2.10% CARE FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% EDUCATION 2.59% PERSONAL 2.10% CARE EDUCATION 2.59% HEALTHCARE/PRESCRIPTIONS 4.11% PERSONAL 2.10% CARE EDUCATION 2.59% EDUCATION 2.59% PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) PERSONAL 2.10% CARE PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) EDUCATION 2.59% PERSONAL 2.10% CARE PERSONAL 2.10% CARE PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) PERSONAL 2.10% CARE PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT 3.40% PERSONAL 2.10% CARE OTHER 5.21% PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) * Source: Statistics Canada PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) OTHER 5.21% OTHER 5.21% PERSONAL 2.10% CARE * Statistics PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) * Source: Source: Statistics Canada Canada PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) OTHER 5.21% EDUCATION 2.59% PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS,* Source: NEWSPAPER) OTHER 5.21% Statistics Canada OTHER 5.21% * Source: Statistics Canada BIGGEST COMPLIMENT YOU **CAN GIVE OTHER 5.21% PRINTED 0.31% MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) Source: Statistics Canada Canada Source: Statistics OTHER 5.21% * Source: Statistics Canada PERSONAL CARE 2.10% OTHER 5.21% * Source: Statistics Canada OTHER 5.21% * Source: Statistics Canada PRINTED MATERIAL(BOOKS, NEWSPAPER) 0.31%

WHERE DO CANADIANS SPEND THEIR MONEY? WHERE DO CANADIANS SPEND THEIR MONEY? WHERE DO CANADIANS SPEND THEIR W WW.C ALLTH E D E FRA N CO S.C OM WHERE DO CANADIANS SPEND THEIR MONEY? MONEY? WHERE DO CANADIANS SPEND THEIR MONEY?

THE BIGGEST COMPLIMENT YOU CAN GIVE YOUR REFERRALS ARE THE YOUR REFERRALS ARE THE BIGGEST COMPLIMENT YOU CAN GIVE YOUR REFERRALS ARE THE BIGGEST COMPLIMENT YOU CAN GIVE YOUR REFERRALS ARE THE BIGGEST COMPLIMENT YOU CAN GIVE YOUR REFERRALS ARE THE BIGGEST COMPLIMENT YOU CAN GIVE YOUR YOUR REFERRALS REFERRALS ARE ARE THE THE BIGGEST BIGGEST COMPLIMENT COMPLIMENT YOU YOU CAN CAN GIVE GIVE

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Barrhaven Independent March 2 2018  

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Barrhaven Independent March 2 2018  

Barrhaven Independent March 2 2018

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