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AMERICANTRAVELER Enriching Your Journey

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Compliments of the Airport

Premiere Edition 2008

FIRST-CLASS

Recession Resistant Real Estate

destinations

5 TIPS FOR

HEALTHY TRAVEL

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Lane Timothy

90 Miles to Nashville

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Incredible 4-Acre Land Opportunity in beautiful downtown McCall, Idaho

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CONTENTS

INSIDE

6

Black Hills, South Dakota

4 | Positive Space

Where Spirits are Renewed This million-acre playground boasts the nation’s highest concentration of parks, monuments and memorials including the iconic Mount Rushmore and Crazy Horse landmarks. Still it remains a well-kept American vacation secret where it’s possible to have fun, connect with nature and get by on a budget.

24 | Green Rewards

26 | Safe Keeping/TSA

28 | Concourse

12

Extreme Oregon Scenic Lane County Oregon with its amalgam of quaint covered bridges and college-town culture is also home to adrenaline-pumping recreation. Here, the nation’s only sandboarding park affords the chance to slide down a mountain of powder-fine sand right into the Pacific. Treetop adventure outfitters offer the chance to spend the night high in a piney canopy. Other thrill seekers pursue white-water adventure.

30 | On the Fly

32 | Carry On

34 | First-Class Destinations

43 | Top Flight Art

18

Business Class Resisting Recession in the Rockies

50 | Vacation Planner

Resort communities and their environs may not be completely immune to an economic downturn but they have plenty of reason to remain optimistic about a rapid rebound. Real estate benefiting from a view, upscale amenities and access to the great outdoors is still at a premium.

54 | Happenings

48

On the Cover Featured Artist Lane Timothy captures all the possibilities of a life of travel in his painting The Honeymooners, a 48” x 60” oil on canvas currently held in a private collection. To find out more about the artist and his work turn to page 48.

60 | Travel Games

64 | Journey’s End

SANDBOARDER: LON BEALE

58 | Kids’ Games

CANYON: SOUTH DAKOTA TOURISM

56 | Crossword Puzzle

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POSITIVE SPACE

“ Happy Thoughts Can Lift You Up”

— James Barrie

E

nriching the air travel experience? Yup. That’s it. If your eyebrows are shooting skyward right now, know that you are not alone. The notion—that we, the traveling public, can somehow improve our high-flying lot—has drawn more than a few quizzical looks. What’s a magazine going to do about luggage restrictions, the high price of fuel, and a reduction in services? Plenty. While we can’t change the circumstances, we can help you meet them in the best possible way. In these pages you’ll find insight and information to streamline your journey. Look for expert packing tips, travel advice from frequent fliers, the latest news from the Transportation Safety Administration and more. There are stories about great adventures and lovely destinations and plenty of photos of America’s scenic places. These beautiful images serve to remind us that this nation has much to offer, and air travel is still the best way to traverse a continent in less than a day. All this helpful content is presented in a design that harkens back to a simpler time—an era when air travel was imbued with leisurely sophistication. Much is made of those early days, when fliers dined sumptuously with white linen and crystal, and flight attendants waited on their every whim. In truth, back then, planes were much slower, prone to chop through turbulence and inspire motion sickness. Airports were bare-bones facilities, typically relegated to major cities and only the well-heeled could afford the price of a ticket. While nostalgia is nice, the truth is we’ve still got it pretty good right here at this place in time. So, in light of ancient wisdom, I’d like to encourage you to focus on the upside and think about the benefits we enjoy. There’s plenty that remains absolutely remarkable about travel in the 21st century. At what other point in history could you breakfast in New York, lunch in Los Angeles

and take a nap in-between? Whenever I start to get antsy about schedule changes, weather delays or long lines, I remind myself that my ancestors spent the better part of a month traveling by steamship from Europe to Ellis Island and that during World War II it took more than a week on a train to cross the country. Today, under the worst circumstances the journey typically spans less than 24 hours by plane. Air travel is still the fastest, safest, most rewarding way to get where you want to go. The next time you start to think otherwise remember Peter Pan’s advice: “happy thoughts can lift you up.” Positive thinking may not help you take wing, but there is an aircraft waiting to do its job. Contemplating the wonders of this form of transportation does much to make your spirits soar. Happy Skies,

Colleen

Colleen Birch Maile Editor-in-Chief American Traveler magazine

P.S.

Once you’ve established your positive attitude, take it one step further. Do something nice for the other guy. We’re all in this together. Try putting others first and see how good you feel. And, should you observe a particularly positive attitude or action or develop a great travel tip, write and tell us about the experience or idea. We’ll publish the best of the bunch. Send your uplifting email to:

info@gopubinc.com. Please type “American Traveler Positive Space” in the subject line.

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Rock R ock SStars" Sta tarss"" O uurr ""Rock President Kelly D. Coles

Never Grow Old O ld ld Neever ver G ver row Ol

Editor-in-Chief Colleen Birch Maile colleen@gopubinc.com

!

Art Director Janie Williams Budell janie@gopubinc.com Publication Director Julie Molema julie@gopubinc.com Copy Editor Jeanette Germaine Proof Reader Anna Bierman Tatro Contributors Tony Banning | Amanda Bjerke | Tom Griffith Steve Hart | Anna Hobart | Christine Karpinski Lourdes Matsumoto

Red Rock Golf Trail Director, Sales and Marketing Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com Advertising Managers AZ, NM, TX, WY, ND, SD: Keith Sauls l 605-786-4111 keith@gopubinc.com MT, OR, UT, WA, Canada: Wendy Rivers l 406-586-0439

wndyrivers@theglobal.net CO, NV, Northern and Central CA: Susan Vernier Garcia l 970-927-9599 susan@gopubinc.com for all other locations call: 208-333-9990

Zion National Park

American Traveler magazine, the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere publication devoted to air travel is published bi-monthly by Go! Publications. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to this publication are not necessarily those of the editor or publisher. Acceptance of advertisements does not imply official endorsement of the products or services concerned. While every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of content, no responsibility can be taken for any errors or omissions. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher. Limited copies are available for $10 each. This magazine assumes no responsibility for safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, artwork or other material. Email is the preferred method of communication with this staff.

For reprints of articles in this issue of American Traveler magazine, please call 208-333-9990.

Go!

P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C O R P O R A T E D

www.americantravelermagazine.com

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A R ene wal of the Spirit Visit the Black Hills to Connect with Nature and Family

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By Tom. Griffith

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any of my best childhood memories center on our family’s annual pilgrimage to South Dakota’s Black Hills. Those idyllic days were spent having breakfast with the presidents at Mount Rushmore, wetting a dry-fly in search of elusive rainbow trout and tubing the rippling waters of Rapid Creek. As darkness invaded the creek-carved canyons, we watched in wonderment as a blanket of stars carpeted the night skies. Those recollections are the reason I decided in junior high school that I would one day return for good and make this ancient mountain range my home.

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BUFFALO: SOUTH DAKOTA TOURISM

I

am not unique. For many visitors the experience bears repeating. The well-kept American vacation secret still amazes first-timers who encounter a scene exceeding their expectations and find their spirits renewed. There are many reasons to visit. This millionacre playground (roughly the size of Delaware) boasts the nation’s highest concentration of parks, monuments and memorials including the iconic Mount Rushmore and Crazy Horse landmarks. There are also myriad private and public attractions. This was the last U.S. region to be mapped. But today’s travelers encounter attractions and amenities far more inviting than did the miners, madams and muleskinners who descended on the hills following the discovery of gold in 1874. Modern mountain resorts, scenic drives, great restaurants and outstanding opportunities for outdoor adventure enable travelers to reconnect with nature and much more. This emerald oasis offers activities such as rafting, hiking, fishing, sightseeing or bicycling the 109-mile Mickelson Trail, a rails-to-trails project spanning the breadth of the Black Hills. Visitors encounter free-roaming wildlife and incredible scenic vistas. It’s the perfect place to forge special memories with spouses, children, extended family and friends. “The Black Hills are a regular vacation destination for my family,” said South Dakota Governor Mike Rounds. “There aren’t many places where you can bond with your family, connect with nature, and connect with the history of the Old West, all in the same area. “One of my favorite places is Custer State Park, where we’ve recently made all kinds of upgrades,” Rounds continued. “There’s nothing quite like waking up at your cabin along a mountain stream and hearing a bull elk bugle just outside your door, or spotting a buffalo wandering nearby. You’re not just viewing the natural wonders; you’re spending time among them.

“Leave your phone, TV and computer behind, because there’s enough to do, see and experience that you’ll forget all about the hustle and bustle of your busy life,” the twoterm governor advised. “I’ve lived in South Dakota my entire life and I’ve visited the Black Hills so many times I’ve lost count. But, I’ve never forgotten the experiences I’ve had there with my family, and you won’t either.” Custer State Park is a 110-square-mile preserve rivaling many national parks in size, diversity of wildlife, commanding views and recreational opportunities. Home to four alpine resorts and the largest buffalo herd outside of Yellowstone National Park, it packs a powerful punch when it comes to impressing more than 1.6-million annual visitors. Park Visitor Services Coordinator Craig Pugsley said, “The countryside remains much the way it was a hundred years ago. This is a place where the bison still roam free and the deer and the antelope play.” In 1927, President Calvin Coolidge found Custer State Park so appealing during a planned three-week vacation that he stayed three months enjoying the pine-clad cliffs, wading the clear waters of one of its many streams and filling his creel with brook trout. He made the State Game Lodge his Summer White House. President Dwight Eisenhower stayed at the same lodge in 1953. When the director and producers of 2008’s National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets visited the park while filming at nearby Mount Rushmore, they were so impressed that they re-wrote portions of the script to include additional scenes in the area. After filming in Philadelphia, Washington D.C. and Paris, stars Nicolas Cage, Helen Mirren and Jon Voight unanimously voted the Black Hills the most intriguing place they visited.

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interpreters, as well as the occasional tribal elder, interact with visitors, display arts and crafts including bead and quill work, and educate travelers about their past and present. In addition, a Children’s Exploration Center tent at the end of the memorial’s Avenue of Flags allows youth to understand the park’s flora and fauna, as well as hear presentations by a wide range of cultural representatives, including the Germans from Russia and the Sons of Norway. “These programs are completely inspirational and educational,” said Mount Rushmore Superintendent Gerard Baker, one of only a few Native American superintendents in the National Park system. (Baker’s brother, Dr. Paige Baker, serves as superintendent at nearby Badlands National Park.) “They allow visitors to connect in an interesting way with their own culture by connecting with the cultures of others.”

For decades, Mount Rushmore’s night lighting ceremony has been the most popular interpretive program in the national park system. On average, 2,500 visitors fill the amphitheater each summer night to listen to a ranger talk, watch a stirring movie about America, sing the national anthem and gaze on the enduring granite faces of four great leaders as the lights come up on Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt. Patriotic emotions run high and tears are not uncommon.

NATIVE AMERICAN DANCER: SOUTH DAKOTA TOURISM

Even after spending 31 years working and living in Custer State Park, Pugsley said visitors often remind him of just how special it is. “This place is exceptional, but we who live here can take it for granted,” he said. “One day I was returning to the park office from Rapid City and a big, mature bull bison was moving across the roadway. There were several cars stopped in front of me, including one from Illinois. I could see it contained mom and dad in front and a couple of kids in the backseat. “The bison walked across the road in front of them and the kids were pitching back and forth trying to get the best view,” Pugsley recalled. “They noticed me behind them and the kids pointed at me, then at the buffalo. They wanted me to be able to experience what they were experiencing. It reaffirmed for me what Custer State Park is all about.” The park’s most popular activities include driving the scenic Needles Highway and Iron Mountain Road, boating on a quiet lake, horseback riding, hiking, chuckwagon cook-outs and taking an open-air Jeep safari right into the buffalo herds. The annual Buffalo Roundup, set for September 29 this year, affords visitors a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to hear the thunder of 6,000 hooves as park staff and volunteers assemble the preserve’s 1,500 head of American bison. Reminiscent of a scene straight out of the Wild West, the modernBuffalo Roundup drew 11,500 spectators in 2007. Every year since 1941, as many as three-million visitors have reconnected with their sense of patriotism at Mount Rushmore. Recently, summer visitors also connect with other cultures through an innovative interpretive program offered in the shadows of what Franklin D. Roosevelt called “America’s Shrine of Democracy.” This summer, three teepees, a sweat lodge and drying racks form the background of the Lakota-Dakota-Nakota Heritage Village at Mount Rushmore, representing the traditional Native American villages as they stood in the Black Hills more than a century ago. Lakota cultural

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“The crowds at Mount Rushmore’s night lighting ceremony represent every color of the rainbow,” Baker said. In this, we have a common bond.” “On a starry night, with a sculpture that represents our highest ideals, with the American flag and our veterans standing side-by-side, with our memories of those who paid the ultimate price for freedom, Mount Rushmore creates a powerful representation of that which is best in America,” Baker noted. “It is hard to remain unaffected. Rushmore becomes us—more than a stone symbol of a nation. It becomes America.” For Bill Honerkamp, who grew up working at his family’s campground and now serves as president of the Black Hills, Badlands & Lakes Association, the region’s primary draw has always been its ability to connect weary travelers with the world around them in a manner that soothes the spirit.

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In Cus uste terr St Stat atee Pa at P rk in Sooutth Da D ko kota taa, yo youu ca c n ro r am withh a vvar arriei ty of wi wild ldlililife ld fe oonn 71,0 71,0 ,000 00 acr cres es ooff wi wide de oope p n sp pe spac aces ac es.. es I eve In very ry ddirirecctition on,, yo on you’ u’llll finnd u’ mo tain mount tain llak akes ak es,, gr es gran anititee pe peak aks k andd breathtaking views. Come to Custer State Park in the Black Hills and let your spirit soar.

www.TravelSD.com/CusterStatePark SD /C Camping Reservations: 1-800-710-2267 Lodging: 1-888-875-0001

www.TravelSD.com/CusterStatePark Camping Reservations: 1-800-710-2267 Lodging: 1-888-875-0001 10 |

“The Black Hills are intimate mountains,” Honerkamp said. “They are a region of uncommon scenic beauty that seems to combine with an aura of mystery and magic to create a place that’s special to so many people. It’s relatively easy to find solitude in sacred places.” The Black Hills, among the earth’s most ancient mountain ranges, are home to 18 peaks exceeding 7,000 feet, “and you can climb to the top of every one of them,” Honerkamp said. “We have canyons and gorges that are easily accessible, and some are older than the Grand Canyon. We have wildlife galore, including buffalo, elk, deer, Bighorn sheep, Rocky Mountain goats, coyote and mountain lion, yet there are few mosquitoes and no wild bear, so it’s a safe place. “Unlike the Rockies, which are normally viewed from afar and are big enough to punish the inexperienced or careless outdoorsman, the Black Hills are user-friendly and inviting,” he added. “We find our visitors revel in the simple things—the stars at night that are obscured at home by city lights, sitting on a hotel veranda sipping a cup of coffee while the coyotes yip in a nearby canyon, or their kids running through the woods, climbing a rock or wading a gurgling stream.” ■

STATUE: EDWARD HLAVKA, SCULPTOR

Edward Hlavka’s life-size bronze sculpture of Thomas Jefferson signing the Declaration of Independence, with Mt. Rushmore in the background.

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Lane County

FUN FOR THE YOUNG

and the Young-at-Heart In Lane County, Oregon, even octogenarians feel like kids againâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; climbing trees, playing in the sand and paddling down rivers. Here the simple joys of childhood take on extraordinary proportions.

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SANDBOARDER: LON BEALE

by Amanda Bjerke

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TREE CLIMBERS: PACIFIC TREE CLIMBING INSTITUTE, LLC

Consider the Pacific Tree Climbing Institute in Eugene. From April through November, certified arborist Rob Miron helps folks of all ages attain a lofty perspective. “Generally speaking we climb 200 feet or higher off the ground. It’s a completely different perspective than being on the forest floor. Wildlife has more interest in you. Birds come really close. We see the big raptors flying around. Once we had an osprey with a fish in its talons come within 10 feet of us,” he said. Climbs usually last all day. Miron explained the process, “We’re typically up 100 feet at noon. We stop and have lunch prepared by a chef on board. We get good organic meals in the woods.” The climbers eat in a tree boat. “It’s a great way station, a sturdy hammock with four points of connection with a mattress in the bottom. It’s what we sleep in as well.”

Miron explained that his services are tailored to fulfilling his client’s dreams and for many folks that means sleeping high in the tree canopy. “Mostly people want to spend two nights. We do have a person who wants to do five nights, and we’re going to help them with that. It is an amazing experience. When you wake up in the canopy, every living thing around you acts as if you’re supposed to be there. The birds are Mother Earth’s alarm clocks. They’re singing and jumping along the limbs all around you. It is incredible.”

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Lane County

Miron’s services also include the possibility of zooming along zip lines between the trees. “Generally they’re between 100 and 150 feet in length and about 150 feet in the air. That’s a lot of fun, too.” The tree-climbing season extends from April through November. It costs $200 per person for a day climb—six hours of fun and lunch. Overnight stays span 24 hours, cost $500 and include three meals. Equipment is similar to that used by rock climbers. No special instruction is required. “It’s a lot of rope work, more so than fixing anchors. Tree climbing is much easier than rock climbing,” Miron said. There is no age limit. “The youngest person [to participate] was two years old. The oldest was 82. They all loved it. But that 82-year-old was really something. He had been the head of his local Boy Scouts. So we were pretty impressed because he had spent a lot of time in the forest, and he said it was the most fun he’d ever had.” Age is no bar to participating in another seemingly extreme Lane County adventure—sandboarding. Think snowboarding down steep dunes. Just 60 miles west of Eugene, the consummate beach town, Florence, is home to Lon Beale and his Sand Master Park—the world’s first sandboarding facility. Not that the sport is new. Beale, considered by many to be the father of modern sandboarding, said “while it may be the latest phenomenon in board sports, it’s probably among the oldest sports in the world. Chinese and Egyptians were sliding down dunes thousands of years ago.” Beale has spent much of his life perfecting the art. As a kid growing up near Death Valley, he “used to slide down the dunes on old car hoods. It was crazy.”

14 |

Back home in Oregon he has free rein at a park where creating jumps, rails and half-pipes is as easy as building a sandcastle. “We can shape it any way we want it,” Beale said, “and when it dries we can ride all the way down a dune and into the ocean if we want. Riding into the waves at sunset is magical. It’s just addictive.”

TREE: PACIFIC TREE CLIMBING INSTITUTE, LLC

Now, sandboarding has gone mainstream and Beale’s facility leads the way. Josh Tenge, four-time world sandboarding champion, gives instruction at Beale’s park. “GQ [magazine] just did a story on people with the world’s 50 top jobs, and they included Josh.” Beale said. Rightly so. The snowboard-instructor-turned-professional-sandboarder is paid to travel the globe sliding down the world’s steepest sandpiles.

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SAND BOARDERS: LON BEALE

Oregon visitors can get in on the fun with very little training. “If you are a surfer or a snowboarder, you’re almost there,” Beale said. “It’s just different enough that you need a little instruction.” Even people who don’t have a knack for staying upright on the steeps have a great time according to Beale. “The sand doesn’t hurt you. We ride shirtless and in shorts. The sand grains aren’t anchored like they would be if you were rubbing up against sandpaper. By the time they’ve formed a dune, the sand grains are very soft and non-abrasive. It’s like playing football or volleyball on the beach. It doesn’t hurt to fall down.” Last year more than 17,000 people took to the 40-acre park. “The youngest was three; the oldest was 84,” Beale recounted. Because it’s sand, older people are more likely to try it. But the bulk of the crowd is in their mid-30s.” A 24-hour pass provides unlimited access to the dunes, plus free sandboard wax. A one-hour private lesson is $45. The season never ends. “Snowboarders and surfers get a few months out of the year and then they’re done. We never stop,” Beale said. Lon Beale is not Lane County’s only adventure pioneer. In the 1920s a 13-year-old with the regal name of Prince Helfrich began taking tourists down the McKenzie River. He went on to develop the McKenzie River Drift Boat and a rafting dynasty. Jonnie Helfrich is married to Prince Helfrich’s grandson Aaron. She explained, “Prince was a pioneer in the creation of rivercraft and also in the exploration of new rivers. He had three sons and a daughter. All the sons followed Prince into the river business. My husband is a third-generation guide. Currently, there are 10 of us guiding. We represent seven different companies. A fourth generation of Helfrichs is guiding now, and I have no doubt that when my kids get a little older, they’ll be involved.”

Jonnie Helfrich, a lifelong boater, runs her family’s Oregon rafting operation. Her husband guides on the Middle Fork of Idaho’s Salmon River. The two met when her Virginia canoe club hired his company to provide raft support for a trip down that legendary waterway. “It was a successful river romance,” she said. “I moved to Eugene the next January, got a job teaching school and five years later we were married.” Her river capabilities made her a natural fit for the family business.

“As a guide, I had lived in a lot of different places—Virginia, West Virginia, Georgia, North and South Carolina, Maine, California. This is a very unique place from a rafting standpoint. The McKenzie is not a terribly difficult river. The hardest rapid is a Class III. They’re not scary at all, just a lot of fun. The McKenzie is fed by a huge underground water system, so even in drought years the water level doesn’t fluctuate much over the course of summer. When the Willamette is dropping like a rock, we’re maintaining on the McKenzie,” she continued.

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Lane County

Jonnie Helfrich also noted that the Eugene area is unique from a lifestyle standpoint as well. “The number of opportunities is really neat. People come out and think that in Oregon it rains all the time. That’s just not true. But, that said, you should be prepared for everything especially if you’re planning a whirlwind tour of the county.” Helfrich noted that Lane County stretches from the Oregon Coast to the soaring Cascade Mountains and also includes the lush Willamette Valley home to many wineries, “It is possible to go from playing at the beach to hiking in the mountains in a single day. So, you should be prepared to layer up. Shorts and a nice warm jacket are both a must.” Explaining that she grew up in the “Megalopolis of southeastern Virginia, Helfrich also lauded Lane County’s culture. “I like the arts and I love Eugene

16 |

because it offers both. I am able to go rafting during the day, and at night I can be all dressed up at the Hult Center for the ballet. To be able to expose my kids to all the aspects of life here is really special,” Helfrich concluded.

DID YOU KNOW? Eugene, a.k.a Track Town, USA, is home to the University of Oregon where legendary track coach Bill Bowerman and his star Steve Prefontaine inspired a running craze that swept America in the early 1970s. Prefontaine perished in a 1975 car accident in Eugene. Bowerman founded Nike, now based in the Portland suburb Beaverton. Eugene still retains its Track Town cred’ as the site of the 2008 Olympic Track and Field Trials. ■

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BUSINESS CLASS

Resisting Recession in the Rockies by Colleen Birch Maile

F

rom Main Street to Wall Street, the nation seems awash in economic gloom. However, in Rocky Mountain resort areas, talk of downturn is met with little more than a shrug and a smile. The positive attitude isn’t limited to A-list resorts such as Aspen and Jackson Hole. Communities neighboring these playgrounds of the rich and richer also retain their optimism against a tide of recessionary rumblings. Consider the string of communities hugging the Idaho line east of Jackson Hole, Wyoming. This is an up-and-coming paradise, an easy drive from Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee ski resorts and Grand Teton National Park. It benefits from the same stunning views, abundant wildlife and blue-ribbon fishing streams that made Jackson Hole one of the nation’s richest zip codes. Its potential is not lost on well-heeled investors. Tiny Driggs, Idaho, a ranching community and newly discovered second-home hot spot, is being transformed by Huntsman Springs, an undertaking of Jon Huntsman, the billionaire philanthropist and industrialist. Huntsman Springs Development Director Bill Reid explained, “So far we’ve donated well over $2 million to the county for a new courthouse. There have also been donations to the local high school for athletic facilities. It’s a wonderful thing to be involved in. Once the Huntsman family puts their name on something, there’s no question about the quality and the integrity,” he said. “Jon Huntsman, Sr. grew up in Blackfoot, Idaho (about 100 miles to the west), and he’s loved the Teton Valley for a very long time. As an avid fly-fisherman, he has a home

here. This project helps ensure that the valley develops in such a way that it will be all the things it can be.” The 1,350-acre project just off Driggs’ Main Street is billed as “smart growth” for its inclusion of open space and conservation efforts. Once completed it will include a 300-room hotel, 18-hole golf course designed by David Kidd, and 650 residences including townhouses, cabins and single-family homes. Approximately 500 acres will remain open space. A small buffalo herd will continue to roam the property. Reclamation efforts are rehabilitating former cattle grazing lands. Reid comes to the project after a long career developing golf course properties throughout the nation. He said that Huntsman Springs is being well-received by people “reaching out for a quieter time and the opportunity to have control in your life. I’ve lived in lots of places—Florida, Arizona, California, Connecticut. Here the quality of air, the reduction in traffic, the ability to see stars in the night sky is unsurpassed.” Reid has plenty of company when it comes to singing the praises of Teton Valley. Five miles south of Driggs and just two miles from equally tiny Victor, Idaho, Teton Reserve is a golfcentric development. Homes are replete with all the high-end amenities typical of real estate in more exclusive resort markets. Prices are significantly less. “We have homes that are similar to what you’d find in Jackson or Sun Valley [where even townhouses come with a six-figure price tag] for $799,900,” Project Manager Mike McCarthy explained.

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GOLF COURSE AND FRAMING: ©2008 STEVE INCH

One of many spectacular Teton Reserve views.

Recently, the partners in Teton Reserve determined that the market was right for a fractional ownership offering. It’s now possible for buyers to purchase the Teton Valley lifestyle by buying fully deeded, one-eighth interests in turnkey homes. Fractional interests start at $139,000 for a two-bedroom, two-bath lodge loaded with upscale amenities. McCarthy, who recently returned from an international symposium on fractional ownership, effused about the concept’s advantages. “The average second-home owner uses their vacation place less than a month out of the year. With a fractional interest you have all the advantages of second-home ownership and none of the headaches. It makes sense for many reasons.” An intricate scheduling system assures owners specific weeks of residency throughout the year. “If they want to come at other times and we have availability in a property comparable to the one they own, we do our best to accommodate those dates as well.” McCarthy explained. All Teton Reserve owners—those who purchase a wholly owned property and those who buy a fractional interest—benefit from players’ privileges at the nation’s only 18-hole reversible golf course. Designed by Hale Irwin, it includes 16 greens with alternate tee boxes. “Approached from different

This home under construction at Teton Reserve benefits from wide open views.

directions, they still have to be receptive. So, Hale Irwin had to create a primary routing that also could be played in the opposite direction. On any given day the course actually changes directions,” McCarthy noted. “The grounds people are trained to make the switch. Signage has to change, too. Our 18 holes are actually four different courses. It’s an old tradition. The Old Course at St. Andrews is also reversible. This is the first in the U.S. We’re quite proud of it.”

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BUSINESS CLASS

The area serves up opportunities for water fun

There are other reasons to be proud of his property’s potential. While McCarthy acknowledged that the valley is not experiencing the same “land rush we saw in late 2006 and 2007, it’s still a healthy market. There is so much to do here—hiking, biking, world-renowned fly-fishing. Of course skiing. I am so glad to be in Idaho.” As is Sun Valley, Idaho’s Gretchen Peter and the rest of the team at Valley Properties, Inc., developers of The Residences at Thunder Springs, a 24-unit fractional development in the nation’s first destination ski resort. Like McCarthy’s project, Thunder Springs offers a one-eighth interest and access to all the amenities enjoyed by those who fully own homes in the development. The price tags are significantly higher than those at Teton Reserve—$465,000 for an interest in a three-bedroom condo. Golf privileges at the nine-hole Bigwood Course and membership in the immense Zenergy Health Club and Day Spa are available to all owners. The state-of-the-art fitness facility includes indoor tennis and squash courts, a wealth of training options and an elaborate salt-water aquatics center that features connected indoor and outdoor pools comfortably heated year-round. “We’ve been wanting to do a fractional in the Sun Valley area for about 15 years,” Peter, Valley Properties’ executive director of marketing, said. “We anticipate it will be an easy sell on lots of fronts. We have a highly targeted audience in our own homeowners. Some will buy because they’re downsizing or want a condo for guests or staff members. We also expect a great deal of interest

from the friends of people who already own a home here. The service and amenities we provide are very important to our future success. So is this wonderful location.” In Sun Valley, people continue to come for the winter and stay for the summer, according to Darlene Young, vice president and managing broker of Sotheby’s International Realty’s Sun Valley brokerage. Like all her counterparts in Idaho’s real estate industry, she remains buoyant about her state’s long-term potential. “We aren’t completely recession-proof in that what happens in the rest of the country does have some effect on us, but our community is certainly set apart in many ways. We didn’t have bad lending practices here. We’ve seen very few foreclosures. Our buyers and sellers are typically financially solvent. Many of our properties are second homes, and they are purchased with discretionary funds; 45% of local transactions are paid for in cash.” Those upscale buyers typically “really care about this place,” she continued. “There’s a great sense of community. Our second homeowners tend to be extremely generous. They love it so much they’re willing to get involved to create more positive amenities. That all adds value to the area and evidences the confidence people have in the Wood River Valley,” she said. “Right now is a great time to buy into what is an amazing lifestyle. Some properties are offered at 2004 prices, and that means buyers are really interested. We are very, very busy,” she concluded. ■

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Appaloosa Ridge

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BUSINESS CLASS

BRILLIANT DEDUCTION$: Everything Second Homeowners Need to Know About Saving on Their Taxes by Christine Karpinski

Ten years ago, Christine Karpinski was a stay-at-home mom who desperately wanted to own a beach retreat but couldn’t afford one. After much research, she discovered she could realize her dream by buying a property and using a “rent by owner” vacation-rental model to profit from her investment in more ways than one. Since purchasing that first home in Destin, Florida, Christine has become an expert on second-home ownership, a best-selling author and a much-in-demand speaker. She logs 100,000 air miles a year sharing her unique insight and expertisee with others and traveling to vacation homes that do double duty as rental properties. To learn more, visit www.HomeAway.com.

HIRE A PROFESSIONAL. Unless you are an accounting genius, I don’t recommend sitting down in front of your home computer with your pile of paperwork, including those endless tax forms, and doing your taxes yourself. It’s pretty complex. In fact, my accountant had to fill out 10 different forms for my taxes this year! There’s a lot of information to go through when you rent out a vacation property, and the rules keep changing. If you aren’t trained to look for all of the different elements, it’s likely that you will miss something. Most vacation homeowners are better off using a tax accountant or tax attorney to prepare and file their income taxes. Don’t worry, their fees are deductible. INCLUDE EVERY POSSIBLE CENT IN YOUR GROSS RENTAL REVENUE. If you were to get audited,

income you overlooked could cost you big. Go through all of your records and then go through

them again to make sure you are reporting ting the right amount. Your gross rental ntal revenue should include all monies ies collected from renters (and kept). • • • • • •

Base rental rate Cleaning fees Parking fees Amenity fees Pet fees Any portion of a security deposit that you keep, and don’t forget to also line-item on your deductions the costs associated with fixing the problem.

Remember that gross rental revenue does not include monies that you return to the renter upon departure, such as refunded deposits, refunded pet deposits, and sales taxes collected and paid to your local or state sales tax office. Keep up with your day-to-day expenses. Sometimes we focus so much on the big deductions— maybe the kitchen was renovated or a bedroom was redecorated—that we lose focus on all those little expenses that add up during the year. Things like checking/credit card account administrative fees, newspaper delivery fees, and postage for mailing paperwork may have been overlooked in the past, but it’s time for that to stop. If they are for your rental home, they are all deductible.

CHRISTINE KARPINSKI AND VACATION PROPERTIES COVER: CHRISTINE KARPINSKI

R

enting out your second home is a great moneymaker and when you save the maximum on taxes, it’s even better. Here are my top 10 suggestions for making vacation homeownership a lot less, well, taxing—deductions to help you make the most of your investment:

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DON’T FORGET EVERYTHING THAT GOES INTO A MAINTENANCE TRIP. Most people remember to

deduct their travel expenses for the trips they take to their property to clean or decorate. But think about the other expenses you rack up during that trip. You

have to eat while you are there, right? It’s likely that you are using cleaning supplies and/or tools as well. These are all costs that can be deducted. If you hire local maintenance or cleaning services in lieu of taking the do-it-yourself route, the expenses you pay out for those services are equally deductible. One word to the wise: these expenses will need to be well-documented, so be sure to keep every receipt, invoice or bill that comes into your possession. REMEMBER THAT ALL OF THAT INSURANCE IS DEDUCTIBLE. Just like any home, your vacation rent-

al requires a lot of insurance. These fees don’t have to be something you benefit from only when something goes wrong. Be sure to keep up with your payments throughout the year and deduct their totals when you file. HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION DUES DEDUCTIONS.

Cringe when you get the bill for your homeowner’s association dues? You aren’t the only one. But here’s some good news for you: As long as you have rented out your vacation home (i.e. turned it into a business), those dues are deductible. And if you’ve ever had to travel to attend a homeowner’s association meeting, those expenses are deductible, too. Just remember, keep documentation of the expenses! DEDUCT YOUR DECORATING COSTS. Owning a second home is one thing. Decorating it is another. It can take a lot of time and money to decorate your second home, and it’s sometimes hard to justify spending money on new furniture or wall hangings. Here’s some more good news. Because these are considered capital improvements, they can be deducted. So, no more guilt. Improvements are crucial to keeping up your rental business. REMEMBER HOW PEOPLE FIND YOU. Do you advertise your rental in any way, maybe online or in newspapers or magazines? The costs—fees, photography, copywriting and so forth—can all be

deducted. Do you have business cards that you hand out to your renters? You get a tax break on the printing costs. Take stock each year of what you’ve done to build your business, and you are sure to find extra deductibles. YOUR HOME OFFICE ISN’T PART OF YOUR HOME. It’s part of your rental business. Vacation homeowners have a tendency to lump the home office used for managing their rental property in with their primary residence. Instead, think of it as part of your business. You can deduct the costs of computers, furnishings, utility bills, etc. based on your percentage of business use versus the percentage of personal use. This is usually based on the percentage of square footage of your home office—for example, if your home is 2,000 square feet and you have a 200-square-foot home office that you use solely for your rental business, then 10 percent of your household expenses may be tax deductible. DEDUCTIONS FOR NEW RENTAL OWNERS. If you just recently purchased your vacation home and opened its doors to renters, there are a few deductions you’ll want to include. One of those is your closing fees and any legal fees associated with the purchase of your vacation rental. And all owners, beginners and veterans alike, should include documentation of their property taxes, mortgage interest, and any refinancing costs when they head to their accountant’s office.

If this list doesn’t get you all fired up about the prospect of next year’s tax season, that’s okay. You’re only human. But hopefully, you’ll recall it the next time you buy a ticket to visit your rental property or buy new curtains for the master bedroom. Save those receipts! Come April 15, 2009, you’ll be glad you were so diligent. The above is intended as a general guideline and should not be construed as tax advice. Be sure to consult your tax professional. ■

Christine Karpinski is the author of How to Rent Vacation Properties by Owner, 2nd Edition: The Complete Guide to Buy, Manage, Furnish, Rent, Maintain and Advertise Your Vacation Rental Investment (Kinney Pollack Press, 2007, $26) and Profit from Your Vacation Home Dream: The Complete Guide to a Savvy Financial and Emotional Investment (Kaplan, 2005, $19.95).

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GREEN REWARDS American Traveler understands the importance of caring for ourselves and the environment we all share. In this department expert travelers divulge their best suggestions for preservation of self and planet.

5 Healthy Tips to Travel By

#1. HYDRATE, DRINK PLENTY OF WATER. “If you’re in

coach class, ask for a can of sparkling water. Most airlines will give you a full can. Otherwise, you may just get a plastic cupful. I never drink alcohol on airplanes. No sugary beverages either. Just water.”

#2 BRING HEALTHFUL SNACKS “I avoid food that has

a lot of packaging. If possible, bring fresh fruit or a banana from home, or some nuts. Now, a lot of us are so busy we can’t think that far in advance. So if you do buy from an airport concessionaire, consider all the options. Look for those that don’t use Styrofoam packaging but use biodegradable packaging instead. Usually they’ll have a sign to let you know. Avoid water bottles that have a huge carbon footprint because it’s bottled far away and has already been transported a great distance.” #3 MOVE “It’s important to get up and move around. Stand in line for the restroom and do a bit of stretching. I always ask for an aisle seat so I don’t disturb others. I try to take time to relax on the plane. I don’t allow myself to work the entire time. You need to take a break so you don’t arrive stressed out.”

Sometimes it’s just impossible to get up and move during a flight. Portable foot pedals like this patented device from StepIt make it possible to exercise calf muscles and increase blood circulation in the lower legs while seated on an aircraft.

#4 PACK LIGHT AND PACK SMART “These days, it’s all

about fuel, and the amount of stuff each of us takes influences overall weight, and that affects fuel efficiency. Shop for fabrics that can be rinsed out in a sink and that dry in a few hours. I travel with a small container of hand-wash solutions and do a lot of rinsing. I also avoid too many [clothing] color palettes. In spring and summer I’ll settle on one dominant color.

STEPIT: MAGELLAN’S

N

iki Leondakis, chief operating officer of Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants, travels all over the U.S. and into Canada overseeing the company’s 41 upscale boutique properties. She logs even more pleasure miles accompanying her husband, an internationally acclaimed restaurant designer, to far-flung projects. “I travel to all the existing Kimpton hotels and restaurants and also look at potential new locations. Then, from a leisure standpoint, one of my hobbies is travel. In my free time I do the hard work of researching restaurants all over the world,” she explained with a laugh. “I log around 200,000 air miles each year.” Her Kimpton Group is a long-time proponent of eco-friendly practices from in-room recycling bins to the use of non-toxic cleaning supplies to special discounts for the drivers of fuel-efficient hybrid vehicles. As part of a commitment to local, organic restaurant ingredients, many of the hotel grounds include vegetable and herb gardens. “At our Hotel Monaco in Washington D.C., it’s right in the courtyard. The guests can see the heirloom tomatoes (the chef uses in his menus) growing,” she said. Here, this eco-advocate shares her top tips for healthful travel. Ranging from personal care to global awareness, these suggestions can easily be adopted by anyone.

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SOAP SHEETS: MAGELLAN’S

Every trip I ask myself ‘what color is this trip?’ Last year I had a purple sumDrop a bio-degradable soap sheet into water for instant suds. The 2 3/4” x 1/4” x mer. For business trips, I 1 3/4” TSA-compliant container holds 50 use a lot of black—black sheets. Available from Magellan’s. pants, turtleneck, scoop neck and change it up with different jackets. Same with shoes. They’re a big culprit. I only do flats for leisure. My husband has it pretty easy. He’s naturally efficient and his clothes, pants and shirts, easily do double-duty. For shoes, he packs driving mocs. There are several brands out there. He prefers Tod’s. They also pack flat. So do our athletic shoes. We both take Nike Free. Unless you’re doing marathon training, they work for cross training and they flatten right down. I am constantly thinking about things that pack flat, even handbags. Scarves are great to change up an outfit for women, and they take up hardly any room.” “Tell people you want better options. Even if the Nike Free shoes person serving you is not making those kinds of decisions, ask them when they will be using biodegradable containers. Hopefully, the comments will eventually filter back to management. Management values customer feedback. It puts pressure on them to look at other options because the options are out there. Our company’s surveys tell us that 69% of our customers are very concerned about the environment and factor enviro-conciousness into their buying decisions. We have 47 different operating practices that have been modified to be more eco-friendly. Tell travelers to let the places where they eat and where they stay know that they want to see a commitment to the environment.” ■

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SAFE KEEPING TSA

TSA Simplified N

early seven years after 9/11, most travelers are familiar with the airport security drill: present your boarding pass and ID, empty your pockets, remove your shoes. But while most folks readily comply with these and other rules, the question remains: Why are these measures necessary? And why does it seem like the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is always adding to or changing the rules? The answer is that the threat is still very real and is constantly changing and evolving. So TSA also must evolve. When a terrorist plot was uncovered two years ago, TSA responded by limiting the quantities of gels and liquids that passengers could carry. Because there is still information about the possibility of shoes being

used as a weapon, it is still mandatory to take them off for additional screening. And as terrorists continue to develop more sophisticated methods using common items that are not prohibited, TSA continues to develop and deploy new technologies and procedures to help keep us safe. That’s because your safety is TSA’s priority. Every rule ties directly to a relevant security concern based on information TSA gathers or gets from other government agencies and law enforcement partners. So here are some of the most commonly asked questions travelers ask about why TSA does what it does, along with some tips that will help speed you through the checkpoint:

Q. Why do I have to show a government ID with my boarding pass? A. Identity matters. Positively establishing

Q. Why do I have to remove my laptop from its bag? A. TSA screens computers to ensure the

identity is as important as the metal detector.

electronics have not been tampered with.

Remember that fumbling to take your ID out of your purse or wallet slows everybody down, so have these items out and ready as you approach the checkpoint. If you’ve lost your ID, tell the security officer and be prepared for extra screening. You can put your ID away after it’s been checked, but keep your boarding pass out until after you walk through the metal detector. You may need to show it again.

Don’t forget to take your laptop out of its case and place it in a separate bin. Video cameras and full-size DVD players and video game consoles also need to come out of their cases.

Q. Why are my liquids limited to three ounces or less in a baggie? A. Liquid explosives are still a threat. Limiting the amount each passenger carries on reduces the risk. Keeping track of your liquids and gels is easy if you remember 3–1–1: - 3-ounce bottles or less for all liquids, gels and aerosols, placed in - 1 quart-sized, clear, plastic, zip-top bag; - 1 bag per passenger placed separately in a security bin for X-ray screening. 3-1-1 rules apply only to carry-on bags. You can pack larger quantities of liquids and gels in checked baggage.

Q. Why do I have to remove my coat and shoes? A. So TSA can ensure passengers aren’t hiding dangerous items under bulky clothing, and because TSA knows that terrorists still seek to hide dangerous items in shoes. We suggest you wear shoes that are easy on/off. Jackets and sweaters also go in the bin, along with any metal items you have on your person or in your pockets.

In this post-9/11 world, security is a partnership. By arriving at the checkpoint prepared to follow these and other security procedures, you help TSA keep you safe by showing you’re not a threat. More questions? Visit the TSA web site, www.tsa.gov, before you travel to ensure a smooth trip through security.

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ON THE HORIZON COMING SOON: NEW SCREENER FRIENDLY LAPTOP BAGS MEAN YOUR COMPUTER STAYS PUT You bet. TSA has given the go-ahead to manufacturers to develop laptop computer bags that don’t require removing the computer. That’s right—bags you can keep your computer in for screening. We expect these newly designed bags to start hitting the market this fall. TSA is ready to accept those “checkpoint friendly” models designed so other items don’t obstruct the view of the laptop while still in the bag. This is a great example of how collaboration with private industry can improve customer service and potentially shorten wait times. Tips for consumers looking to purchase these bags can be found at www.tsa.gov.

Pédrique

TRANSPORTATION SECURITY OFFICER HOMETOWN:

Baltimore, Maryland

WITH TSA SINCE:

ALLOWING PASSENGERS TO GO AT THEIR OWN PACE Self-Select Lanes are coming to an airport near you. Nearly 50 airports now let travelers select one of three lanes—Expert, Casual, or Families/Special Assistance. The idea is to give travelers a choice based on their needs and knowledge of the security screening process. By grouping passengers together, frequent flyers get through more quickly, while giving families traveling with kids, first-time flyers, or those with special needs more time. Everybody wins.

December 2001

‘ A long time visual drawer, Pedrique has an eye for details – and he’s not afraid to use it. He notices everything that passes through the checkpoint.

Coming Soon: A new look for TSA security officers.

GOT FEEDBACK? Whether you have a complaint, question, or compliment TSA wants to hear from you. Visit http://www.tsa.gov/blog to join the conversation. ■

WHAT’S UP WITH THAT?

TSA OFFICER: DAN WHIPPS

LOCKS: DAVID TROPP, SAFE SKIES, LLC

Q. Can I lock my checked bag?

A. Yes. But if a TSA security officer needs to open a bag for inspection, it may be necessary to break the lock. Passengers can purchase TSA-recognized locks, which can be opened by security officers without breaking them. (By the way, if your bag is inspected you’ll receive a notice saying so. You’ll know we’ve been there.) For a list of TSA-recognized locks, visit www.tsa.gov.

These patented TSA recognized luggage locks from Safe Skies make it easier to travel secure in the knowledge that your packed bags are locked up and ready to go!

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CONCOURSE

EATING YOUR WAY Through DIA

N

early every major air terminal offers plenty of sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of flight. For passengers traveling through Denver International Airport, there’s a refuge one floor above the passenger level of United’s Concourse B. Directly above the train station in the center of the concourse, a great selection of restaurants and other diversions awaits on the mezzanine level. The first restaurant to open “upstairs” was Wolfgang Puck’s Express, a rapidly expanding offshoot of the Austrian chef’s original Wolfgang Puck fine dining restaurants. Puck Express provides healthy choices for quick, casual dining featuring a great selection of freshly made sandwiches, salads and woodfired pizzas. Their chicken pesto sandwich is my pick. If Mexican cuisine suits your fancy, you’ll also find a Cantina Grill Express serving up a “combinacion grande” of excellent dishes from south of the border. I often opt for the vegetarian burrito along with an ice-cold Corona. The newest eatery upstairs is Paradise Bakery and Café. Westerners are already familiar with their freshly prepared baked goods (made from scratch). The faithful and newcomers alike will appreciate their fresh selection of soups, salads, sandwiches, paninis and wraps. Try the Crumbly Blue Cheese or Paradise Greek salads.

AIRPORT: DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

America’s major airports are more than gateways to opportunity and adventure. They are also strongholds of entertainment and enterprise. This magazine invites savvy, frequent fliers to share insight into the diversions that make it easy to wile away time between flights. This edition’s contributor, career traveler Steve Hart, began delivering airline tickets for a small-town travel agent when he was a freshman in high school. He became a full-time travel agent before heading off to the University of Colorado where he obtained a business degree with an emphasis in Traffic and Transportation. The education served him well. His long aviation-marketing career culminated in 15 years as vice-president of SkyWest Airlines. After retiring, Hart signed up for his first frequent-flier card and logged almost 200,000 miles in just 13 months. He now serves as a consultant to the industry and travels frequently through Denver International Airport, a facility he says offers a mezzanine full of tasty options.

by Steve Hart

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ATRIUM: DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Their turkey cranberry sandwich is playground will keep your small travelers entertained while you great regardless of the season. enjoy your waffle cone and Every sandwich is served with a freshly baked muffin. And every freshly made cookie du jour. Take traveler will appreciate A Massage, some baked goods onboard only if Inc. where, for just $15, you can you want to provoke your seatmates have a trained masseuse toil for to envy. 10 minutes to eradicate travelIf cold and creamy better suits related tension. your traveling sweet tooth, you’ll The atrium in the Elrey Jeppesen Terminal DIA. If you’ve still got time to spare, there’s probably also find Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream. Not content no better spot in all of DIA for people watching. with just vanilla and chocolate? You can choose The mezzanine balcony affords great views of the from flavors like Crème Brulee, Pumpkin Cheeseconcourse level below where literally thousands of cake, Coconut Seven Layer Bar, and Phish Food! passengers each day rush to catch flights to points For the health conscious, a wide assortment of all over the globe. Fitting, then, that you can also smoothies, low fat yogurt, cold drinks and sorbet is get a great perspective of the statue of Colorado’s also available. own John “Jack” Swigert, Jr. who had his own There’s more to the mezzanine than food. bird’s-eye view as one of three astronauts on NASA’s Business travelers will appreciate the Qwest ill-fated Apollo XIII mission. Business Center where a wide variety of businessDenver’s Concourse B Mezzanine features more related services and spaces are available. If you’re options than you’d find throughout many mid-size a smoker, try the Aviator’s Lounge. And, if you’ve American airports. Scoot up the escalators on your got kids in tow, head for the SkyPort Play Area on next trip through DIA and check it all out! ■ the west end of the mezzanine. This miniature

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For more information, visit Fly2Pismo.com or call 1-800-443-7778 AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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ON THE FLY

Louisville, Kentucky’s Jonathan Blue Connecting with Business’ Most Important Asset

SAVVY SECRET:

When flying on a small-capacity regional aircraft Jonathan Blue puts his “short-list” of reading material and other travel essentials in the computer sleeve of his briefcase. He gate-checks the main bag and carries just the sleeve onboard.

JONATHAN BLUE: BLUE EQUITY, LLC

J

onathan Blue knows business. Blue Equity, LLC, the private equity firm he heads, has amassed a diverse roster of interests. It has created companies that produce Spanish-language Yellow Page directories and agencies representing the likes of Janet Jackson and Reggie Bush. His enterprises promote media rights to events including the Boston Marathon and the French Open. Others are involved in real estate and financial services. More than 1,000 people work for various Blue Equity holdings. Empire building is second nature to Blue. For four generations his family has been a mainstay in Louisville’s entrepreneurial circles. In 1913, Blue’s ancestors began a scrap metal recycling business that flourished and paved the way for a network of affiliates. Now a part of Caterpillar, those entities were first sold to Progress Rail Services Corporation. Jonathan Blue worked there too, handling worldwide business development of railroad and rail-related services before leaping into the high-energy private equity arena. Now, Blue’s business holdings take him from coast to coast and south of the border. Despite the wonders of technology, he chooses to make contacts by flying four out of five week-

days. He maintains that personal interaction is still essential to success. “It’s always been part of our philosophy. There is nothing like face-toface access, whether it’s meeting with a client or even making an introduction. Email and phone calls are fine, but there is no better way to send the message that you really care about taking the next step with somebody—no matter what that next step may be—than saying ‘I’ll see you tonight,’ or ‘I’ll be there in the morning.’ Showing up on their doorstep means that this is really important to you.” The emphasis on the human touch reflects Blue’s belief that people are “a business’ most important asset. No matter how effective your processes, or how sophisticated the technology or machinery, at the end of the day people are the ones who still run everything. You have to be around them to really have an influence. It’s as true for employee relations as it is for working with partners and clients. There are no distractions when it’s one-on-one,” he said. Blue’s hometown makes accessing the world especially easy. “One of the great things about Louisville, and there are many, is that the central location means it’s just a 90-minute flight to much of the U.S. Even though I fly four out of five weekdays, I’m not on a plane too much. Typically it takes less than two hours to get where I want to go. There are non-stop options to New York City. And it’s a little under two hours to Houston and from there just two more hours to Mexico City. “For all the stuff that gets written, all the time, about what a hassle air travel is, at the end of the day, I still find it a remarkable thing. I can have

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When flying aboard regional aircraft (planes with fewer than 100 seats) consider accepting the offer to “gate check your luggage.” Airline personnel will take and tag your carry-on items, and give you a receipt. You will be relieved of the burden of toting and stowing your carryon bag. When you disembark it will be waiting beside the plane. Briefcases with removable computer sleeves make it easy to take just what you need with you when gate checking.

LUGGAGE: TUMI

Tumi Alpha Wheeled Deluxe Brief

breakfast at home with my family and dinner in Denver or L.A. with a client. To me the ease is still a little hard to comprehend.” Blue often departs Louisville on a regional jet to Chicago or Atlanta. Because one of his companies produces a community newspaper, publishing is a special interest. He carries a large amount of reading material onboard and reduces in-flight hassles by prioritizing his papers and minimizing carry-on luggage. “I have this great Tumi briefcase that doesn’t quite fit on the smaller planes. But it has a computer sleeve that I use as a mini-briefcase. I put everything I need for the plane in that sleeve. Then I gate check the bag. My shortlist makes it onboard. I don’t have to hassle with the briefcase. It works great.” As he finishes with a piece of reading material, Blue discards it as he travels. He also makes sure there is very little down time during his business trip. “I build a tight agenda around the city I am in. In addition to multiple meetings, I make sure I have dinner and lunch engagements. I always look for the opportunity to make the most of time. Except for exercise, I am busy.” His jam-packed schedule makes coming home to Louisville especially appealing. “It’s a wonderful place with an exceptional quality of life,” he said. “You can do things here you can’t do in a big urban metropolis. In one day you can take in a museum, a show and a sporting event,

because you can get to everything in a short period of time. The same amenities that require a drive across town in a big, big city are easily accessible in Louisville. And, the moderate climate means it’s easy to participate in things.” Civic honors reflect the breadth of Blue’s industriousness. He’s been Louisville’s Small Company Business Leader of the Year, earned the Governor’s Economic Development Award and was the youngest person to be named among Louisville Magazine’s “Most Powerful People.” Now chairman of the Chamber of Commerce and a member of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees he said, “I consider myself an ambassador for the city when I travel. At the same time, the more we travel the easier it is to bring back ideas from other states and countries. We can all learn so much from each other, and air travel makes it easier.” ■

SAVVY SECRET:

Frequent flier Jonathan Blue said he “always tries to take the first flight of the day, even if it’s at 5:45 in the morning. It may not be scientific, but in my mind, if something goes wrong with an early flight, subsequent schedules can be affected. I feel like I have a better chance of avoiding problems by leaving early. “

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CARRY ON

Creating a Personal Comfort Zone

A

lmost two decades ago, Anne McAlpin was a cruise director on a mission—to improve the way people packed. “I realized that most cruisers packed too much. I wanted people to learn how to pack their things more efficiently and have room to get things home at the end of the cruise.” She planned a shipboard event and was shocked when more than 100 people showed up. Her insight proved so popular she wrote a book, Pack it Up, in 1990. Together with a DVD of the same name it continues to be a favorite of frequent travelers determined to get the most out of every trip. In addition, Anne is a popular lecturer, traveling more than 400,000 air miles each year. Her seminars offer tips to groups ranging from Nordstrom department store employees to members of the American Automobile Association. She believes that it’s helpful to create an onboard refuge when flying. “Bring your own elegance with you,” she advised. “Do all you can to create a comfort zone so you can feel like you are in first class even when you fly coach.” In addition to the standard entertainment fare, here are some items sure to transform any flight into a relaxing experience.

1. SOMETHING WARM: Bring a blanket or

multi-purpose wrap from home. This is especially true if you find comfort in sleeping. But even if you plan to stay awake and work, it can be hard to regulate temperature in an aircraft. If you have a lightweight blanket that can also be used as a towel or a sarong, that means you can pack lighter. Even men can benefit from a small blanket that’s also a beach wrap. Plus, if you spill coffee it falls on your wrap not your business suit. I stow it in a gallon-size Ziploc bag, so it’s easy to get to. I know that if it comes from home it’s nice and clean. 2. SOMETHING SOFT: Either bring your own inflatable pillow or a regular pillow packed in a compression bag. A lumbar pillow is important if you find airline seats uncomfortable. Men often find this to be true. 3. SOMETHING TASTY: Bring upscale snacks. Almonds and chocolate mints are among my favorites. But, if you love peanut butter sandwiches, bring those. Whatever food comforts you. Do not bring yogurt or other gelatin or liquid-based foods. Bring a variety of treats. You can buy those small, 100-calorie snack packs, but I just make my own using the snack-size Ziploc bags. I consider variety a fun-factor, so I always have several different kinds.

SAVVY SECRET:

STAYING HYDRATED during travels does not mean you have to purchase bottled water from an airport concessionaire or depend upon a flight attendant’s good nature. Travel expert Anne McAlpin suggests that you carry an empty water bottle through the security checkpoint and fill it at a drinking fountain in the gate area. “You don’t have to buy water to have water with you at all times,” she emphasized.

Earplugs are my favorite things. I know there are very expensive BOSE noise cancellation systems and those are great, but I buy the very inexpensive kind that attach with a string. I buy them in quantity, and they’re less than a dollar a piece. Because they have a string they don’t get lost, and I always put five in

ANNE MCALPIN: CHRISTOPHER BRISCOE

4. SOMETHING TO MUFFLE SOUND:

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my carry-on bag. Should there be a crying baby or other distraction on the plane, I give everyone around me a set of earplugs. You’d think I was passing out hundred dollar bills.

TAGS: JEFF HOWE, IT’S. . . IN THE BAG!

SAVVY SECRET:

5. SOMETHING TO DIM LIGHT: Eye-masks are

very inexpensive and take up very little room, but I am just as likely to use a bandana. You can also use it as a washcloth when you reach your destination. ■

ANNE MCALPIN RECOMMENDS

that travelers conquer the “black plague” at baggage claim with ‘Tude Tags. A heavy-duty alternative to ribbons and bows, they don’t get caught in equipment and their humorous messages add a little levity to the travel experience. Created exclusively by Tags for Bags of Palm Desert California, they retail for around $10 each.

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W

hat a country! From soaring mountains to deep canyons, inland seas to towering waterfalls, America’s natural wonders are sites to behold. So are its singular cultural opportunities. After you’ve done Disney, toured Manhattan and conquered Vegas and L.A. there’s still much to experience all across the nation’s 3.6 million square miles. (That translates to more than 9-million square kilometers of fun.) The following pages offer tips about the USA’s lesser-known travel adventures and opportunities. All are easily accessed by air—still the most efficient way to get where you want to go.

If your only view of Great Falls is from our fabulous airport or from 25,000 feet above ground, you’re missing a world of adventure. In addition to being near the grand Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks, we’ve also got first class museums, historic attractions, thrilling outdoor opportunities and much more.

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FIRST CLASS DESTINATIONS

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA

Camping in Comfort — California Style

TENT: EL CAPITAN CANYON

I

f your camping repertoire includes pitching a pup-tent in the dark, sleeping on the hard ground and waking up with bugs in your hair, the proprietors of El Capitan Canyon, a “high-end” campground just north of Santa Barbara, want to talk to you. Indeed, they want to soothe and pamper you, tuck you into Egyptian cotton sheets and a down-filled duvet—all in the shade of a giant sycamore grove. Larry Callahan, managing partner, explained, “We want our guests to experience all of the ruggedness, spirituality and beauty that nature has to offer, but in comfortable surroundings complete with amenities. We offer contemporary camping—California style.” El Capitan’s tents are already in place—on raised wooden decks. Most feature hand-woven willow queen-size beds. Towels, toiletries and camping lanterns are provided. Fresh air wafts into screened windows. The doors zip up snug. Nearby cabins, built of cedar, are decorated in earth tones. Down-filled duvets cover cushy beds. All include bathrooms and wet bars; some feature jacuzzi tubs. Best of all, a five-minute stroll leads to El Capitan State Beach. Its sandy shore makes a great spot for swimming, surfing, picnicking and fishing. A 2.5-mile bike path leads to even more adventure at Refugio Beach. Only in the Golden State does camping carry this cachet. ■

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FIRST CLASS DESTINATIONS

BEND, OREGON

High Desert Museum

a wealth of interactive opportunities make the museum a must-see for every Bend visitor.

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LIVING HISTORY SAWMILL: HIGH DESERT MUSEUM

T

he ultimate encounter with Central Oregonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique character is available throughout the year at the extraordinary High Desert Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a must-see for any visitor. Even the most ardent golfer should make time for a tour. The ofďŹ cial missionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to help visitors explore and understand the cultures, history and wildlife of the vast High Desert region seems a bit dry (pun intended). The actual experience is as rich and varied as the area it represents. Located just a few miles south of Bend, it combines the best elements of a natural sciences facility, zoo, art gallery, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands-on learning center and history museum. Each distinct element works to amplify the fascinating High Desertâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an expanse stretching east from the Sierra to the Rockies, and north from Nevadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Great Basin to southern British Columbia. The work of Oregon artists, often demonstrated on site, typically poses an opportunity to share a unique element of High Desert life or landscape. Naturalists explain intriguing facts about animals housed in the facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s habitat. The 7,500-square-foot Birds of Prey Center hosts regular presentations that entertain and educate. Nature trails provide examples of and information about native vegetation. Equally beneďŹ cial are living history presentations, such as the historic Lazinka Sawmill. Powered by a 100-year-old engine, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the last mills of its kind in Oregon and is in operation most weekends between Memorial Day and the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s late September Harvest celebration. Impressive historical exhibits trace the intriguing saga of manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interaction with the High Desert Oregon landscape. Of special interest are details of Native American life through the 20th century. Living history presentations and

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FIRST CLASS DESTINATIONS

MISSOULA, MONTANA

Traveler’s Rest

TRAVELER’S REST: DALE DUFOUR

W

hen it comes to significant links to the past, none surpasses Traveler’s Rest State Park—11 miles southwest of Missoula just outside the tiny town of Lolo. Until a year ago, historians conjectured that the only tangible physical evidence of the Voyage of Discovery still in existence was William Clark’s name crudely carved into a stone pillar near Billings, Montana. They also believed that the creek Meriwether Lewis called Traveller’s [sic] Rest in his diary was located at the confluence of the Lolo and Bitterroot Rivers. However, in summer 2002, archeologists found evidence of the Corps’ latrine and central cook fire at what is now Traveler’s Rest State Park. The emerging facility strives to present interactive, interpretive experiences that bring history to life. A self-guided walking tour makes it easy to get in touch with America’s premiere explorers. This is more than the rehashing of a familiar story. As Traveler’s Rest Executive Director Loren Flynn explained, “We want this to be a multi-disciplinary experience. A place where people will walk away saying, ‘I didn’t know I’d learn about that.’” Open all year, Traveler’s Rest will ultimately incorporate elements of astronomy, archeology, geology, botany, and Native American arts. Bitterroot (Lewisia) plants, like those that sustained Native Americans for thousands of years, have been reintroduced to the site. “Remember, Lewis and Clark did not wander into a wilderness. They came into an existing culture that had been going on for thousands of years,” Flynn said. ■

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5 airlines providing non-stop service to 7 destinations and connecting flights to thousands of destinations worldwide.

www.flymissoula.com AMERICAN TRAVELER MAGAZINE PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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FIRST CLASS DESTINATIONS

OXNARD/VENTURA, CALFORNIA

America’s “Secret” National Park

J

ust 11 miles separate California’s mainland from Anacapa, the most accessible of the five islands comprising Channel Islands National Park. Traversing the short distance transports travelers back a century or more. In the hour-and-a-half it takes to travel from Oxnard’s Channel Islands Harbor to Anacapa, visitors to this almost anonymous national park trade 21st-century trappings for a world where nature rules. To prepare for the adventure, visit the National Parks Visitors Center in Ventura. Scale models indicate the size of the island chain, and interactive exhibits offer information about the region. It’s also possible to book a boat from here. Every excursion to the islands is a treat. You’ll likely encounter surfing dolphins and, depending on the time of year, may also see spouting whales. Consider taking to the water in a kayak once you arrive at your destination. Indigo waters cascading over the mouths of sea caves are hard to resist. They hold vibrant fish, tiny

teeming sea creatures and tide pools that are all but extinct along California’s Coast. Situated where cool and warm ocean waters mingle, the sea here provides a meeting ground for ocean mammals indigenous to both the north and south coastal areas. The archipelago is also home to six kinds of pinnipeds (seals, sea lions and their furry-flippered cousins). As the West Coast’s most important water-fowl nesting ground, the park is also a bird watcher’s fantasyland. Wildlife flourishes in part because only 30,000 humans visit the island chain each year. (The waters surrounding the island attract a total of 60,000 visitors annually.) Accommodations are primitive. Less than rugged-outdoors-types will want to combine a visit to the park with lodging on the mainland. ■

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FIRST CLASS DESTINATIONS

POCATELLO, IDAHO

Up-and-coming Literary Landmark

T

he Barnes and Noble crowd knows The Enders Hotel as a remarkable memoir by Brandon Schrand. The compelling rendition of western life in the 1980s was featured as a summer pick in the Barnes and Noble Great New Writers program and drew much critical praise. Fans of the book can visit its namesake still operating in Soda Springs, 50 miles east of the Pocatello Airport—the nearest air facility. Literary sojourners seeking to connect to the dilapidated lodging depicted in Schrand’s book are in for a surprise—albeit a pleasant one. While the “world’s largest captive geyser” still gushes just outside Schrand’s former hotel/home, The Enders has endured a major facelift. Tricked out to its 1917 grandeur with antique furnishings and historic memorabilia, the bed-and-breakfast houses a museum that serves as a nice introduction to area history. For extra and important insight into the dramatic changes this region has experienced in the past quarter century, read the book. Its poetic prose tells an important tale. ■

Old Trail Town • Cody, WY

You don’t have to search the globe for a great vacation, it’s here— Cody/Yellowstone Country. There’s no better place – or time – to be with your family or friends. Call or visit our website for a free vacation guide and package information.

Cody/Yellowstone

Country

P.O. Box 2454 •Cody, WY 82414 • 800-393-2639 • www.yellowstonecountry.org

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FIRST CLASS DESTINATIONS

SUN VALLEY, IDAHO

In the Footsteps of Hemingway Ketchum at the time of his death, Hemingway is buried in the cemetery just north of town. From Highway 75, turn right into the cemetery, take the right hand road and stop just after the curve. Look for four tall pine trees. It is a most inauspicious resting place. There is no headstone. A granitemarker lies level with the ground. To learn more about the author in a place he loved so well, consider attending the annual Sun Valley Hemingway Festival. The event, held September 25-28 this year, includes tours of Hemingwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite haunts, lectures and panel discussions by national experts and surviving family members. The authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s niece, Hilary Hemingway is featured this year. She will present her documentary Hemingway in Cuba. A celebratory Evening in Cuba event will include plenty of salsa dancing and mojitos. â&#x2013; 

&2)$!9 /#4

12th Annual

Trailing of the

HEMINGWAY: SUN VALLEY / KETCHUM CVB

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reated as Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s answer to the grand European resorts, Sun Valley became the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst ski destination in 1936. Celebrities quickly embraced it as a year-round refuge. In 1939, Ernest Hemingway completed his Spanish Civil War novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls, in Ernest Hemingway room 206 of the Sun Valley Lodge. Now the Hemingway Suite, it displays a bronze bust and black-and-white photos of the Nobel-Prize winner. The author loved to hunt, ďŹ sh and ski here in what he called â&#x20AC;&#x153;the loveliest mountains that I know.â&#x20AC;? A resident of nearby

Sheep Tales Gathering:

Sheep

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Songs and Stories of Sheep Ranchingâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;?Remembering Whenâ&#x20AC;?

Festival

IN CONCERT

Rosalie Sorrels with Hal Cannon joined by sheepherders and storytellers for an evening of stories and reminiscing of sheep ranch and herding.

/CTOBER   +ETCHUM(AILEY )DAHO

nexStage Theatre, Ketchum 7:00 p.m. doors open at 6:00 p.m.

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Sheep Folklife Fair

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WWWTRAILINGOFTHESHEEPORG

Roberta McKercher Park, Hailey, 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Big Sheep Parade

Special events include multi-cultural dance, music, art and food.

35.$!9 /#4/"%2 .//.

Saturday Night

Main Street, Ketchum

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Story Continuesâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; In Concert Brenn Hill â&#x20AC;&#x153;new voice of the westâ&#x20AC;?

(no dogs please)

popular recording artist joined by

Hal Cannon

Photo courtesy of Mary Ann Syms

and sheepherders and storytellers sharing contemporary stories.

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Harper Livestock Community Partners Trailing of the Sheep

Festival

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nexStage Theatre, Ketchum 7:00 p.m. doors open at 6:00 p.m. Visit our website for ticket information: www.trailingofthesheep.org

!,,7%%+%.$ Valley-wide lamb dine-around, special workshops and historical displays

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FIRST CLASS DESTINATIONS

TWIN FALLS, IDAHO

Perrine Bridge Draws International Crowd

O

ne mile north of Twin Falls, Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longest span bridge (1,500 feet or 457.2 meters) stretches over the Snake River some 480 feet below. Constructed in 1927 it was the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest bridge at the time. It still affords exceptional views of the Snake River Canyonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;best known as the site of Evel Knievelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ill-fated, televised motorcycle jump in 1974. Now, other adventurersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;BASE jumpersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;come from across the globe to leap from its expanse. (The acronym stands for buildings, antennas, spans and earth. All are worthy launching pads for these extreme-parachutists.) Whether you come to Twin Falls to BASE jump from the bridge, or simply take in the scenery, be sure to ask about Shoshone Falls east of town. It has a greater vertical drop than the much-praised Niagara and is very impressive when ďŹ&#x201A;owing. However, its water is often diverted for agricultural irrigation purposes. Check with a local before taking the trip. â&#x2013; 

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For event or activity information and lodging lodging, contact:

TwinInFalls the middle of everything! Centrally located in South Central Idaho, Twin Falls is the perfect home-base from which to experience all that life has to offer around the region.

208-733-3974 866-TWIN FALLS www.twinfallschamber.com

Watch, listen, or download video and audio podcasts about things to see and do in the Twin Falls Area at www.twinfallschamber.com or at iTunes.

08AMT_JulyAug 41to48.indd 42

Parks, golf courses, and docks follow the majestic Snake River as it winds through the region â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the steep canyon walls framing the setting for fishing, boating, rafting, and waterskiing. Small-town America lives on here with friendly faces meeting you at every turn. Discover antique stores, museums, fairs, and festivals. Urban delights amuse you. Enjoy gallery openings, wine tasting, concert halls, and jazz outdoors. Or shop-til-you-drop in retail centers and quaint shops.

www.twinfallschamber.com

7/17/08 12:34:14 PM


TOP FLIGHT ART

PHOTO FEATURE DAVID LYONS

Pilot’s Passion for Photography

by Anna Hobart

Evening falls on Lake McDonald, the largest lake in Glacier National Park northeast of Kalispell, Montana.

C

bought some 3200-speed film and

sky. Fascination with aviation and

that if you put film in the refrigera-

astronomy combined to foster a passion for

tor it becomes more light-sensitive,

photography. His dad was a Delta pilot and

and I was able to get a few good

his mother was the Memphis airport radio

images way before there were

operator “back in the day when somebody

digital cameras. When I did it

had to relay information between the tower

correctly, I could capture more

ontinental Airlines Pilot David Lyons (right) grew up with an eye to the

began experimenting. “I learned

DAVID LYONS :JOE BRIDWELL

ALL FEATURED PHOTOS: DAVID LYONS

and the airplanes. That’s how they met,” he

than my eyes could pick up.”

explained. His mom held a general aviation pilot’s

By the time he finished high school, Lyons

license and before long the two fliers married and

was more interested in photography than stars. He

settled in Marysville, Tennessee near Knoxville.

did continue to harbor a love of flying. By the

There, as a child Lyons spent time looking

time he headed to Alabama’s Auburn University

heavenward. “My first love was astronomy. On clear

to pursue a degree in aviation management,

nights I’d get out my telescope and stargaze, but it

Lyons was a licensed pilot. He worked as a flight

was hard to share what I saw.” Snapping a photo

instructor all through college, and six months

seemed to be the solution. As a middle-school

after graduation he was a commercial pilot.

student Lyons confronted a harsh reality: it’s hard

His career allows him to capture the nation’s most

to photograph stars. “Normal film wasn’t light-

impressive sights. “I love flying and photography

sensitive enough, and I needed a really long

so much that it never seems like work to do what I

exposure.” He invested in a fully manual camera,

do,” he said.

To learn more about David Lyons and his fine art photography, visit www.exactexposure.com.

AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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TOP FLIGHT ART

Interstate Highway 35 through rural Minnesota is a “barn lover’s delight,” according to Lyons. A cold front had just blown through on this summer afternoon, creating a beautiful skyscape.

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TOP FLIGHT ART

Bixby Bridge on Highway 1, 13 miles south of Carmel, California, provides an excellent view of Big Sur’s rugged coast. Here, Lyons captures the bridge’s own beauty as well.

AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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TOP FLIGHT ART

Mesa Arch at Island in the Sky, part of Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah. To capture this image Lyons awoke at 4 a.m. “Lodging was about an hour away, but getting this shot was well worth the effort,” he said.

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TOP FLIGHT ART

Lyons, like most photographers, spends a good deal of time chasing light. This photo of Portland Head Lighthouse near Elizabeth, Maine, was created just as the cloud cover and fog evaporated. ■

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AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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TOP FLIGHT ART

Unspoiled by Success COVER ARTIST LANE TIMOTHY

by Anna G. Hobart

Departure, 48” x 60”, oil on canvas

LANE TIMOTHY: COURTESY MR. AND MRS. CHARLES AND SUSAN TIMOTHY

B

y any assessment, Lane Timothy’s career is going places. Topdrawer galleries in Santa Fe, Scottsdale and Palm Desert represent him. London-based Bentley Publishing Group distributes his giclee prints in 30 countries. American Art Collector magazine recently devoted a cover story to his figurative pieces. Before he completes an oil painting, it is typically sold. At age 33, Timothy’s biggest challenge is keeping up with demand. Timothy’s natural ability has attracted attention for much of his life. He was just a junior in high school when he nabbed top honors at the prestigious C.M. Russell Auction of Western Art. That was back when horses and cowboys—standard Western fare—dominated his work. After a year at the University of Montana his art took him to Salt Lake City where he beat out college grads for a graphics position at an ad agency. “It was a really good job, but it wasn’t what I wanted to do,” Timothy said. Instead, he went to Europe, studied the techniques of Old Masters and came home to Missoula to paint. “Before that trip I had worked in acrylic, watercolor, pastels, chalk, but not oil. I’m completely self-taught in that media.” Now, all he does is oil on canvas. Life experiences continue to influence an evolution of styles. Since his marriage more than two years ago, Timothy has found a niche in figurative painting. His wife, Christy, is his favorite model. Subject matter typically reflects a back-story. Viewers relate to the work at many levels. “It’s been a lot of fun, researching the different eras. It’s definitely been my most popular work.

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Allie Cat, 60”x 48”, oil on canvas

Eye of the Beholder, 48” x 36”, oil on canvas

Despite success, Timothy remains a downto-earth Missoula, Montana boy at heart. Unflinchingly loyal to his hometown, his art is a mainstay at local charity auctions, supporting everything from the Children’s Hospital to the Boy Scouts to Camp Mak-A-Dream for kids with cancer. The day we chatted he was transporting a load of artwork from Salt Lake City where he now lives to a major show in Scottsdale. He also carried a violin. “I’m painting it to be auctioned off for the Missoula Symphony,” he explained. “I’ll be doing that during the show. I still try to help out at home however I can.” ■

For more information about the artist and his work, visit www.lanetimothy.com. American Dreamer, 48” x 60”, oil on canvas

AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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VACATION PLANNER

Ski 2009!

Changes in Altitude = Changes in Attitude

by Tony Banning

S

now! The stuff of childhood fantasies and holiday landscapes falls deep and dry in the mountains of America’s West. Getting out and playing in drifts does more than make everybody feel like a kid again. It’s a great antidote for the stresses of life in the low-country. In increasing numbers, families, couples and solo travelers are discovering that taking to the slopes refreshes the soul. Now, as the days grow shorter and the evening air begins to grow cooler, wise travelers plot the details of a perfect ski vacation. For an ideal getaway, look to the Rockies and points west. You’ll discover that stellar hospitality awaits and expert staff members are eager to answer your questions. As you research resorts, be sure to consider: • Nearby attractions • Programs for children, beginners or those who need to brush up on their skills • Après-ski activities • The availability of on-site child or infant care if that is a concern • Equipment rental programs. They eliminate the need to travel with bulky skis and snowboards and often provide the latest equipment, giving you the chance to try before you buy. ■

The following pages include details about a few of American Traveler’s favorite ski destinations. Read on. You’ll discover places where travelers of all ages, interests and abilities can be revitalized by a memorable mountaintop experience.

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Alta Ski Area

UTAH

A

lta and pure, unspoiled skiing are truly synonymous. Respected for its classic powder skiing, challenging terrain and spectacular views, don’t forget that Alta also offers great beginner and intermediate skiing. Alta Ski Area celebrates 70 years of skiing this season. On October 19, 1938, the Forest Service issued the initial permit to construct a lift at Alta to the Salt Lake Winter Sports Association. Alta officially opened as a ski area in December 1938. Throughout the years, Alta’s philosophy has been to offer a quality skiing experience for a fair price. The focus is on skiing, earning Alta accolades as a “purist’s mountain.” It is one of the three remaining areas in the United States to be a skiers’-only mountain. Snowboarding is not allowed. Alta, along with Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort, proudly celebrate eight years of offering America’s first lift-served interconnect. With the AltaSnowbird “one ticket,” skiers have access to 4,700 acres. AltaSnowbird was voted the number one resort in the U.S. by Skiing Magazine for five years running. Alta is dedicated to sustainable environmental practices—learning from the past, being guided by best-management practices now, and leading with innovation and research in the future. More information is available on alta.com. For Vacation Packages, please call 866-281-0355.

866-281-0355 | www.alta.com

COLORADO

Gunnison - Crested Butte S

ome of the most beautiful places on earth are lesser known and undisturbed. There’s a special sense of wonder that goes along with discovering a place like this. You feel somehow it belongs to you. You take that place with you, even when you leave. Gunnison-Crested Butte is like that. It’s a breathtakingly beautiful, luxuriously civilized place that has fortunately remained very much the same over time. Here you will find genuinely friendly and helpful locals. You will also find towns so authentic, it’s like taking a step back in time. Crested Butte Mountain Resort is known for Colorado’s best grooming and offpiste skiing where the longest lines you’ll see are behind your skis! A true destination resort, unlike many of Colorado’s “day tripper” ski resorts, attracts visitors who like to come for a longer visit and get to know the place. Winter also brings such delights as snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, dog sledding and snowmobiling in glistening forests and magnificent back country. Getting here is easy. Leaving is much harder. Fly into the Gunnison-Crested Butte Regional airport this ski season, 11/26/08 – 4/5/09. Visit our web site for flight, lodging and package information. Experience Colorado’s true colors. What are you waiting for? “Crested Butte Mountain Resort…Inspire Your Passion”

Lodging Phone: 800-323-2453 | www.GunnisonCrestedButte.com Snow Report Phone: 888-442-8883

AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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VACATION PLANNER UTAH

t is said that a picture is worth a thousand words. Although the beauty and grandeur of the mountains above and valleys below Snowbasin have inspired many pictures, the skiing /riding at Snowbasin will imbed an unforgettable picture in your mind and memory. Located in the idyllic northern Utah community of Huntsville, in the spectacular WasatchCache National Forest, Snowbasin has established itself as the newest destination that savvy fans want to keep to themselves. But, as outstanding resorts tend to do, Snowbasin has stepped into the limelight and there’s no turning back. Snowbasin’s Lodges will welcome and provide you with the best there is. The attention to service details are equally inspiring to our visitors. Join us and witness incredible vistas of nature, culinary delights and pampered service available at the resort! Partake in improving your skills with our Snowsport’s Instructors with a varied offering of classes, from Bumps, Bumps, Bumps to Skiing the Blues. Try out your Nordic skills on our 26 km of groomed trails. A complete line of skis and boards is available in our full-service rental shop. Licensed day care is available. Après-ski entertainment on Friday and Saturday afternoons and a complete retail shop. We invite you to learn about us, connect with the resort, explore here, and experience the Spirit of Snowbasin.

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I

Snowbasin Resort

801-620-1000 | 888-437-5488 | www.snowbasin.com

COLORADO

T

Telluride Ski Resort

elluride —unmatched in North America. Stashed among the highest concentration of 14,000-foot peaks in North America, breathtaking views are just a part of what makes Telluride stand out among mountain destinations. Historic buildings, quaint bakeries and local watering holes blend with luxury hotels, five-star restaurants, sophisticated shops and some of the finest spas in the world. Telluride’s free gondola is the main source of transportation—so no traffic or long lines, and no driving once you’ve arrived! Adding to Telluride’s reputation for legendary terrain, the resort is thrilled to announce the opening of Revelation Bowl. This spectacular European-style terrain, located directly off the back side of famous Gold Hill and Chair 14, will be served by a new, locally manufactured LeitnerPoma lift. Situated above tree line, the natural, wide-open bowl offers advanced and expert skiing in an unbelievably scenic setting. A spirit of adventurous individualism permeates the town and defines the region. The friendly, open-hearted residents and genuine community spirit of Telluride shape a sense of inclusiveness and belonging that everyone can experience and enjoy. Touting the combination of awe-inspiring views, world-class terrain, Rockies snow, an easy-going town and hassle-free destination, Telluride is truly unmatched in North America. 800-778-8581 | www.tellurideskiresort.com

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Not only are we rich in history, but we also offer a wealth of options. They’ve come here for generations. The adventurous, the seekers, and those who just need a place to get away from the cares of a busy world. Here in Sun Valley we’re as steeped in history as we are in ski runs. And if that history has taught us anything, it’s that people need a place to indulge their adventurous side as well as their more restful side. Which is why we created our Lift Ticket Exchange Program. Spend a few days letting it all out on the mountain, then redeem a day’s lift pass for one of the many other reasons people return to Sun Valley year after year: Try cross-country skiing or snowshoeing, take your group ice-skating, indulge in a massage, or even a gourmet meal. The choice is yours, and your historic vacation awaits.

For resort information and reservations call 1.800.786.8259 or www.sunvalley.com

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HAPPENINGS

| SEPTEMBER

| AUGUST BOZEMAN, MT | AUGUST 1 - OCTOBER 31

MONTANA PAINTERS ALLIANCE EXHIBITION & SALE Join us as we host 23 Montana Painters as they depict the landscape and culture of the American West. Show runs through October 2008.

406-585-8339 for more information or visit www.betsyswartzfineart.com

Jackson Hole, WY | September 4-21 FALL ARTS FESTIVAL This is Jackson’s premier cultural event of the year. It attracts hundreds of nationally and internationally acclaimed artists and work that embodies the spirit of the West. Visitors will experience visual, performing and culinary arts that showcase the diversity of the Intermountain West. Wildlife, landscape, Native American and contemporary pieces include the work of featured artist Greg Beecham and his painting Recon. www.jacksonholechamber.com

Great Falls, MT | September 5 Gainesville, FL | August 1- October 19

RIVERS EDGE TRAIL, BLUES & BREWS

AN OCEAN OF DEVOTION: SOUTH ASIAN REGIONAL WORSHIP TRADITIONS

Considered Great Falls’ best party, the Blues & Brews event features food, microbrews, domestic beers and a top-notch roster of regional and national blues artists. Recent headliners include Tab Benoit, Rod Piazza and the Mighty Flyers and Elvin Bishop. The event matches funds for state and federal trail grants and funds to expand, extend and improve the 30-mile long River’s Edge Trail. www.greatfallscvb.visitmt.com

Thirty-two objects dating from the third century through the mid20th century, including some never before exhibited, are drawn from the local University of Florida Harn Museum’s Asian art collections. Works are grouped according to specific deities and narratives significant in various Hindu traditions. www.harn.ufl.edu

Vail, CO | August 8-10

BEND, OR | SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER

VAIL ARTS FESTIVAL

HIGH DESERT MUSEUM NEW EXHIBITS: BUGS! AND STRONG MEDICINE

The 24th annual Vail Arts Festival welcomes artists from throughout the United States to a three-day, juried, outdoor art show. Spectators have the opportunity to visit with artists and view creations in 13 mediums. No admission charge. www.vail.snow.com

Fresno, CA | August 22-24 FRESNO GREEK FESTIVAL Fresno’s most anticipated cultural extravaganza is back! Come out for delicious Greek food and wine, olive oil tastings, homemade pastries, Greek coffee, live Bouzouki music, dancing, entertainment, and an international bazaar. www.co.fresno.ca.us

IMAGE CREDIT: Ken Gray / Oregon State University

BUGS! Yuck! Cool! Live specimens, bugs in history, and interactive fun for all ages. September 26 - February 1. Sponsored by West Coast Bank Strong Medicine From Paiute Indians and frontier traders to hot springs and snake-oil salesmen. 100 years of medicine in the High Desert. October 10 - January 11. 541-382-4754 | highdesertmuseum.org

Moab, UT | August 28-September 13

Klamath Falls, OR | September 13

MOAB MUSIC FESTIVAL

KLAMATH BLUES FESTIVAL

Moab’s premier music festival marries world class musical performances with the spectacular landscape of the Utah Canyonlands region. Classical chamber music is the mainstay of the festival, with traditional folk music, jazz, Latin music, and the compositions of living composers. www.moabmusicfest.org

Celebrate blues music with top-notch bands, workshops, micro brews, food and vendors at the Klamath Blues Festival. Festival proceeds benefit the Veteran’s Memorial Project and the Klamath Blues Society Scholarship Fund. www.klamathblues.org

Santa Barbara, CA | September 13 Ventura, CA | August 30-November 30

SANTA BARBARA SANDCASTLE FESTIVAL

BETWEEN HEAVEN AND EARTH: ENTRE CIELO Y TIERRA

Head to East Beach in Santa Barbara and build the sandcastle of your dreams. Enjoy live music, a treasure hunt and food and refreshments plus vendor booths. Then end the day with a surf-aduck race. www.sandcastlefestival.com

The Museum of Ventura County presents this colorful exhibition of artwork inspired by the elements of earth, wind and fire. www.venturamuseum.org

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| OCTOBER COTTONWOOD, CA | OCTOBER 4, 2008

San Diego, CA | September 13-14

PRESENTED BY THE COTTONWOOD ENRICHMENT COUNCIL

ARTWALK ON THE BAY ArtWalk, the largest open-air gallery in the region, hosts this free event at the Embarcadero Marina Park North in downtown San Diego. It’s held along the waterfront, in the backyard of the Manchester Grand Hyatt Hotel, adjacent to Seaport Village. The park provides a scenic venue for art, music and interactive art experiences for children. www.artwalkonthebay.org

COTTONWOOD’S OLD WEST ART, WINE & MUSIC FESTIVAL Come join the fun with wine tasting, entertainment, artisans and crafts. Music and entertainment will be varied from Old West reenactments and native dancing to local and regional musicians. See Historic Front Street of Cottonwood, sip some great wine and buy some beautiful arts and crafts. info@cottonwoodenrichmentcouncil.com 877-680-7387

Steamboat Springs, CO | September 20 STEAMBOAT BREWERS’ FESTIVAL Celebrate fall with a beer tasting, featuring Colorado’s best breweries. The White Water Ramble band from Fort Collins is featured this year. Enjoy live music, food vendors and a root beer bar for the kids. www.steamboatbrewersfestival.com

Boise, ID | September 25-28 IDAHO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Grab your popcorn and check out the Gem State’s local filmmakers’ efforts at The Idaho International Film Festival. This event promotes culture and arts in Idaho by showcasing the states’ independent filmmakers. www.idahofilmfestival.com

San Luis Obispo, CA | September 29-October 5 PLEIN AIR PAINTING FESTIVAL Nationally ranked artists carefully selected for this event paint landscapes in the natural environment. Their ability dazzles eager art collectors and spectators alike. During the week of the festival, dozens of painters from across the United States flock to San Luis Obispo County’s great outdoors and scenic wonders. www.sloartcenter.org JACKSON HOLE, WY | OCTOBER 3-13

TETON WELLNESS FESTIVAL

Missoula, MT | September 26

Experience the healing and inspirational power of this place we call Jackson Hole! Rejuvenate the health and wellness of the mind, body, spirit, and earth. Features the Teton Wellness Festival along with a rich diversity of presentations, workshops, exhibitions, arts, and activities.

PAINTED VIOLINS An auction of 12 real violins transformed into amazing works of visual art by some of the region’s finest artists. Proceeds benefit the Missoula Symphony Association and the Missoula Symphony Guild. www.missoulasymphony.org

307-733-3316 www.jacksonholechamber.com

Chico, CA | September 26-27 CHICO AIRFEST 2008 The sky’s the limit! Check out the Chico AirFest with the Canadian Forces Snowbirds Jet Team. Watching the Snowbirds perform aerobatic maneuvers in the sky is fun for the whole family. www.chicoairfest.com SANTA BARBARA, CA | SEPTEMBER 27-28

SANTA BARBARA VISUAL ARTS ALLIANCE ArtWalk 2008 at the Santa Barbara Museum o f N a t u r a l H i s t o r y, w w w . s b n a t u r e . o r g . Over 200 artists, live music and great food along the oak-shaded banks of Mission Creek. Made in Hollywood: Photographs from the John Kobal Foundation at SBMA through October 5, www.sbma.net. For a calendar of visual art events in Santa Barbara County, visit www.sbva.org.

Kalispell, MT | October 2-5 GLACIER JAZZ STAMPEDE This annual four-day jazz festival features ragtime, Dixieland, swing, modern and big-band jazz at fun venues around Flathead Valley. www.glacierjazzstampede.com

Bend, OR | October 9-12 BEND FILM FESTIVAL Against the backdrop of the majestic Cascade Mountains, this festival transforms the rustic recreational haven of Bend into a bustling center for filmmakers and film lovers alike. Centered entirely in historic downtown Bend, theaters, lecture sites, music rooms and party venues spark with the energy excited by the overwhelming presence of cinema. www.bendfilm.org AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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GAMES

The answers to clues in bold face print can be found in the magazine’s pages. Solution on page 62

ACROSS 1 4 9 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 26 27 31 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 44 45

Seed of a legume Fun water craft Buffalo Bill _____ Eugene sport _____ boarding Make amends Musical instrument Public swimming pool Water wheel Factory Exploit Small body of land Express words by letters Extreme Tiny carp, minnow Benign tumor of the skin Liar Upbeat in music Exhausted Pair Colors permanently Emancipated Fitting return Beetle Shelter (Scottish) Zest Abnormally narrowed Involuntary muscular contraction Exclamations of surprise

46 Danced to Roll Out the Barrel or Who Stole the Keeshka 50 ________Rushmore 53 Narrow strip of wood 54 Malt beverage 55 Swiss mountains 56 Bottoms of shoes 58 Bedouin 59 Travel on 60 German submarine 61 Inclined to do 62 Before long 63 _____ gritty 64 Conclusion DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Monetary unit of India Finished Fuss Wizard’s Dorothy Gale Coral island Long ago Black bird New Zealand parrot Force Off-Broadway theater award Child’s toy Shout Insult

20 21 23 24 25 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 37 38 40 41 43 44 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 56 57 58

Chills Gust of wind Chilled Ventured In for the night Meadow Ancient Roman mid-month Hard fatty tissue Commotion Increases Indian peasant Withered Black Hills foliage Trout, perch etc. Filth Fishing vessel Golden Norwegian arctic explorer Warm and cozy Fold Brother of Moses Antelope Something that is owed Roman god of war Potpourri Hair arrangement Arizona canyon type Idaho’s celebrated ____ Valley Japanese sash Admiration

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T

W

T

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AMERICANTRAVELER

Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Page Seek and find these hidden words Connect the dots one line at a time, and see how may boxes you can make. Traveling with a friend? Take turns. The person with the most boxes at the end wins the game!

Help the boy get to the fruit!

S L L A T L T I S B

A E L U G G A G E I

O E A N A D H A S K

airplane candy wing tag

I S I T O G C N S E

L O WS R P S O E L HF UP P I AL S F fun seat pillow pilot

WS OV L A L C I A P T OI L O G N P O

Y D N A C A E T U H

I P E A N U T S S S

soda shop peanuts luggage

Find the 5 differences between the two girls

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GAMES

KAKURO PUZZLE

14

HOW TO PLAY: A Kakuro puzzle is simple. Just like Sudoku,

15

the playing area is made up of blocks of squares that run in rows (horizontal) and in columns (vertical). The shaded clue squares have diagonal lines with numbers above and below the line. The number above the line is the “across” clue and the number below the line is the “down” clue. Together, the blank squares following the number clues are an “entry.” The object of Kakuro is to fill in the entry using only digits 1 through 9 so that the sum of the entry equals the clue given.

34

10

11

16

5

15

16

23

3

14

8

3

25

3

8 28

21

13

28 23 14

3

17

22

23

17

21

14

3

16 17

19

14 9

10 15

3

7

15

38

16

31 3 3

12

11

17

RULE #2: You may only use the numbers 1 through 9.

19

13 17

Solution on page 62.

4

4

7

to its left (for across) or directly above it (for down).

than once. Unlike Sudoku, a number may be repeated within a row or column if it occurs in a different entry separated by a clue.

11 12

7 4

RULE #1: Each entry must equal the sum of the number clue

RULE #3: Within an entry, you may not use a number more

15

28

16 IN KAKURO, THERE ARE THREE SIMPLE RULES TO FOLLOW:

13

22 35

12

16

34 9

12

4

3

4

14

12

28 18

15

For more original Kakuro puzzles, check out The Original Kakuro Book: The Latest Puzzle Craze Since Sudoku by the Puzzle Society™, published by Andrews McMeel Publishing and available at all major bookstores. Play Kakuro, Sudoku and crosswords on the Web at www.puzzlesociety.com. Puzzle © 2006 Andrews McMeel Publishing.

Reach the affluent frequent q flier in a whole new w way! s Your advertisement in front of millions of frequent fliers using a variety y of airlines. s Targeting resort areas and affluent communities! s Complimentary distribution to travelers in select public p c and executive air terminals.

Advertise in this exciting new magazine! Call NOW forr informaation.. Teen na Wright, Directo or, Sales & Maarkeeting g 208.33 33.9990 ext. 106 s teena@ @gopu ubin nc.co om

www.americantravelermagazine.com Brought to you by the publishers of the award-winning SkyWest Magazine

AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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TRAVEL GAMES

Don’t know much geography? You’re not alone. Even frequent travelers often spend so much time flying over the continent, they’re not aware of where they are or where they’ve been. Test your travel smarts with these quizzes.

ALBANY CHARLESTON CONCORD DES MOINES LITTLE ROCK PIERRE MADISON SACRAMENTO SALEM

Capital Ideas

TALLAHASSEE

Think you know this country? Maybe you’ve memorized the names of state capitals, but can you find them on the above map? Try matching the cities listed at right with their location:

America The Beautiful From the heartland to the hinterlands America boasts many impressive place. How much do you know about its record-holding locales? 1. Missouri borders eight states, a record it shares with just one other state. Which of the following states does not border Missouri? a. Iowa b. Kansas c. Kentucky d. Oklahoma e. Ohio EXTRA CREDIT: Name the other state bordering eight states. Hint: It’s among Missouri’s neighbors. 2. The largest river in the Pacific Northwest hugs the border between the states of Washington and Oregon. What is it? a. Clearwater b. Colorado c. Columbia d. Colville e. Conasauga 3. What is the highest peak in the United States? a. Denali b. Elbert c. Mount Whitney d. Mount Rainier e. Mount Hood

Capital Ideas Answers: B- ALBANY, G- CHARLESTON, D- CONCORD, A- DES MOINES, I- LITTLE ROCK, J- PIERRE, H- MADISON, F- SACRAMENTO, C- SALEM, E- TALLAHASSEE Amreica the Beautiful Answers: 1. E. Ohio, States bordering Missouri are Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Arkansas, Tennessee, Illinois, and Kentucky. (although technically it is across the Mississippi River from its eastern neighbors Tennessee, Illinois and Kentucky.) EXTRA CREDIT: Tennessee 2. C. The Columbia River runs 1,243 (2,000 km) miles from British Columbia to the Pacific Ocean. 3. A. Alaska’s Denali also known as Mount McKinley holds the record as the highest peak in all of North America at 20,320 feet or 6,194 meters.

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TRAVEL GUIDE MEDFORD, OR

DANA POINT, CA ORANGE COUNTY’S NEWEST ADVENTURE Home to the 63-foot Catamaran the Ocean Adventure these naturalist guided tours will take you out to experience marine life such as the mighty 100 ft. blue whale, and dolphin that frolic in our warm coastal waters. 800-590-9994 www.danawharf.com

Welcome to Medford, Oregon, the center of the thriving Rogue Valley. Savor awardwinning artisan cheeses, chocolates, specialty foods, and nationally recognized wines. Enjoy great Northwest dining, eclectic shopping, and an endless list of activities and events. Get outside with fly-fishing, rafting and jet boating on the Rogue River, championship golf courses, and Crater Lake National Park. 800.469.6307 • www.visitmedford.org

PINEDALE, W Y

VENTURA, CA

Fall for the beauty of Mountain Man Country – incredible scenic drives, abundant wildlife, quiet trails, friendly towns, crisp mornings and great trout streams! Sublette County Visitor Center, Pinedale, WY 888-285-7282 www.MountainManCountry.com

EXPERIENCE A REAL CALIFORNIA ADVENTURE. Gateway to Channel Islands National Park, Ventura offers the ultimate adventure whether you seek an island excursion, whale watching, antique shopping an amazing arts scene or fine dining. You can do it all in Ventura’s quaint, unspoiled environment. Get your free visitor guide now: 800-4ventur www.ventura-usa.com/at

JACK SON, W Y

COLORADO/UTAH

To advertise in this section, please call (208) 333-9990

NORTH GRILLE—exceptional bistro fare with unmatched views, 150 bottle selection, eclectic wine list, lunch Wednesday-Saturday, dinner Thursday– Saturday, Sunday brunch, located at the Jackson Hole Golf and Tennis Club, five minutes south of the airport. Public Welcome. 307-733-7788

THE RODIZIO GRILL. An authentic Brazilian Steakhouse featuring a parade of waiters holding three-foot skewers stacked with a variety of over a dozen rotisserie grilled meats carved tableside by Brazilian Gauchos. Freshly made salads and homemade Brazilian desserts abound. Locations in Salt Lake City and Denver. www.rodiziogrill.com

I DA H O / M O N TA N A

V I C TO R, I D

K E TC H U M, I D

JAKER’S RESTAURANTS. If you’re looking for great food and service in a casual, comfortable setting, try any of the Jaker’s Restaurants. We feature a variety of steaks, seafood, pasta, salads and classic sandwiches. Locations in Great Falls, Missoula, Idaho Falls, Twin Falls and Meridian. www.jakers.com

Bernard’s Bistro at Teton Reserve has a growing cult following…the atmosphere is intimate and comfortable yet sophisticated and the menu flows from Pan-Asian to French to Italian to Hawaiian fare and back again—always creative, fresh and memorable. For reservations, call Bernard’s Bistro at 208-787-4224.

KETCHUM GRILL offers contemporary American cuisine served in casual and rustic surroundings. We use locally grown produce to create food full of flavor that you and your guests will love. Featuring an award-winning wine list. Reservations online at www.ketchumgrill.com or call 208-726-4660 • 520 East Ave. Ketchum

SOUTHERN UTAH

SOUTHERN UTAH’S KANE COUNTY averages over 320 days of sunshine each year. The area is perfect for year-round family activities. Lake Powell offers excellent water adventures Multi-use trail systems and maps are perfect for year-round outdoor adventures. Zion, Bryce and Grand Canyon offer Spectacular views in each of the four seasons. Check us out for year-round fun. 800-SEE-KANE www.kaneutah.com

DINING GUIDE

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GAME SOLUTIONS

Solution to Crossword on page 56

Solution to Kakuro on page 59 14

11

10

16

5

15

15

22

13

15

11 12

5 3 2 4 1 9 8 5 4 9 35 34 28 9 8 7 6 4 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 4 3 1 3 14 7 1 6 2 1 16 23 3 8 25 3 7 1 8 2 8 6 9 28 2 1 13 21 28 9 8 7 1 3 1423 5 8 1 3 4 2 3 2 1 22 2 3 8 9 21 23 9 6 17 14 14 9 5 16 3 1 2 1716 7 9 5 9 19 10 3 8 4 7 15 7 1 2 4 3 15 2 1 38 31 3 9 5 6 8 7 3 8 4 7 3 3 12 11 2 1 4 2 1 5 19 4 17 13 12 9 4 12 16 4 3 1 4 3 9 14 3 17 34 28 9 2 8 3 4 7 1 3 1 7 9 9 18 15 8 1 1 8 9 1 2 3 5

3 1

17

8 9 16

9 7 12

8 4

By Leigh Rubin

willowcreekpress.com/rubes

Creators Syndicate, Inc. © 2007 Leigh Rubin!

rubes2@earthlink.net www.creators.com

RUBES®

4

“So I figured, after years of migrating, why not cash in some of my frequent flier miles?” For more of Leigh Rubin’s humor check out his new, 2009 Rubes Zoo in a Box daily desk calendar, available at your favorite neighborhood or online bookstore, visit www.willowcreekpress.com/rubes or call: 800-850-9453

62 | AMERICAN TRAVELER PREMIERE EDITION 2008

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BUSINESS CLASS

CLARK FORK CATTLE CO. RIVERFRONT RANCH $4,500,000 “One Of A Kind” 630-acre working cattle ranch. A sportsman’s paradise, with abundant hunting & fishing. A Montana dream property. Minutes from Missoula Int’l Airport. Over a mile of river frontage, water rights and borders National Forest. Includes a 5-bedroom home, bunkhouse sleeps 15, motorized gondola to cross the river. Would make great dude ranch. A must see!!! Call Bill Zader @ 406-239-7530 Ranch & Residential Specialists

CONTACT:

www.westernmontanarg.com 800-257-7670

FLY into Klamath Falls, OR and DRIVE the

9ROFDQLF/HJDF\6FHQLF%\ZD\ 9ROFDQLF/HJDF\ 6FHQLF%\ZD\ All_American Road

‹*YH[LY3HRL5H[PVUHS7HYR ‹/PZ[VYPJ+V^U[V^U2SHTH[O-HSSZ ‹-VY[2SHTH[O4\ZL\T ‹3H]H)LKZ5H[PVUHS4VU\TLU[

#LOSERTHANYOUTHINKä

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We Rent

Dreams

To advertise in this space, please call (208)-333-9990

EagleRider is the world’s largest adventure rental company specializing in Harley-Davidson, Honda, BMW, dirt bikes, ATVs, watercraft, and snowmobile rentals and tours. EagleRider has worldwide locations in the USA, Mexico, Spain and France. Tours include guided and self-drive in the Southwest, Route 66, Mexico, Europe, and more. 888-593-8706 www.eaglerider.com

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THINK YOU KNOW AMERICA’S LANDSCAPE? Do you know this place? Featured photographer David Lyons is a commercial airline pilot who spends his free time photographing national treasures like this impressive silhouette. Be among the first five travelers to correctly identify this location and win a copy of the recently released DVD National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets. Need a hint? The movie was filmed in part in the area depicted in Lyon’s photograph. To enter, simply send a postcard or letter to: American Traveler Journey’s End contest Go! Publications, Inc. 205 North 10th Street, Suite 540 Boise, Idaho 83702 Contest expires October 31, 2008 and is not open to employees of Go! Publications or their families. Offer void where prohibited.

JOURNEY’S END PHOTO: ©2005-2007 DAVID LYONS AT EXACTEXPOSURE.COM

JOURNEY’S END

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American Traveler Magazine Premiere Issue