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VERGE

C ALVIN COLLEGE | VOL. 2.1

How a business major turns two of her passions into a superior plan. p. 6

PLUS: THE FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE BREAKDANCE FEVER THE ART AND SCIENCE OF HUMAN MOVEMENT FIRST-YEAR DIVER MAKES BIG SPLASH


PLACE: Mangrove in Celestún, Yucatán DATE: Saturday, Jan. 8, 2011 COURSE: Spanish interim in Yucatán, Mexico


VERGE Vol. 2.1

A Calvin College publication for prospective students and parents Verge—the edge, rim or margin; the brink. The point beyond which an act, state or condition is likely to start or happen—as in “on the verge.”

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The verge is a place where you’re finally able to see everything that’s in front of you. A place where you can say, “I can get there from here.” At Calvin, you’ll find yourself on the verge of more than you can imagine: new ideas, unexpected opportunities, new territory in your life, your studies and your faith. From the verge, you’ll catch a vision of how to live. And Calvin will take you there.

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CONTACT To submit a question or a letter: verge@calvin.edu To change your address: verge@calvin.edu PRODUCTION VERGE is produced three times a year by Calvin’s admissions and financial aid office.

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www.calvin.edu/verge EDITORIAL AND CREATIVE TEAM: Jeanne Nienhuis ’80, editor Allison Graff ’07, head writer Joy’l Ver Heul ’04, creative director CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Lynn Bolt Rosendale ’85 Phil de Haan ’84 Davis Dryer ’12 Derek Neice ’12 Megan Swierenga ’08 Alexandra Van Milligen ’12 Theo Voss ’12 Andrew Steiner ’12 CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Lisa Anderson Ben Arendt Kelly Powers

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FEATURES

MORE

4 6 14 16 20

3 THE COLLEGE SEARCH PROCESS 10 FACULTY PROFILE 11 INTERNSHIP Q&A 12 SO YOU NEED A MAJOR? 18 PACKING IT ALL IN 19 GRAND RAPIDS 22 FACULTY PROFILE 23 DINING AT CALVIN 24 SUMMER RESEARCH 25 FAITH 26 MEET YOUR COUNSELOR 28 VISIT CALENDAR 30 FINANCIAL AID 32 DOING BUSINESS IN PANAMA

THE FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE BUSINESS + BAKING FIRST-YEAR DIVER MAKES BIG SPLASH BREAKDANCE FEVER THE ART AND SCIENCE OF HUMAN MOVEMENT


STEP

HOW TO SURVIVE RESEARCH

WHAT OR WHERE? Are you looking for a certain major? Are you looking for a school close to home—or far away? Start narrowing your search by your academic interests or by geography to keep your college options manageable.

STEP

THE COLLEGE SEARCH PROCESS

DO THE RESEARCH: Check out college guide-books from The Princeton Review, U.S. News & World Report or Peterson’s College Search as a way to compare and contrast institutions. Look for colleges with your major or interests, breadth of programs, studyabroad opportunities or community life that matches your personality.

TIP Read the mission statement of a college—it’s a huge window into what a college values.

ASK ALUMNI: Ever heard this: “College was the best time of my life!” Find out why from family, friends, teachers, youth leaders.

APPLY & VISIT

SUBMIT YOUR APPLICATIONS: Fall of your senior year in high school is the best time to apply, and many colleges offer free applications. Apply to Calvin before Dec. 1, and we will waive your application fee!

TIP Find out what other admission materials may be required, such as transcripts, ACT or SAT scores, recommendations, essays, etc.

ENROLL: Once you’ve made your college choice, confirm your place in the Class of 2015 by May 1, the universal college decision date. This may involve submitting a housing application, enrollment deposit, orientation registration and health forms.

STEP

SCHEDULE A VISIT: Some students say that a college just felt right—or wrong—when they visited. So experience it. Stay overnight in a residence hall, take a tour, talk to an admissions counselor, sit in on classes and get a feel for the place. Don’t forget to bring your parents!

COMPARE THE #’s AND ENROLL

APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID: After you are admitted, apply for scholarships (your job!) and financial aid (most likely this will be your parents’ job). Pay close attention to deadlines so you are considered for all the aid available.

TIP

When you receive your financial aid packages, compare not only the final costs but also the opportunities at colleges you’re considering.

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THE FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE

How you spend your days in college is probably going to look a little different from how you spent them in high school. Example: no study hall.You’ll have breaks between classes you could spend studying—or getting a cup of joe and hanging out with friends. The point is, you get to make decisions about your schedule. Check out how one first-year—accounting major Louis Hill—spent his time during a week in his second semester at Calvin.

LOUIS HILL MAJOR: ACCOUNTING MINOR: FINANCE HOME: WESTLAND, MICH.

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MO N DAY

T U E S DAY

WE D NE S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

8: 00AM 9: 00AM

CLASS

CLASS

CLASS

CHAPEL

CHAPEL

CHAPEL

11: 00AM

CLASS

CLASS

CLASS

12: 00PM

CLASS

CLASS

1: 00PM

LUNCH

10: 00AM

2: 00PM

LUNCH

LUNCH

CLASS

CLASS HELP

CLASS HOMEWORK

CLASS

Chapel with the baseball team

Math 143

LUNCH

NAP

3: 00PM 4: 00PM 5: 00PM

Religion 131 with Prof. Madison. I love it when he sings because he’s awful at it.

BASEBALL PRACTICE

BASEBALL PRACTICE

BASEBALL PRACTICE

BASEBALL PRACTICE

BASEBALL PRACTICE

TEAM DINNER

TEAM DINNER

TEAM DINNER

TEAM DINNER

TEAM DINNER

HOMEWORK IN LIBRARY

HOMEWORK IN LIBRARY

GO OFF CAMPUS WITH FRIENDS

Visit Prof. McMullen during office hours for extra help.

Econ 221 with Prof. McMullen, the coolest guy ever Lunch with the crew at Knollcrest

Baseball practice is the favorite part of my day.

6: 00PM 7: 00PM 8: 00PM 9: 00PM 10: 00PM 11: 00PM

HOMEWORK IN LIBRARY

CHILL IN RVD HOMEWORK IN LIBRARY

RELAX IN NVW

Dinner with the baseball team

Relax with friends, listening to music and watching soccer

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BUSINESS

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+ BAKING BY ALLISON R. GRAFF

When Kelly LeCoy was a freshman in high school, she envisioned herself working on the 54th floor of a skyscraper in downtown Chicago, doing public relations or “something glamorous like that.”

GLAM LIFE WITHIN REACH? Fast-forward to 2011. Kelly is spending her final semester as a Calvin student in Chicago, interning at a community business alliance. Her internship isn’t on the 54th floor of a skyscraper, but she’s interviewing at a company in Chicago’s “Loop” district. The company calls her to schedule a second interview for a position in its marketing office. She’s one step closer to that dream job.

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THE BEGINNING OF A PLAN Jump back a year. Kelly is a junior in an advanced marketing class taught by business professor Tom Betts. She’s considering topics for her senior honors thesis: a marketing plan for a hypothetical company or a cost-benefit analysis for a new variety of ice cream at a local creamery. The sky’s the limit.

Electric Cheetah Bistro and The Green Well. She loves grabbing artfully-crafted espresso drinks from Sparrows Cafe and digging through fashionable resale items at Urban Exchange.

Professor Betts makes it clear that the project should be about something she loves—something she could spend her life doing after graduation.

And while she loves exploring new foods and fun products, she’s equally interested in the businesses behind these things. She notices how passionate the business owners are about their offerings and how people flock to these shops for the quality products and the personal service.

IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

THE LIGHTBULB MOMENT

Jump back another year. Kelly is entering her junior year. She and her friends love exploring Grand Rapids’ trendy neighborhoods, where they can’t get enough of the delicious dishes offered up by places like The

› › › ›

By the fall of her senior year, Kelly starts her honors project: a marketing plan for a potential business in Grand Rapids’ growing Wealthy Street district. She’s thinking a clothing store, maybe specializing in vintage fashion. Then she has her moment. The one when the proverbial lightbulb comes on.

Why Calvin? Kelly always knew she wanted to go to a Christian college, but wasn’t sure she could find a business program with enough course offerings. She eventually chose Calvin: “It really came down to the community at Calvin. I really felt at peace when I was visiting campus and just saw myself here for four years.”

Calvin’s business program: Kelly’s sold on two things: the level of individual attention she’s gotten from her business profs and the real-world experience she’s gotten in classes and internships. “The professors have just poured into me, and we’ve had a lot of opportunities to work with actual businesses. Having to present a marketing plan to an executive from Hudsonville Ice Cream is way different than doing problems in a book.”

A Christian perspective on business: For Kelly, Calvin’s business program confirmed that you can be a Christian and a person in business. “As a Calvin graduate, I think I have a better perspective on how what I do affects more than just me. [In Calvin’s business program] we talked about how you need Christians in the business world to help change how things work.”

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It happens as she’s talking with Calvin graduate and Wealthy Street business owner Amy Ruis ’94. Kelly learns that the state of Michigan doesn’t allow food producers to sell their products in shops like Amy’s Art of the Table unless they are created in a regulated commercial kitchen. Enter Kelly’s idea: “Why couldn’t I make a kitchen? People can rent it from me and then they can sell their food wherever they want!” Uptown Kitchen is born.

THE REAL WORK Kelly’s brilliant idea, it turns out, isn’t new. Many cities around the country have rental kitchens where food entrepreneurs can create their products. Now Kelly can use other commercial kitchens as models for her own kitchen. Professor Betts helps Kelly refine her plan with what seems to her like a never-ending stream of questions: “How much are you going to charge? Are you going to rent people space, or will your profit come from their food sales? What’s your profit margin going to be? How much equipment do you need? How many clients do you need to break even? How are you going to get paid? How much space do you need?”


TO CHICAGO, WITH A PLAN

“I realized, my heart’s in Grand Rapids—that’s really where I want to be,” she said.

In January of her senior year, Kelly’s bags are packed for her semester in Chicago and the business plan could easily go in a box for storage. Instead, Kelly uses her time in Chicago to pursue the plan further, visiting rental kitchens in the Windy City to research cooking equipment, kitchen layouts and startup costs.

Two hours later, she receives a phone call from a large office furniture manufacturer in Grand Rapids, asking her to interview for a project management position there. She interviews for—and gets—the job at Steelcase Inc.

When Kelly heads back to Grand Rapids in March to present her business plan at bizPlan, a Calvin-sponsored competition, her plan is so well-researched that it takes first place and earns her seed money for Uptown Kitchen. In April she competes in another regional business plan competition and wins that, too. More seed money.

Now Kelly spends her days managing the proposal process for government furniture contracts and nights looking at potential spaces for Uptown Kitchen. In June, she presented her business plan—again—to prominent Grand Rapids business people in a contest called 5x5, and won. The seed money from 5x5: icing on the cake.

GLAM LIFE—IN GRAND RAPIDS As Kelly nears the end of her senior year at Calvin, she has a second interview for a dream job in Chicago. She’s also got $4,000 in start up money and a few potential investors for her Grand Rapids-based Uptown Kitchen business.

WEB EXCLUSIVE

Check out www.calvin.edu/verge to view Kelly’s biz Plan presentaion.

Kelly turns down the dream job interview.

d Rapids

r t’s in Gran a e h y m , d e z I reali

t to be.

e I wan r e h w y ll a e r —that’s

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FACULTY PROFILE TOM BETTS: MAKING IDEAS FLY

Professor Tom Betts uses a funny YouTube video called “Advertiser vs. Consumer” to kick off his “Intro to Marketing” class. It gets students thinking about the ethics behind marketing and advertising. Is advertising always self-serving and manipulative? Is it innately bad or evil because it involves trying to sell people something? Take a marketing class taught by Professor Betts and you’ll learn that trying to sell something is about the approach you take, about using what he calls the “art and science of marketing” to connect the right people with the right products or causes. “As Christians, we have to take marketing further because we have a deeper call—we have redeeming work to do,” he said.

With years of business experience, Professor Betts provides valuable insight to real-world marketing, and structures his marketing course in a way that is both engaging and educational. Emily Keller ’09

ABOUT PROFESSOR BETTS EDUCATION BBA in marketing, University of Michigan MBA, Western Michigan University EXPERIENCE 25+ years of marketing experience in banking systems, Christian publishing (InterVarsity, FaithAlive and Zondervan) and consulting WHY CALVIN “It fits who I am—it fits my passions. I’ve been a coach, a youth minister, a teacher—I love to teach skills. I also love marketing, the science and art of things. I love Jesus, too. If you take all of these things, they add up to this job at Calvin College.” 10 VERGE

Professor Betts has spent more than 25 years exploring the best ways to connect people and products—from banking systems to magazines and, most recently, books at Grand Rapids-based publishing house, Zondervan. Instead of simply lecturing about marketing plans, Professor Betts connects his students to local businesses where they actually create real marketing plans. “I enjoy teaching, but I enjoy mentoring and advising more. I love seeing students become the best they can be—I get energy out of seeing that happen.” Professor Betts worked closely with recent graduate Kelly LeCoy as she developed her award-winning business plan (see page 6). He asked her a lot of tough questions in the process. “In the real business world, you have to have a good plan for the idea to fly.” With all of his time spent in the business world, Professor Betts knows well what it takes to make an idea work. Now he’s all about helping students put wings on their ideas.


In many ways, an internship is like a first date with a potential career, a time when you can ask questions like, “Are we well-suited for each other?” and “Does the lifestyle you offer line up with my long-term goals?” That’s just what Calvin’s own Josh Schroyer got at his internship with WOOD-TV 8.

INTERNSHIP Q&A WITH SENIOR JOSH SCHROYER, INTERNING AT WOOD-TV 8

Q

So Josh, how did you get connected with WOOD-TV 8?

Q

A Basically it was just the experiences I had at

A Well yeah, one day I came in, and one of the

Calvin that got me the job. Over my freshman, sophomore, and most of my junior year, I kind of built my resumé. Then when I was a junior, I applied for the position at WOOD-TV—went in for the interview, and got the job.

Q

So what did your day look like when you went into work?

A Well, usually I show up at eight every morning

people that usually shoots the stories was sick. They knew I had some experience shooting, so they were just like, “Hey so-and-so’s gone, but we still really need to shoot this story because it needs to air tomorrow. You’re the only one who can do it.” So I was pushed into a position that I was kind of ready for, but I wasn’t actually trained to do.”

Q

Was this your first internship experience at Calvin?

A No, it was actually my second internship at

WOOD-TV. I also interned the summer between my junior and senior years. Over the summer, I was doing more production and news, and then this spring I was working on the Show 8 West, which is more entertainment focused.

So what sort of projects have you been working on lately?

A Well, my favorite was definitely the Rocket

for the shooting portion of the show. Then I talk with the executive producer, pick up the scripts, assist the floor director between set changes, greet guests in the lobby, bring the guests coffee and water—that type of stuff. I guess that’s a typical morning. Then sometimes I stick around in the afternoons, and I’ll get to do some filming.

Q

Oh, so you actually got to do some shooting for the show?

Summer lipdub we did last year. We actually shut down the fieldhouse for the afternoon and had like 100 students come in. Yeah, that was probably one of the biggest projects I tackled at Calvin. And it wasn’t even for a class! It was just kind of an idea.

Q

What advice do you have for incoming students hoping to study media productions?

A I would say definitely get involved in student

organizations on campus. When you’re a freshman, that’s the easiest way to get to know people and start getting hands-on experience right away. Ask to help with some of the larger projects juniors and seniors are doing. They’d definitely love your help, and they’ll probably teach you a few things along the way!

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BEHIND

Do you like to work behind the scenes or be center stage?

Consider art or digital communications

Consider media productions or architecture

PIXAR FRONT

THE ARTS

Consider engineering information systems

MICRO.

Choose theatre, music or dance

CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING

Do you want to work for Pixar or Microsoft?

SO YOU NEED

A MAJOR? Explore your likes and dislikes, or consider the list below. There’s something for everyone!

THE ENVIRONMENT Do you want to work in the field or in the lab?

FIELD

LAB

Consider environmental studies

OV E R

100

OPTIONS 12 VERGE

Try geology, ecology or environmental science

Accounting African Diaspora Studies Archaeology Architecture Art Art Education Fine Arts Art History Studio Art Asian Studies Astronomy Audiology Biblical Studies Bilingual Education Biochemistry Biology Biotechnology

NO

Do you like numbers?

YES

Do you want to shape environmental policies?

YES

BUSINESS

NO

Consider finance or accounting

Can you list all 50 states?

Business Finance Human Resources Marketing Operations Small Business Chemistry Chinese Classical Languages/Studies Communication Arts and Sciences Computer Science Dance Digital Communication Dutch Ecology Economics Education (30 majors and minors) Early Childhood Education

Geography might be for you!

Elementary Education ESL Graduate Studies (MA) Secondary Education Special Education Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering Electrical & Computer Engineering Mechanical Engineering English Environmental Geology Environmental Science Environmental Studies Exercise Science Film and Media Studies French Gender Studies


WORLD LANGUAGE

Try French or Spanish

Do you value something old?

YES

Try German or Dutch

WEST

Try Japanese, Korean or Chinese

Do you want to go east or west?

YES

Do you want something spicy?

NO

EAST

NO

Go with Greek, Latin or linguistics

COMMUNICATION Do you like people or processes?

Do you spend your spare time reading books or watching movies?

MOVIES

Consider strategic communication or media studies Consider international relations

BOOKS

Try literature or writing PEOPLE

POLITICS

PROCESS

Consider Consider operations marketing, small business, or organizational communications

IDEAS

GLOBAL & HISTORICAL

Geography Geology German Greek Health Education History Information Systems Interdisciplinary Studies International Development Studies International Relations Japanese Journalism Kinesiology Korean Latin Latin American Studies Linguistics Literature

Mathematics & Statistics Media Production Medieval Studies Ministry Studies Missions Music Applied Music Music Education Music History Instrumental Music Music Theory/Composition Vocal Music Worship Music Natural Resources Natural Science Nursing Organizational Communication Philosophy

CULTURE

Do you like politics or culture?

Do you like action or ideas? ACTION

Try African, Asian or Latin American studies

Consider archaeology or international development

Physical Education Physics Political Science Pre-Dentistry Pre-Law Pre-Medicine Pre-Occupational Therapy Pre-Optometry Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Physical Therapy Pre-Physician Assistant Pre-Seminary Pre-Veterinary Studies Psychology Public Administration Public Health Recreation Religion

Scientific Computation and Modeling Social Science Social Work Sociology Spanish Speech Pathology & Audiology Speech Pathology (MA ) Sport Management Strategic Communication Sustainability Theatre Theological Studies Therapeutic Recreation Urban Studies Writing Youth Ministry Leadership

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FIRST-YEAR DIVER MAKES BIG SPLASH BY LYNN ROSENDALE

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At the NCAA III national championships, Calvin diver Andy Krafft took third place in the men’s three-meter diving competition. Not bad for a freshman who hasn’t trained or dived competitively in more than four years. During middle school, Andy trained with the best as part of the top U.S. Elite Junior Olympic diving team. A homeschool graduate from Fort Wayne, Ind., he stayed off the boards except for some recreation-league diving during the summer, and decided on a Christian college close to home. “We looked around Ohio State University,” said his dad, Scott Krafft, “and I told him to think about training at this level, or I asked him if he would rather pursue a Christian (college) education.” “When I decided I wanted to go to a smaller Christian school, I thought it was the end of the road,” said Andy. “There aren’t many Christian colleges that have diving, so I figured that was it.” But his dad had heard about Calvin. “I knew something about Calvin’s academic atmosphere and I really liked that,” he said. “I also had heard about the wonderful new natatorium (the Venema Aquatic Center), and I kept thinking that if Andy could have the opportunity to dive at the Division III level at a school with good academics, he should at least think about it.”

BACK ON THE BOARD Andy and his parents visited Calvin, and a few months later he was back in the pool. “I walked into the pool and just seeing the facility and talking to (diving coach) Aaron (Paskvan) and smelling the chlorine got me excited to dive again,” he said. “In talking to Andy about his background, I knew he was going to be pretty decent,” said Coach Paskvan. “I didn’t think he would get it back so fast, though. He has some very special talent.”

MORE THAN TOPPLING RECORDS Just a month into the competitive season, Andy had broken the school record on the one-meter board, and later broke a 25-yearold mark on the three-meter. His third-place finish at nationals was icing on the cake. For Andy, his college experience goes beyond records and diving: “I’m really glad I came here. Calvin is unique in a lot of ways, and it fits my personality. I feel like Calvin gives me more opportunities to develop my faith and grow closer to Christ, and my faith is very important to me. “I love diving, but I didn’t want it to be my life. That’s why I love Division III; it’s a good balance.” WEB EXCLUSIVE

Watch Andy dive vimeo.com/20103182

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WEB EXCLUSIVE

Visit www.calvin.edu/go/breakdance to watch Taek and Matt breakdancing DOWNROCK a floor move in which the hands support the body as much as the feet

Colby Touchine Gallup, NM Major: Exercise science

BREAK Taek Kim is the co-founder of Calvin’s first breakdance club, but he refuses to call himself a breakdancer. “I’m just not at that level yet.” He doesn’t have a breakdance name yet either. Friends of his are called “Blank” (Calvin Breakdance Club co-founder Matt Warren), “Raze” and “Christ-Like,” but he’s still waiting to discover his name. “Your name comes with your style. Your style comes from your identity—and from practice.” Wait. Isn’t breakdancing just breakdancing, with standard moves you learn to master? Apparently not. “There’s so much freedom in breakdancing because once you learn the basic moves, there are so many ways to personalize it. You can do salsa, martial arts—you bring your knowledge and personality into it.” Carmen Brummel, an exercise science major now studying physical therapy at Northwestern University, got inspiration for her personal style from another sport: diving.

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As a diver, her signature style is based on what are called “power moves” in breakdance lingo. In other words, acrobatic moves that require lots of things developed in diving: body awareness, strength and control. For Carmen, this means incorporating lots of handstands and “freezes” into her breakdancing. Personal styles are most obvious when two breakdancers (or, “b-boys” and “b-girls”) compete against each other in a breakdance “battle.” Calvin’s breakdance club hosted two of these battles in its first year. The first competition was so crowded that people were turned away at the door. The second battle, called a 2x2 battle, drew 29 teams of two from around Michigan and moved to one of Calvin’s gyms in the Van Noord Arena to fit the hundreds of people who showed up for the event. For Taek, the 2x2 helped him figure out exactly what he loves about breakdancing. “It really breaks down barriers and stereotypes between people. Girls and guys compete against each other, kids compete—I even competed against some people who don’t speak English. Basically, it’s not about hierarchy, it’s just about how hard you try out there.”


Carmen Brummel Allendale, Mich. Major: Exercise science

FREEZES controlled poses that require a breaker to suspend himself or herself off the ground using upper-body strength.

Taek Kim Seoul, South Korea Major: Social work

DANCE

FEVER

Follow Calvin Breakdance on Facebook: www.facebook.com/calvinbreakdance 17


PACKING IT ALL IN

BEST FOR: The world traveler “I love my backpack! It’s lasted all through college. I brought it with me to Kenya, and it still has some African dirt on it. I refuse to part with it!” Emily, junior

YOUR GUIDE TO CHOOSING THE RIGHT BACKPACK

BEST FOR: The adventurer “My bag is actually a climbing backpack. It has compartments for carabineers, ice picks, water bottles. And it redistributes the weight from your shoulders, which is nice if you have to carry a million books across campus.” M.D., sophomore

BEST FOR: The fashionista “I have two backpacks, but I’m really into the messenger bag. I like it because it still looks good when you’re wearing nice clothes. And you can bike with it.” Mike, senior

BEST FOR: The essentialist “I got my backpack at Meijer. It has a lot of compartments, and it looks pretty sporty.” Melissa, junior

BEST FOR: The Bohemian “My backpack is an old mail carrier’s bag from Amsterdam. My mom bought it there when she was studying at Calvin.” Alexandra, senior

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THERE’S 4 YEARS’ WORTH

OF

PLAY HERE n

Explore more of GR www.calvin.edu/go/gr

Grand Rapids

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Enjoy a day at the beach in Holland or Grand Haven Grand Haven Catch a late-night outdoor movie at Reeds Lake Hike the dunes along the lakeshore Go mountain biking on top-rated trails Go camping up north for a weekend Visit Millennium Park to hike, fish, kayak, swim and more Go berry picking at Fruit Ridge U-Pick Kayak or canoe down the Grand River Work in Calvin’s community garden

Try out swing dancing in Rosa Park Circle circle 19 29


THE ART AND SCIENCE OF

HUMAN MOVEMENT BY PHIL DE HAAN

What’s in a name? Plenty, says Brian Bolt, chairperson of the Calvin department formerly known as HPERDS. After a year-long process, HPERDS—the acronym stands for health, physical education, recreation, dance and sport—has changed its name to the kinesiology department. Kinesiology is, Professor Bolt said, the most recognized term in the physical education and recreation field. And it’s a name that will benefit students, especially as they head to graduate school and the job market.

STUDENTS APPROVE Annika Soule thinks the name change is fitting. Annika is a senior from Holland, Mich., who is studying exercise science at Calvin and plans to become a physical therapist (she already has been accepted to graduate school). She said she’s happy about the name change and believes it will benefit future students. “Kinesiology will carry more prestige,” she said. “I think that it clearly communicates that Calvin is profoundly academic and indicates exactly what unifies us as a department, which

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is movement—the study, appreciation and application of movement in all its shapes and forms. I think it also advertises to the rest of the campus and to the greater community a clear sense of Calvin’s possibilities. HPERDS isn’t a recognizable acronym, and this reduces that confusion.” Senior Trent Salo, who is headed to graduate school this fall at the University of Kentucky, echoed Annika’s words. “Using the name kinesiology will enable employers, graduate school admissions and other students to understand exactly what our major entails,” the Rudyard, Mich., native said. Both agree that what the department does for its students is more important than the name on the degree.

PROFESSORS ARE ADVISORS AND EXAMPLES “I have been blessed to have class with almost every single professor in the kinesiology department … ,” said Annika. “They have been incredible advisors when it came to choosing classes to take to become prepared for physical therapy school to helping with recommendations for physical therapy schools to helping me decide between the programs I was accepted into. And it’s not only that: They and many of the other professors have been such awesome examples of faith.”


Trent agrees. “From the first day I stepped on campus,” he said, “I felt that the professors and faculty within the department, specifically the profs who teach exercise science, were genuinely concerned about my academic progress and career aspirations.” Both students were able to work this year on campus as personal trainers and said the new facilities in the Spoelhof Fieldhouse Complex—including the new labs, new fitness rooms and more—were invaluable assets in that work. “It is reassuring to know that the equipment we are using, especially in our exercise laboratory, is top notch,” said Trent. “I would put our facilities and equipment against any other college or university in the nation.”

HANDS ON Trent worked this year with a recreational athlete who had suffered a torn hamstring, while Annika worked with a client with multiple sclerosis (MS). “Not only have I been stretched to come up with unique workout patterns, but I’ve learned so much about identifying with people and how to provide them with measurable goals,” Annika said. “Every single person has their own fears, expectations and reservations. As a physical therapist, I have to know how to work with that. People with MS have a lot of barriers to exercise. If I can help them move beyond their fears, I feel like I have accomplished something big.”

Trent, a varsity basketball player who struggled with his own injury, a broken foot, his senior year, concurred. “It was great to be able to apply the things we learn in class to our sessions with our clients,” he said. “It definitely helps to solidify the important concepts within our field. The hardest thing I found out was judging the exertion level of my client. Oftentimes, I had to flat-out ask my client if the exercises were too difficult because I wasn’t sure based on their expressions. That is an aspect that cannot be learned in the classroom.” Such comments are music to Professor Bolt’s ears: “We believe our major is a great option for Christian young people who want to explore God’s gifts of movement and health and leisure,” he said, “and we hope the new name will open up our department to even more students.”

WEB EXCLUSIVE

Check out www.calvin.edu/verge for a tour of the human performance lab and more facility pics.

KINESIOLOGY MAJORS

MINORS

Exercise science Sport management K-12 education Therapeutic recreation Recreation/leadership Pre-professional programs

Dance Health education Kinesiology

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FACULTY PROFILE:

JULIE WALTON Dr. Julie Walton, professor of kinesiology, jokes that she landed her position at Calvin because she started hearing voices—or more accurately, one particular Voice. After finishing her PhD in exercise physiology, Professor Walton was working with the cardiology department at Spectrum Health when a voice in her head prompted, “Call Calvin College.” Although she had heard of Calvin, she knew next to nothing about it. “When I went to college, I wasn’t a Christian yet, so it didn’t even occur to me that you could integrate faith and learning,” she said. But the quiet voice continued its urging through the week, so she sent Calvin an e-mail inquiring about openings. “In a week’s time, I was interviewed and offered a position teaching exercise science,” she recalled. Now more than 12 years into her teaching career, the voices she hears are often those of her students. In addition to teaching exercise science and nutrition courses, and working in the human performance lab, and serving, with Professor Nancy Meyer, as pre-physical therapy adviser, she regularly eats with students—for enjoyment and sharing, of course, but also for her research. “Eating together around a table is a simple practice with a host of embedded Christian practices like prayer, testimony and hospitality. For a few precious minutes we become fully present to one another in ways a classroom or technology environment can’t provide.” The results of her recent pedagogical research are clear: “Relationships between students and faculty are significantly improved by sharing just two meals together in a semester.”

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EDUCATION BA, Colorado State University MA, Ball State University PhD, University of Maryland CERTIFICATION AND MEMBERSHIPS American College of Sports Medicine Certified Clinical Exercise Specialist Legacy member, American College of Sports Medicine Past president, Christian Society of Kinesiology and Leisure Studies RESEARCH INTERESTS • The shared meal as a Christian practice: how food and faith interact • Theological reflections on sport • The long-range effects of physical activity in aging adults FUN FACT Walton dislikes biking but loves Calvin’s spinning classes.

I encourage [my students] to set God, and the knowledge of God, as their first learning priority, and to make godly living a lifestyle. I don’t want them to just think Christianly, but to live Christianly.


A SLICE O

F

DINING

Slice it yo ur Dining Se way! Enter your d eli creatio rvice sand n in the C w prize? Be alv sides bein ich competition ea g the ultim ch year. T in your frien h ate sandw e ds, ich deli menu you’ll also see yo ur creatio chef with for the se n on Calv mester. in’s In 2010–1 1, t first place he signature “Firs t Beets B , followed aby closely by the “Jen V ” won os.”

AT C ALV I

N

FIRST BEETS BABY

Created by student Brandon Koster

START WITH YOUR FAVE BREAD

GF

Spinach

+ GLUTEN-FREE No worries, we have gluten-free bread and bagels for you.

Honey Mustard Curry Sauce

Pepperoni

Pepper Jack Cheese

Banana Peppers

THE JEN VOS SANDWICH

Created by students Rachael Machiele and Karis Roper (friends of Jen Vos)

Turkey

VEG VEGETARIAN One of our many vegetarian options

OTHER DINING OPTIONS: The Knollcrest and Commons dining halls feature special events and meals for students. Throughout the semesters, a Chef Series teaches students unique recipes, including: cake decorating, the art of grilling, how to make sushi and various pizzas.

Thinly sliced cucumbers

Spinach

The dining halls also feature many vegetarian and vegan options like soup and pizza. Food allergies of all kinds are taken seriously, and both dining halls offer gluten-free pizzas, bread and bagels. A peanut-free salad bar is also offered daily. Display cooking stations showcase assorted foods like Indian, Japanese and Mediterranean. The cooking stations also feature chicken wings, sizzling salads and pasta.

Provolone Cheese

Diced Tomatoes

Pesto Sauce

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Researching bacteriophages in mosquitoes

Netting invertebrates

Jedi Trainer virtual reality

SUMMER RESEARCH Partner with your professor in summer research projects to make your studies come alive.

calvin.edu/academics/opportunities Making solution during Project SEED

Discovering bacteriophages

Measuring a herring gull’s beak

Studying galaxies far, far away

Planting native trees

Planting in a rain garden

Interviewing Cuban refugees

Learning lab techniques for Project SEED

Researching herring gulls

Researching berberine

Using lasers in photo chemistry


FINDING A NEW HOME AT COLLEGE BY DAVIS DRYER Coming to college is a crazy time in your life, no matter what. New friends, new classes and new experiences all add up to excitement, almost to the point of being overwhelming. For me, the beginning of my first-year at Calvin was a tumultuous time. My parents had gotten a divorce in the spring of my senior year of high school. With all of this change in my life, the last thing I wanted was to go off to this strange new experience and be so far away from any fragments of familiarity I had left. Moving into my dorm room, I felt nervous, sad and terribly alone. However, that quickly changed. I was blessed to have a floor of great, welcoming guys. As my friendships with them began to grow and deepen, the more they knew me and could talk to me about the things I was going through. One of the biggest helps to me was our floor Bible study. Growing spiritually with a group of guys, opening up and talking about such an important part of our lives, really gave me the motivation to keep going. Also, the accountability of the group helped me to persevere in my spiritual life despite the business of school. Because of the impact the Bible study had on my life, I decided to become a Barnabas for my floor my sophomore year. I wanted to ensure that the guys on my floor had the same resources and support that I had relied on. Through my experiences and friendships made in the dorm, I was able to make it through one of the toughest times in my life. This helped me to fall in love with Calvin and to invest myself in the dorm and the people within it.

45+ students serve as Barnabas reps on their floors and apartment buildings each year

4-8

HOURS

you’ll spend each week working as a Barnabas

BE A BARNABAS YOUR MISSION: to encourage others on your residence hall floor to love God and others by organizing prayer groups, worship times and Bible studies YOUR INSPIRATION: Acts 4:36—you are called to become “sons” (and daughters) “of encouragement.” YOUR SUPPORT: Two associate chaplains and interns from Calvin’s seminary will train and mentor you as you create Christian community. YOUR CIRCLE: Join other dorm leaders (RAs, Cultural Discerners, Community Partnership coordinators) twice a month to coordinate dorm retreats, Unlearn Week activities and environmental sustainability programs. LEARN MORE www.calvin.edu/faith/discipleship/students/barnabas

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CALVIN ADMISSIONS:

COMING YOUR WAY STEPHANIE DEWEERD

NUNANA NYOMI

KAREN JEFTS

BART TOCCI

WHO I SERVE:

WHO I SERVE:

WHO I SERVE:

WHO I SERVE:

Unity Christian HS, Kalamazoo Christian HS, Western Michigan Christian HS, Muskegon County, south central Michigan, California

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL:

non-Canadian international students

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL: Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Indonesia and Malaysia

all the places listed above!

Calvin Christian HS, Allegan, Cass, Berrien and Van Buren counties (Michigan), Indiana, Iowa, the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, Hawaii, Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Kansas, Missouri

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL:

Calvin Christian HS, Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky, Oregon, Washington, Iowa and Missouri

South Christian HS, northern Michigan, the southeastern U.S., Washington, D.C., Delaware, Maryland and Virginia

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL: Washington, D.C., Maryland and Delaware, Texas, northern Michigan and South Christian HS

26 VERGE

WHO I SERVE:

New England, New York, Pennslyvania, New Jersey and Kent County (Michigan)

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL: all the places listed above!

www.calvin.edu/go/matts

www.calvin.edu/go/stephanied www.calvin.edu/go/karenj

MATT STERENBERG

www.calvin.edu/go/bartt


KELLY POWERS

MARK ASMA

WHO I SERVE:

Ottawa County (Michigan) and the metro Detroit area

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL: Detroit in October

www.calvin.edu/go/kellyp

LYNDI BELL WHO I SERVE:

Grand Rapids Christian High School

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL:

GRCHS in October

www.calvin.edu/go/lyndib

WHO I SERVE: Illinois

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL:

the greater Chicago area

www.calvin.edu/go/marka

NICOLE SHIPMAN WHO I SERVE:

Arizona, Colorado, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin, Holland Christian HS

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL:

all the places listed above (except Arizona)

MEGAN SWIERENGA WHO I SERVE: Transfer Students

WHERE I’LL BE THIS FALL:

Michigan Community Colleges and MACRAO Transfer College Fairs

www.calvin.edu/go/nicoles

Calvin admissions representatives will also be traveling in these Canadian provinces: Ontario, British Columbia, and Alberta. Check out our travel schedule at www.calvin.edu/go/canadian-travel. From Ontario? Catch the bus to Calvin October 25-27. Register for your spot at www.calvin.edu/go/bus-trip.

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Chaos Day/Sept.

Year round

$1 BUCK FRIDAYS Buck Fridays will ensure that you’ll never spend a Friday night bored as a Calvin student.

Fall Music Festival/Oct.

Calvin Theatre Company/Nov.

www.buckfridays.com

Tree Lighting/Dec.

DAILY CHAPEL

Choose a rhythm for your week through the themes of daily chapel.

January Series/Jan. 28 VERGE

Monday = grow Tuesday = pray Wednesday = testify Thursday = breathe Friday = sing www.calvin.edu/faith

Year round


SAO CONCERTS

Sports/March

Year round

ECOSYSTEM PRESERVE Find turtles, birds, minks and more as you stroll through Calvin’s 90-acre Ecosystem Preserve.

A dazzling concert lineup, thought-provoking artists, critically acclaimed films— Calvin’s Student Activities Office teaches you to find where God is at work in popular music, film, video games, fashion and more.

Year round

Rangeela/Feb.

Plan your visit Think about the extra-curricular activities that are important to you—music, sports, theater or festivals—and schedule your visit to include some of these events! Experience our signature Fridays at Calvin visit program or a Department Day visit, where you can dig deeper into your major. If these options don’t work for you, no worries. We’ll be happy to schedule an individual visit just for you—and your parents, too!

Dance Guild/April

www.calvin.edu/visit - schedule your visit www.calvin.edu/calendar - check out campus events 29


FINANCIAL AID:

MAKING IT WORK › › ›

Think of the application process in terms of these three steps:

Don’t bypass a great school just because of sticker shock! If you’re excited about a college, apply. At Calvin, over 92 percent of students pay less than full price—a lot less, in fact. At Calvin, you will have opportunities galore to grow in every direction—like boarding a plane to study abroad or praying with your team at nationals or tackling an incredible internship. In all these ways and more, Calvin will launch you into a remarkable future. College costs can be daunting—no doubt about it. But know this: Calvin’s financial aid staff is committed to working with you to understand your family’s situation and will carefully explore a variety of financial aid programs.

STEP 1:

Apply for admission www.calvin.edu/apply The $35 fee will be waived for applications received by Dec. 1 (U.S. citizens) or Jan. 1 (Canadians and internationals).

TIP

STEP 2:

To receive maximum consideration for financial aid and scholarships, make sure you are admitted by Feb. 1.

Explore scholarship opportunities through Calvin’s scholarship search www.calvin.edu/go/scholarships Search for additional scholarhips: www.fastweb.com

TIP

STEP 3:

Apply for financial aid www.calvin.edu/finaid/apply Financial aid applications are available starting Jan. 1.

Don’t despair if you miss recommended deadlines for financial aid. Often there is still money available beyond these dates. Apply as soon as you can.

Don’t let the financial aid process scare you—applying is easier than you think. WHAT FINANCIAL AID FORMS DO I COMPLETE?

WHEN ARE THEY DUE?

QUESTIONS?

U.S. citizens

1. Free Application for Federal Student Aid www.fafsa.gov 2. Calvin’s Supplemental Financial Aid Form www.calvin.edu/go/supplemental (optional)

Feb. 15

(800) 688-0122 (616) 526-6134 finaid@calvin.edu

Canadian citizens

Canadian Financial Aid Form www.calvin.edu/finaid

April 1

(800) 688-0122 (616) 526-6134 finaid@calvin.edu

International citizens

Declaration of Finances form www.calvin.edu/international

April 1

(800) 688-0122 (616) 526-6134 finaid@calvin.edu

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MAKING IT WORK WITH A CAMPUS JOB

PHYSICAL PLANT

ADMISSIONS

SHOULD I WORK DURING COLLEGE?

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

LIBRARY

Literally hundreds of Calvin students help pay for their education with a campus job. And aside from the money—which is a huge help—your college job can be a big part of your education, providing structure, support, new skills and career preparation.

FOOD SERVICES

FIELDHOUSE COMPLEX

AUDIO VISUAL

TIP

Explore campus job opportunities during your summer orientation session. CAMPUS SAFETY

FISH HOUSE

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The brigade also helped the women articulate a vision for their business that reflected their goal of cultural preservation. While the Embera value their baskets for their usefulness, tourists and missionaries value them as cultural objects. “It’s not just a basket,” Brendhain encouraged the collective, “it’s an Embera basket.”

KNOWLEDGE IS THE CURRENCY

DOING BUSINESS IN

PANAMA BY ANDREW STEINER

In Tortí, the students offered three days of workshops for the bank’s board of directors. The bank was already on strong financial footing, making profits and paying dividends to its members. What it needed was a stronger definition of leadership roles, an issue the students were able to address with the knowledge they had gained in class. “It was great to take the business knowledge I’d acquired through 90-some credits at the time and actually apply that in a real-life situation, and not only to apply it, but to apply it for someone else’s benefit,” Brendhain said.

FAITH IN PRACTICE

Brendhain Reid, a business major from Jessup, Md., spent the last week of May in Panama with tattoos on his arms and money on his mind. Eight students from Calvin’s chapter of the Global Business Brigades (GBB) divided their time between two Panamanian communities: a micro-finance bank in Tortí, and an artisans’ collective in Piriati Embera. Global Business Brigade, a national organization with chapters all over the country, uses a “bottom-up approach” to help find solutions to communities’ problems. “One of the things we’re really big on is no handouts …,” Brendhain said. “It’s more about presenting them with the right questions so that they themselves can come up with the right answers.”

AN ARTISANS’ COLLECTIVE The students worked with 50 Embera women who founded an artisans’ collective as a means of preserving traditional crafts—like basket-weaving and jewelry-making—and as a source of income. Aided by two translators and two coordinators, the students analyzed the collective’s practices and offered a business plan that addressed the importance of collaboration between the artisans.

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Even though GBB’s goals are economic, not spiritual, Brendhain has found that the subject of faith has come up on every trip. “What I found out this time,” he said, “is that all the board of directors (of the bank in Tortí) were members of the same church. Sometimes we would open meetings with prayer. Sometimes that was at our request; sometimes it was at theirs, which was really great. Working with Global Business Brigades, their values line up with our faith.”


The Decemberists April 25, 2011

Lupe Fiasco Sufjan Stevens Over the Rhine Jeff Tweedy Fleet Foxes My Brightest Diamond Anathallo David Bazan The Mountain Goats Broken Social Scene The Decemberists Cornel West Andrew Bird Emmylou Harris Death Cab for Cutie Patty Griffin Gillian Welch Welcome Wagon Wilco Anberlin Joanna Newsom Explosions in the Sky Grizzly Bear

You care about pop culture. So do we. Should you reject popular culture or embrace it? Consider Calvin’s alternative: holy worldliness. Using the lens of our Christian faith, we help students engage with popular culture to discern its positives and negatives—to be in the world, but not of it. It’s a bold path, but we accept the challenge. Join the conversation. www.calvin.edu/go/culture

Derek Webb Ratatat Switchfoot Sigur Rós Jon Foreman K’NAAN Jars of Clay The Blind Boys of Alabama


Office of Admissions and Financial Aid 3201 Burton St. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49546-4388 www.calvin.edu/verge

FOLLOW CALVIN facebook.com/calvincollege facebook.com/calvinadmissions

The research environment at Calvin is a huge advantage. Being familiar with advanced techniques and cross-disciplinary research certainly gives you a leg-up. One comment I got consistently during my interviews was that it was rare for an undergrad to have such a thorough understanding of his research, which was entirely a credit to my Calvin professors.

As a biochem major Nick Be knew that graduate school was in his future. Since he also wanted a life outside of the lab, he chose Calvin.

Nick Be ’05 MAJOR AT CALVIN Biochemistry

GRADUATE STUDIES PhD in biology, Johns Hopkins University Postdoctoral fellowship, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Study-abroad programs took him to Vietnam, India and Ecuador. The band he formed in the dorm didn’t make it big, but the friendships did. His classes, along with research he did with chemistry professor Eric Arnoys, provided an onramp to his grad school plans. Nick recently completed his doctorate at Johns Hopkins, where he studied central nervous system tuberculosis, a devastating disease that affects children in developing nations. Next, he’s heading to California for a postdoctoral fellowship in biodefense research, studying better ways to identify unknown pathogens that are of interest to national defense.


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