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Eames TYPOGRAPHY HOUSE OF CARDS


“The details are details. They make the product. The connections, the connections, the connections. It will in the end be these details that give the product its life.” – Charles Eames

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Design Purpose problems objective problem solving

Schematic Design

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page 19

4

Production

digital development studies analysis

page 02

research inspiration brainstorming

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6

3

Design Development

page 10

5

Outcome final design final application

thumbnails/sketches concept development analysis

TABLE OF CONTENTS © 2012 Jamie Turpin, Eames Typography & House of Cards


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Course: GRDS 709 – OL Professor: Merrick Henry Quarter: Winter 2011

the challenge: problem objective

The project’s objective is to exploit and create one’s own typeface. For this project, the creative process begins with the idea which culminates in the outcome: to make one aware of the properties that bring unity to any typographic system. Overall, this project is designed to encourage an understanding of the abstract properties inherent in existing typographic forms. To start, I began the design process by researching and observing different typography styles and forms. I selected a few of my favorite typefaces such as Univers, Rosewood, and Helvetica to dive in for a closer look at what actually makes and forms a good typeface design. Consistency, detail form, and line weights are a few characteristics that I gathered from the research. From all of the inspiration images I accumulated, I was able to develop my brainstorming thoughts and ideas which formed numerous thumbnail creations that support my brainstorming. While creating the thumbnails, I focused on a few letters at a time to see if the type was forming creative characteristics for a display or decorative type. I had a strong idea of the end product and I was also conscious of the end use of the design. A few of the challenges were to exemplify

13/16 Univers 47 Light Condensed

target audience

Age Group: 13 – 68 Gender: Male & Female Personality: Enjoys Typography and Design Interaction

uppercase only due to our schedule and time. I continued my design development by drawing a few characters that combined vertical, horizontal, diagonal, and curved strokes. Next, I selected a few thumbnails and developed the sketches into further defined conceptual drawings that exemplify my design intent. I took this opportunity to define specific traits of the typeface weight, width and overall texture and color. Then, my conceptual development led me to form studies on color, typography and material that would be incorporated in the digital compositions. The digital development identifies and illustrates the placements for the display, primary and secondary type along with visually forming the grid structure for each design layout. The type and color selected during the studies are exemplified on the digital roughs to form the overall visual aesthetic of each composition.

design outcome

My final design is exploited at a superior level by exemplifying my design goals and objectives for the typeface weight, width and overall texture and color combined with legibility which allows the form to be viewed as decorative type and interesting while the target audience is drawn to the final type. I passionately enjoy telling the design story for the Eames typography design process. Finally, my design provides a consistent rhythm for each letter profile to articulate Ray Eames dot pattern. The overall design exemplifies consistent rhythm, legible stroke weights, and balance with a contrasting utilization for the positive & negative of the final forms.

After my analyses on adjustments and revisions were noted on the first round of digital solutions, I began executing my final design which was visually supported and in sync throughout each phase of my design process.

DESIGN NARRATIVE

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original typeface design

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research

Typography studies exemplifying form, uniform detail and successful use of line weights.

INITIAL RESEARCH


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research

Building profiles that articulate and resemble the profile of letterforms.

RESEARCH


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research

Architectural inspired furniture designs that resemble typeface forms.

RESEARCH


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inspiration

Product forms that resemble and speak typeface design.

INSPIRATION


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inspiration

Eclectic objects and materials that create typography.

INSPIRATION


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brainstorming

Next, I brain dump all of the ideas and thoughts that I have in my mind that relate to the project onto paper.

BRAINSTORMING


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design intent

Exemplified are thumbnail sketches from my Moleskine that illustrate my design thoughts and clever typography ideas that voice a harmonious personality that employs a vintage modern tone.

what’s it saying? sans serif

Neutral

geometric art deco

Retro

script handwriting

Casual

serif

Timeless

modern serif

Glamour

italic sans serif

Let’s Go

THUMBNAILS


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THUMBNAILS


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THUMBNAILS


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1

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conceptual intent

Exemplifying a decorative type that employs a retro, vintage tone. This conceptual type employs sans serif characteristics with its geometric personality that exploits consistent character weights, form, rhythm and details. The intended use for this typeface design – signage, magazines or posters in a vintage setting. Color palette – turquoise, red, yellow and gray.

2

conceptual intent

Illustrated is symmetrical type that is intertwined with my creative handwriting that resembles the nature of Helvetica type. The display type is symmetrical in form, has consistency in its characters and utilizes its stroke weights in a successful manner. The intended use for this display type – on illustrations, magazine covers or as typography that resembles ones personal handwriting style. Color palette – open to end user.

CONCEPTS


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3

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conceptual intent

To the right, I am exemplifying a vintage personality for display and/or decorative type. This typewriter style personality exploits consistency, uniformity, unique stroke weights, and flow. The intended use for the typeface design – magazines and posters in a vintage environment. Color palette – minimal color with 1 color strongly emphasized. My personal color of choice for this typeface is turquoise.

4

conceptual intent

Illustrated is display and/or decorative type that is intertwined with a retro vintage persona. The display type is symmetrical, uniform, and exploits a playful personality with the utilization of different stroke weights. The intended use for the display type – signage, magazine covers or posters in a branded environment. Color palette – turquoise, red, yellow, orange, blue, green, black, gray and white.

CONCEPTS


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5

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conceptual intent

Shown to the right is a decorative typeface that’s influenced by the modern designers of their time period, Charles and Ray Eames. The furniture’s personality exploits consistency, modern characteristics, detailed stroke weights with a balanced flow. The intended use for this typeface design – product design, interaction design components and print design. I suggest utilizing vintage colors that echo the design intent.

6

conceptual intent

Illustrated is a timeless serif type that exploits a decorative persona that is reflected by Ray Eames’ Small Dot Fabric. The decorative type is symmetrical in form, has a consistent personality and exploits a successful engaging level of stroke weights. Intended use – decorative type exemplified on magazine covers, announcements and posters that support the Eames’ branded environment. Color palette – vintage color palette.

CONCEPTS


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intertwining concepts

Moving forward with intermingling concepts 05 and 06 to exploit Eames’ style at its fullest level.

CONCEPTS


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After studying the different forms of Charles and Ray’s furniture creations, I feel the Eames Molded Plastic Armchair with wood dowel base, Eames Lounge Chair, Eames Walnut Stool and

Ray’s Dot Pattern create very unique forms and shapes that would be utilized to the fullest extent for forming decorative type.

Molded Plastic Armchair

Ray’s Dot Pattern Fabric

Eames Lounge Chair

Ray’s Pattern Fabric

Eames Walnut Stool

Eames Identity Icon

CONCEPTS

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typeface development

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Directional, motivational and painful insights that my peers shared with me on their views of my concept.

Tom Creamer “Wow this looks tough! I like this concept frr shrr and you have included some nice research visuals to help the viewer better understand the full concept and direction you are headed. Oh yeah, and Im sure they help you too right. It would be great if you could incorporate some angles into the words too, like a chair/letter that is at an angle slanted left or right, and then you have like a lamp or table that is flat and straight to the viewer, it could really give each word formed a “cool” effect. Like angles of furniture you see depending on where in the room you are standing nice works”

Jennifer Oliver “Hi Jamie! This is such a cool idea--and could go in so many directions. From some of your reference material, I wonder if you could pull some of the details from the pieces (like the balls from the coat rack) and include them in the alphabet--maybe these balls become ball terminals on some of the letters (?) Maybe the ‘I’ looks like the profile of the turned wood stool? Just some thoughts--great start, though!”

Marvin Eans “I enjoy the styles you provided for you different concepts. It it will be interesting to see how you integrate the themes into the typefaces. With you background in interior you could offer some great design solutions. I think it would be interesting to see some of the interior design concepts fused with this typeface design project. Look forward to seeing the progression.” Denise Gross “I really find your concept interesting. I can see how a typeface can develop from this.

Dena Wallace “I think this is a really cool idea. Your research gives a lot of great, stylized shapes to draw from for your letters. I think you can push this idea to make some really interesting shapes. I look forward to seeing more!” Dyan Gulovsen

“I want to see more on how you incorporate Charles and Ray Eames furniture style into the lettering- very interesting concept look forward to seeing the results. Good Luck.”

I hope that whichever way you go, you will keep your hand sketched style. It would be a real shame not to have that as part of the letterforms. Can’t wait to see more!”

Professor Merrick Henry “The visual research and supporting materials are very inspiring. I wonder while looking at the architectural qualities if you need to be so literal with the visual representation of your forms. Could you possibly just pull in a slight resemble of the designer? I find the modular design to be very nostalgic of that period and my concern is how decorative the forms will get where visibility and legibility is hindered.”

ANALYSIS

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feedback


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Exemplifying a retro/vintage style for decorative type. The development illustrates a successful use of positive and negative space within the forms. The stroke weights are drawn at engaging balances that provide nice depth for each character. The rhythm of the geometry and use of hierarchy form an unexpected balance of the characters.

Consistency of shapes in each Character

Different Stroke Weights

proposed palette

485C

3945C

7472C

424C

Positive + Negative Form cap height

x-height

baseline

Sans Serif Type [Retro/Vintage Type]

DIGITAL

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design development


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design development

I’m exemplifying a typeface that resembles a typewriter key design in black and white to relate to the positive and negative profile the shape forms. The stroke weights are drawn at a nice articulating balance. The pop of color type is successful due to the how it plays and flows with the rhythm, line weight consistency and unity.

Different Stroke Weights

Arm

Positive + Negative Balance

Serif Type

[Typewriter Type]

proposed palette

pop of color

424C

7479C

DIGITAL

485C

542C


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Charles and Ray Eames are considered the most significant and collectible furniture designers of the 20th century. After I intermingled the concepts 05 and 06, I want the typeface design to take form and resemble Charles and Ray’s profile of their furniture designs. The geometric, modern style of Eames’ furniture are unique forms that speak custom typeface. Their furniture exemplifies a successful balance with height, widths, texture and color. I want the type design to carry these characteristics too.

Make consistent to provide a rhythmic flow to the type design

“K” character style does not flow with the others.

Consistent Form

Proposed Colors

Black

Black 7C

424C

1797C

646C

1225C

Directional Feedback: Try to have the line weights be consistent from one letter to the next.

DIGITAL

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design development


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1959 Chairs For Home, Office + Public Areas

1959 Eames Aluminum Group

426C

Vintage Black Powerful, Elegant, Heavy, Basic, Classic, Expensive, Magical, Nighttime, Prestigious

158C

Orange Fun, Whimsical, Glowing, Vital, Tangy, Energizing, Loud, Friendly, Gregarious

9C

Cool Gray Classic, Cool, Practical, Timeless, Quality, Quiet, Ghostly

426C

Vintage Black Mysterious, Bold, Basic, Strong, Magical, Classic, Elegant, Prestigious

458C

Red Exciting, Energizing, Dynamic, Dramatic Provocative, Aggressive, Powerful

White

White Pure, Clean, Sterile, Innocent, Silent, Bright, Glistening, Airy

1375C

Orange Fun, Whimsical, Glowing, Energizing, Gregarious, Vital

MOMA Swell Poster

Eames High Cabinet

416C

Gray Professional, Classic, Enduring, Sophisticated, Solid, Expensive

484C

Red Earthy, Strong, Stimulating, Provocative, Energizing, Dynamic

646C

Blue Calming, Cool, Constant, True, Dependable, Happy, Restful

128C

Yellow Cheerful, Enlightening, Soft, Sunny, Warm, Friendly

603C

Yellow Rich, Comforting, Acidic, Energy, Luminous, Cheerful, Enlightening

543C

Blue Calming, Eclectic, Constant, Restful, Dependable, Vibrant

White

Yellow Pure, Clean, Silent, Glistening, Airy, Bright, Lightweight

STUDIES

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color studies for Eames Type


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Another round of feedback that my peers shared with me. Very beneficial, directional feedback that allows me to learn from this project.

Dimitri Koumbis “I think the direction you are moving in is great. What really stuck out to me was the wire pieces, the “dot” figures and the iconic stool/ seat. Maybe you could just work around those ideas or maybe one of them to make it a bit more consistent. I think if you have a few of the letters illustrated and the rest are just simply drawn, it would be fine. Good luck and I am looking forward to the finished product!”

Raazia Hussain “You have a great concept to ground your typeface in. Right now I feel that each character that you’ve developed is unique in itself, but is not working as a group or the alphabet. Can you take any one element and make it consistent in all? My favorite letters from your set are M and W. They have a very different character (no pun intended) and remind me of a suspension bridge. Even the swollen ends that you have in some of your letters can be worked into all. Good luck, Jamie!”

Denise Gross “Great work so far and your process book looks great. I think i am with Dimitri on this with the A looking a little out of place. Like he said, maybe if you just add the wire and “dot” figure to it. Or when I look at your sketches the other element that I think that would be interesting to have consistently in each letter is the cross marks that are in the M and W. It seems like there needs to be something that ties them together so that you know they are from the same alphabet. That being said, you may want to wait to really try to develop that until you get a few more of them in Illustrator.

Amberlee Isabella “I echo everyones comments. Great concept just carry it all the way though. Dig to find those common elements as you progress. The wire frames stand out to me the most right now as the solution to this. Even if the piece is curved or straight the metal details are dominate.” Good luck!”

Dimitri Koumbis “I like the use of the thick/thinness of the characters, BCD. The A seems a bit out of place, so maybe you could incorporate that element into it? Also, try adding some stroke weight to the I, so it looks like it is part of the group too.” Love this!”

The other thing you might want to think about is when you scan them, play with the levels to make them pure black and white in Photoshop, and then color select, create paths and copy those paths over into Illustrator. If you do that you will keep your hand rendered look. There ends up being a lot of points on the paths but it allows you to have that hand rendered look. I did that on some of the ones I was experimenting with and it looks like I just scanned them in when they are really vector art.”

ANALYSIS

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feedback


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Submittal for Course Winter 2011

Professor Henry Project Feedback: “Jamie, The visual research and process journey was richly developed The ideation across the board was sound and you’ve managed to pull interesting aesthetics together without blinding your reader on extra detail and busy design. The forms that are disjointed are, ‘A’, ‘D’, ‘H’, ‘I’, ‘M’, ‘N’, ‘O’, ‘T’, ‘U’, ‘V’, ‘W’ and ‘Z’. Do you know why? The rest of the design seems to have something in alignment and the consistency give them that alignment. This is what typeface design is all about; no matter if it’s for decorative or continuous body reading. The devil is in the design and I want you to find it. Thank you for a rich quarter, I appreciate your effort and hard work.”

ANALYSIS


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Submittal for Course Winter 2011

ANALYSIS


FINAL DEVELOPMENT NONLINEAR PROCESS


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influence

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Eames Typography

Final typeface development that I created as a reflection of being influenced by Charles and Ray Eames.

FINAL


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product development

Since the typography is in process of being finalized, the next step it to develop what type of application the typeface will be utilized on.

influence

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thumbnails

Shared below are further thoughts and development for the packaging.

THUMBNAILS


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design development

The intent for the package design is to provide a solution that utilizes sustainable material, speaks a consistent vintage tone, and provides product interaction for the end user.

Package Design

[Au Natural/Vintage Tone]

vintage pattern

walnut wood

mohawk loop antique vellum, 18 pt

CONCEPT


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mock up study model

I formed the study model at full scale to observe the connections, scores, and folds a bit closer to make sure the functionality of the concept works effectively. I learned that I need an extra ¾” panel on the panel as I noted in my concept drawing. The baker’s thread represents an elastic cord, which is necessary to support the house of cards products. The mock up model shown is for mass study only; the materials thickness is not the correct intent of the final materials I plan to utilize.

MOCK UP


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mock up study model Directional feedback from Professor Abadie: “Jamie, Thanks for the update. Question - page 30 - the actual area where the cards will sit - will you need to add some sort of ribbon for the cards to sit on and the user to be able to pull on to get the cards out? or...some sort of thumb cut to help get the cards out? I am thinking that the cards will fit nicely into that area so you don’t want people having to flip over to get them out or having to use their nails against the box wall to pry them out. (hope this makes sense)” Directional feedback from Jane Dorn: “Hi Jamie, When I grow up, I want to save a bunch of dollars so I can purchase an original Turpin Moleskine for my art collection. Just sayin’. I agree with Trudy re: the need for an unobtrusive way to remove the cards from the box. Looking forward to seeing how you resolve that! I noticed a few problems with the page #s throughout (duplicate and missing numbers), but am guessing you will be finalizing those once final images are placed, etc.”

MOCK UP


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package development

DIGITAL


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The frontside exemplifies the typeface that I created. The backside provides an image of Charles and Ray’s furniture that influenced the design direction for the typeface.

B

A Front Side

Back Side

Front Side

C Back Side

Front Side

Back Side

1

5

9

2

6

10

3

7

11

4

8

12

FINAL

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house of cards [12] Retro Designs


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FINAL


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FINAL


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FINAL


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final house of cards

FINAL


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final house of cards

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eames typography The meaning behind the name: I decided to utilize the name Eames since majority of Charles and Ray’s furniture is identified with their surname somewhere within the identity of the piece. Some of the Eames’ furniture is called out in very simple contexts such as the Eames Lounge Chair, Eames Storage, and Eames Molded Plywood Chair. I felt being consistent with their idea of simplicity is the key for naming the typeface design.

Each character profile speaks its own personality through line weights, form, and texture. I feel that exemplifying the curves in Illustrator into a nice contour form was the hardest for me due to wanting to make sure the overall shape was aesthetically pleasing and consistent in form. I am ecstatic to have the opportunity to incorporate my favorite designers into the mix of typography and to exploit my passion for furniture design as the typography design.

Jennifer Oliver “Jamie, this is looking great!! Including some of the elements from the fabric was a great idea, and I love the way the metal crossbars work to connect the forms.” Dena Wallace “I think you have created a really interesting and original typeface. I really love it in red! My favorite letters are K and Z. I feel these are some of your most interesting shapes and immediately bring to mind furniture. I am looking forward to seeing the finished product.” Denise Gross “I don’t know about you, but I have a new healthy respect for decorative typefaces! I think they can be super difficult to design! Your’s looks great! You really worked it out. It is unique and very different. I love it. I think there are many different uses for it, especially in the “decorative” category.”

“Eventually everything connects – people, ideas, objects. The quality of the connections is the key to quality per se.“

— Charles Eames

FINAL

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final analysis Overall, this project turned out to be very innovative and explorative for me. In the beginning I had a hard time figuring out what the typeface actually wanted to be, but while I was researching for inspiration I came across Charles & Ray Eames, and their furniture profiles and designs started speaking typeface design to me. I eagerly moved forward with utilizing different forms of their furniture profile designs. After I determined the typography design intent, immediately the alphabet was formed by utilizing different furniture profiles of unity, rhythm, and hierarchy that the Eames’ designs articulated.

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Eames Typography // House of Cards  

Process Book I was influenced by Charles and Ray Eames’ furniture when I began developing my concept for this typeface. I wanted to create...

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