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JOSHUA HAROLD LENTZ

suMMarY P hoto: Aa ron Le nt z, june 201 2

8 5 2 H O P E S T R E E T, P R O V I D E N C E , R I 0 2 9 0 6 401.829.9229 JLENT Z393@G.RWU.EDU

joshua has working experience with individuals who are innovating the architecture/engineering/construction industry by using technology to advance the design process. He is well versed in the terminology and culture of architecture/art/engineering/construction world. joshua is looking to become part of a team and to work towards his architectural registration and both personal and career growth, while still maintaining his passions in design, innovation, sustainability, research and art. International architectural mindset. Locations for academic projects include: Beit Shean, Israel/ Buenos Aires, Argentina / Mumbai, India,/Rotterdam, Netherlands / florence, Italy / Boston, Massachusetts, and others.

eXPerience SUMMER

2012

D E S I G N S T U D I O T E A C H I N G A S S I S TA N T ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY S C H O O L O f A R C H I T EC T U R E , ART & H I S TO R I C P R E SE RVATI ON NAAB ACCREDITED BRISTOL, RI

C r i t i q ued & a s s i s ted hi g h s cho o l s t ud ent s i nteres ted i n p u rs u i n g a rc h i te c t u re . 2010

-

2011

I N T E R N A N D C O N S U LTA N T H O R I ZO N TA L S Y S T E M S NEW YORK, NY

C rea ted v i d eo t uto r i a ls fo r s o ft w a re. helped tes t s o f t wa re . p ro vi de d i n s i g h t o n ex pect a t i o ns fro m upco mi ng g enera t i o n o f a rchi te c t s a s fa r a s b i m a n d a e c . bra i ns to r med crea t i v e d i rect i o n. red es i g ned element s i n t h e Us e r In te r fa ce , wo r k c a n be s een i n a uto d es k bi m3 6 0 g lue ( a uto d es k a cq ui red h o r i zo n t a l s y s te m s ) . 2006

-

2011

T R I A G E C O O R D I N AT O R S A S C O A E L EC T R O N I C S C O./ R E PA I R S P LU S EAST PROVIDENCE, RI

Tro ubles ho o ted co ns umer elect ro ni cs , d i s pa tched te c h n i c i a n s , t r i a g e d, I T, a n d per fo r med d ut i es t ypi ca l o f a n o ffi ce a s s i s t a nt .

e D u c at i o n 2007

-

2012

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE, B.S. IN ARCHITECTURE/DUAL DEGREE ROGER WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY S C H O O L O f A R C H I T EC T U R E , ART & H I S TO R I C P R E SE RVATI ON NAAB ACCREDITED BRISTOL, RI Mi no r i n A r t a nd A rchi tect ura l Hi s to r y

fALL

2010

I N S T I T U T E AT PA L A Z ZO R U C E L L A I F L O R E N C E , I TA LY A rchi tect ure s emes ter a bro a d

2003 - 2007

CLASSICAL HIGH SCHOOL PROVIDENCE, RI

Gra d ua ted i n to p t w ent y percent o f cla s s , ho no r ro ll


r e l at i v e c o u r s e s

Skills

gra du ate th esis st udio -prof. julian bonde r (arc h.6 1 3) gra du ate design st udio -he rnan maldonad o y ma x ro hm ( A R) ( a rch. 5 1 5 ) gra du ate design st udio -t angram archite kte n (N L ) , d ea n w hi te, ( a rch. 5 1 5 ) co m p reh en sive de sign st udio - robe rto v iola ocho a , s a s a ki ( US A ) ( a rch. 5 1 3) advan ced arc hite ct ural de sign st udio: urban -c a r lo a chi lli ( a rch.4 1 6) I TA LY

a rchi tect ura l de s i g n d raw i ng ha nd d ra ft i n g la s er cut t i n g mo d el ma kin g pa i nt i ng pho to g ra phy pla s ter ca s t i n g

h isto ric reh ab ilit at ion workshop - prof. arnold ro bi ns o n ( hp.6 81 ) th esis researc h se minar -prof. hasan-udd in khan ( a rch.6 4 1 ) advan ced co mpute r applicat ions in de sign- andrew t hur lo w ( a rch. 5 87 ) p ro fessio n al p ract ice -prof. gary graham (arch. 5 4 2) co n tem p o ra ry issue s in public/priv ate space - K L M a rq ui tecto s ( A R) ( a rch. 5 3 0) arc h itec tu re journalism -prof. christophe r mulv ey, s a fd i e a rchi tect s ( a rch. 5 3 0) enviro n m en tal de sign re se arch - d r. e le f t he rios pav li d es ( a rch. 5 22) co m p u ter a p p licat ions for profe ssional pract ice - pro f. g a r y g ra ha m ( a rch.4 88) arc h itec tu re in conte x t -prof. f ranco pisani (arch.47 7 ) I TA LY site & enviro n me nt -prof. de re k bradord (arch.321 ) th e americ an sky scrape r -prof. gail fe nske (arc h. 5 7 7 ) h isto ry o f ita l ian de sign -prof. f ranco pisani, (arch. 5 3 0) I TA LY h isto ry o f mo de rn archite ct ure II -prof. john hend r i x ( a rch. 3 26) h isto ry o f mo de rn archite ct ure I -prof. gail fe nske ( a rch. 3 25 ) art an d a rc h itect ure in t he islamic world -prof. ner mi n kura ( a a h. 3 23) th eo ry o f a rc hite ct ure -prof. luis Carranza (arch. 3 22) h isto ry o f art and archite ct ure II -prof. ne rmin kura ( a rch. 3 22) h isto ry o f art and archite ct ure I -prof. ne rmin kura ( a rch. 3 22) design o f stru ct ure s II -prof. me te t uran (arch.4 3 5 ) design o f stru ct ure s I -prof. robe rt d e rmod y (a rch.4 3 4) mec h a n ic al & e le ct rical e quipme nt -prof. je f f re y s t a a t s ( a rch. 3 3 3) aco u stic s & l ight ing -prof. je f f re y st aat s (arch.3 3 2) co n stru c tio n mate rials & asse mblie s II -prof. wi lli a m mcq ueen ( a rch. 3 3 1 ) co n stru c tio n mate rials & asse mblie s I -prof. ch a r les ha g ena h ( a rch. 23 1 )

3 d a ni ma t i o n s 3 d rend er i n g a d o be a cro b a t a d o be crea t i ve s u i te a d o be i llus t ra to r a d o be i nd esi g n a d o be pho to s h o p pho to s ho p L i g h t ro o m a r t la nt i s s t u di o a uto d es k a u to c a d a uto d es k re vi t a uto d es k m ay a a uto d es k Vas a r i a uto d es k e co te c t b u i l di n g a n a l y s i s a uto d es k g re e n b u i l di n g s t u di o bi m bi m3 60 g lu e ht ml5 + cs s mi cro s o ft o f f i ce (e xce l , o u t l o o k , po w er po i nt , wo rd) mult i fra me s ketchup zco r p 3 D pr i n t i n g

el em en tary italian I –e le na bandine lli (it al.101) I TA LY fo u n datio n s o f paint ing: color & d e sign –prof. m i cha el r i ch (v a r t s . 281 ) co m p u ter a p p licat ions in busine ss –prof. fe rd s chro t h (ci s .1 0 2)

References J a c k E a r ly E V P C h ief Operat in g Of f icer Ho ri zo n t a l S t e p h e n W h i t e D ean at Ro g er Wil l iams Un iv ersi t y Jon Lentz Own er at S AS C OA/ Repairs P l u s

Sy s te m s

j pe 3 65 9 9 9 @ cox. net S white @ rwu. edu J O N@ repairsplus .com

H o n o r s / A W AR D S Salmanson Grant - Gran t award ed

to Jo sh u a in re s p o n s e to h i s s e lf p ro p o s e d t ri p to Be i t S h e’a n to d o c u m e n t , i n terv i e w, a nd i nv e sti g a te the a rcha e o lo g i ca l si te of Scy thopo l is as it per t ain ed to h is M aster o f A rc h i te c t u re Th e s i s . Work Displayed for AccreditatioN - Wo r k f ro m Gra d u a te S t u d i o w i t h Ta n g ra m A rc h i te k te n A m s te rd a m w a s c h o s e n to b e di sp laye d fo r Accre di ta ti o n. 3


TABLE OF CONTENTS

T HE S I S S T U D I O

1

G R AD UAT E ST U DI O

9

C O MPR E HE NSIVE S TUDI O

15

G R AD UAT E ST U DI O

23

PAI NT ING

31

P H OTOGRA PHY

33

CENTRO PAR A

4


L E U V E NH AV E N DOMU S T OR E N

ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

C E N T E R F O R I N T E R P R E TAT I O N

MUSEUM OF TOLERANCE

L A A G R IC ULT UR A UR B A N A

BEIT SHEAN, ISRAEL

MUMBAI, INDIA

B UE N OS AIRE S, ARGENTINA

5


C E N T E R F O R I N T E R P R E TAT I O N

BEIT SHEAN, ISRAEL

fA L L 2 0 1 2

The social use of heritage is to serve as a model to assist an intimate opportunity to understand an archeological site in its cultural and natural context by the engagement of resources of which is water. The project sheds light on the dual importance of conservation and preservation of the archaeological sites of Beit She’an National Park and the shared water heritage of Nahal Harod, a main tributary of the jordan River. As a conduit for research and exploration, it will provide archeological and ecological research facilities for local and visiting professionals, spaces for educating visitors and creating awareness of the challenges facing the region, the center will inspire a place of respect to revel in the archeological 1


origina l sketch

ea rly spa tia l sketch

model colla ge = roof+wa ter+topogra phy+ruins

h i llsi de si tu ati on

and hydrological history of the region and begin to promote solutions for these chal lenges. The use of water seeks to assist the conditioning of the building. Cisterns are located on the south edge of the building. The water collected is recycled and used for both the roof and to test and monitor the water quality. A link between the present and past is made throug h the connection of water.

site loca tion

site section

2


from left to right: model of city, close up of model Archa eologists on site, pre- excava tion, beginings of excava tions, sewa ge runoff, wa terfa ll on Na ha l Ha rod, si te pl an

ti mel i n e PERIOD

First settlement at the Tel

5000-3600 BCE CHALCOLITHIC

15 to 12 century B.C.E Center of Egyptian rule

3600 - 1130BCE CANAANITE

Death of Saul and his sons at Mt. Gilboa, the corpses were displayed at the City Walls

1140 - 1000 BCE

732 B.C.E - Destruction of the City by the Assyrian army

1000 - 732 BCE

Foundation of Nyssa Scythopolis

THE JUDGES

ISRAELITE KINGDOM

333 - 63 BCE HELLENSITIC

Monumental City, a temple to Zues is built at the top of the Tell

63 BCE - 324 CE ROMAN

Flourishing Christian city, a church is built at the Tell

324 - 632 CE BYZANTINE

01.18.749 - The city is destroyed by an earthquake

632 - 1099 BCE EARLY MUSLIM

Fortress built on new site and small village at the Tell

1099 - 1187 CE CRUSADER

1322 - Ashtori Hagerhi live in Bet She’an and descroves the city in his writing

Small village in a new site

1260 - 1517 CE MAMLUK

1517 - 1917 CE OTTOMAN

1948 - Modern Bet She’an is built

20TH CENTURY

3

E A S T B AT H H O U S E


perpspec ti v e from tel looking towa rds modern day beit shea n

I N T R E P R E TAT I O N C E N T E R

W E S T B AT H H O U S E

PALLADIUS STREET

T H E AT E R

SIGMA

AGORA

NYMPHEON

4


Section Perspective of Entry

5


pla n

p e rs p e ct ive o f ap p ro ach

roof + entry pla n

pla n

6


7


from left to right: a ncient cisterns

8


C E N T R O PA R A L A A G R IC ULT UR A UR B A N A

BU E NOS A IR ES, ARG ENTI NA

SPRING 2012

The character of Argentine culture and the contemorary social and urban reality of the city of Buenos Aires is that of the Inbetween. This refers to the situations of the urb an and rural relations but also the social of the informal settelments and the built structures of the city. Part of the historical aspect of Buenos Aires is the notion of the ‘party wall’. I took this element, and its rythym and inversed it to sho w the social and agricultural presences of the city. Buenos Aires’s foundation was the cultivation of agriculture. This is the merger of rural and urban, and the Center for Urban agriculture connecting people. 9


origina l sketch

spa tia l colla ge

approac h i n g bri dge en tran ce

site loca tion

loca tion x50,0 0 0 x5,0 0 0 x50 0 x50 x5

10


DN

11


+11,00 PLANTING LEVEL 1:200

+6,00 SEGUNDA NIVEL 1:200 +6,00 SECOND LEVEL 1:200

0.00 PLANTA NIVEL 1:200 0,00 GROUND LEVEL 1:200

-3,00 SERVICIO NIVEL 1:200 -3,00 SERVICE LEVEL 1:200

12


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MUSEUM OF TOLERANCE

MUMBAI, INDIA

fA L L 2 0 1 1

The museum’s physical manifestation striv es to initiate a communal grip in Mumbai, where Pilgrims and inhabitants, alike, can latch onto, in moments when shelter is needed or comfort is wanted. During the abrupt storms that occur in monsoon season or the intense heat where a natural breeze in a familiar space is can be granted. The Museum acts with the people and for the people, providing spaces to inform and gather; constructed with materials rooted with local craft and spatial situations echoing the pavilions and thematic spaces of Indian architecture. 15


origina l sketch

spa tia l colla ge

t hre s ho l d perspec ti v e ren der

site loca tion

16


This building is a place of sheltered space for tolerance in the region. This concept seeks to not force pilgrims to engage with the building during the pilgrimage to Haji Ali Dargah, if they do not wish. but at the same time it seeks to prioritize public sheltered space as essential core of tolerance by creating a single interwoven entity with pavilion like spaces on pilotis for people to interact. The building stresses the integration of citizens throughout thematic spaces of india, such as the courtyard and the pavilion. the building and Bazaar become an unity. Nature is incorporated into the interior volumes in the for m of voided courtyards. The relationship with the Dargah, the coast, and the city, is materialized through the Bazaar element functioning as a sheltered gathering spot for the 40,000 pilgrims that arrive on the site every thurs and friday. The project is organized as a system of parts that can run independent, since their functions have different periods of use during the week.The implementation of the museum is sought to maximize the orientation (north-south) and make them less desirable minimum in the (east-west) for energy and light. This decision also offers to give an urban front to the coast line. The building is pushed north for a couple of reasons: the first being that the shear amount of people can be accommodated,a nother is the provide enough room so people can see the Mahalximi temple to the south-west, and the to allow for future events and coastline design integrations. The strategies for achieving energy efficiency, passiv e cooling, means low maintenance and cost. The main entry is near the center of the building to provide immediate connection to both the private museum experience the the public auditoriu m and commercial spaces. The west is the Museum sector. To the east, is the administrative and sector. To the south facade horizontal windows decreases the amount of used trays and lighting on the walls for maximum use of natural light inside. To the north the cafe and bookstore are located, with more horizontal windows woven into the stone facade, incorporating indirect natural light, ideal for the visual comfort of the offices, without prejudice to the intense heat gains from direct insolation. Heat gains in volumes are reduced by the addition of an Roof that casts a shadow on the volume, and directing Cross ventilation into the space. The openings in the woven stone facade break up the thermal mass of one large stone, which is used to reduce solar heat gains. 17

from left to right: axo n o f site situatio n, pho to s o f tid e: lo w/m id / hig h lo w tid e, m id tid e, hig h tid e


perpspective looking towa rds site a nd Ha ji Ali Da rga h

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A0.03

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L5_Pavilion Canopy 84' - 0"

L4_Pavilion Roof 62'Roof - 0" L4A_Bookstore 60' - 0"

L3_Pavilion Floor 2 L3A_Bookstore Floor 48' - 0" 2 46' - 0"

L2_Pavilion Floor 1 34' - 0"

L1_Bazaar 02_Street 12' - 0"

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L5_Pavilion Canopy 84' - 0"

L4_Pavilion Roof 62' - 0" L4A_Bookstore Roof 60' - 0" L3_Pavilion Floor 2 L3A_Bookstore Floor 48' - 0" 2 46' - 0"

L2_Pavilion Floor 1 34' - 0"

L1_Bazaar 02_Street 12' - 0"

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A0.03

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L5_Pavilion Canopy 84' - 0"

JOSHUA H. LENTZ L4_PavilionOF Roof TOLERANCE MUSEUM 62'Roof - 0" L4A_Bookstore 60' - 0"

BUILDING SECTIONS

L3_Pavilion Floor 2 L3A_Bookstore Floor 48' - 0" 2 46' - 0"

01 09/2011 Author Checker

Project number Date Drawn by

L2_Pavilion Floor 1 34' - 0"

Checked by

A2.02 L1_Bazaar 02_Street 12' - 0"

Scale

1" = 10'-0"

8/5/2012 6:24:14 PM

Z3

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L E U V E NH AV E N D OMU S T OR E N

ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS

SPRING 2011

Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands. With that, comes the issue of Density. This slot shaped site has historical & monumental importance, including the adjacent Willem de Kooning Academy. The Leuvenhaven Toren combats these problems. Public lower levels connect the Hogeschool and the Toren with sports and art gallery spaces. While an element with independent structure, seeks to unify the new and old by piercing the north and south ends of the building, containing a pool the overlooks the water, and a culture center that includes the historical time line 23


origina l sketch

r

site loca tion

of Rotterdam. Residential towers, sit atop of the public space, soar to the sky to reach a total building height of 128 meters. The form respects the context, yet takes full advantage of views. Altogether, it echoes a block that has been carved & shaped by a craftsman. The Toren’s skin unifies the carved form with colors that symbolize the spirit of Rotterdam; from becoming a prominent port city, to withstanding attacks during the Second World War. This Toren will hold meaning not only for the residents but for the whole city of Rotterdam. 24


0

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On the Sixth level, the indoor space is ready to rent and built to suit any need. The outdoor area has a small garden and terraced seats that overlook the water. On the roof of the Hogeschool sits a new Tennis Court, whose thermal and solar mass help heat the swimming pool. The floors above are office floors with an open floor plan.

The ground level brings natural elements inside the building to connect the south and north exteriors by a water troth, which runs the entire length of the buil ding. This creates the three public entry points on this level. flanking the main axis on the west is: a private entry for residents, and a small cafe with an outdoor terrace. On the east, is a 2 level bookstore with a private reading garden on the ground which connects to the terraced seating space facing the Academy. Continuous stairs flank the axis on either side pro viding direct access to the upper levels without directional change. 27


Above the office floors are 30 levels of residential. The initial levels have 12 and 13 units per floor until the 19th floor when the eastern tower stops and western continues with 6 and 7 units per floor. The unit number varies per floor because there is a maisonette unit. The units are distributed to the edges to provide privacy to the residents, with the larger units placed in the corners to take advantage of the views. This orientation allows the inner edges of the building envelope to become public. Between the circulation cores is a double height community area which leads to an outdoor garden, this happens on every other level. The unit types of 30m2, 45m2, 60m2, 70m2 maisonette, and 80m2 2 bedroom unit, create an easily adaptable layout.

One can find an amazing pool on the fourth level. Along with the pool there is men and women locker rooms. On the western side of the floor is a new entry to the basketball court located in the Hogeschool. To the North is gallery space, whose floor levels shift at the point when the Hogeschool ends. Bridges between the galleries intersect through the element’s culture center program area. On the fifth level, locker rooms are replaced by fitness areas. On the west is a yoga area and free weight area, while the east houses the aerobic machines. And Gallery spaces occupy the northern space exactly like the layout of the fourth level, below.

The second level houses a restaurant and bar, while providing a entry point from the bridge via a platform and ramp. In addition one can gain access to the ground level without having to enter the building via a stairwell that remains in line with the exiting sidewalk’s profile. On the third level is space available for artist’s in residence. 28


C A F E PAV IL ION

29

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND


B A C K B AY R O W H O U S E

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

30


T H E L I G H T O F D AY

31

ACRYLIC ON GYPSUM


HOMAGE TO EUAN UGLOW

ACRYLIC ON GYPSUM

The composition is carefully crafted using geometry, the actual matzo ball is in the direct center of the painting, while the bowl is shifted to the left and the shadow mirroring the offset on the right. The colors are natural to the matzo ball, but the wall is a blue similar to that used in Uglow’s still life works, and the table’s color is a direct color complement to the wall.

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JOSHUA HAROLD LENTZ 8 5 2 H O P E S T R E E T, P R O V I D E N C E , R I 0 2 9 0 6 401.829.92 29 J L E N T Z 3 9 3 @ G . R W U. E D U

Portfolio of Joshua Harold Lentz  

Portfolio for Gradute School at the School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation at Roger Williams University by Joshua Harold Lent...

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