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ISSUE 10 / 2019

URBAN RANCH

A single dad designs a ranch-inspired home as open and airy as it is kid- and horse-friendly.

RangeJH.com

COMPLIMENTARY

TEN TIPS

DESIGN

TRAVEL

Using Color

A Better Bedroom

Santa Fe


Kr a f y P h o t o s

headwalljh.com | 307.413.7754


TABLE OF CONTENTS features

38 —

URBAN RANCH

A single dad with a working cattle ranch near Daniel, Wyoming, builds a kid- and horsefriendly home in Wilson. By Maggie Theodora

44 —

COMING HOME

The Prughs lived in eight different houses around the valley in seven years. When they were ready to settle down, they took elements and details from each and added personal touches, the biggest of which are their three young boys. By Dina Mishev

50 —

NOT SO SIMPLE

A home in the Aspens shows how a “simple” house done well takes a lot of thought and planning.

page 44

By Lila Edythe

Photograph by David Agnello

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WITH PINGORA CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

HOYT ARCHITECTS 1 1 1 0 M A P L E W AY J A C K S O N , W Y | 3 0 7 . 7 3 3 . 9 9 5 5


TABLE OF CONTENTS departments

20

— 36

30

10 / WHAT INSPIRES ME Jane Carter-Getz

26 /ARCHITECTURE: NOTHING TO SEE HERE A caretaker’s residence in a popular public park on the Snake River blends into the surrounding area, while still allowing the caretaker inside to keep an eye on things.

12 / FAVORITES What we love right now

30 / TRAVEL: SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO This ancient city of adobe is a magnet for fun seekers and saints.

16 / MUST HAVE: SOFAS Think of this piece of furniture as an investment you sit on. 18 / NEIGHBORHOOD: SOLITUDE Hidden on a bench in the Snake River bottoms, this neighborhood with big lots lives up to its name. 20 / TEN TIPS: COLOR THEORY Local design professionals share how you can bring color into your home.

36 / DESIGN: BEDROOMS We spend up to half of our lives in bed. Here’s how to make that time comfortable and well designed. 56 / HOME SWEET HOME The Klein Family

ON THE COVER Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy Photographer Tuck Fauntleroy shot JJ Healy’s Wilson home, designed by GYDE Architects, for this issue of Range. “The asymmetric, modern lines and mixed materials blend well with the landscape,” Fauntleroy says about the project. “Finding creative ways to capture that feeling and aesthetic made this a compelling shoot.” Healy says GYDE co-founder Peggy Gilday pushed him—delicately—to go with a more modern look than he had originally envisioned. “I’m so glad she did,” he says, describing the look as “modern industrial ranch.” RANGE ISSUE TEN 4


Trailblazing Modern Architecture in Jackson West for over 25 Years. TrailblazingModern ModernArchitecture Jackson and Trailblazing and the theWest Westfor forover over25 25Years. Years.

dynia.com dynia.com dynia.com Jackson, Wyoming Jackson, Jackson,Wyoming Wyoming 307.733.3766 307.733.3766 307.733.3766 Denver, Colorado Denver, Denver,Colorado Colorado 303.339.9910 303.339.9910 303.339.9910 New NewYork, York,New NewYork York New212.484.9860 York, New York 212.484.9860 212.484.9860


A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

THERE’S NO DOUBT FINDING AND sharing beautiful homes in Jackson Hole is a wonderful job that I’m thankful for (along with many other things, including a home of my own that I love). But have you heard of “house envy”? This is Range’s tenth issue and my tenth issue as editor, and I am no better at resisting this feeling now than I was when editing issue one. I had naively thought that I would become inured to gorgeous homes. How could I not be envious of the home Eileen and Greg Prugh created for their three sons though (“Coming Home,” p. 44)? The form of the house is nothing earthshattering, but the easy, whimsical style they applied to the interior, and the activity, friends, and laughter with which they share it are special among all of the homes I’ve had the fortune to visit. “Not So Simple,” on p. 50, shares the story of a home in the Aspens an architect designed for herself and her family. Read this feature and look at photographer David Agnello’s accompanying images and see if you’re not envious of how organized and well designed the house is. Journalist Jeremy Pugh’s story about what to do in Santa Fe, New Mexico (p. 30), doesn’t inspire envy, but wanderlust. Halfway through my first read of it I was online looking at flights, dreaming of staying at La Fonda and seeing what Meow Wolf was all about. This issue’s “Favorites” department (p. 12), a collection of awesome home/design items found in area boutiques, also inspired some wanderlust, though it was much more easily satisfied: I had only to travel to downtown Jackson to check out the featured favs. Fans of Rendezvous Park, the unique, privately owned public park on the west bank of the Snake River, will be interested in writer Samantha Simma’s article about the under-construction caretaker’s residence there (“Architecture,” p. 26) designed by GYDE Architects. In this issue we also have design professionals share some of their favorite sofas (“Must Have,” p. 16) and tips on how to incorporate color into your home (“10 Tips,” p. 20). Journalist Mark Huffman looks into the history of the Solitude subdivision north of town (“Neighborhood,” p. 18), and Samantha Simma reports on how to improve the quality of your sleep and the look of your bedroom (“Design,” p. 36), among other articles. As always, I hope you enjoy this issue of Range as much as I enjoyed putting it together. And that it doesn’t inspire too much house envy.

Dina Mishev Instagram @rangemag / @dinamishev

RANGE ISSUE TEN 6


Jackson Hole, Wyoming Teton Valley, Idaho


CONTRIBUTORS

PUBLISHER Kevin Olson

DAVID AGNELLO (“Coming Home,” p. 44 and “Not So Simple,” p. 50) photographs structures and their inhabitants worldwide. Architecture, interiors, and the people that use the built environment are his most common subject matters, from modern architecture in the American West to resorts in Turks and Caicos. The interaction between nature, structure, light, and human interface is the driving force behind David’s photography.

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Adam Meyer EDITOR Dina Mishev ART DIRECTOR Taylor-Ann Smith PHOTO DIRECTOR Scott Eren COPY EDITOR Richard Anderson

Photographer TUCK FAUNTLEROY’s images have been published in outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, Dwell, Conde Nast Traveler, Goop, and Powder Magazine. In this issue of Range he shot “Urban Ranch,” p. 38. A native of Easton, Maryland, Fauntleroy says, “Spaces are where we spend the vast majority of our time. Designing spaces that are enjoyable to be in/around is critical.” See Fauntleroy’s ongoing Waterline series of aerial images of rivers in snow-covered landscapes at Tayloe Piggott Gallery.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lila Edythe Mark Huffman Samantha Simma Jeremy Pugh Maggie Theodora Geraldine Stal CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS David Agnello Cole Buckhart Tuck Fauntleroy Matthew Millman ADVERTISING SALES & DISTRIBUTION Kal Stromberg kal@tetonmediaworks.com AD DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Sarah Wilson Chelsea Robinson Lydia Redzich

Grand Etagere RHYTHM - RAW - REFINED

e k r e e dy . c o m

JEREMY PUGH,

who writes about how to make the most of a trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico, in this issue (p. 30), is a travel writer, essayist, and author based in Salt Lake City, Utah. Currently the digital editor of Salt Lake magazine, Pugh’s writing appears in SKI, VIA, and Lonely Planet magazines. The second edition of his book 100 Things to Do in Salt Lake City Before You Die was published in May 2019, and his second book, Secret Salt Lake, will be published in 2020. RANGE ISSUE TEN 8

Range magazine is published twice yearly. P.O. Box 7445, Jackson, WY 83002 (307) 732-5900 / RangeJH.com © 2019 Teton Media Works. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this magazine’s original contents, whether in whole or part, requires written permission from the publisher.


THE CURRENT TRADITION

T RA DIT IO NA L ELEM ENT S M EET CO NT EM PO RA RY INSPIRAT ION

JJST I R E MAND E SI G N.COM | @J A CQU ESTIREMA N DESIG N


WHAT INSPIRES ME

JANE CARTER-GETZ FOUNDER / BELLE COSE By Lila Edythe ∙ Photography by Cole Buckhart “IF I’M NOT DOING SOME sort of work that involves updating or freshening up something, whether it’s a store or a house, I feel like I’m not doing anything,” says Jane Carter-Getz, who owns six lifestyle stores across the valley—Belle Cose, Belle Cose on King, Belle Cose Home, Belle Cose West Bank, and two Belle Coses in the Four Seasons in Teton Village. “I like the feeling of starting from scratch and I also like challenging myself and pushing myself out of my comfort zone.” Here Carter-Getz shares some of the things that inspire her creativity.

Temple St. Clair certainly has her classic pieces [of jewelry] like the Rock Crystal amulet that I wear, but she is always expanding her line. With inspirations from Gustav Klimt to the Silk Road, she uses color and fine gemstones in ways that always impress me. From about $1,700, available at Belle Cose, 48 E. Broadway Ave., 307/733-2640, bellecose.com

We recently redesigned a classic 1960s house on West Kelly Ave. I had never done anything in the mid-century modern style before, and it was really outside of my wheelhouse—I had gravitated to more classic and traditional. By the time we were finished with the house, though, I loved the style.

I love what Stio does and also love to support a local brand. I buy a lot of it for my husband and son Jack. The brand’s Kids’ Hometown down hooded jacket is filled with water-repellent down, and it takes all the abuse a 9-year-old can think up, washes up beautifully, and Jack never complains about being cold when he’s wearing it. It goes from the slopes to the Wilson School playground with style! $159, available at Stio Mountain Studio, 10 E. Broadway Ave., 307/201-1890, stio.com

Christmas decorating is something I think about all year long. It is the most magical time of the year. I remember our first Christmas in Jackson—my parents started bringing us here in 1965—I must have been about 4 or 5, and I have definite visual memories of a small Christmas tree by the fireplace. Now I move everything out of the main store and set up 15 or 16 Christmas trees, each of which has its own theme. I have people that will come in every day during the Christmas season because they say the store just makes them happy. I love that I’m not the only one getting pleasure out of it. Christmas trees are up in Belle Cose between November 2 and January 10-ish. Belle Cose, 48 E. Broadway Ave., 307/733-2640, bellecose.com

John [Frechette] and Christian [Burch] have a fresh design perspective, and I love the way they merchandise. Every item in [their store] MADE in Jackson Hole is curated and special. I buy things at MADE, but more often I just go there and enjoy the look and feel. 125 N. Cache St., 307/690-7957, madejacksonhole.com RANGE ISSUE TEN 10


designing the places you gather | shannonwhitedesign.com


FAVORITES FORM & FUNCTION New West Knifeworks’ knife magnets are as much art as they are practical. Thanks to the super-strong magnets encased within, each can hold between five and seven knives. And thanks to a process that fuses wood—using different species including walnut and juniper— with alumilite resin, each looks like a piece of fine art. From $450, available at New West Knifeworks, 98 Center St. Unit C, 307/733-4193, newwestknifeworks.com

The artisan behind Wood & Grain, which makes wooden tea light holders and cutting/ serving boards inlaid with brass, turquoise, and other semiprecious stones, is a full-time physician assistant. If he’s half as good with his patients as he is with the design and fabrication of these, they’re lucky. Tea light holders $22, cutting boards from $109, available at Workshop, 180 E. Deloney Ave., 307/203-7856, workshopjh.com

CLASSIC COASTERS Kara Adomaitis has been photographing the landscape, people, places, and events of Jackson Hole for 25 years. She turned some of her favorite images of the Tetons—Oxbow Bend, the Cathedral Group, Jackson Lake, Mormon Row— into ceramic coasters that celebrate the valley’s beauty. $34 for a set of four, available at 307 Jackson, 55 S. Glenwood St., 615/533-6999, 307jackson.com

SMELLS LIKE INSPIRATION POINT It seems Ethics Supply Company can’t help itself from being cute and creative. A seven-ounce hand-poured bar of soap that contains activated charcoal, is infused with scented oils, and has a top edge cut into a silhouette of the Tetons? Of course. Travel- and full-size candles made from coconut-apricot wax that smell like Inspiration Point above the west shore of Jenny Lake? Yes. What does Inspiration Point smell like? Golden willow, wild rose, and fresh snow. From $14.50, available at Paper & Grace, 55 N. Glenwood St. B2, 307/733-8900, paperandgrace.com RANGE ISSUE TEN 12

Photography by Cole Buckhart

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FAVORITES

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Photography by Cole Buckhart

Tenley Thompson, a painter, ceramicist, and mixed-media artist, had us with the name of her studio—Jumping Jackalope Studios—and made us forever fans with glazed stonewear that she hand paints with simple silhouettes of different views of the Tetons or geometric depictions of animals. Thompson’s wildlife pieces are informed by her training as a wildlife biologist. Pieces are food-, oven-, dishwasher-, and microwave-safe. From $25, available at Penny Lane, 35 Glenwood St., 307/733-3080, pennylanecooperative.com

TRAM FANS SKT Ceramics is based in Cincinnati, Ohio, but just for MADE the company created custom, hand-painted coffee mugs and an “everything dish” that feature the Aerial Tram at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. From $25, available at MADE, 125 N. Cache St., 307/690-7957, madejacksonhole.com

WEARABLE ART We’ve long loved Abby Paffrath’s colorful artwork, but what to do when our walls are full? Meet Art4All by Abby hats. Each trucker cap features her work on the front and an adjustable back. $29.95, available at Penny Lane, 35 Glenwood St., 307/733-3080, pennylanecooperative.com

COLORFUL TOTE

OPEN UP

“We upped our selection of canvas bags when Jackson went bagless,” says Paper & Grace manager Cassie Dean. We love Rifle Paper Co.’s 100 percent cotton canvas 17-inch tote bag screenprinted with original paintings of flowers, herbs, and vegetables by company co-founder Anna Bond. $26, available at Paper & Grace, 55 N. Glenwood St. B2, 307/733-8900, paperandgrace.com

You can never have enough bottle openers—do you misplace yours as often as we do?—so don’t feel bad if you can’t pick just one of these metalshop bottle openers cut from steel in the shape of local wildlife. And then one’s cut in the shape of Big Foot. We went with the Big Foot and the bear. $14, available at MADE, 125 N. Cache St., 307/690-7957, madejacksonhole.com

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MUST HAVE

SOFAS Think of this piece of furniture as an investment you sit on.

By Geraldine Stal I KNOW THE EXACT MOMENT I first felt like an adult: I was in my early 30s and my thenfiancé and I bought a sofa that cost as much as our monthly mortgage payment. I thought it the most gorgeous sofa I had ever seen, and when I sat down in it I didn’t want to get up. It swallowed me in the best way possible. It replaced a sagging, stained sofa I had bought at a furniture warehouse sale in Idaho Falls ten years prior that guests had been giving the stink eye to for about five years. Still, a sofa that cost as much as the monthly payment for the house it was in? “Yes,” says Kathy Reedy, who founded ek Reedy Interiors in 1990. “A quality sofa that will last is expensive.” (My experience supports this: My sofa celebrated its fifteenth birthday this summer and remains as comfortable as the first time I saw in it.) Glenda Lawrence, founder of the boutique upholstery studio and interior design firm Matterhouse, agrees. “Sofas just have to be made by hand. There is not a lot of factory production that can be done. And then you get into fabrics that can cost hundreds of dollars a yard.” Because the idea is to have your sofa for a while, “go for something timeless and a neutral color,” Lawrence says. And, of course, pick something comfortable. Cushion firmness is a personal preference, “but you need to make sure the sofa is the right size for you,” Reedy says. “Your knees should bend at the end of the cushion.” Finally, choose function over form. “Get a sofa that fits your lifestyle. Don’t change your lifestyle for your sofa,” says Alex Nye, a designer at the design store/firm Home Again. “You might really want a velvet sofa, but if you have pets, that’s not the best choice. We sell a lot of sofas with Crypton kid-proof fabric.” Here Reedy, Lawrence, and Nye share some of their favorite sofas for Jackson Hole homes.

The Character

“It has character,” Lawrence says about Thayer Coggin’s Spaced Out sofa. “When you look at it, you know that it was finely designed and put together.” Unusual for the back cushions that don’t fill up its entire backrest, Lawrence says it “could work in a house that has a modern or classic feel.” From $7,800, available through Matterhouse, 150 Scott Lane, 307/699-7947, matterhouse.com

The Family Guy

Neval’s modular sectional is “where style meets lifestyle,” Nye says. “It is comfort to the max. It manages to hold its beautiful shape without sacrificing comfort. It is so lounge-worthy and perfect in every way. Paired with a kid-proof fabric, it is a slam-dunk for any Jackson family.” From $5,500, available through Home Again, 890 S. U.S. Highway 89, 307/739-2232, homeagainjh.com

Affordable Good Looks

The Brenna convertible sofa from Urban Outfitters “is the perfect small-space solution without comprising on style,” says Home Again’s Nye. Its tufted cushions provide structure and balance, and we love that it converts from a sofa to a bed. “Plus you can’t beat the price,” Nye says. $479, available at urbanoutfitters.com

RANGE ISSUE TEN 16


Summer Lovin’ Polywood’s Hudson settee “is the top-of-the-line situation for enjoying the few months of summer we get here in Jackson,” Nye says. Made in Syracuse, Indiana, from recycled milk jugs, all of Polywood’s outdoor furniture is resistant to stains and isn’t prone to splinter, crack, chip, peel, or rot. “We vetted so many outdoor lines before picking Polywood,” Nye says. “This furniture will withstand our weather, although we do recommend bringing the cushions inside. And it looks so lux and is comfortable.” Settees from $1,995, available through Home Again, 890 S. U.S. Highway 89, 307/739-2232, homeagainjh.com

Ultimate Flexibility “All of Kravet’s pieces are great quality and well designed,” Reedy says. “They have a lifetime warranty and offer clients the ultimate flexibility.” There are hundreds of fabrics and leathers to choose from. Reedy likes Kravet’s Lehigh sofa because it is extremely comfortable and is available on a quick ship program, which means you can get it in two weeks instead of the usual ten to twelve weeks. From $6,000, available through ek Reedy Interiors, 140 E. Broadway Ave. #2, 307/739-9121, ekreedy.com

Plush & Comfortable “Designing a sofa is not for amateurs,” Reedy says. “It requires talent and skillful fabrication for a sofa to emanate style and provide comfort.” New York City-based Dmitriy & Co uses traditional techniques like hand-tied springs and materials like down fill in cushions. The company’s Chelsea Square sofa with one cushion is a favorite of Reedy’s because “no one has to sit on a seam or joint line, and when you lay down you have an almost bed-like experience rather than three cushions all moving at one time.” From $9,800, available through ek Reedy Interiors, 140 E. Broadway Ave. #2, 307/739-9121, ekreedy.com

And, yes, IKEA

“We recommend people invest as much as they can in a sofa because it is something you’ll likely sit on every day,” Nye says, “and sofas are something that you get what you pay for.” Still, most people don’t have thousands of dollars to spend on a sofa. For its price, IKEA’s Vimle sofa is a good option. Yes, its cushions are polyurethane foam and its frame isn’t solid wood (it’s a mix of solid wood, plywood, fiberboard, and particleboard), but we like its clean look, and it doesn’t cost as much as a car. From $649, ikea.com

The Conversation Starter Nye admits this Australian-designed custom sofa isn’t for everyone, but “for someone looking to make a statement, this could be the sofa. It is both rustic and mid-century in style, which you don’t usually see in the same piece, and it has super details.” While the front is upholstered in leather or hide that you get to pick, the back is entirely wood. From behind it looks more like a sculpture than a sofa. “We learned of this sofa by word-of-mouth and we’re so glad we did. It brings a totally different perspective to the store than anything else we have.” From $5,985, available through Home Again, 890 S. U.S. Highway 89, 307/739-2232, homeagainjh.com

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NEIGHBORHOODS

SOLITUDE Hidden on a bench in the Snake River bottoms, this neighborhood with big lots lives up to its name.

By Mark Huffman Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy DRIVE AS FAR NORTH ON Spring Gulch Road as it stretches, along the backside of Jackson Hole Airport where few people go, over the edge of the bench to the Snake River bottoms and—if you’re a homeowner in the aptly named Solitude subdivision—you are home. Many more people know the name than have ever been there. Solitude is on the way to nowhere, 586 acres at a dead end. In keeping with the trend in Jackson Hole, these lackluster acres, benefitting by being out of the way and having a nice view, have become a fancy place to live. In 1979 the bovines moved out to let Jackson developers William Meckem and Pete Mead (a member of the Hanson-Mead ranching family that runs cattle on Spring Gulch to this day)

begin the work of subdividing. Both men were well-known pilots—Meckem, a former Air Force flyer who arrived in the valley in 1959, ran M&M Air Charter—and the two men had plenty of chances to view the land as they flew from the nearby airstrip. Even by the standards of Wyoming cattle, the land that was to become Solitude wasn’t particularly desirable. The owners, ranchers Phil and Betty Lucas, told the Jackson Hole News in 1982 that as cattle-raising land, the parcel was “second and third class.” Mead remembered recently that it “wasn’t the best land, it wasn’t even good pasture land.” The soil is sandy and poor. The parcel was partly sagebrush plain. Along the west boundary it turned into a tangle of trees and scrub bordered by the Snake River, which is armored with a rock dike installed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to hold back spring flooding. The Lucases—their descendants still ranch in Jackson Hole—looked at the sale as a way to preserve the family’s way of life. They saw a big tax bill hitting the following generation, Betty RANGE ISSUE TEN 18

Lucas said. Even without inheritance taxes, the county had threatened “to assess the land at what it will sell for,” she said. “It should be assessed as agricultural land.” But while the use changed from cattle to the houses that dot the parcel today, Solitude is still much less dense that most valley developments says Dennis Triano, an eleven-year resident of the subdivision and an agent at Eagle Mountain Real Estate. Triano says the attraction is being fairly close to town but being in a spot that avoids the increasing traffic in the valley. Triano lived north of town for nearly twenty years before buying a house in Solitude, and he likes the feel of that part of the valley. “Solitude is a great place to live,” he says. “It’s a perfect spot to build homes, down off the bench there, basically it’s ‘solitude.’” Beyond that, Triano says a big draw is the Tetons: His house is in the open, eastern part of the subdivision, and that means a big view. “I think Jackson Hole is the main attraction,” he says, “but the fact that we love to see the mountains is why we live north of town.”


Meckem and Mead designed a layout that prevented crowding. Most of the 103 lots are five or six acres, which gives owners privacy. The east-west streets line up with views of the mountains, and these views suggested the roads’ names: Buck Mountain Road, Phelps Canyon Road, Death Canyon Road, Cloudveil Road, and Avalanche Canyon Drive.

IT’S A PERFECT SPOT TO BUILD HOMES, DOWN OFF THE BENCH THERE, BASICALLY IT’S ‘SOLITUDE.’” [ DENNIS TRIANO, RESIDENT ]

An early complaint by the Wyoming Division of Game and Fish—that subdividing this area would hurt elk migration—was resolved. The solution included a ban on most fencing. Today, Triano says, the area remains thick with moose and deer, sometimes bison, and elk are so common that they “can get annoying.” Another worry turned out to be imaginary: The school

superintendent at the time told commissioners he would need land for a school because “one hundred and three homes could generate a lot of children.” As it turned out, Solitude wasn’t to be a children kind of neighborhood. Meckem, Mead, and a third partner, Bob Lucas, worked a deal for the Lucas family to get its money as the area sold. “We paid them as we sold the ground, there was not really any money down,” Mead says. “Fortunately it sold pretty well.” When lots went on the market in 1979 they were advertised for as low as $80,000, and Triano remembers some going for less. That’s a hazy memory now. Within a few months of the subdivision coming online you could see lots advertised at $95,000. In 1983 one was listed at $250,000, though that seems to have been a stab at a windfall, because two years later one was offered for $100,000. Still, the price for 5.45 acres was $195,000 in 1992 and $695,000 for 6.5 acres in 1997. Triano is currently agent for the owner of several six-acre lots bought nearly 30 years ago as an investment. They’re listed at $950,000. Each. House prices are also strong: In 1989 a threebedroom place with two baths was advertised at $450,000; in 2001 a house and guesthouse

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was offered for $4.25 million. About the only house on the market recently has been a 3,760-square-foot place built in 1988 and listed at $3.495 million. Triano bought his house nearly a dozen years ago for something more than $2 million, and he considers that a deal. “Of course, 2008 happened, and everything slowed down for six years,” he says. “But it was brutal everywhere in the valley. But now everything has come back, it’s tremendous.” Some lots were bought by people who were building houses and wanted even more elbowroom than the original lots offered. It started out that “people would purchase land and hang onto it,” Triano says. They’re still hanging on. “Over half the property has never been built on,” he says. Still, there’s been a recent boom, and there are about five houses currently under construction. So what started as a bit of speculation, like a lot of Jackson development ideas of the 1970s and ’80s, turned out to have been a good idea. “It was kind of taking a chance,” Mead says of the initial idea, “but all of a sudden people were starting to buy stuff. I guess I was surprised, but I’ve been surprised by what has happened here in the last 40 years. If I’d been smarter, I’d have bought more.”

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Using a dark paint can be the most effective and affordable way to make a dramatic change in a room. This room has such a large scale it could carry the dark color.


TEN TIPS

2

For this room we selected about six different colors of blue and put samples up on the wall. We picked the one that looked best in the space, and that was determined by the light coming in the windows and the color of the trim and floors.

COLOR THEORY By Lila Edythe

3

“COLOR CAN MAKE A SPACE,” says interior designer Melinda Shirk. “It can give life to the design.” But color can be intimidating, too. “It is an opportunity to make an expensive mistake. What if you get a colorful sofa and don’t love it in five years?” That’s why Sarah Kennedy, an interior designer at CLB Architects, recommends that clients stick with timeless neutrals for bigger pieces of furniture. Still, it is important to have color elsewhere, she says. “Last winter was a perfect example of why we need color,” says Kennedy. “Outside here can be white for eight months of the year. By April, after seeing tones of white and grey for so long, my brain was dying to see color. There are so many neutral colors in our environment, it’s nice to have some visual stimulation inside.” Shirk, Kennedy, and Stan Czerniak, a professional painter, share how you can bring color into your home.

Pulling the bold color on the walls into the draperies creates contrast and continuity. You always want to have a thread of continuity through a room and then extending into the whole house. The paint color is the thread that we picked up in this room. The same color is in the draperies, but combined with a cream background to keep the space light.

“PERSONALLY, MY HOME IS VERY NEUTRAL WITH COLORS ON THE WALL,” SAYS MELINDA SHIRK, AN INTERIOR DESIGNER AND CO-OWNER OF STOCKTON & SHIRK INTERIOR DESIGN. “I BRING IN COLOR TO MY HOME SEASONALLY BY SWITCHING UP AREA RUGS AND THROW PILLOWS, BUT I LOVE WORKING WITH CLIENTS WHO ARE OPEN TO BIGGER COMMITMENTS TO COLORS. THE OWNERS OF THIS HOME DIDN’T WANT THE CURRENT TREND OF LIGHT ON LIGHT, THEY WANTED RICHNESS AND DEPTH OF COLOR.”

4

21

When used with bold, dark colors like this peacock blue, neutrals like we used on the ceiling and in the draperies and the linens on the bed can soften a room and make it warm and inviting.


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WESTERN +D ESIGN

2 5 T H

A N N U A L

C O N F E R E N C E

2 0 1 7

JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING September 5-8, 2019 SNOW KING CENTER

TICKETS: WesternDesignConference.com

OPENING PREVIEW PARTY • RUNWAY FASHION SHOW • DESIGNER SHOW HOUSE • LIVE AUCTION • 3-DAY EXHIBIT + SALE RANGE ISSUE TEN 22


TEN TIPS

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The idea of painting a log cabin white inside isn’t new or original, but this remodel had such a short timeframe it was the easiest and fastest way to make it lighter and brighter, which is what these homeowners wanted. This doesn’t just work in a log cabin, but in any cavernous space.

To make a pop of color work in a white space, you need for the color to be pretty vibrant. In this room, the tangerine orange color of the chairs draws your attention and is dramatic.

Photograph by Tom Harris

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“WE RARELY DO AN INTERIOR THAT DOESN’T HAVE SOME ACCENT COLOR,” SAYS SARAH KENNEDY, ONE OF THE FOUNDING DESIGNERS OF CLB ARCHITECTS’ INTERIOR DESIGN TEAM. “NEUTRALS CAN GET VERY COLD IN THIS ENVIRONMENT, PARTICULARLY IN THE LONG WINTERS, AND COLOR CAN WARM UP A SPACE.” BUT YOU DON’T WANT TO GO CRAZY. “THIS CABIN IS AN EXAMPLE OF ‘LESS IS MORE,’” KENNEDY SAYS. “THE PALETTE IS SELECTIVE AND PLAYS ON PRIMARY COLORS. IF WE HAD DONE A GREEN TABLE HERE INSTEAD OF THE LIGHT WOOD, THIS VIGNETTE WOULD FEEL VERY DIFFERENT.”

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We always install small brush out swatches in selected locations. We want to see what the colors look like on a cloudy day and on a sunny day. We do these brush outs only after the lighting has been installed. Colors, particularly neutrals, will look different under LED or incandescent lights.

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Many people don’t consider white a color, but it is, and there are 1,001 shades of it, which makes it a very difficult color to get right. There are whites made from base tints of so many different colors—pink, green, blue, brown, black. How much of these base colors you see in your white depends on the light and other colors in the room.


P HOTO : JO S H M ET T EN

T H E C O M M U N I T Y F O U N D AT I O N O F J A C K S O N H O L E

SMART -

EFFECTIVE -

STRONG

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TEN TIPS

IF YOU’RE A DO-IT-YOURSELFER, HIRING A PROFESSIONAL PAINTER MIGHT SEEM EXTRAVAGANT, BUT STAN CZERNIAK, WHO FOUNDED STAN CZERNIAK PAINTING INCORPORATED IN JACKSON IN 1989, SAYS IT’S NOT. “IT’S EFFICIENT. PAINTING IS ONE BIG MESS AND IT REQUIRES SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT. WE HAVE THE EQUIPMENT AND COME IN LIKE AN ARMY.” ANYONE WHO HAS EVER PAINTED A ROOM KNOWS IT’S HARD WORK, TOO. CZERNIAK SAYS, “IT’S LIKE EIGHT HOURS OF AEROBICS, AND THERE’S STRENGTH TRAINING, TOO. I’D SAY WE’RE HALF MOVING COMPANY. IT’S RARE TO PAINT A ROOM WHERE YOU DON’T HAVE TO MOVE FURNITURE OUT OF THE WAY.”

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To get a real depth of color, prime your walls first. And vice versa: When you’re going from a vibrant color to a lighter shade, prime it. You think it’s more work, but it isn’t. It’ll save you time when it comes to painting, and it will make the end result look better.

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Good paints are more expensive, but they wear better. This is especially useful if you’ve got kids or dogs—both can really raise hell on paint. Good paints are stainresistant and mark-resistant.

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Low sheens are in. I like Sherwin Williams’ emerald matte finish. It’s a somewhat washable matte.

Photograph by Audrey Hall

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In rooms where you might want to be able to wash the walls, like bathrooms and kitchens, consider using a satin finish; it’s more washable than matte.


ARCHITECTURE

Nothing

A caretaker’s residence in a popular public park on the Snake River blends into the surrounding area, while still allowing the caretaker inside to keep an eye on things.

TO SEE HERE

By Samantha Simma Renderings courtesy of GYDE Architects

GYDE ARCHITECTS DESIGNED MOST OF the built structures in Rendezvous Park, including the restroom and combined rest area/ information kiosk. So it made sense that the firm, which was founded in 2017 by architects Peggy Gilday and Nona Yehia, should design the park’s office, maintenance shed, and caretaker’s residence. The caretaker’s residence was a county requirement, “but it also had to fit within the park design,” says Laurie Andrews, president of the Jackson Hole Land Trust, the nonprofit that owns and operates Rendezvous Park on the west bank of the Snake River near the intersection of Highways 390 and 22. After almost three years of reclamation, the 40-acre park on the site of a former gravel pit opened to the public in 2014 and quickly became a community gathering space with thriving wildlife habitat, ponds, meadows, and knolls. Gilday calls it “a natural playground,” and the aesthetic of the structures aims to capitalize on that playfulness.

The caretaker’s residence is “unlike anything we’ve ever worked on,” says Gilday, who was also the architect behind the 2011 expansion of the Teton County Library. “It was unique in the needs that needed to be met. In a typical home we have a client, and here we didn’t. We had to be flexible, considering that it could be a family or a single person” who would be residing in the home. Because of this, the design of the 961-square-foot, two-bedroom, one-bathroom residence is neutral. The interior materials palate includes simple, durable finishes at a moderate price point: floors are wood, doors are flat-panels, and walls are drywall. These materials have the added benefit of keeping the space bright in an otherwise shady, wooded environment, and also allow residents to personalize the space with their own furnishings and decorations. To make the residence appear smaller than it is, its second bedroom is positioned at the back of the building, but an open floor plan and vaulted ceilings make the spaces feel

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A unique selection of locally made ceramics, home goods, jewelry, accessories and children’s gifts.

Workshop 180 E Deloney Street Jackson (307) 203-7856 workshopjh.com workshopjacksonhole RANGE ISSUE TEN 28


ARCHITECTURE

Rendering courtesy of GYDE Architects

Natural cedar frames its entryway and windows, and the house is sided with cedar that has been stained black. “The black melds back into the darker trees in that area, with the more natural wood relating back to the kiosk,” says Koriakin. Because so much effort went into reclaiming the park’s natural environment, the residence was partially sited based on where the fewest trees would have to be cut. Having tagged the healthy trees in the area, “we realized if we moved the house five feet and twisted it, we’d save five trees,” says Koriakin. If you want to see the new caretaker’s residence at R Park, the park is open daily from sunrise to sunset. Its entrance is off Highway 390, a.k.a. Teton Village Road, about ½ mile north of its intersection with Highway 22.

Photograph courtesy of Jr Rodriguez

larger than they are. Corner windows provide forested views that allow caretakers to observe and regulate park visitor activities while still providing privacy. “We wanted the residence to have the same language as the kiosk and restroom,” says Katherine Koriakin, GYDE’s lead architect and project manager. The designs of both the kiosk, which is covered and has built-in benches adjacent to informational panels about the park, and the 237-square-foot bathroom include evenly spaced cedar slats and tall cedar poles. The former creates an airiness that blends with the natural surroundings, while the latter serve as navigation aids that can be seen from almost anywhere in the park. The caretaker’s residence also uses cedar in its exterior materials palate:

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TRAVEL The high alpine desert around Santa Fe

SANTA FE

Fresh margaritas

Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi

La Fonda Hotel

By Jeremy Pugh WITH A GLASS OF ONE-ICE-CUBED mezcal in your hand, the warm heat of a cooling high desert floor moves up your spine. The imposing Sangre de Cristo Mountains rise to the east, and a pastel-crushed sunset spans the dusty downslope valley to the west. Over the adobe skyline of Santa Fe, the smell of burning pinion rises, matching the smoky bite of your mezcal. It is fall in Santa Fe and, Dorothy dear, you aren’t in Jackson any more. This ancient city of adobe and spiritual woo-woo has been a magnet for seekers and saints for centuries and continues to bewilder and enchant—a heady potion made up of colonial Spain, 19th-century Mexican nationalism, territorial war, and westward expansion. Plus, there’s mezcal. (Yeah. Tequila’s over.)

Meow Wolf RANGE ISSUE TEN 30


GET YOUR ART AND ARCHITECTURE ON The city of Santa Fe long ago consecrated its look and feel in codified urban planning scripture, and its modern fathers have kept the faith. Don’t try to build a structure—be it a multi-use condo or otherwise—over two stories here. Esta prohibido. In 1912, when the city’s population hit 5,000, the town padres channeled the City Beautiful Movement, a philosophy of architecture and urban planning that set civic beauty as the means to the end of a harmonious social life. Santa Fe’s strict height and building restrictions have staved off the sprawl and ugliness that mar other southwestern cites like Phoenix and Albuquerque and created a real estate market that rivals Jackson Hole’s price point. One of the oldest buildings on the Plaza, the square at the heart of Santa Fe’s compact old town, is the Palace of the Governors (105 W. Palace Avenue, palaceofthegovernors.org). A civic

and commercial space, it has been in operation since 1610, ten years before the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock. The building, under seemingly constant restoration, maintains sections of its original construction and upgrades from later eras. The Palace is also home to the New Mexico History Museum (505/4765200, nmhistorymuseum.org) where you’ll learn about the state’s unusual battle for statehood, its dubious honor in the history of the creation of the atomic bomb at Los Alamos, and Fred Harvey, the first chain restaurant and hotel magnate in the West. His hotels and lodges in Santa Fe and around the untamed edges of the Santa Fe Railway line (like the Grand Canyon) influenced American design and architecture and modern ideas of travel, for good and ill. The good: Early Harvey Lodges, with their use of local materials and emphasis on the environment, were the

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model for the great National Park lodges we revere today. The ill: homogenized lodging and restaurants, everywhere. Reserve a room at La Fonda (100 E. San Francisco St., 505/982-5511, lafondasantafe.com). This historic landmark hotel is adjacent to both the Plaza and the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi, aka the Saint Francis Cathedral, a squat Romanesque church that challenges the city’s height-restricted skyline— barely (131 Cathedral Place, 505/982-5619, cbsfa.org). At La Fonda, grab a drink by one of the many roaring fireplaces amid long halls with large paintings by Gerald Cassidy. Note the boldly painted Kit Carson, who gives you the hairy eyeball from a pillar in the lobby. The art moves around, so be sure to ask about Cassidy’s famed depiction of Shalako, The Giant Messenger, a rendition of an archetypal Zuni figure.


Rendering courtesy of JLF Architects

THOMAS SHAFER ARCHITECTS ch i ca go

teton valley

sh a fe r a r ch .co m

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TRAVEL

BRING IT HOME The Plaza is home to the same type of, well, let’s call it “high-end souvenirs” you’ll find on Jackson’s Town Square, with one exception: The Original Trading Post (201 W. San Francisco St., 505/984-0759, santafesilverart.com). There are other shops of this ilk in and around The Plaza, but as the name says, this is the original. In addition to a nicely curated selection of Native American jewelry in the staff-served cases, there is a maze of kitschy postcards and kachina dolls, back rooms of quirky bags and gifts for the kids (what kid doesn’t need a taxidermized chicken talon?), and treasures, prints, and paintings you might actually want to put up or put out for display. During fall and spring, the Native American peddlers outside the Palace of the Governors are where it’s really at. Here you will most often deal directly with the artisan who made each piece. Canyon Road (visitcanyonroad.com) offers a concentrated collection of more than 100 galleries, boutiques, and pit stops for coffee, drinks, and a lovely lunch, scrunched into less than one-half mile. Canyon Road terminates at the Randall Davey Audubon Center (1800 Upper Canyon Rd., 505/983-4609, audubon.org), where you can take a guided birding tour across 135 acres of preserved high desert landscape.

Canyon Road

Meow Wolf

PLAY

Runners on Atalaya Mountain

The poster child of Santa Fe’s modern mystic magnetism is Meow Wolf (1352 Rufina Circle, 505/395-6369, meowwolf.com), an immersive experience where touching and climbing are encouraged. In 2010, a cooperative of young refugees from Burning Man, the annual living experiment/performance art party in the Nevada desert, came to town. They set up shop out of a VW microbus and started making things. A supportive community and some generous backing by George R.R. Martin—author of the “A Song of Fire and Ice” fantasy series that the HBO show Game of Thrones is based on and a Santa Fe resident since 1979—led to a permanent Meow Wolf installation in a defunct bowling alley on the edge of town. The adventure starts in the front yard of a Ray Bradbury-feeling home from Anytown, USA. Open the refrigerator door and step through it. On the other side is another

Photography courtesy of Tourism Santa Fe

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dimension of sight and sound. If you’re feeling nimble, you can also get to this dimension by climbing into and through a washing machine. Don’t worry: This will all make sense once you’ve been. Head outside of town to one of the eight Northern Indian pueblos along the Rio Grande (santafe.org). These pueblos are a glimpse into life in the western Americas before the Spanish arrived in the region in the 1500s. The watchtower, or Atalaya Mountain, is a great way to get the lay of the land. Atalaya is a 9,121-foot-high mountain on the outskirts of Santa Fe. Several hiking trails take you to its summit, at which lookouts have watched for signs of fire for centuries. The most popular trail starts at St. John's College (1160 Camino De Cruz Blanca, 505/984-6000, sjc.edu) and is a 5.8-mile round-trip way to sweat out all the red and green chile.


DINE Although you often have to join the waitlist to get a table at The Shed (113 1/2 E. Palace Ave., 505/982-9030, sfshed.com), its true New Mexican menu is worth it. Start the countdown with a seat at the bar and order a Silver Spur margarita with a mezcal float. Continue on that path or step outside to Cathedral Park and watch the light (it’s a thing). Either way you should start pondering how you’ll answer one of the most important questions you’ll be asked while in New Mexico: red or green? The question refers to the distinctive and either very spicy (green) or very, very spicy (red) chile sauces that smother pretty much every entrée at The Shed, and pretty much everywhere else in town. Answer this question with “Christmas” to try both. Pop a Zantac first. Dr. Field Goods Kitchen and Butcher + Baker (2860 Cerrillos Rd., 505/471-0043, drfieldgoods.com) embraces the local-first vibe with local produce and meat. This is a hearty lunch stop, with meaty meals coming out of its signature wood-fired oven. In the butcher shop you can get choice cuts of locally grown beef and pork to take back to to your AirBnB to grill up yourself. After dinner, drinks. Barman Chris Milligan serves signature garden-toglass cocktails inside the St. Francis Hotel (210 Don Gaspar Ave., 505/983-5700, hotelstfrancis.com). Bar Alto in the Drury Hotel (828 Paseo De Peralta, 505/424-2175, druryhotels.com) is the best rooftop bar from which to ogle the stunning Santa Fe sunset while sipping a Paloma.

Local meat from Dr. Field Goods Kitchen and Butcher + Baker

Suite at El Rey Court

STAY

Photograph courtesy of El Rey Court

Beyond the touristy confines of El Plaza and the classic comforts of La Fonda lies El Rey Court (1862 Cerrillos Rd., 505/982-1931, elreycourt.com), a funky relic along the original Route 66 in an area that used to be the outskirts of town. Staying away from The Plaza isn’t a big deal because Santa Fe is not a large city; here there’s the added benefit of the rooms being spread out over five leafy acres. An ample canopy and a glittering pool offer a quiet refuge. Get breakfast next door at The Pantry (1820 Cerrillos Rd., 505/986-0022, pantrysantafe.com), a local legend that has been serving gloriously spicy New Mexican food since 1948. Again, Zantac. RANGE ISSUE TEN 34


TRAVEL

CHIMAYÓ If Santa Fe somehow doesn’t give you an intense enough distillation of folk art and New Mexican culture, take a day trip to Chimayó and visit the El Santuario de Chimayó (15 Santuario Dr., Chimayó, 505/351-9961, holychimayo.us). El Santuario is a sacred pilgrimage site for Catholics and features beautiful reredos, brightly painted wooded screens that portray various saints. Some of these were done by the folk artist Molleno, who created reredos and retablos in places of worship around the region from about 1815 to 1845. Known as the “chile painter,” Molleno’s negative spaces are marked by his signature use of flat color areas in green and red, matching the chiles you had last night for dinner. You can taste the art, in a sense, at Rancho de Chimayó (300 Juan Medina Rd., Chimayó, 505/351-4444, ranchodechimayo.com), named by the James Beard Foundation as an American Classic dining spot. And then drop a few bucks on the best red chile powder in the world, on sale in every gift shop in the area.

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SLEEP TIGHT

DESIGN

We spend up to half of our lives in bed. Here’s how to make that time comfortable and well designed.

By Samantha Simma A FEW WORDS THAT RUN through interior designer Kristin Fay’s head when she starts to design a bedroom are comfort, inviting, peaceful, serene, calm. “You want to be able to relax and decompress in your bedroom,” she says. “The point of the room is for you to sleep and recharge. You want the room to have a calm energy, whereas living rooms and kitchens are more high-energy areas.” With this in mind, the first piece of furniture Fay picks out is the headboard/bed frame. “Bedrooms will differ in the number and placement of their windows, the color of their walls, the artwork and accessories, lighting and views, and dozens of other details,” she says. “But every bedroom has a bed. That is why a headboard and bed frame are the first things I think about. After these are picked, we’ll build the rest of the room around them.” For bedrooms that are used every night (as opposed to guestrooms), Fay likes upholstered headboards. “They’re cozier, softer, and inviting,” she says. In guest rooms where people

might only be sleeping for a week or two at a time, Fay sometimes suggests headboards made from wood (she likes reclaimed barn wood) and a liveedge wood platform bed frame. “For long-term, I think comfort is a good guide, but it is fun to mix it up in rooms that aren’t used as frequently,” Fay says. While the headboard and bed frame are the first items Fay considers, there are two things that are more important to how well a bedroom functions: the mattress and the pillows. These get covered by linens so they don’t affect what a bedroom looks like, but “correctly supporting your body is the number one most important ingredient to deep sleep and, consequently, a great next day,” says Jennifer Fay, owner and founder of Linen Alley, a Jackson shop that sells all things bed-related. (She’s also Kristin Fay’s sister-in-law.) Jennifer says that pillows and mattresses, as well as the sheets and bedding that cover them, should be looked at as investments. “When you go for high-quality products, they can last a really long time.”

Sheets

Sleeping Pillows

“Sheets, in look and feel, are a personal preference,” Jennifer Fay says, “but I always recommend sheets made from 100 percent natural materials like cotton or linen.” Polycotton blended sheets “lack in their ability to breathe since they are not an all-natural product.” And they won’t last as long. “I’ve had 100 percent cotton sheets for 15 years and there are no holes in them,” Jennifer says. Kristin says, “These are something you’re lying on for eight hours a day. What they look like matters to the feel of the room, but you should pick sheets based on comfort first.”

Thread Count

“Thread count really means nothing as far as what sheets feel like,” Jennifer says. “It is really a way to get people to spend more money on cheap sheets. The real difference is between sateen and percale.” The latter has a tighter weave and a crisper feeling. Sateen has a little bit of sheen to it. “It’s silkier, but not slippery,” Jennifer says.

The best pillows are true down pillows, which by their nature are hypoallergenic, although Jennifer says she often sees customers with preconceived notions about allergies and down. “It’s actually dust held in the feathers incorporated with the down that people are allergic to.” In the U.S., a pillow can have up to 20 percent feathers mixed with down and the manufacturer can still call it 100 percent down. Jennifer says that if you pay less than $100 for a standard-size down pillow, it is likely that it is not truly 100 percent down. Aside from down being hypoallergenic, Jennifer says, down pillows “breathe, are softer, and bring you closer to your mattress so your neck is in alignment with your spine.” They also come in a variety of firmnesses. “We carry three different companys’ down pillows,” she says. “One company’s firm is a lot firmer than another company’s.” How do you know what firmness is right for you? “As long as someone is willing, we have them lay down with different samples that we have and we look at their posture. We’re looking for your neck to be in alignment.” RANGE ISSUE TEN 36

Hastens

Sheets Mattress Pad


Bedding

“You can have a great headboard and not have the bedding right and it can be distracting,” Kristin says. “It’s hard to go wrong with fairly quiet patterns and neutral colors. Crazy, bold patterns and colors can ruin the feeling of calm we’re trying to create.”

Accessories

“For a serene space, I keep it uncluttered,” Kristin says. “A throw blanket at the end of the bed and some decorative pillows can add a lot and are an easy way to add a pop of color if you want. But be careful not to do too many pillows. A bed covered with pillows that you have to take off and then put back on every day isn’t appealing.”

Sleeping Pillows

Mattress

Accessories

The Swedish royal family has slept on Hästens mattresses ever since the company was founded in 1852. Today Hästens mattress models range in price from $9,000 to $189,000. To many people this is ridiculous. To others, “these are handdown-to-your-grandchild beds,” Jennifer says. Each Hästens mattress takes more than 350 hours to make, has more than 30 layers, and is entirely handcrafted using organic wool, cotton, and braided horsehair that has been cleaned and dedandered. Linen Alley carries Hästens mattresses that range in price from $15,000 to more than $42,000. Jennifer says she noticed a difference the first time she slept on a Hästens, which happened on a visit to the factory in Sweden. Linen Alley employee and interior designer AJ Albright invested in a Hästens of her own. “I think her exact words after her first week sleeping on it were, ‘It’s incredible,’” says Jennifer. Hästens uses the materials it does and includes so many layers in part to help regulate body temperature and to allow air to flow through the mattress continually. “Once you drive a Ferrari, it’s hard to drive other cars,” Jennifer says. “It’s similar with a Hästens.”

Thread Count

Color & Texture

Color & Texture

“Start with a neutral palate and warm the space with layers of texture,” Kristin says. “In bedding, I like to do a mix of wools, plaids, or heavy furs— different textures that complement each other.”

Mattress Pad

The average person loses as much as one pint of moisture in sweat each night while they sleep. This is “a recycling process your body needs to do—it’s a release of daily toxins from the environment,” says Jennifer. Using a cotton or wool pad will wick away moisture that otherwise gets trapped in your mattress and will prolong its life. 37


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URBAN RANCH A single dad with a working cattle ranch near Daniel, Wyoming, builds a kidand horse-friendly modern industrial ranch-style home in Wilson.

By Maggie Theodora | Photography by Tuck Fauntleroy

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JJ

Healy’s life was in transition when he decided to make a new family home near Wilson. He and his kids, Cormac, 11, and Sawyer, 9, had lived on the Double J Ranch, a real cattle operation near Daniel, Wyoming, with Healy’s then-wife since 2004. He still has the ranch, and he and the kids still spent a lot of time there, but, “I recognized that having something closer to Jackson would make things easier now that the kids are getting older,” he says. Still, he wanted to bring some of the ranch with them. “I wanted to be able to keep horses so the kids could continue working on their equestrian skills,” he says. A 3.5-acre property adjacent to open space protected by a conservation easement in the Schofield Patent subdivision just east of Wilson fit the bill for what he originally envisioned as a more compact version of the Double J. “We had this home that we loved and I thought we could just re-create it outside of Wilson,” he says. But Peggy Gilday, a co-founding partner of GYDE Architects, which he chose to design the new home, quickly and gently talked him out of this. “She was helpful in inspiring me to do more than re-create [the Double J]. In a very delicate way, she pushed me to go a little more on the modern side,” Healy says. While Healy’s idea to build a Double J 2.0 was abandoned early in the design process, he says he was still thinking “of just a main house and a barn with a guest unit above it.” But that too evolved. “[GYDE] is big into imagery and I kept liking the images they showed me of compounds. But I was still asking for just a house and a barn,” Healy says. “Then in a meeting I remember Peg saying, ‘Don’t hate this,’ and then showing me an idea they had come up with that was a compound. It wasn’t what I had asked for, but I immediately knew it was what I wanted.”

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The compound includes a 5,700-square-foot, two-story main house and attached garage, a 985-square-foot, two-story detached guesthouse, and a two-stall barn with a hayloft. The main house/garage is one building, but to reinforce the compound feel, it was broken into two parts separated by a glass breezeway. The result is that it looks like two buildings. An added benefit is that from the oversize sliding glass doors that make up the breezeway walls, there is immediate and easy access to outdoor living spaces. While Healy chose not to re-create the Double J, he and GYDE did use it as inspiration for this house. “We started calling the style of this house ‘modern industrial ranch,’” he says. “That was our mantra throughout the project. With every move we made and finish and material we selected we asked, ‘How does this fit?’ Having such a well-defined theme made decisions easier. If something wasn’t true to the theme, we didn’t do it or use it.” The forms of the various buildings are modern. Exposed metal work is industrial. The palette for siding and materials is ranch. “I think the powder rooms have all three of these in one place,” Healy says. There, the cabinetry is made from reclaimed barnwood, the sinks are very modern, and the fixtures are industrial. The combined kitchen/dining/living room is similar to the main living space at the Double J, down to the Tulikivi woodburning stove. “I like the flow of it and know that it works,” he says. But here, sitting at the built-in swinging stools at the kitchen island that are copies of the stools in the ranch’s kitchen, you look out the windows and see the Tetons instead of the Wyoming or Wind River Range.

Top: Homeowner JJ Healy was going to do a blonde, butcher block countertop on the kitchen island, but “Peg [Gilday] and John [Stennis, of GYDE Architects] said walnut would give the space a deeper feel, and look more refined,” Healy says. “I’m so glad I listened to them.” Finding two live-edge slabs of walnut at Wilson-based furniture-maker Charlie Thomas’ Magpie Furniture workshop was icing on the cake. “They were the perfect size to make the dining table I wanted,” Healy says. “Charlie told me he had had these slabs for almost 10 years. He said they were waiting for me.” Bottom: A glass breezeway connecting the two forms of the main house has sliding doors on both sides. These open to outdoor living areas where Healy has installed Cowboy Cauldrons. These suspended fire pits are adjustable in height and made from thick, plate steel.

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Left: The mantra that guided the owner of this home in selecting finishes and the materials palette was modern industrial ranch. “I think the powder rooms have all three of these [qualities] in them,” owner JJ Healy says. The vanity is made from reclaimed barn wood (ranch) while the sinks are modern and the faucet and lighting are industrial. Middle top: The master bedroom has a wall of windows on its north side that frames the Teton Range. “I bought this property in 2005 and had always dreamed of putting a home here,” Healy says. “Finally the right time came.” Middle bottom: Healy says this house shows “the importance of long-term relationships in the valley. OSM has built over 10 structures for me over the last 15 years, including the Double J Ranch. Peg [Gilday] and I have known each other for more than five; we originally met serving on the Center for the Arts board. All these house projects take years and invariably have bumps, issues. I pick partners that I like and trust.” Right: To reinforce the compound feel of the project, GYDE Architects designed the main home to look like two buildings by installing a glass breezeway.

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COMING HOME The Prughs lived in eight different houses around the valley in seven years. When they were ready to settle down, they took elements and details from each of these and added personal touches, the biggest of which are their three young boys.

By Dina Mishev Photography by David Agnello

From left to right, Crosby, Rory, and Luke Prugh hanging out in Luke and Crosby’s shared bedroom. 45


T

he night before I met Eileen and Greg Prugh at their 4,500-square-foot home across the street from Jackson Elementary School, 15 kids were running around it and its yard, which is thick with aspen trees. Three of these kids were their boys, Rory, 10, Luke, 8, and Crosby (Croz), 6. “I love super neutral interiors,” says Eileen, “but we don’t live that life.” The life the family does live is one of wellcurated and well-designed simplicity informed in part by humor and the unusually high number of homes they lived in prior to this one—a hazard of Greg’s job as a Realtor/developer—but mostly by their boys. “We picked all imperfect finishes from floors to tile and even to the way the drywall was finished,” says Greg. Eileen says, “We didn’t want to be worrying that our kids and their friends were nicking stuff. It had to be livable.”

Included in Greg and Eileen’s definition of livable is fun. “Our stuff is tongue-in-cheek,” Eileen says. “We’ve had so many challenges, and humor and fun have saved us. This home reminds us not to take things so seriously.” The fun: Propped on the kitchen counter against a tile backsplash is an oil painting of a stick of butter by local artist Mike Piggott. On a wall near the dining table is a photograph of two men in well-worn jeans and cowboy hats staring at Prada Marfa, a permanent architectural installation by artists Elmgreen and Gradset just off U.S. Highway 90 near Marfa, Texas. Custom metal work and sculptures by artist and friend Ben Roth decorate several rooms. Tucked among books and mementos from world travels on a shelf in the living room is a soccer-ball-size bust of their dog Wheatleigh, who died in 2017. You can’t visit the powder room, where the walls are

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covered in white tiles with dozens of butterflies painted in black on them, without smiling. In the game room, try not to fall in love with the vibrant wallpaper of birds resting in tree branches that covers an entire wall. A challenge: While Eileen was pregnant with Croz, the couple learned he had Down Syndrome. It was this knowledge that helped convince them to finally commit to building a home for themselves. Their prior houses were almost all spec projects of Greg’s that they lived in until they sold. “Building this house was us taking control of the situation as much as we could,” Eileen says. “We wanted to know we’d have a home that would grow with us and give us the opportunity to address whatever needs Croz might have.” Because Croz’s biggest needs at the moment are Star Wars toys, music, superheroes, and playing outside with his brothers and friends, an


WE PICKED ALL IMPERFECT FINISHES FROM FLOORS TO TILE AND EVEN TO THE WAY THE DRYWALL WAS FINISHED. WE DIDN’T WANT TO BE WORRYING THAT OUR KIDS AND THEIR FRIENDS WERE NICKING STUFF. IT HAD TO BE LIVABLE.”

Left: The Prughs installed storage cabinets all the way to the ceiling in every room in the house, including the kitchen. “We like everything to be put away and didn’t want to have any boxes,” Eileen Prugh says. The butter painting by Mike Piggott was a wedding gift from Greg to Eileen. Next to it is Atticus Finch by Shannon Troxler. “Birds and bugs are everywhere in this home,” Eileen says. “[Atticus Finch] is definitely a favorite and was a gift [from me] to Greg. We like art that is thoughtful and playful.” Right: The wallpaper in the game room is by Icelandic-born artist Kristjana S. Williams, who Eileen’s sisterin-law, interior designer Jen Visosky, introduced her to the work of. “She sent me a link to her site and I fell in love with this piece,” Eileen says. Eileen thought the birds in “various states of whimsy were lively and fun” but it was the pomegranates hanging from the tree that caused her and Greg to fall in love with the design. The family had recently lived in Granada, Spain, for a year. “Granada translates to pomegranate,” Eileen says. The blue velvet chairs are from Room and Board.

[ EILEEN PRUGH ]

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Clockwise from top: A bronze sculpture of the family’s dog, Wheatleigh, who died in 2017, sits atop the piano in the living room, which also has a Charles sofa (in charcoal grey cashmere wool) from B&B Italia and a Noguchi table. The paper mache llama head in the boys’ bathroom is from Paper & Grace; “I love the color and laugh when I see him,” Eileen says; “He’s unexpected in a valley known for wildlife.” The dresser in the master bedroom was found by the couple at an antique dealer in Granada; “We like its patina and history,” Eileen says. “We’re minimalists at heart and definitely not collectors, but this piece reminds us of the beautiful old city we called home for a year.”

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extra master suite, included in the design in case he needed a live-in helper, has been transformed into a game room. The extra master suite might have been one of the biggest nods to practicality in the home’s design, but it is not the only one. Surrounding the fun and whimsical décor and style are an abundance of thought-through details. You could accuse the couple of having an excess of built-in storage … until they explain how it allows them to keep pretty much everything neatly hidden from view yet easily found. “We know exactly where everything is, but you don’t see it unless you need it,” Eileen says. The number of deep sinks, which are in every bathroom, could also be seen as excessive, but they’re utilitarian. “We lived in a place with shallow sinks and learned they didn’t work for us,” Eileen says. “Unless you were really careful, water splattered everywhere. We didn’t want to have to be really careful in this house.” Lights inside the toilets might seem silly, except “they’re great for the boys’ aim,” Greg says. After several years of carrying car seats and groceries up the stairs of houses that had reverse-living designs, they knew they wanted their kitchen and all of the home’s public spaces to be on the ground floor. Eileen also wanted the ground floor to open out to green space. Because of this, and because of the home’s location directly across the street from Jackson Elementary, the couple jokes that the house is school-in/school-out. Except none of their boys goes to Jackson Elementary, so the joke is really on them. (This school year, all three are students in Munger Mountain Elementary’s dual language education program.) By intention, there are no fences around the yard. Before Greg sold the adjacent lot to the east to a friend who has three boys almost identical in age to Rory, Luke, and Croz, he asked the parents if they’d put up a fence between the two houses. They said, “no,” which was the right answer. “We want our house to be open and welcoming,” says Greg. “It’s more important to us who is in it than what is in it.”

Top: After living in several different homes with upside-down living, the couple knew they wanted all of this home’s public spaces to be on the ground floor. One of the many reasons they wanted this was because, “it’s so nice to be able to spill out onto decks in the yard in the summer,” Eileen says. Bottom: The bathroom on the ground floor features a wall tiled in “Papillon” by designer Ruben Toledo for Ceramica Bardelli. 49


NOT SO Simple

A home in the Aspens shows how a “simple” house done well takes a lot of thought and planning.

By Lila Edythe Photography by David Agnello

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ew York-based architect Hope Dana first visited Jackson Hole in the late 1960s when she was a child. “I think I took a ski lesson with Pepi Stiegler,” she says. “It was an amazing vacation.” In 2013, Dana and her husband John Perkins, who is also an architect, albeit not practicing, bought a “shack” in the Aspens—built cheaply in the 1970s and well on its way to obsolescence—with the idea of eventually demolishing it and building something new. When the couple started designing their new home several years later, “we wanted it to feel like a vacation house,” Dana says. “The idea was to have everything be so simple and the house be all about easy living and the views. We wanted to have space for guests [including two adult kids] and where we could entertain, but my husband and I also wanted to be able to be there alone.” The couple celebrated Christmas 2017 in their new home. “It’s everything we wanted it to be,” Dana says. And more. Dana says neither she nor Perkins realized how good the 0.75-acre property was when they bought it. “Having a perimeter lot in the Aspens is unusual, the established vegetation makes it super private, and the views are incredible,” she says. Siting the house was not

easy, though. “Now it seems obvious, but it took us a while to arrange the program of the house to maximize the views,” Dana says. As special as the views from inside the fourbedroom, 3,000-square-foot home are, “it is very plain from the outside,” Dana says. “We were kind of looking for a big statement without it being ostentatious in any way.” The statement the home makes is one of ultimate simplicity. Bedrooms don’t have closets, bathrooms have medicine cabinets but no vanities, and there are very few doors. “Inside is as plain as outside, but everything inside is very purposefully done. We thought about every inch,” Dana says. The simplicity of the design and finishes gives spaces the feeling of a Scandinavian summer home, and the whole house screams “hygge,” a Danish word for a quality of coziness and comfortable conviviality that engenders contentment or well being. While Dana doesn’t use the word to describe the home’s design, “I did want the house to feel cozy,” she says. But “we also wanted a super-open house with lots of windows.” Because of these often-disparate directives, “we spent a lot of time on the window configurations,” she says.

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Opposite page: “We considered every material carefully and the materials are limited,” says homeowner and architect Hope Dana. “I tried to develop a complimentary palette of materials and colors. Throughout the house we wanted durable, easy to clean, and non fussy materials. In the entryway, porcelain green/gray tile has a little shimmer in it which seemed to compliment the ash wall boards and flooring.” This page: “The first big decision [about materials] was to have the walls and the floors be 8-inch ash boards,” Dana says. “It is light in color but also textured and warm. We built on the palette from there.” Shown here is the upstairs TV room/library.


Left: “When I sit in [this] white Eames chair, I can see aspen trees through the front door and behind them are mountains,” Dana says. “I wasn’t expecting that front view to be so special.” Dana had the insides of the window frames painted black throughout the house “so you’d see right out,” she says. “The idea is that the window frames disappear.”

Middle: The upstairs master bathroom. Right: The home’s staircase is a study in the black/white/ash color scheme.

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The interior materials palette adds to the home’s coziness, too. “The first big decision was to have the walls and floors be eight-inch ash boards, which are light in color but also textured and warm,” Dana says. From there she selected porcelain green-gray tiles for the entry hall, mudroom, and laundry and powder rooms. “It has a shimmer to it that compliments the ash wall boards and ash flooring.” They painted all of the interior window frames black—“You see right out,” Dana says— as well as the stair handrail, the revel where the floor meets the walls, the ledges at the fireplace, and upstairs lighting fixtures.

In the kitchen, the cabinetry is dark with light countertops. “The furnishings throughout the house also play on the ash-black or ash-white themes,” Dana says. While this is the first home Dana has designed for her family from the ground up, “we have done apartments before and did a huge remodel to an existing house in Connecticut,” she says. “They’ve all been different, but we do have a very clear aesthetic that has been similar between the spaces: We always bring the outdoors in. With this house, it’s a very special landscape that we’re bringing in.”

Opposite page: “All the furniture throughout the house has ash wood accents to match the ash walls,” Dana says. The dining area includes an Alvar Aalto dining table and Eames molded plastic chairs from Design Within Reach. In the living area, a Noguchi coffee table sits in front of a sofa from Design Within Reach. On the wall at the end of the sofa, “I knew I wanted a big, splashy piece of art,” Dana says. “I just didn’t know what it would be.” As soon as she saw this Alex Katz silkscreen though, she knew it was “perfect for the space.” The chairs in front of the silkscreen are Jens Risom. All of the rugs throughout the house are from Nordic Knots and made in Sweden. This page: “It is very plain from the outside,” Dana says. “We were kind of looking for a big statement without it being ostentatious in any way.”

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HOME sweet HOME

THE KLEIN FAMILY AS TOLD BY ALEX KLEIN Photograph by Cole Buckhart

THIS HOUSE HAS ALWAYS BEEN the residence of Grand Teton Lodge Company’s general manager, a position I’ve had for six years now. I worked my way up at the lodge and have lived in all of its employee housing. My first job (in college) was as a busser in the Pioneer Grill. Then I lived in the employee dorms. Later I came back as director of operations and lived on the other side of the Jackson Lake Lodge property where all the rest of the staff housing is. There’s a road over there we call “Staff Street,” and about fifty employees and their families live there. My wife Dawn and I lived there for about five years, and that’s where our daughter Evelyn, who is 12 now, was born. From 2009 to 2013 we lived in Colorado and then came back here—to this job and this house. This house was built in 1959 and used some of the log beams from the original Jackson Lake Lodge (that was built in 1922; the current Jackson Lake Lodge was built between 1953 and 1955). It was definitely designed for entertaining. Every August we host the annual seniority party for GTLC employees who have been with the company for at least RANGE ISSUE TEN 56

10 years; it’s usually about 80 people including spouses and senior leadership. We’ve had employees get married in the side yard, where Evelyn sometimes practices gymnastics, and also small wedding receptions. From the deck we’ve seen hawks, otters, elk, moose, wolves, and the occasional bear. We had a mother deer with two fawns call this place home the last couple of years. Evelyn swears she saw a wolverine on the deck one morning when she was about 7. I’ve had friends ski the Skillet Glacier on Mount Moran and I’d be on our deck with the big camera lens taking photos of them. The deck has a good story behind it. It wasn’t always this big. In the 1990s, thengeneral manager Clay James was going to host President and Mrs. Clinton at a reception here, and the deck at that time didn’t meet the Secret Service’s standards so Clay had it improved and enlarged. The reception for the Clintons ended up at Jackson Lake Lodge, but we certainly use the deck. I love having a cup of coffee out here in the morning, and a glass of wine or a cocktail just tastes better with this view.


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Range JH: Issue 10  

Authoritative yet approachable. Contemporary yet cognizant of the valley’s rich history. Meet Range, Jackson Hole’s premiere magazine about...

Range JH: Issue 10  

Authoritative yet approachable. Contemporary yet cognizant of the valley’s rich history. Meet Range, Jackson Hole’s premiere magazine about...

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