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Sioux Falls | Washington’s Tri-Cities | Ski Destinations | Autumn Budget Travel

priceless: please take one September | October 2009

California’s

SLO County Operated by SkyWest Airlines

magazine


Sioux Falls offers ab museums, water pa undant shopping, restaurants featur ing rk accommodations. s, year-round events, area winerie local flavors, an historic downtow Best of all, our fulln, arts, theatre, pa s and much more! rk W service Conventio n & Visitors Bureau e are a community filled with qual s, golf courses, ity m s Located at th services ak es your life easier. So e junction of I-29 relax. We’ve got it and and I-90 s More than 4, covered! 200 hotel rooms s South Dakota ’s largest city s Accommodat s 100,000 sq. es groups of all si ft. Convention Cent zes er s A #1 Host Ci ty

Sioux Falls Conve

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contents Page 10 | Halfway between the snarl of SoCal and the Bay Area’s bustle, life plays out at a slow pace in San Luis Obispo County. From its wide-open beaches to winding country roads, this slice of heaven on earth makes an ideal vacation destination for Californians or anybody else inkling for an authentic taste of the Golden State.

Sioux Falls, SD Amazing Days on the Prairie Page 16 | Sioux Falls, South Dakota is one of those hometowns of the heartland where people smile at strangers, are unfailingly polite, and seemingly appreciate the good things they’ve got going. Visitors avail themselves of plenty of diversions including those revealing the real story about Laura Ingalls Wilder and her little house on the prairie.

28 | America’s Best Places: Wausau, Wisconsin 30 | America’s Best Places: Moses Lake, Washington 31 | Art Watch: Arroyo Grande, California’s Paul McCloskey 32 | Sky News 36 | Ski Destinations 39 | America’s Best Adventure: Eugene, Oregon Drift Boat 40 | Budget Friendly Vacations

Tri-Cities, WA An Exceptional Growing Climate Page 20 | This high-desert area affirms the theory that good things come in threes. The distinct communities of Pasco, Richland and Kennewick, Washington all benefit from a pleasant setting near the confluence of the Columbia, Yakima and Snake rivers. Each presents unique advantages that combine to create an enviable business and leisure environment.

On the Cover: Winter Light, by Paul J. McCloskey is a 16”x 20” Photo-Painting. The Arroyo Grande, California artist created it via a unique technique combining photography, pigment printing and acrylic paints on watercolor paper. The result captures the changing seasons in a San Luis Obispo County vineyard as seen through an olive grove. Learn more about the artist and his work on page 31.

42 | America’s Best Happenings 44 | It’s Our Journey, Too 48 | Behind the Scenes 50 | Crossword Puzzle 52 | Route Map 53 | About Our Aircraft 54 | Airport Maps 56 | Parting Shot

Web Extras!

If you like this magazine you will love our new affiliate-website www.americasbestplaces.com. See pages 2 and 3 for details.

operated by SkyWest Airlines

Sioux Falls: Becky Macdonald

Back Road Bonanza

24 | America’s Best Places: Fort Wayne, Indiana

Tri-Cities: John Clement Photography

S-L-O County, CA

Cover: Paul J. McCloskey

September | October 2009


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Welcome Aboard

Our People Offer Unparalleled Dedication Dear Passenger: I’m writing this letter as I take my twelve-year-old

son for his first trip “across the pond.” He has been anticipating this trip for weeks, and his eyes light up with delight every time he talks about being in Paris, visiting the Eiffel Tower, seeing the Arc de Triomphe and strolling down the Champs Elysees. As the flight attendant welcomes us, I can’t help but note the novelty of travel through the eyes of my son. There’s no doubt the world he’s growing up in is vastly different than mine was. Among other things, air travel and technology have made his world much smaller and more accessible—though clearly not without its own set of new challenges. Yet in the midst of a global recession, there’s no doubt that a view through his eyes offers refreshing perspective. He believes that he can change the world, and he understands that he owns his destiny. In that regard he’s a little bit like the people at SkyWest. We recognize that there are a myriad of challenges beyond our control, but we also recognize that we’re part of the solution. The companies that survive and thrive through good and bad times are those that create value for their customer—those that do things better. One of the greatest things about our SkyWest people is that everywhere I go employees are asking how they can do a little bit better for our customers and our company. Their attitudes are already making a difference. It’s found in the parts person who comes to me with a more cost-effective agreement; the pilot who talks to me while I’m in the cockpit’s jump-seat about how he thinks he can improve a program; the gate agent who has a fresh idea. SkyWest people care about each other and the customer. They continue to innovate and execute and make progress and improve upon the things we know we already do well. That kind of focus, particularly in today’s environment, is unmatched and critical to what we’re doing. You won’t find it anywhere else. With that kind of ownership, it’s clear that every one of our 10,000-plus employees wants to take care of you, the customer, better than anyone else. We’re passengers too and we understand that what we do and how we do it makes a difference in your day. Whether you’re connecting through a hub or on your way home, SkyWest’s people want to make your travel experience a good one. So on behalf of our dedicated employees, I’m pleased to welcome you aboard SkyWest United Express. Sit back, relax and enjoy your flight.

Russell “Chip” Childs President and COO SkyWest Airlines

6 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express


WAITING FOR A FLIGHT? SEE THE SIGHTS. Take a FREE shuttle and a tour of historic Temple Square—in less than two hours. Pickups at Terminal 1 (door 1), Terminal 2 (door 12).

When you Come to Utah, be sure to visit

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Your tour group can:

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to the glorious music of the famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir, rehearsing and performing in the Tabernacle on Temple Square.

They also perform in the 21,000-seat Conference Center. See visittemplesquare.com for details.

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your roots in the FamilySearch Center, where helpful volunteers can assist in retrieving family history information from the world’s largest repository of genealogical records.

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through two upscale visitors' centers that include the Christus statue by Danish sculptor Thorvaldsen. Visit the interactive map of ancient Jerusalem (kids love it!) and much more.

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ramblings and recommends

Eavesdropping: My Personal Economic Indicator Dear Reader: I confess. I am an inveterate eavesdropper. Years ago a college professor encouraged my natural tendency to listen-in on others by recommending the technique as a goldmine for creative writers. “Listen everywhere you go,” she said. “Cafes, airports, train stations. You’ll get ideas and inspiration and insight.” As I carved a career telling stories, I learned to keep an open ear to strangers. Sometimes I actively chat up a seatmate or passerby. Most often I passively pay attention. In addition to free entertainment and intellectual stimulation, I find that what I hear indicates much about the state of humanity. With my typical Pollyanna-perspective, I am thrilled to report that things are looking up. Just a few years ago I noted that my fellow travelers seemed to spend a lot of time talking about acquisitions—exotic getaways, great deals on luxury goods, pricey new homes destined to sell for an even higher price, cars, boats and other external trappings. Even casual airport chatter often revealed a game of consumptive one-upmanship bordering on the ravenous. No more. The dizzying economic maelstrom leaves little room for pomposity. In the midst of significant challenges I now encounter waves of sensibility. Conversations are often salted with gratitude for life’s simple blessings—a job, a home, the ability to travel—and an awareness of its grand impermanence. I hear talk of hope

even in the face of brutal adversity, and joy in the midst of uncertainty. We are taking things one day at a time and learning to look for new opportunities, tap into forgotten strengths, stretch our budgets and take our fun where we find it. Truth is, good times are almost always at hand. It’s just a matter of choosing to find them. Even the most laborious business trip can incorporate adventure. Savvy travelers check with the local CVB for freebies as well as special discounts for restaurants, retailers, museums, zoos and other attractions. They know hotels are often willing to make a deal for excess inventory and that special offers can be theirs for the asking. Autumn is an especially appealing time for travelers looking for a little leisure. Crowds diminish. Prices drop and inexpensive festivals herald the bounty of the land. Winefests, Applefests, Pumpkinfests and more hearken to our agrarian roots and remind us that the seasons pass quickly and life is worth celebrating. So, as this year begins its ebb into history, allow me to encourage you to ponder the things that really matter; make a conscious effort to look at all the beauty and wonder the world holds. Decide to make the most of each day—even if things don’t go exactly as planned. As for me? I can have a good time anywhere—as long as there’s someone to listen to. Happy Skies!

Colleen

Colleen Birch Maile Editor in Chief

Go!

P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C O R P O R A T E D

president Kelly D. Coles editor-in-chief Colleen Birch Maile colleen@gopubinc.com art director Janie W. Budell janie@gopubinc.com copy editor Bethany Maile proof readers Anna Bierman Tatro | Quincy Budell contributors Amanda Bjerke | Anna Hobart Connie Naylor | Marissa Snow

director sales and marketing Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com advertising managers AZ, NM, TX, WY, ND, SD: Keith Sauls l 208-354-5400 keith@gopubinc.com MT, OR, UT, WA, Canada: Wendy Rivers l 406-586-0439 wndyrivers@theglobal.net CO, NV, Northern and Central CA: Susan Vernier Garcia l 970-927-9599 susan@gopubinc.com for all other locations call: SkyWest Magazine corporate office 208-333-9990 l fax: 208-333-9991 205 N. 10th St., Suite B100, Boise, ID 83702 email: info@skywestmagazine.com www.skywestmagazine.com SkyWest Airlines 444 S. River Rd., St. George, UT 84790 435-634-3000 l email: info@skywest.com SkyWest Airlines Stock Symbol: SKYW

SkyWest Magazine (ISSN 1527-4152) is published bi-monthly by Go! Publications, Inc. for United Express operated by SkyWest Airlines. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to SkyWest Magazine are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or of SkyWest Airlines. Acceptance of advertisements does not imply official endorsement of the products or services concerned. While every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of content, no responsibility can be taken for any errors and/or omissions. No part of this SkyWest Magazine may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher. © 2009 Go! Publications Inc. All rights reserved.

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For reprints of articles in this issue of SkyWest Magazine, please call 208-333-9990. Visit us on our website at www.skywestmagazine.com.

8 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express enviroink.indd 1

10/1/08 10:44:38 AM


Back Road Bonanza

in California’s SLO-Lane

by Colleen Birch Maile

T

hat old Judy Garland song runs through my head every time I think of San Luis Obispo County—“S-L-O” as the locals call it. Located halfway between the snarl of SoCal and the Bay Area’s bustle, life really is slower here, and simpler too. There’s something about the place and its people that always lifts the spirits. From the fresh salt air of Morro Bay and Pismo Beach to the walnut groves and vineyards of the Edna Valley, I can breathe deeply here. Californians looking for a quick getaway or anybody else inkling for an authentic taste of the Golden State would do well to explore this slice of heaven on earth. Consider the lure of the land itself. It’s easy to spend a weekend, a week, or longer rambling along the back roads, encountering breathtaking views at almost every turn. Variety is the order of the day. Sand dunes, rolling surf, wooded country roads and fertile farm fields are a feast for the eyes and a balm for the soul. There’s never enough time to enjoy all the county has to offer. So plan on staying a while. Throughout the area you’ll find an array of lodging—from quaint bed-and-breakfast inns to luxurious seaside resorts, kitschy motels to historic hotels. Dining options abound. Boutiques, art galleries and studios pop up in some of the most 10 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

out-of-the-way places. There are a plethora of golf courses, bike paths and hiking trails. Wineries and tasting rooms are seemingly everywhere—from downtown plazas to remote rural locales. In fact, there’s so much to see and do that every day in SLO goes by very quickly. To get started, choose from the following menu highlighting some of the county’s charming communities. Once you’ve had a taste of SLO you’ll want to return—often. San Simeon, best known as the site of William Randolph Hearst’s opulent “castle,” now a state park, is also home to some notable waterfront. Piedras Blancas and San Simeon beaches are the southernmost California playgrounds of the northern elephant seal. The long-snouted creatures can be seen—and heard—from highway vantage points. Males emit a thunderous roar. They’re especially prevalent during the winter mating season. Cambria, an artists’ colony with a Victorian ambience and a carefree sensibility, is a worthy destination in its own right. Its Main Street runs parallel to the highway between the Pacific and forested hills and is home to quaint galleries, restaurants and shops. Cambria also serves as gateway to a stellar attraction that doesn’t cost

© 2004-2009 “Painting With Light” Photo-Paintings by Paul J. McCloskey - All Rights Reserved Autumn Colors, a 24” x 36” photo-painting on canvas, mixed media

Forget your troubles. Come on get happy . . . Gonna chase all the blues away . . .


© 2004-2009 “Painting With Light” Photo-Paintings by Paul J. McCloskey - All Rights Reserved Autumn Light, a 16” x 20” photo-painting on watercolor paper, mixed media

more than some petrol and time behind the wheel. The picturesque Santa Rosa Creek Road wends eastward from town through the forest, past orchards, vineyards and historic rancheros. The first five miles are relatively flat and popular with cyclists. Then the switchbacks begin. It’s steep and curvy and deserving of a driver’s respect, but the views make it well worth the time. Paso Robles, 30 miles inland from Cambria via Highway 46, is noted for both water and wine. For more than 150 years, tourists have flocked to its healing hot springs. Today, the Paso Robles Inn is located on the site of a spa built in 1900. Its guests continue to enjoy the rejuvenating waters. The local wine industry boasts an equally impressive heritage. Vineyards were first planted in the region more than a century ago. Now more than 200 wineries make their home in the area. In autumn, the deciduous vines turn the rolling hillsides shades of purple and gold, adding a delicious visual dimension to the region’s many tasting opportunities.

The Edna Valley spills down to the ocean. Pacific breezes and morning fog help cool its grapes. The area also enjoys one of the state’s longest growing seasons and a lovely landscape. Pismo Beach, California’s Clam Capital, sits atop a cliff overlooking the Pacific and ocean fun defines the town. The 60-acre Pismo Beach State Park offers a playground and volleyball courts. A staircase leads to downtown’s Margo Dodd Park. With its quaint gazebo, it’s a perfect perch to relax and take in the amazing view. It forms the terminus of several streets including Ocean Boulevard, and is a great place for a picnic—especially at sunset. Steps at the end of Pier Street access the beach and offer opportunity for snorkelers in the gentle tide pools. At nearby Shell Beach, there are more good times. All along the water, kayakers splash, landboarders and kiteboarders scoot merrily along, and surf and dive shops offer lessons and rent fun by the hour.

Morro Bay takes its name from the rocky volcanic outcropping— morro—that marks its San Luis Obispo, harbor. Don’t even founded in 1772 as one Fall foliage along a country road south of Paso Robles think about scaling the of the original Spanish landmark. It’s the nesting ground of protected Missions, is now the county’s largest town. As home to California Polytechnic State University, it enjoys all Peregrine falcons, a state park and decidedly off the expected college town trappings—including a limits. But many other diversions are at play great performing arts center and a wealth of enter- in this historic fishing village. Book a charter trip tainment. A sophisticated intelligentsia adds an and land your own catch-of-the-day or dine extra measure of art and culture to a place that still sumptuously at a local eatery where seafood honors its ties to the land. The county’s thriving is always fresh. Grab the camera and photograph agricultural sector is showcased year-round with a the harbor. Kayak or boat to the Morro Sand Dunes—home to several varieties of protected fabulous weekly farmer’s market. Don’t miss it. birds. Amble down the beach and do nothing Edna Valley, just south of the town of San Luis except listen to the sounds of a world at peace. n Obispo, adds much to the county’s stellar reputa- Illustrations accompanying this article are by Paul McCloskey, an tion as a wine-growing region. Grapes are the Arroyo Grande graphic artist/photographer. A sampling of his largest crop in an area that still counts walnuts, Central Coast images are on display at that community’s Clark olives and cattle among its products. Wine lovers Center Pavilion now through October. In addition to producing fine planning an exploration of the Paso Robles Amer- art prints using an innovative technique he terms “photo-painting” ican Viticulture Area (AVA) would do well to also McCloskey commits his art to note cards available at the visit here and the neighboring Arroyo Grande San Luis Obispo Airport gift shop. For more about his work Valley. You’ll encounter small mom-and-pop see ArtWatch page 31 or visit the Painting With Light Gallery at operations, chatty winemakers and few crowds. http://web.mac.com/paul_mccloskey/Painting_With_Light_Gallery. skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

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ANNUAL COUNTY OPEN STUDIOS ART TOUR October 10 - 11 (South County) October 17 – 18 (North County) More than 200 local artists open their studios and greet the public. This is an opportunity to see the creative process unfold and find a personal treasure. Sunset washes Morro Bay with color

PASO ROBLES HARVEST WINE TOUR October 16 - 18 During harvest, wineries invite revelers to learn about their art with a roster of fun activities, including a twoton grape stomp. PISMO BEACH CLAM FESTIVAL October 17 - 18 California’s Clam Capital salutes its favorite crustacean with a downtown parade, music, food, a clambake and a clam chowder cook-off. Yum! n

EXPERIENCE

San Simeon Cambria

PASO ROBLES WINE COUNTRY

Morro Bay

Paso Robles

San Luis Obispo Edna Valley

Pismo Beach

Arroyo Grande

TASTE SENSE DIVERSITY MYSTIQUE INTENSITY CENTRAL COAST

CALIFORNIA TERROIR HISTORY PASSION FUTURE PASOWINE.COM

© 2009 PASO ROBLES WINE COUNTRY ALLIANCE – WWW.PASOWINE.COM

12 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

© 2004-2009 “Painting With Light” Photo-Paintings by Paul J. McCloskey - All Rights Reserved Winter Solstice, a 24” x 36” photo-painting on canvas, mixed media

While any time is a good time for an SLO playcation, the harvest season is special. Whether you can stay for a week or just a weekend, autumn brings ideal weather— warm, sunny days and cool clear nights—and offers a bevy of festivals and events. Consider these possibilities:


&OROVERTHIRTYYEARS THE (OPEFAMILYHASHELPEDSHAPE 0ASO2OBLESINTOAWORLD CLASS W I N E RE G I O N  ( O P E & A M I L Y 7 I N E S P RO D U C E S 4RE A N A ,IBERTY3CHOOL !USTIN(OPE AND#ANDORWINES 3 T O P B Y T H E P I C T U RE S Q U E TASTINGCELLARNESTLEDINTHE HILLSOF0ASO2OBLES    HOPEFAMILYWINESCOM

The Vineyards Have Spoken! Visit our stunning mountaintop location, and taste highly acclaimed estate-grown westside Paso wines: HMR Pinot Noir, Viking Cabernet, Rhône varietals and dry-farmed Zinfandel 5805 Adelaida Rd., Paso Robles, CA 93446 800.676.1232 • adelaida.com • Tasting Room open 10–5 daily

Open Daily 11 am – 5 pm

Sample our estate grown, certified sustainable award-winning wines Located at the corner of Vineyard Drive & Adelaida Road 8 9 1 0 ADELAIDA ROAD , PAS O RO BLES , CALI F O RN I A 8 05-226-9455 ¡ WWW. H ALT ERRAN CH . CO M

CALCAREOUS

2005 CABERNET ‘BEST CAB IN CALIFORNIA’ FROM THE CA STATE FAIR

VINEYARD www.calcareous.com

Panoramic hilltop location just four miles west of Paso Robles.

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13


time e f i L a f o ion The Vacat t Park n e m e s u al Am r u t a N ’s California

Exploring the cities of the Central Coast is the delight of young and old alike. And the best days are when every member of the family is along for the ride. Find happiness together in San Luis Obispo County. www.SanLuisObispoCounty.com

Arroyo Grande • Atascadero • Grover Beach • Morro Bay • Paso Robles • Pismo Beach • San Luis Obispo Baywood-Los Osos • Cambria • Cayucos • Lake Nacimiento • Nipomo • Oceano • San Miguel • Shandon • Templeton Avila Beach • California Valley • Cholame • Halcyon • Harmony • Pozo • San Simeon • Santa Margarita


San Luis Obispo County is California’s Natural Amusement Park

� S.F.

C PA

The charming downtown park, award-winning wine, cuisine and golf, outdoor family adventures, lakes, and cultural events of Paso Robles offer an authentic taste of California. www.travelpaso.com

IF IC O CE AN Hearst Castle

Paso Robles

Morro Bay San Luis Obispo

Pismo Beach San Luis Obispo is full of fresh, fun activities. Renowned wineries, world-famous Farmers’ Market, or the simplicity of a hike with a breathtaking view Experience the SLO Life! www.visitslo.com Discover Your Better Nature in Morro Bay. Play ocean-side golf or go kayaking, hiking, surfing or photograph wildlife by the bay. www.morrobay.org

Pismo Beach has fresh ocean breezes, beautiful beaches, a lively downtown and a rich wine region just a few minutes away. www.ClassicCalifornia.com HALFWAY BETWEEN SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES O P E N E V E RY D AY

L.A. �


America’sB est Places

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Amazing Days

on the Prairie by Anna Hobart

S

ioux Falls, South Dakota ranks high on my list of comfortable American cities. It’s one of those hometowns of the heartland where people smile at strangers, are unfailingly polite, and seemingly appreciate the good things they’ve got going.

Forbes magazine likes the little city on the Big Sioux River for its economic climate. (It regularly places tops in the publication’s surveys of places to do business or find work.) Locals enjoy an enviable lifestyle. The charming downtown boasts a bonanza of public sculptures, quaint trolley cars and a bounty of cute shops and cozy restaurants. There are several art galleries and studios, museums and performing arts groups. The Sioux Falls Arena packs the calendar with sporting events, concerts and expositions. There’s a year-round zoo, and a large park surrounds the namesake falls, a must-see for every tourist. Visitors find plenty of things to see and do right in town. That said, anyone who grew up pining for a Little House on the Prairie experience should schedule a day trip from Sioux Falls to De Smet, South Dakota—about an hour-and-a-half away by car. If by some fluke your elementary school teacher failed to read Laura Ingalls Wilder’s stories aloud to your class, you may be scratching your head. The Little House on the Prairie 16 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

The town’s namesake falls on the Big Sioux River are a must-see

TV show plunked Laura, her ma and pa and sisters in Walnut Grove, Minnesota, where they lived out more than eight first-run seasons and have existed in syndication for a quarter-century. Hollywood’s creative license took a toll there. In reality, the Ingalls were nomads hop-scotching from Wisconsin to Kansas, Minnesota, and Iowa before finally putting down roots in the Dakota Territory when Laura was a teenager. (They only spent two years in Walnut Grove.) In DeSmet you find the truth of their tale. Tourists started poking around town almost as soon as Laura published the first of four books set in the community. That 1939 work, By the Shores of Silver Lake, detailed how the family arrived on the heels of the first government survey team and, while waiting to file their homestead claim, lived in a lakeside house the surveyors left behind. The Ingalls hunkered down in that simple structure during a series of brutal blizzards documented in The Long Winter. When spring came, DeSmet began to grow up around them. Laura immortalized its development in Lit-


Historical Buildings: Kaitlin O’Shea

restored. Its period furnishings include a dresser built by Pa Ingalls. Across the street, the Discover Laura Center is a hands-on museum featuring a one-room schoolhouse and all its trappings, plus plenty of 19th-century gear and gizmos. Among its many activities, the young and young-at-heart can work a treadle sewing machine, or learn to spin wool. In 1880, the family moved to a 157-acre farm. That Ingalls Homestead is now a commercial venture featuring a reproduction of the Ingalls’ “little house” and a barn reconstructed in their exact locations. It also presents a sod dugout similar to the Ingalls’ home on the banks of Minnesota’s Plum Creek. Covered wagon rides, a petting zoo of farm animals and a re-creation of an 1880s-era school make this a fun adventure for Little House fans of all ages. After seven years on the homestead, Pa gave up farming and built the family a modest, white, wood-frame house in town. The simple twostory structure still stands on its original Third Street location and contains many of the Ingalls’ possessions. By the time her family moved to that final home, Laura was 20 years old, married to homesteader Almanzo Wilder and helping him tend a wheat crop near DeSmet. Its failure was the first in a series of setbacks that eventually prompted their move to Missouri’s Ozarks where Laura wrote the books detailing her childhood. For three weeks each July one of those stories is dramatized during De Smet’s Laura Ingalls Wilder Pageant. The theater is located outdoors between the Ingalls’ original homestead and the marshland that has replaced some (but not all) of the Silver Homes on the Prairie: Author Laura Ingalls Wilder and her family spent their first Dakota winter in the structure shown at left; Later Charles “Pa” Ingalls built the house shown at right Lake of Laura’s day. The site itself is a part of the community’s Little House legacy. tle Town on the Prairie and reflected on her stint as a Maps provided by the Memorial Society 15-year-old South Dakota schoolmarm smitten with the direct visitors to other Little House landmarks. young farmer Almanzo Wilder in These Happy Golden They include the land claim where newlyweds Years. Laura and Almanzo Wilder welcomed their Writing secured Laura’s place in history. Generation only surviving child, Rose, and their place of after generation falls in love with her work. Shortly after worship—The First Congregational Church (the the author’s 1957 death at the age of 90, De Smet’s city stained glass windows are still held in place fathers made it easier for fans to connect with by frames Pa crafted). The hilltop cemetery, her stories by establishing The Laura Ingalls Wilder where Ma, Pa, Mary, Grace, Carrie and Laura’s Memorial Society and turning much of their still-small unnamed son are all laid to rest, is also notetown into a tribute to the author and her family. The worthy. As are the stories and their still-touching original Surveyors’ House has been moved from the portrayal of this region. shores of Silver Lake to downtown and is completely skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

17


1000

Amazing animals. continents.

6

One place. Delbridge Museum of Natural History in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, home to the collection of hunter Henry Brockhouse. Combined admission with the Great Plains Zoo. www.greatzoo.org 18 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express Skywest Quarter Page Ad

Aerial view of Heartland Country Corn Maze’s mountain lion design

Maze: Heartland County Corn Maze apples: Becky Macdonald

Next summer, Sioux Falls’ Washington Pavilion—the community’s impressive all-purpose arts organization—will present the Guthrie Theater’s highly acclaimed Little House on the Prairie, the musical, starring Melissa Gilbert as Ma. The original Minneapolis production debuted in the fall of 2008 and ran for 93 soldout performances. Sioux Falls is among just 30 cities included in the national tour. Audra Fullerton, director of artistic planning for the Pavilion’s Husby Performing Arts Center said, “When it was brought to our attention that it was going on tour we just had to be part of it because of its profound relevance and historic importance to our region.” The show will run June 1 through 6, 2010.

It’s not necessary to wait until next summer to get a taste of rural South Dakota. Autumn in Sioux Falls holds other opportunities to feel close to the land. During the harvest season, anyone can get a tiny glimpse of the pioneer experience by heading south of town to pick apples or choose a fresh pumpkin at the Country Apple Orchard near Harrisburg. About five miles from there, the Heartland County Corn Maze is an opportunity to clamber through a dense field carved with paths that also form a work of art. This manner of fall fun is a far cry from cutting corn with a hand sickle or a team of horses. The tasks that meant survival for Laura and her family now provide pleasant pastimes for those who live much easier lives. Her tales of the faith, love and friendship that sustained the prairie pioneers still resonate in Sioux Falls. n


Melissa Gilbert & Steve Blanchard in The Guthrie Theater Production of LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE The Musical and Kara Lindsay as “Laura” book Rachel Sheinkin music Rachel Portman lyrics Donna diNovelli based on the ‘Little House’ books by Laura Ingalls Wilder

directed by Francesca Zambello

production initiated for the stage by Adrianne Lobel and Francesca Zambello

TICKETS START AT $34.00!

ONE WEEK ONLY! • JUNE 1-6, 2010 For tickets call:

(605) 367-6000

www.washingtonpavilion.org Downtown Sioux Falls, SD


America’sB est Places

Washington’s Tri-Cities Enjoy an Exceptional Growing Climate

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ashington’s Tri-Cities area affirms the theory that good things come in threes. Three distinct communities— Pasco, Richland and Kennewick—benefit from a pleasant high desert setting near the confluence of the Columbia, Yakima and Snake Rivers. Each community affords unique advantages. Together they create an environment Business Week recently recognized as one of the top three American places to “make a fresh start.” Kennewick, the most populated, boasts a strong manufacturing sector and a huge fun factor. Making the most of its location on the banks of the mighty Columbia River, it’s home to Columbia Park—a recreational mecca featuring the Family Fishing Pond, playground, splash park and public golf course. Kennewick’s entertainment options also include annual hydroplane races, the local fair and a long roster of entertainment options at the Toyota Center. A lovely cable bridge crosses the Columbia to connect Kennewick with Pasco. That thriving community enjoys retail and housing booms, yet clings to its agricultural heritage. Each year throngs flock to the Pasco Farmer’s Market—the region’s largest showcase for local growers. Patrons enjoy fresh produce and the products it 20 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

inspires. Every September The Fiery Festival celebrates the local Hispanic community with a salute to all things spicy and flavorful. Richland shed its farm-town attitude more than 60 years ago when it became the federal government’s choice for the Hanford Site, home to the nation’s first nuclear reactor. It remains a major global force in science and technology. Residents also benefit from proximity to the Hanford Reach National Monument—the last free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River. In addition to ample recreational options and a bustling business environment, the cities share a sunny, four-season climate pleasing to man and especially well suited to Washington’s flourishing wine industry. The area is home to the prestigious Red Mountain viticulture area, a region known for its full-bodied red varietals, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah. Grapes grown in this unusual terroirs benefit from warm sunny days and the cooling effect of the Yakima River at night. They are sought after by some of the

Vineyard: John Clement Photography

by Connie Naylor


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Cable Bridge

• Conventions • Meeting Rooms • Weddings • Exhibitions

Dancer at The Fiery Festival

state’s many exceptional wineries. Washington State is the nation’s second largest producer of wine. Only California outpaces its yield. The Tri-Cities area serves as gateway to Eastern Washington’s wine country. More than 200 wineries dot the countryside, and 50 are within a half-hour drive. Visitors will find little, if any, traffic as they travel from one winery to the next and more often than not will have the opportunity to meet the winemaker during a tasting. Flying between the nation’s top wine regions is easy thanks to SkyWest service to and from San Francisco twice each day. Deanna Smith, public affairs director for the Tri-City Development Council said that commercial air service also provides other advantages, “From an economic development standpoint, having convenient and affordable air service plays a significant role in sustaining economic prosperity for a region like ours. Having air service to San Francisco enables our leisure travelers better access to places like Hawaii, Europe and Asia. It also fosters more business and investment for our growing clean-tech economy with businesses and venture capitalists on the West Coast as well as connecting the nation’s two wine tourism regions.” n

7016 W Grandridge Blvd, Kennewick, WA 99336 509-737-3700 • sales@3riverscampus.com www.threeriversconventioncenter.com

• Multi-Purpose • Concerts • Sports • Broadway

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Hanford Reach National Monument

A full service event & conference center 6600 Burden Blvd, Pasco, WA 99301 509-543-2999 www.traconline.com skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

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Tri-Cities, Washington

So many opportunities for business or pleasure...

...even more to Tri. The Tri-Cities is a leader in energy solutions and clean technologies for the state of Washington and the world, home to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the northwest’s major food processing and agricultural businesses—and with more engineers and PhDs per capita in the US, the Tri-Cities has a solid infrastructure in both R&D and manufacturing. Fly here for business, sip our world-famous wines in the heart of Washington’s wine country, play on one of our many golf courses, or enjoy the mighty Columbia River ... and see why what’s new starts here in the Tri-Cities!

Direct flights from Pasco/Tri-Cities, Washington to San Francisco & Denver daily

www.tridec.org

www.united.org

www.visittri-cities.com


America’sB est Places

Fall In

love with

Fort Wayne, Indiana by Amanda Bjerke

These programs, excellent educational opportunities, stellar health care and a very affordable lifestyle make Fort Wayne a great place to live and work. The bustling little city at the confluence of three rivers is also a lovely place for an economical getaway. Consider these five things to love about Fort Wayne in autumn. 1. Urban Outdoor Fun: Fort Wayne’s location

at the headwaters of the Maumee, St. Joseph and St. Marys rivers defined much of its early history. Now its lovely situation translates into al fresco recreation. More than 20 miles of River Greenway form a linear “park” and an opportunity for fresh-air aficionados to ramble along the riverbank. Several city parks sprawl out from the greenway. Just north of downtown, Headwaters Park sets the scene for many local events and festivals and is home to the city’s public ice rink—a gathering place in winter. During every other season, this is the place to embark on a unique Fort Wayne experience—a canopied pedicycle ride. Billed as “Model-T Horseless Carriages,” the four-wheeled Italian-made vehicles accommodate a family of five (as long as at least two passengers are kids). A self-guided three-mile trek takes riders along both sides of the park and offers spectacular views of the St. Marys River—especially when autumn foliage is in full color. Guided tours include a more extensive greenway exploration. Rentals are available on weekends through October. Rates begin at just $10 for the self-guided tour. 2. Museums that Mix It Up: Balance your

E

ach year, the National Civic League recognizes just ten U.S. communities as All-American Cities. In 2009, Fort Wayne Indiana’s “can-do” spirit earned it the honor for the third time. In making the award, the league cited three specific community success stories: a massive fundraising effort instigated by Oprah’s Big Give that generated more than $1.2 million to extend the city’s already excellent River Greenway; a push to improve resources for a burgeoning immigrant community; and a countywide collaboration to nurture competent, caring and responsible children and adolescents.

24 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

outdoor fun with an educational experience that is as economical as it is entertaining. A Museum Dream Pass offers admission to three top-notch museums for the price of one. Participating institutions include the outstanding Science Central, a hands-on exploratorium sure to appeal to the young and the young-at-heart, as well as the History Center and the Botanical Conservatory where seasonal displays add to the lush and varied landscape. In addition to indigenous plants, you’ll discover a Sonoran desert and a tropical orchid garden. 3. Johnny Appleseed Festival and a Window to the Past:

Held September 19 and 20, this unique event heralds the life and times of John Chapman, the itinerant preacher who tramped across the


Midwest planting orchards and sharing seeds. This is not your typical community celebration. You won’t find corn dogs, cotton candy or carnival rides. The more than 200 vendors adhere to strict historical requirements. All are costumed in early-19th century garb. None may use modern conveniences. Food is cooked over an open fire and limited to what was available during the time Fort Wayne’s most famous native son was alive. Many of the activities take place in Johnny Appleseed Park, the original home site and burial ground of the Chapman family. If you miss this year’s festivities consider planning for 2010. The dates may change but this trek back in time is always held the third full weekend in September—and always worth the trip. 4. Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo: Parents Magazine ranks this facility among the nation’s top 10, and the word “children” does appear in the name. Yet there’s no need to tote a youngster along to have fun here. Visitors of all ages enjoy themselves, especially at the new African Journeys exhibit where it is possible to hand-feed a giraffe and have a face-to-face encounter with

lions. The Sky Safari ride carries passengers high above this little slice of Africa and gives a bird’seye view of the lush setting. The zoo is open daily through mid-October. 5. America’s Largest Public Genealogy Library. Trace your heritage at this unique re-

pository. With more than 350,000 printed volumes and 513,000 items of microfilm and microfiche, the genealogy department of the Allen County Public Library is a world of information. Whether you’re an experienced researcher or just beginning to chart a family tree, the helpful staff will eagerly assist your efforts. The extensive holdings include African-American and Native-American records. There is also a direct link to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. Best of all, there is no charge! Did you know? Fort Wayne’s location at the

western edge of the Eastern Time Zone means air travelers bound for Chicago, where Central Time is an hour earlier, actually disembark their planes approximately 10 minutes before they take off? n

Smart.

Today your business is faced with serious questions. How can we save money? What’s the best use of our time? When can you be here? Answers are waiting right here at Fort Wayne International. This is the place to start when business calls. We’ll get you there faster, easier and in some cases cheaper. So the next time the road calls, take to the air.

flyfwa.com

FWA, business at a whole new altitude. SM

skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

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Insider’s Insight

Fort Wayne, In

NFL Hall-of-Famer Rod Woodson

26 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

In his scant time off, Woodson loves being with his wife and five sons, and is also heavily involved in a campaign to eradicate prostate cancer. “My wife started looking into it on the Internet and the first thing she said to me was that African-Americans are 2.5 times as likely to have the problem over their lifetime. For all men, one in six of the general population will be diagnosed. I got my first test last summer as part of the Kimberley Clark Depend Campaign to End Prostate Cancer. As an athlete you think nothing can happen to you. But as a human being you have to think about the bigger picture. I want men to realize that people depend on you. You need to do the right thing on a consistent basis. Growing up in Fort Wayne I learned the importance of keeping commitments to family, to friendship, to community and to the future. If we want to be there for our kids and our grandkids, having this prostate test is important. I want to encourage every man to take their health seriously,” he said. n Hometown Hankerings Rod Woodson admits he’s not a gourmet kind of guy. His favorite hometown eateries underscore that truth. When in Fort Wayne he likes to go to one of Powers Hamburger Shops. “There are two little stands in the area and they serve miniature hamburgers, similar in size to White Castle, but they’re 100% beef and are made right in front of you and they’re really good. And then I have to go to Coney Island for a chili-and-cheese dog. To me those are the perfect foods for a day in the Midwest.” n

Rod Woodsen: Kevin Terrell/WireImage.com

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hen Rod Woodson was inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame Rod Woodson on the set of the NFL in August, most football fans Network’s show Total Access. reflected on his illustrious 17 years as one of the league’s most versatile players. But folks in Fort Wayne, Indiana saw something more—a humble hometown boy who’d parlayed natural ability and a Midwestern work ethic into a stellar career. In turn, Woodson, the hard-working defensive back, credits his Fort Wayne upbringing with much of his success. “There is a common link between the way my parents raised me and where I am today,” he explained in a pre-induction interview. “In Fort Wayne they still have the old-school family values that I still hang onto. I love that close-knit community, and I’m so glad I grew up in that environment, playing tackle football in the front yard with my brothers, going to Memorial Park where I spent every summer day when I was a kid going to the Pavilion. That was our entertainment. I still love the closeness that you experience in that little city.” Now, a partner in a downtown Fort Wayne business, Woodson Motor Sports, the man who played on the 2001 champion Baltimore Ravens is also a proponent of the community’s business environment. “The taxes are lower and your cash flow isn’t going out as fast. It’s an excellent place to grow a company.” The eleven-time Pro Bowl player spends much of his time in California, where he is an analyst for the NFL Network. His post-gridiron career requires plenty of commercial air travel. During the football season he’s on planes every week. His best advice to fellow travelers echoes the lessons of his Fort Wayne youth: “Be prepared, be organized and pay attention. These are lessons for life but when it came to travel, I had to learn the hard way. At first I was thinking it was going to be like on a charter. Now, I know to give myself a lot of time, and to always expect the unexpected.”

Raven and Sttelers images: Al Messerschmidt

Reflects on Hometown Values


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America’sB est Places | Wausau, Wi

Where People Make the Difference

by Amanda Bjerke

Peggy Wolff agrees. Like Hermening, she moved to Wausau from Milwaukee more than 20 years ago. She explained that the central Wisconsin community merges the best of small town life with a high-quality culture that belies its size. “It’s always felt like a much larger place to me because there’s so much available here. Health care is excellent. The Wisconsin River flows right through downtown and brings a lot of recreation, Wausau’s Whitewater Park offers paddlers fun on the Wisconsin River including our whitewater kayak course. We have great venues n 1979 an act of terrorism thrust 20-year-old for theater programs that are as good as any I’ve Marine Sergeant Kevin Hermening into seen on Broadway. There is a ballet, the music an unwelcome spotlight. The youngest conservancy, and wonderful museums. Our American taken captive during the Iranian Woodson Art Museum attracts national and Hostage Crisis, he emerged 444 days later to a international attention.” While still a newcomer Wolff began volunhero’s homecoming and a mystifying future. “I didn’t want what had happened to me to teering in the lavish gardens surrounding the forever define who I was,” he recalled. When Woodson. “I was pulling weeds and planting he returned to his native Milwaukee, Wisconsin flowers. Through the years I’ve done so many unwelcome celebrity followed. “It was all any- things there. I’ve been a greeter and a docent one wanted to talk about,” he said. Hermening and I’ve been very involved with our annual wanted a new home—a smaller, quieter place Birds in Art exhibition.” The museum’s flagship where he could establish an identity based on event kicks off Labor Day weekend and recognizes the best contemporary artistic what he “actually did with his life.” He and his wife moved to Wausau and representations of birds and related subjects. It Hermening set about building a business, includes a nine-week run in Wausau and a raising a family and following the pattern of subsequent national tour. Participants typically community service that he said defines his come from at least 15 countries. “One year some adopted hometown. “It’s a wonderful place artists from the Netherlands were so excited where volunteerism is very high. People give when some artists from Wyoming came in back to the community here. It’s small enough wearing cowboy hats and boots. One fellow that we still value the contributions of our neigh- from the Netherlands said he’d always wanted to bors. I think that everyone should have at least meet a cowboy,” Wolff laughed. “My husband one cause beyond what they do for their church and I travel quite a bit and we were once in the or their political party. I think that attitude is Mount Kenya Safari Club and there was the work of one of our artists,” she said referring to David prevalent here.”

I

28 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express


Home to Birds in Art... and so much more! s,IVELYCHANGING EXHIBITIONSCHEDULE s0ERMANENTCOLLECTION GALLERIES s)NVITINGSCULPTURE garden and grounds s!RT0ARKnANINTERACTIVE CHILDRENSGALLERY

Kevin Hermening: USMC

Shepherd, an English artist noted for his paintings of African wildlife and a participant in Wausau’s highly competitive juried avian show. “The Woodson really brings the world to Wausau,” Wolff noted. Wausau residents also have convenient access to the rest of the world according to Kevin Hermening, who emphasized the contribution air service makes to the community. “The airport is easy to get to and easy to get through. There’s one security gate. For Cubs fans it’s really simple to get to Chicago,” he said, noting that football lovers get their fix in Green Bay just an hour-anda-half away by car. Wausau’s attributes exceed the altruistic nature of its citizens and excellent transportation according to Hermening, “I’m looking out my office window and I can see the Wisconsin River running right through town. There’s the kayak park where they have races in the summer and Granite Peak and our ski hill in the distance. I can’t say enough about the way downtown has been renovated. My office is in the restored Jefferson Hotel. My favorite restaurant is in the same building. It’s a very easy place to live,” he said. “The people really do make all the difference here,” Wolff added. “We’ve got that Midwestern friendliness and small-town values and citizens really do want to share their talents. I know people who have moved here in their 70s and gotten involved volunteering for the community. It’s what we do. And all in all, it’s helped make Wausau just wonderful.” n

Kent Ullberg, Rites of Spring

In 1981 Wausau’s Kevin Hermening celebrates his new-found freedom during a New York City Ticker Tape Parade.

700 North 12th Street Wausau, WI 54403-5007 715-845-7010 www.lywam.org Always FREE Admission Birds in Art 2009 on view September 13 - November 15. Full-color catalogue available.

skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

29


America’sB est Places

New SkyWest Service Brings the World to Moses Lake

by Connie Naylor

30 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

parts of the country. Even when one of our manufacturers had to lay people off earlier this year because of the global community, they [the employees] were absorbed immediately.” Debbie Doran-Martinez, executive director of the local chamber of commerce, agreed, noting, “When I talk to our hotel and restaurant people they say that they are doing the same business as they were last year or even seeing single digit increases. We are growing both our recreation and business sectors.” Companies seeking to relocate or expand appreciate the availability of large parcels of land with infrastructure in place, countywide fiber optics and low-cost power. “Our electric rates are among the lowest in the country,” Smith said. They also like the fact that SkyWest’s passenger service now connects the community with Seattle and the world beyond. Craig Baldwin, executive manager of the Port of Moses Lake Airport said, “Regional air service is huge. One of the questions we are always asked is about air service. Moses Lake Industries does business in China. It’s so helpful for them to fly out of Moses Lake rather than driving to and from Seattle. Genie Industries has a location here but their headquarters are in Redmond in the Seattle area. They can get back and forth easily. It is a tremendous asset for us.” Excellent air service coupled with leisure and lifestyle advantages may soon make Moses Lake Seattle’s best bedroom community. n

Theatre: Washington State Tourism / Spencer Grigg

arried urbanites have plenty of reasons to escape to Moses Lake, Washington. The pastoral community sits smack dab in the middle of eastern Washington. That means lots of elbow-room. The sunrise side of the Cascade Mountains has twice the land mass and half the population of the state’s western portion. Locals make the most of the outdoor opportunities their environment offers—soaring up and down the local sand dunes, biking between cultural attractions on urban activity paths and enjoying water fun at the community’s namesake lake. They’re also able to make like a Big Kahuna and hang ten in the midst of a fertile high desert. The Surf ’n’ Slide Waterpark features a wave simulator and an assortment of towering waterslides. Other major attractions, including the Gorge at George Amphitheater and Coulee Dam, home of the World’s Best Dam Laser Light Show, are within an easy scenic drive. When it comes to livability, low crime, little traffic and a cost-of-living that favorably compares to larger communities are also pluses. This enviable lifestyle has helped the community expand its traditional agricultural economic base and skip through the recession with little long-lasting fallout. Jonathan Smith of the Grant County Economic Development Council in Moses Lake, said, “While we have noticed some effects of the national downturn, we are very pleased that we are not in the same situation as other

Centennial Theatre

Aquatic Center: Grant County Tourism / J. Craig Sweat

H

The Moses Lake Aquatic Center

Fountain: Grant County Tourism / J. Craig Sweat

The fountain at Moses Lake


ArtWatch

| Arroyo Grande’s Paul McCloskey

Photographs that Paint with Light

images: © 2004-2009 “Painting With Light” Photo-Paintings by Paul J. McCloskey

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or more than 20 years cover artist Paul McCloskey lived a comfortable urban life working at a large San Francisco Medical Center, taking evening art and photography classes and exploring California’s back roads on weekends. In 2004 a layoff turned that tidy world on end and opened fresh opportunities for the Boston native. “When I first came to California in 1977 it was a three-and-a-half day Amtrak trip. After the layoff I decided what I really wanted to do was journey back across the country, visiting as many national parks as I could,” he said. He grabbed his camera and a sleeping bag and took more than two months making his way to New England. McCloskey spent more than a year in the East, staying with his elderly father on Cape Cod and accompanying him to Florida in the winter. The camera was in constant use. The photographer’s return trek to California took a southern route across the nation’s lower latitudes. The result—a large body of work that captured the American landscape and shaped McCloskey’s future. “When I lived in San Francisco, a city that I still love, I would come down to the Central Coast

when I needed to escape the madness and congestion of the Bay Area. I loved the people, the environment, the whole package. When I came back, I decided that San Luis Obispo County was where I wanted to call home, and art was what I wanted to pursue.” He moved to Corbett Canyon just outside of Arroyo Grande. “I couldn’t have picked a better place in terms of my personal outlook and also getting my work out there.” McCloskey’s innovative art draws heavily on his former career as a graphic artist at the hospital. “I still think of myself as a graphic artist,” he said. “I was doing graphics on the first Macintosh back in the 1980s. Now I see myself as something of a digital alchemist combining today’s digital imaging and photo technology with digital printmaking and the fine art of plein-air painting. They’re all about natural light.” A diverse group of artists capable of conveying light provide McCloskey with inspiration. They range from photographers such as Arthur Stieglitz and Ansel Adams to an assortment of masterful painters including Caravaggio, Vermeer, Pissarro, Monet, O’Keefe and Dixon. Like them, he works to portray light and also to “capture the spirit and beauty of nature. I hope that viewers find that there’s more than just a pretty picture when they look at my work.” n

Spring in Adelaide Country, a 24” x 36” photo-painting on canvas, mixed media/pigment print with acrylic depicts the outskirts of an old town site near Paso Robles.

Old Paso Barn, a 16” x 24” pigment print on watercolor paper is based on an infrared photograph.

To create his “photo-paintings” McCloskey starts with a color image created with his digital camera. He does minor touch-ups in Photoshop and often converts the image to black and white. He then prints on either watercolor paper or canvas using a digital fine art printer and archival fine-art pigment inks. McCloskey uses acrylics to paint over what he terms his “pigment print.” “This creates a more painterly, textural image with a 3-D perspective,” he said. skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

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skynews

| Salt Lake City, UT

Make the Most of a Layover

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t only takes 15 minutes to get from the airport to downtown Salt Lake City where there is so much to experience. Making the trip is extra easy with free airport shuttle service to Temple Square, the historic, spiritual center of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Air passengers with at least a two-hour layover can enjoy a highly informative, 40-minute Temple Square tour and more, according to Dale Sansom who directs the program. Regularly departing shuttles wait at two locations. Ask a customer service agent for the location nearest you. The shuttles also return passengers to the air terminal. The service is sponsored by the Visitor Activities Section of the church, in cooperation with the Salt Lake Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Utah Travel Council, the Salt Lake Downtown Alliance and the airlines. n

5524 S. Yellowstone Ave. |Idaho Falls, ID | T: 208.523.3323 3091 Pine Street, Bldg. 4|Big Sky, MT | T: 406.993.9423 3465 Nor th Pines Way, Ste. 101|Wilson, WY | T: 307.733.5960 www.harkerdesign.com 32 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express


skynews

| Salinas, CA

Steinbeck Center Explores the Land’s Influence on Man

Steinbeck Center: The National Steinbeck Center

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iterature buffs visiting the Monterey Peninsula will surely want to make time to take a tour of Salinas’ National Steinbeck Center. Everyone else should, too. The facility serves as both an archive and a tribute to all things associated with John Steinbeck, one of America’s finest authors and Salinas’ favorite native son. In telling his story, it touches a common human chord about the way people are shaped by the landscapes of their youth. That’s why a visit to this place is important, even if your exposure to the great man of letters is limited to a high school English class or the film renderings of his best works—East of Eden, The Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men or Tortilla Flats. The Steinbeck Center’s multi-media experience is sure to entertain, educate and inspire thought about the way the natural world can shape so much of each individual’s life.

During the author’s childhood, the Salinas Valley was a noted agricultural region. It remains so today. At the Steinbeck Center a progression of galleries use artifacts, film clips, photographs and the author’s own words to draw comparisons between Steinbeck’s work and the life he lived growing up in the Salinas Valley. As a bonus the Valley of the World Agricultural exposition helps visitors understand the elements of growing and processing food. The center is located on Main Street in downtown Salinas just 15 miles from SkyWest service at the Monterey airport. n

Beautiful Stone Brings People Together At Montana Stone Gallery, the premier natural stone importer of the Northwest, it is understood that homeowners and builders want a quality end product. Homeowners prefer to visit the gallery in order to view the best selection of stone and many bring in elements of their home to find the most complimentary stone selection. Beginning a remodeling project can be intimidating. This is why at Montana Stone Gallery, homeowner and fabricator relationships can be forged to ensure the clients’ needs are met by a talented fabricator they can trust. Fabricators rely on the superior quality stone available at Montana Stone Gallery to continually provide them with the material they need. Each slab is inspected for defects and other variations before distribution. At Montana Stone Gallery, stone is not viewed merely as a fabric to work with; the stone is viewed for the potential it holds to be created into a useful piece of art in a home. Kitchen countertops are a place where friends and family gather around to celebrate holidays, birthdays, and many more occasions. Stone from Montana Stone Gallery will enhance the festivities in a home with its beauty and durability. 406-541-7625 www.montanastonegallery.com skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

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SkyNews

| Palisade, Co

W A Delicious

Travel Experience

ine lovers know Palisade, a quaint Victorian town just 10 miles from the Grand Junction airport, as the soul of Colorado’s grape-growing region. More than a dozen wineries make it their home. The annual Colorado Mountain Winefest, held September 17 through 20 this year, draws thousands to town. While oenophiles justifiably come to sample the exceptional fruit of the vine, once in Palisade, they discover much more. This friendly formerfarm town offers an easy-going ambience with something for every recreational appetite. Palisade takes its name from one of the many unusual sandstone and shale formations that mark Colorado’s northwest corner. The stunning topography includes a myriad of hoodoos and pillars that beg to be photographed. The world’s largest flattop mountain, the Grand Mesa, is

Plan to now play St. George, - You’ll loverates! the rates! Plan now playtoSt. George, Utah Utah - You’ll love the

Canyon, Sunbrook, The Ledges, Sky Mountain, Coral Coral Canyon, Sunbrook, The Ledges, Sky Mountain, SunRiver, St. George, Southgate or Red DixieHills. Red Hills. SunRiver, St. George, Southgate or Dixie Now booking theSand new Hollow Sand Hollow Golf Resort! Now booking the new Golf Resort!

P. James Nugent, M.D.

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Located in Utah’s thisdestination golf destination Located in Utah’s desert,desert, this golf offers offers packages to fit anybody’s schedule, skill level, pocketbook! packages to fit anybody’s schedule, skill level, pocketbook! Book tee times 6 months in advance with no fees. Book tee times 6 months in advance with no fees. Go online for package quotes. Go online for package quotes. Fly direct to -SGU via SLC! Fly direct to SGU Delta- Delta via SLC!

34 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

Richard Blanks, M.D.

Laura Duncan, N.P.

Christine Helsby, N.P.

Russell Biggers, D.P.T.


Experience Palisade! In the Heart of Colorado’s

Fruit & Wine Country among the wide-open spaces, much of it federally protected, that lure explorers. For adrenaline seekers, white-knuckled mountain biking fills the bill, as does whitewater rafting on the Colorado River. The town lends its name to the luscious Palisade peach, and agriculture still plays a role in a place that provides a getaway that is as affordable as it is relaxing. Orchards contribute much to the valley’s scenery and, like the wineries, are open for tours. The Sunday Farmer’s market runs through the end of October and is not to be missed. It’s held in a charming downtown that also includes art galleries, an array of restaurants, retailers and bed-and-breakfast inns. All these simple pleasures make any time the right time to encounter Palisade—Colorado’s rising star. n

Palisade Chamber of Commerce 970-464-7458 www.palisadecoc.com

Art with Wax, October 2009

In the heart of fruit & wine country Exhibitions in all styles & media 119 W. 3rd Street, Palisade, CO 970-464-4819 www.thebluepiggallery.com

Unwind in the Vines Wine Country Inn Weddings, Reunions, Meetings, Celebrations, Retreats, Affordable Getaways

777 Grande River Drive Exit 42 Off I-70 Palisade, Colorado 970.464.5777 888.855.8330 www.coloradowinecountryinn.com skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

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Ski Destinations

TOP 5 Reasons to Play in the Snow This Winter

1. Feel younger: Playing in the drifts erases years from your life. Make a snow angel, catch a flake on your tongue, toss a snowball. Bet you’re smiling just thinking about it.

2. Get stronger: Whether you’re a black diamond downhill racer or contemplating your first foray on the slopes, you’ll find a physical activity to suit your ability. Inexpensive lessons and top-notch rental equipment make exercise as easy as it is fun.

4. Enjoy a smorgasbord of fun: Winter resorts offer

3. Be calmer: Breathe the fresh air, take in the

5. Save money: Package deals are absolute steals

exquisite scenery and count on a change in altitude to improve your attitude.

Alta Ski Area

lots of entertainment beyond the slopes. Options often include spa treatments, snowshoeing, Nordic skiing, dogsled and sleigh rides, fine dining and retail therapy. this season. There’s never been a more economical time to enjoy yourself in the high country.

Utah

Whatever your ability, Alta is for you. Alta Ski Area provides alpine & Nordic skiing, guided snow cat skiing, ski school lessons and programs, and mid-mountain dining. Private businesses provide the rest, including lodging, dining, a ski-in coffee hut, helicopter & back country touring, community arts programming, massages, and church services. Alta has a worldwide reputation for its powder skiing. Deep powder snow, rugged terrain and spectacular scenery established Alta’s fame. Its best-kept secret, however, is the great beginner and intermediate terrain available. Twenty-five percent of the mountain is rated beginner, 40% intermediate. That translates to over 1,500 acres of skiing that is very family friendly! For the more advanced skier, the remaining 35% of terrain will no doubt challenge your skills. The area averages over 500 inches of snow each season, with a whopping 697 inches last season. Alta Ski Area and Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort share a skiing experience with the AltaSnowbird pass, offering 4,700 acres. Alta and Snowbird continue to maintain separate ownership and operation, preserving the unique skiing experience and resort atmosphere each offers. Alta is located 25 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, approximately 45 minutes from the Salt Lake City International Airport. n www.discoveralta.com | 888 258-2840. 36 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express


Gunnison-Crested Butte

Colorado

Some of the most beautiful places on earth are lesser known and undisturbed. There’s a special sense of wonder that goes along with discovering a place like this. You feel somehow it belongs to you. You take that place with you, even when you leave. Gunnison-Crested Butte is like that. It’s a breathtakingly beautiful, luxuriously civilized place that has fortunately remained very much the same over time. Here you will find genuinely friendly and helpful locals and towns so authentic, it’s like taking a step back in time. Crested Butte Mountain Resort is known for Colorado’s best grooming, diverse terrain and off-piste skiing. And, the longest lines you’ll see are behind your skis! A true destination resort, unlike many of Colorado’s “day tripper” ski resorts, Crested Butte attracts visitors who like to come for a longer visit and get to know the place. Winter also brings such delights as snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, dog sledding and snowmobiling in glistening forests and magnificent back country. Getting here is easy. Leaving is much harder. Fly into the Gunnison-Crested Butte Regional Airport this ski season, 11/25/09 – 4/4/10. Visit our website for flight, lodging and package information. Experience Colorado’s true colors and inspire your passion for adventure. n Lodging Phone: 800-323-2453

www.GunnisonCrestedButte.com

Snow Report Phone: 970-349-2323

skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

37


Red Lodge Mountain Resort

Montana

It’s time to indulge your inner ski bum. The part of you that craves a genuine ski experience and views of seven mountain ranges, not seven hotels. That part of you that wants an après ski beer brewed locally that costs what a beer should cost. The part of you that worries more about being the first to drop a chute, not about how much cash you had to drop for a lift ticket. Red Lodge Mountain Resort overlooks the historic Western town of Red Lodge, Montana, and embodies the very spirit of skiing. Located in a town with more dining and après options per capita than any other town in Montana, this hidden gem is truly ‘the last best place.’ In fact, Outside Magazine named Red Lodge to its ‘Top 30 Best Places to Live and Play in the Country’ list. Located 60 short miles from Billings and just north of Yellowstone National Park, this mountain, with its 65 runs, 7 lifts and unrivaled number of sunny days, is undoubtedly an authentic, unspoiled skiing experience. And with Ski & Stay Packages starting at only $45 per person, per night, it’s easy to claim that Red Lodge Mountain Resort is the best value in skiing in the Rockies. n

www.RedLodgeMountain.com | 800-444-8977

406-446-2610

Help select America’sB est places vote now for: • B est National Park • B est Ski Destination • B est Zoo

SkyWest and United Airlines travelers are invited to participate. it’s free!

www.americasbestplaces.com/magazine Results to be published in SkyWest Magazine 38 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express


Leaf-Peeping

Oregon Style

Drift boat images: Meg Trendler

I

by Connie Naylor

n autumn, leaf-peeping opportunities abound in America. While New England’s forested hillsides and the Midwest’s wooded lakeshores attract a parade of motorists eager for a glimpse of dramatic color, Oregon offers an equally impressive and far more serene experience—the view from a McKenzie River drift boat. As the name implies the versatile flat bottom boat was developed on Oregon’s McKenzie River, almost a century ago by Prince Helfrich, one of the first professional guides on the river. Today, his progeny provide a variety of whitewater rafting and guided fishing services throughout the area. Each fall, one of Prince’s grandsons, Aaron Helfrich, also offers scenic boat tours as his fishing schedule allows. Aaron’s wife, Jonnie, who is also a guide, said, “We are notoriously flexible and very accommodating. The scenic trips are typically more inexpensive than fishing. People should just call and see about availability.” That’s just what Meg Trendler did last year. “I’ve lived here 36 years and I’d never done a drift boat trip,” she said. “They always intrigued me, but I had no interest in fishing. One of my co-workers, Samara Phelps, is a native and she’d never done it either. We both just wanted to go for the ride. And we did. It was so serene and luxurious; it was like having a limo take us down the river. We had these great front row seats and Aaron did all the work. All we had to do was look from one side to the other. We chased a great blue heron on his way down the river; saw lots of osprey and other water birds. It was exciting because it was a new adventure for me, and so comfortable. We went through lots of little rapids and got

splashed a little with the cold water but not like anything you experience in a raft.” No section of the McKenzie is void of rapids, Jonnie Helfrich explained. “But the boats are very comfortable. They have heaters. There’s a concrete ramp into the boat so they [passengers] don’t wade in the water. There’s no need for special clothes or shoes. It’s a great way for people of all ages to see the river and all the wildlife along its banks,” she said.

Aaron Helfrich, Meg Trendler and Samara Phelps

The leaf-peeping season can begin in late August when the red maple foliage begins to turn crimson. It typically extends into early November. For those hankering for a dash of New England-like scenery, it should be noted that the McKenzie River flows through Lane County. It’s home to 20 covered bridges, the greatest concentration of the structures west of the Mississippi. Meg Trendler’s trip with Helfrich went beneath the Goodpasture Bridge. At 165-feet it is the longest of Oregon’s covered bridges and one of the most photographed. The drift boat afforded a unique midstream perspective of the bridge, the river and the natural world. “It was such fun to take that ride,” Trendler said. “It really opened our eyes to the beauty of the river in a different way.” n skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

39


Budget Friendly

I

f you thought the summer of ’09 offered great travel bargains, wait until you see what’s in store for the rest of the year! The deals have never been better. Top resorts are slashing prices and creating great package deals. Whether you’re looking for a once-in-a-lifetime outdoor adventure, a leisurely golf getaway or a luxurious spa stay, now is the time to enjoy a top-notch vacation without breaking the bank. A sluggish economy also means fewer crowds and the opportunity for better service as proprietors strive to impress guests. Check out these three great options for fun—and savings. StayAndSkiFree.com. Yes, you read that correctly! Winter vacations are more affordable with free lift tickets from November 25 through December 16, 2009 when you book lodging and skiing at Crested Butte, Colorado’s last great ski town. Rest assured you won’t need to skimp on comfort, rewarding experiences and great service! Our 1800s Western and Victorian Rocky Mountain towns will take care of that. StayAndSkiFree.com | 888-280-5726. Fall is a beautiful time to visit Central Oregon and enjoy Eagle Crest Resort’s incredible $99 Unlimited Golf and Lodging Package. Eagle Crest offers three great courses at one amazing price. Rates include lodging and unlimited golf at any of the three courses.

40 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

Sycamore Mineral Springs Resort Where the “Beach Meets the Vineyards,” voted Best Getaway and Spa on the Central Coast. An authentic California resort since 1897 rests atop hot mineral springs and spans more than 100 acres just two miles from Avila Beach. Each guest room features a private balcony spa. Guests enjoy daily yoga classes. Experience our secluded hillside mineral springs hot tubs, renowned Spa & Wellness Center and award-winning Gardens of Avila Restaurant. 800 234-5831 | sycamoresprings.com

Rates are based on two people at the Inn or four people in a vacation rental. Weekend rates start at $109/person. This offer goes through November 15th. Some restrictions may apply. 866-976-6152 www.eagle-crest.com


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America’sB est Happenings

| September VENTURA, CA | SEPTEMBER 1 - 7

They Paint Horses, Don’t They? and Amazing Horses A to Z are two equine-centric exhibitions presented by The Museum of Ventura County.

SONOMA, CA | SEPTEMBER 4 - 6

Wine Country Weekend Tours, tastings and more in the nation’s original wine country, just a gorgeous hour away from SkyWest service to San Francisco.

MEMPHIS, TN | SEPTEMBER 4 - 13

Delta Fair and Music Festival celebrates the region’s heritage with live entertainment, midway rides, a rodeo and a youth livestock competition.

GRAND CANYON, AZ | SEPTEMBER 11 - 26

The Grand Canyon Music Festival presents an array of worldrenown classical artists performing at a majestic World Heritage Site—the South Rim’s Shrine of the Ages.

DENVER, CO | SEPTEMBER 12 - 13

Monolith Festival at Red Rocks. The natural amphitheater south of Colorado’s capital presents two days and five stages worth of the best of Indie music.

Fred Tomaselli, Woodpecker, 2008. © the artist. Courtesy James Cohan Gallery (New York) and White Cube. Photo: Erma Estwick.

ASPEN, CO | August 1 – October 11 Aspen Art Museum presents a museum-wide survey of artist Fred Tomaselli’s two-dimensional works from the late 1980s to the present. Drawing upon a range of art historical sources and decorative traditions, Tomaselli combines materials like pills and herbs with found illustrations of plants, flowers, birds, and anatomical subjects to create multilayered, baroque paintings that explode in mesmerizing, psychedelic patterns. 970.925.8050 or www.aspenartmuseum.org

COLUMBUS, OH | SEPTEMBER 18 - 20 The Riverfront Arts Festival closes out the city’s festival season with a full schedule of performances, including jazz, blues, folk, world music and even opera. WEST YELLOWSTONE, MT | SEPT. 18 - 28 Yellowstone Fall Fever Cool, comfortable nights & ‘hot’ activities by day. Watch bugling bull elk battle for their harems. Fight a feisty trout in blue-ribbon streams. Boat on Hebgen Lake or bike in the annual Old Faithful Cycle Tour. Find your own adventure during Yellowstone’s ‘secret season.’ Fall rates and lodging packages available. www.yellowstonedestination.com

OMAHA, NE | SEPTEMBER 19 Riverfront Wine Festival, held at the Lewis and Clark Pavilion, brings together area wine lovers for tastings and a celebration of the fruit of the vine.

BEAN BLOSSOM, IN | SEPTEMBER 23 - 26 35TH Annual Bill Monroe Bluegrass Hall of Fame and Uncle Pen Days Festival is the country’s oldest gathering of its kind. Get there with SkyWest service to Louisville, Kentucky.

CHARLESTON, SC | SEPTEMBER 24 - OCTOBER 25 (EXCEPT MONDAYS – WEDNESDAYS) Annual Fall Tour of Homes and Gardens offers an intimate look at the historic structures of this gracious city. Building’s from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries are all part of the five-week event.

QUEBEC CITY, QC | SEPTEMBER 25 - 27 VISALIA, CA | SEPTEMBER 17 16th Annual Waiters’ Race carries on a tradition that dates to the storming of the Bastille during the French Revolution and features the community’s best food and wine. Get there via SkyWest service to nearby Fresno.

MISSOULA, MT | SEPTEMBER 18 Montana Matters concert for the benefit of the Montana Matters Collaboration for Conservation features Shane Clouse, Tom Catmull and others.

Les Journees del la Culture includes a roster of free activities featuring musicians, visual and performing artists and writers all demonstrating what it takes to create a major cultural exhibition.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA | SEPTEMBER 26 - ONGOING Journey to the Stars, a new show featuring narration by Whoopi Goldberg debuts at the California Academy of Sciences Morrison Planetarium. The academy is a natural history museum that also includes a world-class aquarium, and four-story domed rainforest.

Do you know America’s Best Places? Vote for your favorites at

Visit www.americasbestplaces.com 42 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express


America’sB est Happenings

| October PALISADE, CO | OCTOBER 1 - 31

RAPID CITY, SD | OCTOBER 9 - 11

Ode to the Honeybee - Works with Wax. Batiks by Bev O’Neil and Encaustics by Diana Woods at the Blue Pig Gallery. Reach Palisade with SkyWest service to Grand Junction 13 miles away.

The Black Hills Pow Wow brings together hundreds of Native Americans including more than 700 dancers representing 57 tribes. They compete for thousands of dollars in both song and dance contests.

CARPINTERIA, CA | OCTOBER 2 - 4

MONTEREY, CA | OCTOBER 17 - 18

Annual Avocado Festival is a free celebration of all things associated with this popular California product. Get there via convenient SkyWest service to nearby Santa Barbara.

25th Anniversary Celebration at the Monterey Bay Aquarium adds activities that recognize a quarter-century of ocean conservation and entertaining education to the always-fun aquarium experience.

CULLMAN, AL | OCTOBER 3 - 10 Cullman Oktoberfest gathers revelers from across the South for this salute to all things German, held at the Festhalle Market Plats and accessed by SkyWest service to nearby Birmingham.

TRAVERSE CITY, MI | OCTOBER 3 – 10 Happy Apple Days serves as a joyful highlight of the leaf-peeping season in this resort community. Stroll among the cornstalks in the main retail area and enjoy free apples before heading out to view foliage along the lakeshore.

ALBUQUERQUE, NM | OCTOBER 3 - 11 The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, the premiere event of its kind draws throngs to see the skies fill with the colorful aircrafts. Jackson Hole, WY | october 2 - 11 Jackson Hole Destination Wellness Experience the healing and inspirational power of this place we call Jackson Hole! Rejuvenate the health and wellness of the mind, body, spirit, and earth. Features the Teton Wellness Festival along with a rich diversity of presentations, workshops, exhibitions, arts, and activities. 307-733-3316 www.jacksonholechamber.com

CHICAGO, IL | OCTOBER 8 - ONGOING You! The Experience. The Museum of Science and Industry’s newest permanent exhibit is a 15,000-square-foot celebration of the human body, mind and spirit that explores mankind’s personal health and well-being.

SUN VALLEY, ID | OCTOBER 22 - 23 Ernest Hemingway Symposium is a celebration of the life and works of the famous author who spent the better part of 22 years in the community that is his final resting place. Reach this event via SkyWest service to Boise, Idaho a beautiful two-hour drive away.

KOHLER, WI | OCTOBER 22 - 25

Kohler Food and Wine Experience: Soak up culinary knowledge and taste delicacies from a roster of celebrity chefs. Just an hour from SkyWest service to Milwaukee.

SCOTTSDALE, AZ | OCTOBER 22 - 24 Crave Arizona tasting and mixology event accessed by SkyWest service to Phoenix.

AUSTIN, TX | OCTOBER 22 - 29 16th Annual Austin Film Festival and Conference honors Oscar-winning director Ron Howard, who is also a featured speaker during the event.

CHICAGO, IL | OCTOBER 23 – ONGOING The Nature of Diamonds presented by the Field Museum provides an in-depth look at nature’s strongest substance, from its geological origins to its cultural significance. Spectacular jewels and stunning gemstones form the backdrop.

NEW YORK, NY | OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 1

12th Annual Chocolate Show, held at the Metropolitan Pavilion, this is the world’s largest event of its kind and among the foremost international celebrations of all things chocolate.

Do you know America’s Best Places? Survey Results at

Visit www.americasbestplaces.com skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

43


It’s Our Journey, Too

| Jerry C. Atkin, SkyWest, Inc. Chairman and CEO

Celebrates 35 Years Still Putting People First

A

sk any of the 10,000 or so SkyWest employees about Jerry C. Atkin, and you’ll likely hear a specific example of how their long-time leader has made them feel appreciated. The venerable bean counter with the strong fiscal background has always shown an interest in the people who work throughout the nation on the “frontline” of this airline. He consistently remembers names and job responsibilities and unfailingly thanks individuals for “everything they are doing.” As he travels throughout the SkyWest system, Jerry Atkin always shows concern for employees and the people they serve.

In 1975, 26-year-old Jerry Atkin became SkyWest president

“We have 32 million passengers that depend on us to run a safe, efficient operation every day,” Jerry said. “A big part of our success lies in our people. They have grown and developed amazingly—not unlike the company.” SkyWest was built on a desire to provide reliable air service to business people, and the airline’s team members have been willing to do the hard work required to make that desire a reality for more than 37 years. Jerry joined SkyWest in 1974 as director of

44 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

SkyWest, Inc. CEO Jerry Atkin with Salt Lake City team members

finance. His ability to balance the fledgling airline’s books and rescue it from a sea of red ink resulted in a rapid promotion. The next year, at age 26, the St. George, Utah native became the youngest president ever of a regularly scheduled airline. Still, like all SkyWest employees at the time, he loaded bags, pumped gas, boarded passengers, and worked the books from the tin hangar that then served as “headquarters.” Today, the airline industry is going through some major challenges that SkyWest addresses by drawing on the lessons learned during those early days. Jerry explained that the core values that represent the company’s luminous past still direct its present and will guide it into the future. “It’s important to look for ways to do something better every single day, and that’s something every one of us can do,” he said. “Making constant improvements to everything we do—even if those improvements are small—has brought us success in the past, and it will continue to bring success in the future.” Jerry’s ability to build relationships has carried the airline from humble beginnings through immense growth including the 2005 acquisition of Atlantic Southeast Airlines. His example has fostered success for employees at every level and for the organization as a whole. SkyWest Airlines has been named


Regional Airline of the Year twice by Air Transport World magazine and was awarded the Federal Aviation Administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AMT Gold Award for maintenance training in 2004, 2005 and 2008, and the AMT Diamond award in 2006. SkyWest was also named the Number One On-Time Mainland Airline in the United States by the Department of Transportation for 2003, 2004 and 2005, years in which it served more than 40 million passengers. In 2007 and 2008 SkyWest was named Bombardierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most reliable CRJ200 Operator in the Americas. Under the SkyWest, Inc. umbrella, Atlantic Southeast Airlines and SkyWest Airlines form the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest regional airline alliance. Jerry will readily credit the people of SkyWest with all the accolades and success. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our people pull together and help each other out, at times making sacrifices for their teammates,â&#x20AC;? he said. There are absolutely amazing people at SkyWest that continue to do absolutely amazing things.â&#x20AC;? n

Jerry accepts Air Transport World magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1987 Regional Airline of the Year award.

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America’s best places MOSES LAKE, WA BIG SKY, MT RED LODGE, MT TRI CITIES, WA INCLUDING PASCO, RICHLAND, KENNEWICK

MONTEREY, CA

GUNNISON-CRESTED BUTTE, CO

SALT LAKE CITY, UT PALISADE, CO CALIFORNIA CENTRAL COAST, INCLUDING SAN LUIS OBISPO, PASO ROBLES, MORRO BAY

www.skywest.com


are off the beaten path WAUSAU, WI

SIOUX FALLS, SD

FORT WAYNE, IN

www.united.com


behind the scenes

Aircraft Safety Comes First at SkyWest Airlines

“Safety First” is more than a mission statement at SkyWest Airlines; it’s a way of life. SkyWest’s impeccable safety record spans more than 35 years, beginning with the highest caliber of trained professionals and extending to a proven fleet of aircraft. The People: Each day, thousands of SkyWest employees are responsible for the safety of hundreds of thousands of passengers. SkyWest’s experienced mechanics, pilots, flight attendants and ground personnel have the know-how and ability to keep their passengers safe. In the Flight Deck: You also have the comfort of knowing you’re flying with some of the most experienced and thoroughly trained pilots the airline industry has to offer. It takes years of training and experience to become a commercial airline pilot, and many come to SkyWest well prepared averaging 1,500 to 2,000 hours of flight time. However, their training has just begun. Before they ever fly a passenger flight, SkyWest spends approximately $30,000 on their training which is geared towards safety. This is a two-month process beginning with three weeks of ground school followed by 50 hours of flight simulator training. The final stage of their training is called the Initial Operating Experience, during which they actually fly one of SkyWest’s aircraft accompanied by a qualified check airman instructor for another 50 hours. All pilots continue their training with mandatory recurrent simulator training for captains every six months and for first officers, every year. Additionally, each year both captains and first officers must participate in a two-day training session similar to ground school. All pilots are also required to undergo a comprehensive medical examination testing their vision and overall physical and mental well-being to determine if they are fit to fly for SkyWest. Captains do this every six months; first officers annually. In the Cabin: At SkyWest, a flight attendant’s first responsibility is your safety. Like pilots, SkyWest’s in-flight team undergoes comprehensive training before they take to the skies. Each SkyWest flight attendant must complete an intense three-week training program emphasizing onboard safety and security. They are well-versed in emergency procedures,

48 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

evacuation protocol and passenger service. While at SkyWest, flight attendants continue their training throughout the year and are required to recertify in First Aid and CPR annually. On the Ramp: SkyWest stresses safety not only in the air, but also on the ground. SkyWest trains its customer service personnel for two weeks, both in the classroom and on the job in ground safety issues. These agents become specialists in aircraft weight and balance. They know the best way to load and unload hundreds of pounds of cargo and luggage without damaging the luggage, cargo, the aircraft or injuring themselves. They are also trained to operate the various ground equipment and park the aircraft once it arrives at the gate. This navigation can often be challenging in airports with busy ramps. In colder climates, they must learn how to properly de-ice an aircraft allowing for a safe take-off and flight. Under the Wing: For every hour one of SkyWest’s aircraft spends in flight, one of their mechanics spends two hours servicing that aircraft. SkyWest maintains a strict maintenance schedule and undoubtedly, an experienced SkyWest mechanic has recently inspected or serviced the aircraft carrying you. All mechanics come to SkyWest with extensive training, including three years of A&P (Airframe and Power) training and certification. Also, every two years SkyWest mechanics undergo three weeks of mandatory training. Each day, all of SkyWest’s aircraft are given attention by a mechanic. Every third day, each plane receives standard service. On the fifth day, a more thorough service and inspection is conducted. Extensive maintenance is scheduled every 54 days with a major inspection every 540 days. Flight Control: This department consists of aircraft dispatchers, system controllers and customer service coordinators located in the Operational Control Center at SkyWest’s headquarters in St. George, Utah. All play an integral role in the airline’s operations. SkyWest dispatch personnel undergo six weeks of intensive training courses, learning in-depth aircraft systems, meteorology and flight planning to become certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Upon arrival at SkyWest, their training continues with three weeks of classes followed by an average of eight weeks of on-the-job training, culminating with a two-day competency check.


Dispatchers are responsible for preparing the flight release, including fuel planning, route selection, Federal Aviation Regulation compliance and weather analysis, as well as monitoring flights to ensure safety. Before each aircraft leaves the runway, dispatchers and captains share responsibility for the safety of the flight. The system controllers are responsible for all coordination, cancelation, delaying and reflow of SkyWest flights. They ensure optimum coverage of and adherence to flight schedules, economics and utilization of the operation. The customer service coordinators assist the controllers, working closely with the stations to maintain a customer service advocacy, always keeping the passenger in mind. These highly trained individuals work with the rest of the SkyWest team to provide a safe flying experience with incomparable service and quality.

The Safety Department: SkyWest has a department wholly dedicated to the operational safety of the airline. Its team monitors all aspects of safety and ensures that the highest standard of safety is maintained. The safety department coordinates with all the departments involved with ground and flight operations and acts as a compliance liaison between the airline and the Department of Transportation and Federal Aviation Administration. It is also responsible for the safety and well-being of all employees and equipment at the airline. The safety department conducts internal safety audits and evaluations of all operational departments. Additionally, SkyWest’s safety department voluntarily participates in the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP); a reporting program for pilots, flight attendants and dispatchers to flag potential safety concerns. n

Incredible 4-acre parcel of land in beautiful downtown McCall, Idaho

The premiere lake front resort community featuring numerous recreational opportunities!

Visit: www.skywestmagazine.com/mccall PRICE

DESCRIPTION

• • • • •

• An incredible 4.25 acre parcel. This lot is partially wooded with gentle slopes allowing for different types of development opportunities. • Property is only (8) miles from Brundage Ski Mountain. • Golf courses including White Tail, Jug Mountain Ranch, Meadow Creek, Osprey Meadows and McCall Golf Club are minutes away.

$675,000. Reduced from 2007 price of $2,970,000. Lot Size: 4.25 AC Property Type: Residential (land) Zoning Description: 5+ Units Features: - Electricity/Power - Water - Telephone - Gas/Propane - (2) parcels: Tax No. 256-L & TAX No. 256-B

CONTACT

Rick McGraw/Broker Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group Cell: 208-880-8889 Email: rickmcgraw@qwest.net

HIGHLIGHTS

• • • • • •

Located in downtown McCall, Idaho Less than (5) minutes to McCall Airport Walking distance to Payette Lake, Restaurants and Shops Easy access to Golf, Ski Resort and Water Activities Less than (2) hours from Boise, Idaho Multiple uses for this Development Opportunity skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

49


fun and games

A Leaf Falls . . . . Signs of the Season Answers to clues in bold reflect the autumn season. Solution on page 52

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ACROSS 1 Autumn apple dessert 4 Slough 9 Colorful in autumn 13 Seize 14 Mistake 15 Indolently 16 Original people of Cuzco 17 Characteristic rhythm 18 Escaping fluid 19 Ox-like African antelope 20 Throw 21 Wash lightly 22 Reason for seasonal festivals 24 Of thou 26 Metal-bearing mineral 27 NYC theater area 31 Start 34 Liz Taylor’s 33-carat diamond 35 Adam’s gal 36 Secondhand 37 Prop up 38 Young guinea fowl 39 Deface 40 Got up 41 Large Nepalese knife 42 Material for Jack-o-lanterns 44 Gave food 45 Capital of Peru 46 Terse 50 Derive 53 Anthony, Harmon or Wahlberg 54 Revised form of Esperanto 55 Firth near Mull Island 56 Burglar or fire 58 Small dam 59 She danced with the King of Siam 60 Rope used to guide a horse 61 Computer symbol 62 Doe or fawn 63 Prizefighter 64 Emerald or ruby

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DOWN 1 Quill for writing (from Latin) 2 Become liable for 3 7th letter of the Greek alphabet 4 Bristly 5 Take away by force 6 Weapons 7 Floor cleaning tool 8 In favor of 9 Abounding in callas 10 Paradise 1 1 Exclamation to express sorrow 12 Bag-shaped fish trap 13 Lofty 20 Web-footed aquatic bird 21 Gather in crops 23 Empty 24 Armistice 25 Expectant desire 27 Copper and zinc alloy 28 Seven days 29 Affirm with confidence

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30 Abominable snowman 31 Collide with 32 Son of Isaac 33 Microbe 34 Basic monetary unit of Sweden 37 Projecting edge 38 Accolade 40 Related by blood 41 Retch 43 Flat 44 Old Macdonald’s job 46 Big 47 Daughter of one’s sibling 48 Expression peculiar to a language 49 It creates a seasonal maze 50 Delighted 51 Solitary 52 Sea eagle 53 Tailless cat 56 Long-sleeved linen vestment 57 Skip to my _____ 58 Hairpiece

Do you know America’s Best Places? Test your Travel Smarts at

www.americasbestplaces.com/magazine 50 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express


SkyWest Travel BOISE, ID cottonwood grille has been rated four stars for the finest in contemporary American cuisine, and features a Wine Spectator awardwinning wine list. Located on the Boise River with a relaxing outdoor patio and an inviting ski-lodge feel.

To Advertise in this section, call Teena Wright 208-333-9990

208-333-9800 cottonwoodgrille.com

MEDFORD, OR

P ark C it y , U T

Come Play in Our Back Yard! Southern Utah’s Kane County offers easier access to more National Parks and Monuments than any other place on earth! We are central to Zion, Bryce and Grand Canyon National Parks! Come, experience life! www.kaneutah.com

Welcome to Medford, Oregon, the center of the thriving Rogue Valley. Savor award-winning artisan cheeses, chocolates, specialty foods, and nationally recognized wines. Enjoy great Northwest dining, eclectic shopping, and an endless list of activities and events. Get outside with fly-fishing, rafting and jet boating on the Rogue River, championship golf courses, and Crater Lake National Park. 800-469-6307 www.visitmedford.org

PARK CITY and its’ three world-class resorts-Deer Valley, The Canyons and Park City Mountain—are an easy 35-minute ride from the Salt Lake City International Airport. Once you’re here affordable lodging options, over 100 restaurants, plenty of bars and nightlife, dozens of shops and spas are even more accessible. For winter specials, weekly updated hot deals and to book online, visit parkcityinfo.com.

B o z e m an , M T

CALIFORNIA

ZION NATIONAL PARK

LIVING THE MONTANA DREAM: This 20-acre offering includes private pond, rustic mountain home with exquisite finishes, 3-car heated garage, detached guest quarters, second building site, views of multiple Montana mountain ranges, abundant wildlife and the privacy you deserve. 10 miles to Bozeman Airport, 16 miles to downtown Bozeman. Offered at $1,500,000 CLC Properties, Inc. 406-580-0865 www.CandaceCummings.com

VENTURA The Real Soul of California Come to Ventura this fall to discover soul-enriching experiences in art, adventure and dining. Ventura offers a relaxed escape in a spectacular coastal setting only an hour from Los Angeles. Get your free visitor guide now: 800-4-ventur ventura-usa.com/sw

Best western zion park inn will provide the comfort and amenities while you enjoy the majestic beauty of Zion National Park. Restaurant, gift shop, convenience and liquor store, hot tub HSIA, Brian Head skiing one hour away. Ask for “SkyWest Package.”

SOUTHERN UTAH

Photo: Tanya Milligan

800-934-7275

www.zionparkinn.com

Where do you get your adrenaline rush? Vote for your favorite adventures at

www.americasbestplaces.com/magazine

skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express |

51


Route Map

Edmonton

Saskatoon Calgary Winnipeg Regina

Vancouver Kalispell

Victoria

Spokane Moses Lake

Seattle/Tacoma

Great Falls Missoula

Pasco/Richland/ Kennewick

Fargo

Bismarck

Helena Bozeman

Quebec

Billings Ottawa

Portland Rapid City

Redmond/Bend

Eugene

Boise

North Bend Medford

Wausau Traverse City Green Bay

Idaho Falls Casper

Klamath Falls

Hayden/Steamboat Springs

Redding

Denver Montrose

Colorado Springs Gunnison

Columbus Dayton Cincinnati

Syracuse

Scranton

White Plains

Pittsburgh

Charleston

Louisville Wichita

Durango

St. George

Indianapolis

Kansas City

Aspen

Grand Junction

Sacramento Oakland San Francisco Modesto San Jose Fresno Monterey

Lincoln

Salt Lake City

Chico Reno

Saginaw Milwaukee Lansing Grand Rapids Detroit Cedar Rapids Des Moines Cleveland Chicago South Bend Moline Omaha Peoria Fort Wayne Akron/Canton Madison

Crescent City Eureka/Arcata

Appleton

Sioux Falls

Lexington

Springfield

Norfolk

Las Vegas

BakersfieldInyokern San Luis Obispo Santa Maria Santa Barbara Burbank Oxnard Ontario Los Angeles Palm Springs Phoenix Orange County Carlsbad Imperial/El Centro Tucson San Diego Yuma

Tulsa

Northwest Arkansas

Oklahoma City

Albuquerque

Nashville

Knoxville

Memphis Huntsville

Little Rock

Birmingham

Dallas

Charleston

El Paso

Austin San Antonio

Houston

Pacific

Mountain

Central

Eastern

Atlantic

8:00

9:00 (Arizona does not observe Daylight Savings)

10:00

11:00

NOON

EFFECTIVE August 2009 (may not reflect recent service updates)

RUBESŠ

By Leigh Rubin

SKYWEST AIRLINES CURRENT ROUTE MAP AUGUST 2009 (updated monthly, may not reflect recent service updates)

H I G H B U M P G L A D Down comforters For more of Leigh Rubinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humor check out his new, 2010 Rubes Zoo in a Box daily desk calendar, available at your favorite neighborhood or online bookstore, visit www.rubescartoons.com or call: 800-850-9453.

52 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

P E N N A E S A U L O N E

I N C U R G E R M E R N E

E T A

S E T T O V E S O R E I N D B A R P K I L I M A N N A A L R B

W R E S T K R O N A L O O

A M P R O R M P O S R T H E B R O A R U P P A C E S E K S F E L A C M A R K A R M N G E X E R

Solution to Crossword on page 50.

L I L I E D

E D E N

A L A S

F Y K E

W E K E U K D O N I W E I C G E

A V E R

Y E T I

I D I O M

C O R N


about your aircraft

The Aircraft galley

emergency exits

Lavatory

galley

emergency exits

Lavatory

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Main entrance Main entrance

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Main entrance

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13 14 15 16 17 18

emergency exit

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emergency exit

eMB 120 eMB 120

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B C

(ForWard gaLLey)

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Lavatory Lavatory galley

a

SkyWest has safely been flying the EMB 120, commonly referred to as the “workhorse” of the regional airline industry, CrJ700 since 1986. Don’t be fooled by the propellers you see; the same CrJ700 technology that powers jet aircraft actually powers the EMB 120 as well. Like jet engines, the EMB 120 is powered by a gas turbine design, allowing for the superior reliability and power that jet engines enjoy. The EMB 120 is also economically sound, allowing it to serve communities that may not support jet service. Additionally, the EMB 120 possesses state-of-the-art technology allowing for maximum passenger safety. Each SkyWest EMB 120 is equipped with a Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS). GPWS is a warning system designed to alert pilots when the aircraft is not in landing configuration or is getting too close to the ground. GPWS detects terrain ahead of and below the aircraft and warns pilots when there’s an obstruction ahead. Each EMB 120 also has an onboard Global Positioning System (GPS), which uses satellites to calculate an aircraft’s position on the earth’s surface. Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems (TCAS) are also included for your safety. A more advanced radar system, TCAS in the flight deck is similar in theory to the equipment used in air traffic control towers to detect the position of all aircraft in the area.

6

5

(aFt gaLLey) Main entrance

11

emergency exit

Main entrance

galley

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a

EMB 120 AIRCRAFT

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emergency exit

a B C dB C d

While SkyWest’s employees are truly what set the airline apart, the equipment used also plays a significant role in passenger safety. SkyWest’s fleet of 280 regional aircraft is one of the industry’s newest. The average age of an aircraft is under seven years. The fleet consists of three different aircraft types; the 30-passenger Embraer 120 Brasilia (EMB 120), theCrJ200 Bombardier CrJ200 Canadair Regional Jet 200 LR (CRJ200), and the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the Canadair Regional Jet 700 ER (CRJ700).

CRJ AIRCRAFT SkyWest has operated the 50-passenger CRJ200 since 1994. And in 2004, SkyWest welcomed the CRJ200’s sister-aircraft, the nearly identical 66-passenger CRJ700, with a two-class cabin and United’s explusSM service. The CRJ200 and CRJ700 offer a balance of the best economics in their class and outstanding performance with the Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics Systems. This onboard technology allows pilots to better observe the flying environment. Both regional jets have the ability to monitor performance of aircraft systems as well as track nearby aircraft and galley terrain clearances. The aircraft are also Lavatory equipped with a weather radar system which helps pilots see potentially CrJ200treacherous weather long before it is encountered. Passengers can rest easy knowing that the technology onboard 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 SkyWest’s aircraft provides for a safer, smoother flying experience Main entrance emergency exits

emergency exit

for both passenger and pilot. That’s safety first! galley

galley

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emergency exits

CrJ700

CrJ200 6

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12 13

Main entrance

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A B

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eMB 120

UNITED ECONOMY PLUS

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UNITED ECONOMY

(ForWard gaLLey) skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express | a

galley

emergency exits

13 14 15 16 17 18

10

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Emergency Exit

UNITED FIRST

CrJ700

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Main Entrance

emergency exit

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Main entrance

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emergency exits


PDX

Airport Maps

Denver (DEN)

Portland (PDX)

DEN

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CONCOURSE E 26

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81 83 85 87 89 91 93 95 94 80 82 84 86 88 90 92

E2 E3 E4 E5 E6

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United Gate Areas United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

E7

Ticket Lobby

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CONCOURSE C

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Parking

United Gate Areas

CONCOURSE B

United Express (SkyWest Airlines) CONCOURSE A

Terminal West

Terminal East

SEA

Seattle (sea)

Los Angeles (LAX) 80

71A 70A

71C-K

64

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Main Terminal

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SOUTH SATELLITE

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ay

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TERMINAL 8 United Gate Areas

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United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

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SFO

United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

ORD

Chicago/Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hare (ORD) CONCOURSE F

C

82

80

71

87A 87 85 83 81

89 Star Alliance Bus to Gates 91-102 (departs every 10 minutes during peak periods)

72 73 74 75

CONCOURSE G (Gates G91-G102 )

ne

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1

Parking Garage LOT A

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To Remote Parking

84

lO

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ina

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78A 77B 77A 76B 76A

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m Ter

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TERMINAL 3 CONCOURSE F

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CONCOURSE E

E15 E13 E14 CONCOURSE C E11 E12 E9 C2 C4 E10 E7 C1 C6 E8 C3 C8 E6 C5 C10 E4 C7 C12 E3 C9 C16 E2A C11 E2 CONCOURSE B F2 E1A C15 C18 E1 F1 B3 B4 C17 C18A B2 Terminal Two B1 B5 C20 B6 C19 C22 B7 C24 C21 B8 C26 C23 C28 C25 C30 C27 C32 B9 C29 C31 B10

F14 F12 F11 F10 F9 F8 F7 F6 F5 F4 F3

San Francisco (SFO)

United Gate Areas United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

B11 B12 B14 B15 B16 B17 B18 B19 B20 B21 B22

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54 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

68 70 69


Opt to sit farther from your feet.

Economy Plus.ÂŽ Purchase up to 5 inches of extra legroom. united.com/traveloptions

Š2009 United Air Lines, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


| Parting Shot

Test Your Travel Smarts

If you’re among the first three readers to correctly identify the location pictured above we’ll send you the entire set for free! To win visit americasbestplaces.com, be among the first three visitors to register the correct answer to this Travel Challenge and we’ll send you the complete boxed set. Shot in HD, it offers a compelling view of the American landscape and makes a great holiday gift.

56 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2009 united express

National PArks: Craig Mellish

C

an you identify this impressive location? Want a hint? This image is taken from Ken Burns’ latest DVD/Blu-ray release, The National Parks, America’s Best Idea. The six-disc, six-part documentary series features 12 hours of stunning cinematography and biographies of compelling characters involved in the establishment of the national park idea. The narrative features the voice of Peter Coyote and traces the birth of the concept in the mid-1800s and follows its evolution through nearly 150 years. There are currently more than 50 national parks in the United States. Some of America’s greatest actors, including Tom Hanks, Andy Garcia, John Lithgow and Eli Wallach, are part of this tribute to these American treasures. Available from Paramount Home Entertainment this October. n


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NEW LISTING

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Developer’s Dream This prime spot is a 6,000 sq. ft. lot on one of the best corners in the desirable West End. According to city code, you have the option of building your personal residence as a single family home or a duplex development. Incredible and rare opportunity for a developer or enduser within walking distance to downtown. $4,200,000 $3,800,000.

TRACY HAISFIELD EGGLESTON

BUBBA EGGLESTON

970-948-7130 tracyaspen@yahoo.com www.tracyaspen.com

970-309-9291 bubbaegg@yahoo.com www.bubbaaspen.com

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SkyWest Magazine September/October 2009