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ISSUE 8 / 2018

TREADING Lightly After years of RV life, retirees build their dream home.

TEN TIPS

DESIGN

ARCHITECTURE

Home Libraries

Swings

A home to decompress


Specialized construction and consulting company creating natural settings, biologically functioning fisheries and aquatic restoration projects.

clearwaterrestoration.com | Case Brown 307.699.3377


TABLE OF CONTENTS features

44 —

TREADING LIGHTLY

After years of RV life, retirees build a house they and the landscape can live with. By Dina Mishev

52 —

FARMHOUSE RISING

A couple with contemporary style builds their dream home in a traditional neighborhood. By Maggie Theodora

A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT

Not everyone thinks the best views in the valley are of the Tetons.

page 58

By Lila Edythe

RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 2

Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy

58 —


ARCHITECTS | ENGINEERS 1 1 1 0 M A P L E W AY J A C K S O N , W Y | 3 0 7 . 7 3 3 . 9 9 5 5 | H O Y T C TA . H O U Z Z . C O M


TABLE OF CONTENTS departments

— 34

20

40

10 / WHAT INSPIRES ME Noa Staryk

26 / ARTISAN: ARCHITECTURAL STONE & TILE Installing tile (well) is an art form.

12 / FAVORITES What we love right now

30 / ARCHITECTURE: CATHARSIS The founders of GYDE Architects design a space to decompress.

16 / MUST HAVE: GRAB A SEAT Are barstools the most functional piece of furniture around? 18 / NEIGHBORHOOD: HIDDEN RANCH Most people don’t know this in-town neighborhood exists, and that’s just fine with its residents.

34 / TRAVEL: WHISTLER BLACKCOMB Don’t worry, Jackson Hole never needs to know.

20 / TEN TIPS: HOME LIBRARIES Make your books as interesting to look at as they are to read.

40 / DESIGN: SWING TIME Porch swings, always a good idea, come in all shapes and sizes. 64 / HOME SWEET HOME Our longtime art director says goodbye.

ON THE COVER Photograph by David Agnello “The view was meant to make this office nook less officelike,” says Phil Schoner of this intimate workspace in the house he shares with wife Carol. “You can look up from your work and see the Grand! How many people can say that?” Almost every window in the couple’s home in the sage flats near the Jackson Hole Airport frames views of the Tetons. RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 4


Trailblazing Modern Architecture in the West for over 20 Years.

Jackson, Wyoming Denver, Colorado

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307.733.3766 303.339.9910 dynia.com


A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR FOR FIVE YEARS IN JUNIOR high and high school, I delivered The Washington Post daily to about a hundred homes in my neighborhood. This job entailed getting up around 5:15 a.m., assembling papers, loading them onto an orange, two-wheeled metal cart whose top was about level with the bottom of my bra, and then pushing this cart around the neighborhood, stopping at every subscriber’s house to run a newspaper up to the front porch. Most mornings, my mom did the first three steps, allowing me to rise at 5:30 a.m., which my body felt was still unreasonable but not quite so unreasonable as 5:15 a.m. It has been twenty-five years since I delivered my last paper. Two years ago, I finally became a morning person. Now I willingly, and happily, get up at 5:15 most mornings. Sometimes I walk around my still-sleeping East Jackson neighborhood in the dark. Other times I make myself a Nespresso and sit on the couch and read, or I sit at the kitchen island and write in my journal. Some mornings—I’m writing this on one of them—my work to-do list requires that I write or edit. However I spend my early morning hours, they’re the coziest, most comfortable part of my day. Although, perhaps if I lived in Carol and Phil Schoner’s simple—and simply gorgeous—new home in the sage flats north of Gros Ventre Junction, the peace and serenity I find in early mornings would last all day. Chatting with the retired couple for the feature story “Treading Lightly,” p. 44, I was as impressed with how much they appreciated their dwelling as I was with the home itself. (And this is saying something, since almost all of the home’s north-facing walls are glass, through which it looks like you can reach out and touch the Tetons.) When Phil talked about how much he loved sitting on the northern patio and watching birds and the changing light—sometimes for hours and not only in the morning—I swooned and promised myself I’d try to carry my early morning calm deeper into my day. It’s been less than one month since I made this promise, and I’m working on keeping it. After following some of the recommendations in this issue’s “Ten Tips: Home Libraries,” p. 20, there are no longer stacks of disorganized books haphazardly placed around the house and crowding shelves, gifting me with a couple of new calm spaces in my home. Writer Joohee Muromcew’s story about porch swings, “Swing Time,” p. 40, reminded me how relaxing sitting on a swing can be, and that my boyfriend and I have a couple of them. I also found inspiration in “A River Runs Through It,” p. 58, about how much a relatively minor remodel can transform a space. “Farmhouse Rising,” p. 52, is inspiring as well, not only because the style and taste of its owners is similar to mine (albeit better), but also because of how happy the couple who built the home are with it. I hope you find as much inspiration in this issue of Range as I have. Thanks for reading.

Dina Mishev @dinamishev @rangemag RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 6


Kr a f y P h o t o s

headwalljh.com | 307.413.7754


CONTRIBUTORS

For the last five issues, journalist MARK HUFFMAN has reported the magazine’s Neighborhood department, which takes a look at the history and development of specific areas of Jackson Hole. He has previously written about The Aspens (Issue 3), the Gill Addition (Issue 4), Rafter J Ranch (Issue 5), John Dodge (Issue 6), and Schofield Patent (Issue 7). In this issue, Huffman, who also writes for Jackson Hole magazine and edits copy for the Jackson Hole News&Guide, delves into the hidden Hidden Ranch neighborhood (p. 18).

Photographer and native of Easton, Maryland, TUCK FAUNTLEROY’s images have been published in The New York Times and The Washington Post newspapers, and Dwell, Condé Nast, and Town & Country magazines. In this issue of Range he shot “A River Runs Through It,” (p. 58). About his architectural photography, Fauntleroy says, “Spaces are where we spend the vast majority of our time. I can’t design, but I love shooting and experiencing them.” Follow Fauntleroy on Instagram at @tuckf.

PUBLISHER Kevin Olson ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Adam Meyer EDITOR Dina Mishev ART DIRECTION Taylor-Ann Smith & Orijin Media COPY EDITOR Dorothy Jankowsky CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lila Edythe Mark Huffman Joohee Muromcew Jeremy Pugh Maggie Theodora CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS David Agnello Cole Buckhart Tuck Fauntleroy Matthew Millman

ADVERTISING SALES Deidre Norman - deidre@tetonmediaworks.com AD DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Sarah Wilson

page 44 RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 8

Kyra Griffin

DISTRIBUTION Hank Smith

Kal Stromberg

Range magazine is published twice yearly. P.O. Box 7445, Jackson, WY 83002 (307) 732-5900 / RangeJH.com © 2018 Teton Media Works. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this magazine’s original contents, whether in whole or part, requires written permission from the publisher.

Photograph (bottom) by David Agnello

JEREMY PUGH tells us why it’s okay to cheat on Jackson Hole Mountain Resort for a long weekend with Whistler Blackcomb Ski Resort in this issue’s Travel department (p. 34). Although he loves Whistler, Pugh’s home base is Salt Lake City. He authored the book 100 Things to Do in Salt Lake City Before You Die and is the former editor of Salt Lake magazine. Pugh’s writing also appears in SKI, Sunset, Utah Style & Design, and Salt Lake magazines. Share your SLC experiences on Twitter at @100ThingsSLC.


Control everything from anywhere.

At Jackson Hole AV, we take ownership of our projects and believe every step of the way is important to the final results. From the very first time we meet with you to the final day of in-house training, we’re here to make the entire process as smooth and as enjoyable as possible. Home & Office Integration | Whole-House Audio & Video | Lighting | Window & Shade Control Home Theater & Media Rooms | Building Automation | Boardrooms | Design Services 307-733-2629 | www.jacksonholeav.com | Jackson, WY


WHAT INSPIRES ME

A trip into HABITS is definitely a habit of mine. I am constantly inspired by the store and its owner, Arcy Hawks. Arcy makes the shop an ever-changing stage that conveys product stories that I admire for the thoughtful editing, product selection, and creative presentations. It’s like eye candy. For Christmas a couple of years ago, my daughter went here with my husband and pointed out this amazing gray cashmere scarf that has a trim lined with feathers that he got me as a gift. I still love it. 35 W. Deloney Ave., 307/733-5665, habitsjh.com

Photo by Katy Gray

I feel like ALI COHANE is a total rock star. She’s the founder (with husband Kevin, a Le Cordon Bleu-trained baker) of PICNIC and PERSEPHONE BAKERY. Ali runs the businesses and she did the interior design in both spaces. Each space is different, so you really see the range of her design capabilities. And the selection of products, from ceramics to books, she has curated to sell at each cafe is really fun. I’m inspired by her taste and the attention that she pays to detail. Picnic: 1110 Maple Way, Suite B, 307/264-2956, picnicjh.com; Persephone: 145 E. Broadway, 307/200-6708, persephonebakery.com

NOA STARYK Founder | Owner Nest

By Dina Mishev ∙ Photography by David Agnello “REDOING SPACES IS MY JAM,” says Noa Staryk, who, with her family, moved to Jackson from Minneapolis in 2011 after vacationing here several times a year starting in the 1990s. She and husband Ted own Snake River Brewing—they bought it in 2006, before they lived here—and when they went shopping for office space in 2012, it was a 1930s cabin on Pearl Avenue that caught her eye. After remodeling it for nine months, the couple used it as their offices until 2016, when Staryk took it over for the boutique Nest. “I had always wanted to have a small shop filled with things I loved,” she says. Formerly the home of Gladys and John Wort (John and his brother, Jess, built The Wort Hotel in downtown Jackson), today the cabin displays shoes and racks full of colorful clothing sourced from around the world. “I’m much more confident with interiors than I am with clothing, but I love the challenge of a steep learning curve,” Staryk says. Here are a few other things that inspire her.

SCOTCH & SODA is a CLOTHING LINE out of Amsterdam, my favorite city! If I have to pick a favorite line that we carry at Nest, it’s Scotch & Soda. Their clothing is whimsical, and the attention to detail is amazing. Each item in the line has a surprise element, whether it is a piece of jewelry that comes with it or a quirky saying embroidered somewhere. 55 W. Pearl Ave., 307/200-6681, scotch-soda.com, nestjacksonhole.com

Alice, last fall’s DANCERS’ WORKSHOP production based on Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, literally blew me away. It was a visual feast, and I was so inspired by the level of artistic production. And I am continually inspired by Babs Case, Dancers’ Workshop’s artistic and executive director. Babs is a visionary leader who inspires the highest-quality artistry. Walking out of that performance, my heart swelled with pride in this place and the people who live here. 240 S. Glenwood St., 307/733-6398, dwjh.org RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 10

Julie Guttormson, owner of REVOLUTION INDOOR CYCLING, orchestrates an annual event, ROCK THE RIDE, to raise funds for stroke and cardiac patients through the St. John’s Hospital Foundation. She has held it for three years, but last year was the first one I went to. I do spin classes many mornings with Julie and they’re always fun, but this was something else. The energy in the room was amazing. Julie is a mom of two who runs her own business, and then she does this on the side to raise money—she raised $53,000 in 2018—for something that is near and dear to her heart. 870 S. Highway 89, 307/413-0441, revolutionindoorcycling.com


T H E S PA C E W I T H I N

DEFINE becomes the reality of the building. space. T H E SYour PA C E WITHIN

becomes the reality of the building. –Frank Lloyd Wright –Frank Lloyd Wright

STUDIO@JJSTIREMANDESIGN.COM | 307-739-3008

jjstiremandesign.com 307-739-3008 307-739-3008jacque@jjstiremandesign.com jjstireman@wyoming.com jjstiremandesign.com


FAVORITES SMELLS LIKE YELLOWSTONE Take the scent of Yellowstone National Park home with you with Good and Well Supply Company’s National Park Collection Candles. Founded by Megan McLaughlin, Good and Well makes all of its soy/wax-blend candles by hand in Seattle, Washington. McLaughlin, who had previously founded a successful handmade soap company, got the idea for national park scented candles after spending time visiting the country’s parks and camping in them. She noticed that each park has its own scent. Yellowstone’s? Vetiver, pine needles, and sandalwood. $38, available at MADE, 125 N. Cache St., 307-690-7957

FUNCTIONAL BISON Can you ever have enough bottle openers? Maybe, but definitely not when the device of choice is Floor | 9’s heavy-duty brass bottle opener, which has the opener set in the body of a bison. Is there a more perfect bottle opener for a Jackson Hole home? $12, available at Belle Cose at Home, 115 E. Broadway Ave., 307/739-HOME, bellecose.com

SCRATCH OFF Modern Natives’ National Park Picture Scratch-Off Poster is both wall art and travel checklist. The 16x20-inch poster features each of the country’s fifty-nine national parks, arranged in order of their founding. (So Yellowstone appears at top left.) A photo of an iconic scene from each park is hidden beneath silver foil. Scratch off only the parks you’ve been to, or scratch them all off for photographic inspiration to visit new parks. $32, available at MADE, 125 N. Cache St., 307-690-7957

COLOR IN THE KITCHEN

Photography by Cole Buckhart

Enamelware isn’t among the first things that come to mind when we think of Turkey— that’d be baklava, followed by carpets, kilims, and then tiles—but sisters Basak Onay and Oyku Thurston are changing that. Their colorful and witty Bornn Enamelware, which is made in Istanbul and locally carried by Picnic, is not only a splash of color for your table, but also dishwasher safe and can withstand temperatures of up to 518 degrees Fahrenheit. From $14, available at Picnic, 1110 Maple Way, Suite B, 307/264-2956, bornnus.com

RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 12


Builders

970 W Broadway, #216, Jackson, WY | www.jhbuilder.com | 307.734.5245


FAVORITES

ENTERTAIN IN STYLE Made Goods’ Jonathan side table is a perfect piece for Jackson Hole homes. Teak logs are set in white resin to create a 20x20x20-inch cube that is simultaneously rustic and contemporary. The same company’s Pace Trays continue the contemporaryorganic aesthetic: They’re made with gray hair-on-hide leather panels mounted onto matte teak. Side table $620, Pace trays from $175, both available at Belle Cose at Home, 115 E. Broadway Ave., 307/739-HOME, bellecose.com

DON’T RESIST THE RESIN

“We’ll pour the scent, and you pour the spirit; candles to cocktails.” How can you not get behind a candle company that issues such a challenge? Each of Ranger Station’s candles is hand-poured into a reusable eight-ounce tumbler. Burn through enough of the candles, which are made with essential oils and natural soy wax, and you have a set of fun tumblers for your home bar. Founded by twin brothers Steve and Jon Soderholm, Ranger Station’s scents are more manly than most candles: timber, leather + pine, copal, birch bark, tobacco + musk, oak moss, and santalum. $36, available at Mountain Dandy, 125 N. Cache St., 307/690-0606, rangerstation.co

We can’t say we’ve been looking for the perfect champagne bucket—or looking for any champagne bucket, really. But, having found Tina Frey’s 9x9x9-inch champagne bucket cast in resin, we’ve got to confess that our consumption of bubbly has increased. A San Francisco-based designer, Frey first sculpted the champagne bucket’s form in clay. A mold was handmade from this, and it is this mold that is used to cast the vessel in lead-free resin. After casting, each piece is hand-sanded. From $56, available at Mountain Dandy, 125 N. Cache St., 307/690-0606, tinafreydesigns.com

Photography by Cole Buckhart

CANDLES TO COCKTAILS

RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 14


designing the places you gather | shannonwhitedesign.com


MUST HAVE

GRAB A SEAT Are barstools the most functional piece of furniture around?

Modern Metal Houzz’s Grand Metal Stools pair a solid, stained pinewood seat with a powder-coated steel frame, giving them a modern farmhouse feel. Choose from orange, red, black, or gunmetal. They’re “an economical way to bring color into a home,” says Shannon White Burns, an interior designer who opened her own firm, Shannon White Design, in 2008. Set of four $498, 307/690-1594, houzz.com

By Maggie Theodora

Waney Wood

Inspired by the ‘waney edge’ of a piece of wood—the knotted planks and random edges that get chopped off when they don’t fit a production line, Tom Dixon’s Offcut Stool is meant to challenge the perception of flat-pack furniture as cheap and disposable. (The stools arrive unassembled and owners, or contractors, hammer the joins together with wooden dowels.) “This is a fun and playful piece,” Jackson designer John Martin of John Martin Design says. “It’s a great piece if you have a white kitchen and are looking to spice it up a bit.” From $370, 310/968-3198, tomdixon.net

BARSTOOLS—WE THINK they’re one of the unsung heroes of interior design. Chances are you have several in your home, and use them for anything from side tables to seats at the dinner table. We asked Jackson Hole designers to share some of their favorites.

Farm Function

Keep It Simple

First designed by Tom Moser more than thirty years ago, the High Stool is “a reincarnation of a tractor seat in wood that is comfortable and beautiful,” says White Burns. Choose from a cherry or walnut seat; the legs are always ash. Either one will be sculpted to follow natural human contours and sanded smooth to showcase the wood’s natural grain. From $920, 307/690-1594, thosmoser.com

British designer Matthew Hilton’s Profile Barstool for Case is all about “clean lines and cradled comfort,” says designer Kate Binger, who founded Designed Interiors in Jackson Hole in 2007 and the showroom/boutique Dwelling in 2010. Throughout his career, Hilton has focused on a design’s end user—here he wanted an ergonomic, simply shaped solution for dining seating. We think he nailed it. From $545, 307/733-8582, dwr.com RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 16


Funky Fresh

Emily Janak, who opened her own design studio, Emily Janak Design, in June 2018 after six years at valley design firms including Snake River Interiors/Twenty Two Home and WRJ Design, says, “These funky stools are a steal and a statement,” about the Bendt barstool by Scandinavian Designs. “They’re an obvious nod to Mies van der Rohe, yet still feel unexpected thanks to the mix of materials.” The materials? A cane seat and backrest, and a cantilevered metal frame finished in polished chrome. “Mountain modern” is a thing now; is “mountain mid-century” one as well? $149, 307/699-0662, scandinaviandesigns.com

A43 ARCHITECTURE

JACKSON | WYOMING Mix & Match

The 2D Bar Stool, from Danish husbandand-wife design firm GUBI, is made from laminated veneer, which you can choose to have upholstered, or not. Mix and match the seat with a variety of metallic and wooden bases. Martin says, “There’s a nice contrast with the black steel and the laminated wood veneer.” From $285, 310/968-3198, shop.gubi.com

Classic & Modern

“I love the lines of the Lisse counter stool by Dmitriy & Co. I had the opportunity to see it being handmade in New York City and the quality is exceptional. The architectural bronze footrest is a subtle but distinguishing detail,” Janak says. From $4,000, 307/699-0662, dmitriyco.com

Rustic Return “I gravitate toward more clean-lined western accents, and feel that these woven leather Natura Stools by Wisteria are the perfect combination of rustic and sleek,” Janak says. “They add a nice textural element to the kitchen with mostly hard surfaces.” $599, 307/699-0662, wisteria.com 17

307.200.1790 chris@A43design.com


NEIGHBORHOOD

HIDDE

N RAN

CH LA

NE

HIDD STELLARIA LANE

WES

EN R ANC

H LO

OP

T BR

OAD WAY

entrance. What Horn finally got when Hidden HIDDEN RANCH IS JUST OFF ONE OF Most people don’t know this in-town Ranch was approved in 1992 was a subdivision Wyoming’s busiest stretches of highway but neighborhood exists, and that’s just with fifty-five lots on about 20.4 acres. The lots has managed to live up to its name. Today the fine with its residents. range from 0.17 acre up to about a half-acre, subdivision, a loop with one extension, is a most around Hidden Ranch Loop and with a few mix of small original homes from the 1990s By Mark Huffman more on Hidden Ranch Lane, an offshoot that and larger additions of recent years. With only Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy goes up the adjacent mountain. Flat Creek runs one entrance—it connects to West Broadway along the western edge of much of the property. via Stellaria Lane, across from Jackson Whole All the land remained in federal hands until 1909, when Luella Wort, Grocer—it’s also an unusually quiet place for the Town of Jackson, with no the mother of John and Jess (who built The Wort Hotel), filed for an 80through traffic. “Hidden Ranch is a great name for it because most people don’t know acre homestead that included part of the land. In 1924 Stephen Leek, a it’s there,” says associate broker Carol Linton of Jackson Hole Real Estate photographer, rancher, and conservationist, filed his own 80-acre claim for land that became the rest of Hidden Ranch. Leek and Luella’s husband, Associates. “It’s a unique location.” At the end of the 1980s the developer, John Horn, aimed to make a place Charles, were half brothers. In 1946 the land went to the Horn family, who also ranched elsewhere in where members of Jackson Hole’s middle class could own a home. As with Rafter J Ranch a few years earlier, Hidden Ranch was driven by a housing South Park during the 1950s. Maurice and Josie Horn, John’s parents, were shortage that seems to have begun with the arrival of the first white people. community stalwarts, and after Josie was widowed she continued being a Horn wanted Hidden Ranch to be even more working class than it has smart investor: She owned real estate around the valley and was for a while turned out to be. “He originally wanted to do smaller lots to make them more owner of the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar. She was also a community booster, affordable,” says Gannett Horn, a nephew of John’s who still manages Horn donating the land for Powderhorn Park and working as an early supporter of the Grand Teton Music Festival and other good causes. family property in the area. Josie and her husband lived in a place at Hidden Ranch that they What John Horn envisioned was something like the Crabtree Lane neighborhood, another Horn family development, also a loop with a single called Powderhorn, a house built originally by well-known Jackson Hole RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 18


grandson, Gannett, says. It was low key, providing mostly a chance to rent one of the little cabins. The business continued until about 1990. Josie died in 1997 at age 89.

IT’S OUT OF TOWN, BUT NOT OUT OF TOWN.”

ONLINE CONSIGNMENT MARKETPLACE

[ ARI GOLDSTEIN, HIDDEN RANCH RESIDENT ]

contractor Jack Kranenberg. It’s a tribute to wood art, combining Old West cabin with Austrian chalet. “The main house has hand-hewn beams in it, made with an ax,” Gannett Horn says. “You can see the marks the ax left. It’s amazing.” Linton says a new owner redid Powderhorn but didn’t change much. “It’s beautifully restored,” she says. The big parcel was mostly a place for the Horn family to live, with construction of their home starting in 1950. Surrounding this house was “a big grassy open space that John exercised horses on,” Gannett says of his uncle. “Around the place they sprinkled some cabins salvaged from abandoned older ranches, including one from the Bar BC.” Three transported cabins, smaller than 700 square feet each, still stand in Hidden Ranch in a testament to recycled housing. Another is still there, but with a big addition. During the 1950s the Horns operated a guest ranch on the property, with Josie in charge, her

When John Horn subdivided the land, the prices reflected the era: In November 1992, just months after Hidden Ranch was approved, one lot was on the market for $66,500. By 1999 a lot was advertised at $169,000. Houses show a similar trend: In late 1993 a three-bedroom, two-bath house was marketed at $247,000, and in early 1995 the price was $179,500 for a 1,136-square-foot home with two bedrooms and two baths. Houses advertised last year included a 2,180-square-foot, four-bedroom place for $753,000, and a three-bedroom house with 2,327 square feet for $815,000. Some have since then been advertised for $1.4 million, and more. There’s a spec house being built that’s priced at $2 million. The old Horn place, 3,400 square feet, was sold last winter for $1.4 million, cash. Linton says the area is mostly home to local people who live in the houses they own. She calls Hidden Ranch “a great little neighborhood.” Seventeen-year resident Ari Goldstein agrees. He lives there with his wife, Jenn Sparks, and their daughter. “It is a hidden niche,” he says. “It’s out of town, but not out of town.” He likes his view— though he catches a little noise and light pollution by being slightly up the hillside—and appreciates the bike path connecting to town, the closeness of the middle school, and the general feeling of living in an “enclave.” Goldstein, whose first job in Jackson in the 1990s was at Pearl Street Bagels, is now an investment advisor at Beddow Capital Management. He’d like to claim financial genius for his investment, but said he and Sparks “kind of got lucky and were able to trade up” during a good time in the real estate market. He says his Hidden Ranch home has nearly tripled in value since 2001, when he moved in, and has “turned into a retirement plan for us.”

19

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TEN TIPS

HOME LIBRARIES THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT designers and librarians agree that there’s no one right way to display books in a home. (Although please, stay away from the trend of “spine-in” display. “While it may create a cohesive color palette, it’s cringeworthy to the bibliophiles of the world,” says Jackson- and Brooklyn, New York-based interior designer Felicity Sargent. “I am vehemently opposed to it.” We couldn’t agree more.) We asked three local experts to share what they think about when curating and displaying clients’ home libraries, which all agree should be as unique as their owners.

Make your books as interesting to look at as they are to read.

By Lila Edythe

1

Home libraries don’t need to follow the Dewey Decimal System, and books don’t need to be arranged in a neat little row. They can be stacked, leaned, piled, and interspersed with other items. Have fun with it! The more unique, the better.

Personally, I prefer books without dust jackets for the more streamlined and elegant aesthetic it creates. So often there’s a beautiful binding hidden beneath the jacket. 2

3

4

Color is a simple way to arrange things, and I understand when clients want to do that. Personally, I use this method to organize my closet, but not my bookshelf. I think contrast and variety are beautiful and, to me, when books are arranged by the colors of the rainbow, the display looks fussy and contrived. The most beautiful rooms look soulful and effortless.

This piece, which I stumbled upon at Home Again, isn’t just a home to books, but serves as a focal point in the room, filling a large blank wall with books and beautiful objects that add interest while offering dual-purpose storage: The top half is for display, while the bottom half is concealed for functional (and possibly unsightly) items. Here we’ve hidden a home office, including a printer and filing system.

RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 20

Photograph by Aaron Kraft

DESIGNER FELICITY SARGENT HAS STUDIED INTERIOR DESIGN, STUDIO ART, AND ART HISTORY, AND HAS A MASTER’S DEGREE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE, SO HOME LIBRARIES ARE CLOSE TO HER HEART. “EVEN THE SMALLEST LIVING SPACE IS DESERVING OF A DEDICATED HOME LIBRARY,” SHE SAYS. IN THIS 1,000-SQUARE-FOOT EAST JACKSON CONDO, SARGENT USED A PROMINENT PIECE OF FURNITURE TO DEFINE THE LIBRARY SPACE. “ITS HEIGHT ANCHORS THE SPACE,” SAYS SARGENT, WHO FOUNDED FELICITY SARGENT DESIGN IN 2015. “IT DRAWS THE EYE UPWARD, EMPHASIZING THE EXPANSE OF THE CEILING, WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY BRINGING THE SEATING AREA INWARD, CREATING A COZY, INTIMATE GATHERING SPACE.”


235 EAST BROADWAY | JACKSON, WY | 307.201.5324 | www.nwks.com


TEN TIPS

THE MAIN LIVING SPACES IN THIS 7,000-SQUARE-FOOT HOME HAVE DISTANT VALLEY VIEWS BUT ANDY ANKENY, A PRINCIPAL AT CARNEY LOGAN BURKE ARCHITECTS, SITUATED THE LIBRARY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE DRAMATIC VIEWS OF A MOUNTAIN RIGHT NEXT TO THE PROPERTY. THIS PLACEMENT ALSO CREATED AN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE LIBRARY AND THE OLDGROWTH PONDEROSA PINE FOREST JUST OUTSIDE. ANKENY SAYS THAT WHILE “THE MAJORITY OF THE HOUSE HAS A SCULPTURAL APPROACH TO THE WHITE WALLS FOR AN AMAZING ART COLLECTION, IN THE LIBRARY WE USED MORE FRAMED WOOD ELEMENTS TO ENCLOSE THE SPACE.”

3

Since the library is far from the kitchen, we included a very subtle bar element, but downplayed the materials so that it didn’t feel like typical kitchen-style fixtures 2 within the space, and we located it in the room to be hidden upon entry. It is discrete in relation to the books, art, and exterior views.

Every linear inch of the clients’ existing collection of books was measured to move from their previous house into this library in a seamless transition. While we measured the amount of shelving in the clients’ prior library, this is an entirely different design and shelving layout. We simply used the linear feet of shelving plus the height and depth of shelving as a metric to make sure that all of their collection would fit within the new layout. We also accounted for placement of art and small sculptural figures.

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Photograph by Matthew Millman

1

The lighting in this space was from a very high ceiling, but libraries need a large amount of light so we layered light from multiple sources: high in the ceiling, recessed within some of the shelves, and with decorative and floor lamps, which aren’t visible in this image.


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TEN TIPS

Pull book spines close to the shelf’s edge to catch the light in the room. This can also help hide unsightly bracket holes on the sides of adjustable shelving.

Keep your favorite titles, most beautiful books, and other 1 points of pride on eye-level shelves where they will get the most attention.

2

3

Rare and heirloom-quality volumes should be protected with archival covers and kept out of direct sunlight.

“BOOKS MAKE A HOUSE A HOME: THEY ADD TEXTURE AND WARMTH,” SAYS CHRISTY SHANNON SMIRL, A LIBRARY SCIENTIST AND FOUNDER OF FOXTAIL BOOKS & LIBRARY SERVICES. BEFORE FOUNDING FOXTAIL, SMIRL WORKED IN PRIVATE, ACADEMIC, AND PUBLIC LIBRARIES (INCLUDING TETON COUNTY LIBRARY). SHE HAS WORKED ON LIBRARIES AS SMALL AS TEN BOOKS IN A WINDOWSILL TO 5,000 VOLUMES TAKING UP FOUR WALLS, AND SAYS A LIBRARIAN LOOKS AT HOME LIBRARIES DIFFERENTLY THAN AN INTERIOR DESIGNER DOES: “JUST AS AN INTERIOR DESIGNER IS THE EXPERT ON ADDING LAYERS OF FURNITURE AND TEXTILES TO A SPACE, A LIBRARIAN FILLS YOUR SPACE WITH A RICH COLLECTION OF STORIES AND TOOLS THAT ARE CHOSEN FROM ALL THE BOOKS IN THE WORLD SPECIFICALLY FOR YOU.”

Add decorative objects made from a variety of materials—wood, metal, 4 ceramics, or glass—to highlight the variety of subject matter and the beautiful texture of your books.

5

Bookends protect books from falling over and being damaged.

Alternate spine orientation between vertical and horizontal, and switch where books are placed on the shelves—left, right, or centered—for an eclectic style to match the variety of your books. Tomes that are too tall for a shelf can be stacked flat with other art and photography books, or moved to a coffee table.

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Photograph by Aaron Kraft

6


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ARTISAN

MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE The perfect shower or kitchen backsplash isn’t just about the tile you select. Installing tile (well) is an art form.

By Joohee Muromcew Photography by Cole Buckhart

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Joe DiMarco is a fourth-generation descendant of a family of Italian masons. After decades of setting tile himself, in 2014 he and his wife, Alicia, bought Architectural Stone & Tile. Joe himself now does more supervising of his seven tile setters on staff.

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Locallly ly Mad de Knife e Arrrtt “EVERYTHING WILL ALWAYS BE DIFFERENT in the field,” observes Joe DiMarco, a master tile setter who with his wife, Alicia, owns Architectural Stone & Tile in Jackson. He’s speaking of the inevitability of unexpected changes during any building project, but also about the deeply human craft of tile setting. “The hardest part is planning and layout,” he says. Either a client will come in with ideas and need a shower or a kitchen backsplash, or a general contractor arrives with an architect’s plans and fairly precise expectations. DiMarco considers the plumbing and electricity, the durability of materials, and the budget. There is, however, a more nuanced process, part aesthetic

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eye and part paper-and-pencil math that can elevate tile setting to an art. The floor or wall must first be squared. The center of the room can be measured in, but then the shape and size of the tiling must be considered so the completed surface looks balanced. If you have a square room, but one side ends with tiles cut to half size and another side ends with whole tiles, the room will look naggingly uneven. The subfloors, even with new construction, can also be uneven. A quarter-inch slope on a floor can be mitigated by the careful hand of a tile setter, or you can end up with an awkward gap below your kitchen sink. The true artist is revealed during the layout process. Even a simple, white, three-by-six-inch polished ceramic tile, perhaps the most popular and classic choice, requires an artful eye in spacing and design. When does a project call for varied spacing and when does it call for strictly uniform placement? Should there be a border, or no border? How will edges and corners be treated, and what color should the grout be? Tile setters usually arrive to find a plywood or concrete subfloor and are tasked to finish it at a certain elevation. A backer board is adhered to the subfloor, then often to an antifracture membrane. “The greatest advancement, technologically speaking, has been SchluterDITRA,” DiMarco says. Schluter Systems produces polyethylene membranes that provide a variety of functions in the tiling process.


ARTISAN

The company’s DITRA line is especially useful as a waterproof “floating” layer to prevent fractures in tile and grouting. Cracks in tile are usually symptomatic of poor installation underneath. Schluter makes other lines for radiant in-floor heating systems, which formerly required setting heating tubes in massive, heavy sheets of concrete before laying down the floor. For most tile setting, thin-set mortar is applied with a trowel, one end smooth and one end notched, then tiles are carefully set with spacers and left for the mortar to cure for twenty-four hours. The setter returns the next day to apply the grout. This is a long process that cannot be rushed. The DiMarcos have seven full-time tile setters, along with Alicia managing the business, Angie Friesen in the showroom, and previous owner Mike Slavin consulting on a few projects. Projects can go on for years. DiMarco recalls that early in his career, shortly after arriving in the valley in 1993, he worked exclusively for six years on two main houses and their accompanying guesthouses. This kind of commitment to a craft is often in the blood; Joe is the fourth-generation descendant of a family of Italian masons. His college summers were spent working for masons and tile setters, and he learned as an apprentice like so many in the building trade and crafts.

INTERIORS 150 Scott Lane | 307-699-7947 | matterhouse.com 29


Rendering courtesy of GYDE Architects

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ARCHITECTURE

SQUARE FEET: 5,000 | BEDROOMS: 4 | BATHS: 4.5 | LOT ACREAGE: 4.84 | COMPLETION DATE: 2020

CATHARSIS

The founders of GYDE Architects design a space to decompress.

By Joohee Muromcew

“THE SITE—IT WAS BOTH the greatest challenge and the greatest intentional paths and pauses: A quiet, sheltered driveway leads to an auto opportunity,” muses Nona Yehia, who, along with Peggy Gilday, is court, with a garage separated from the main house by ten or so paces. These co-principal of GYDE Architects. The nearly five-acre site for this provide the client with moments to decompress and take in the serenity of 5,000-square-foot home is near the breezy crest an interior courtyard. Entering the house, the eye of Saddle Butte, with mostly pristine Grand is immediately drawn to and beyond the dining Teton views to the north and sweeping views of room, which appears to float before a stunning Sleeping Indian to the east. view of the Grand. A “widow’s walk” of sorts Rather than sharing a lot of dream-house extends from the double-height living room over clippings with the architects, the client described the space below, stretching that last retreat into the multilayered, multifaceted experience peace to within near grasp of the Tetons. she desired in arriving and being at home. An The volume of the house and the roofline accomplished, driven neurosurgeon from Texas, had to respond to the landscape. “When a client [ NONA YEHIA, ARCHITECT ] she envisioned every moment from driving up allows us, we try to consider the house a part of Saddle Butte to taking in the view of the Tetons the landscape,” explains Yehia. “And the site is from her master bedroom as a cathartic process she calls “shedding hot always a participant in the design.” Gilday shares various ideas of volume hell.” Yehia and Gilday responded with a schematic plan incorporating and shape their team created using a 3-D printer, setting them upon a 3-D

THE SITE—IT WAS BOTH THE GREATEST CHALLENGE AND THE GREATEST OPPORTUNITY.”

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ARCHITECTURE

Not just a tile store. We sell tile and setting materials from a tile installer’s perspective. We offer knowledge, experience and friendly service to help you make good decisions.

replica of the site. The temptation to relate the pitch of the roof obviously against the slope was revised for more nuanced iterations that speak to the landscape, rather than in contradiction or overt extension of it. The house rises with two separate volumes, one sheltering the living room area and the other above the master suite. One roof subtly lifts away from the slope, while the other seems to be “peeling away from the earth,” as Gilday describes. Nearly half of the

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MASSING I

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Renderings courtesy of GYDE Architects living space is on the lower level, with largescale windows taking full advantage of northern and eastern views. The design creates intimate interior spaces with larger-than-life dramatic backdrops of the valley. Exterior materials are still under consideration, though Yehia and Gilday discuss dark steel or stone for the base, with warm woods and glass to lighten and brighten the upper elements. This home is the first residential project they’ve worked on together: It was only in 2017 that the women merged their respective firms. On their evolving creative process as partners, Gilday says, “It’s been pretty fluid. The greatest challenge is we’re both so excited to work on it. But, most importantly, there’s a lot of trust between us, and between us and the client, so it works.”

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MASSING IV

FINAL CONCEPT


Just because you have a checking account with a local bank doesn’t mean they’re your best option for home financing. Contact the Jackson Hole Mortgage Guy to get started!

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TRAVEL

Whistler Blackcomb ON THE DOWN LOW

By Jeremy Pugh

Peak to Peak Gondola

WITH ONE OF THE WORLD’S greatest ski resorts right here in the Tetons, Jacksonites can be forgiven for a lack of curiosity about skiing elsewhere. Why would we think about another resort? But let’s not pretend that we don’t have a wandering eye from time to time. Be honest, you’ve said the word, perhaps over beers at the Mangy Moose, leaning in and whispering it across the table: “Whistler.” Just saying it feels like you’re cheating on Jackson, right? Nevertheless, you find yourself dreaming of Canadian ridgelines, poutine, and ice-cold Molsons. And this is okay. Go ahead and leave that Jackson Hole Mountain Resort season pass dangling on the key peg and slip away to Vancouver, British Columbia, for a ski vacation. After landing in Vancouver, it’s only a two-hour drive on the Sea-to-Sky Highway (see sidebar) into the Fitzsimmons Range, where you’ll quickly be sitting in front of a roaring fire in your pied-à-terre in one of Whistler’s two base villages, a trail map spread out before you.

Whistler is really Whistler Blackcomb Ski Resort, and all the space between its two massive, namesake peaks. All told, it’s the largest ski area in North America. From the lowest base area at the resort, Creekside Village, the ascent to the top is dramatic: A gondola and lift take you from 2,140 feet above sea level to Whistler Mountain’s 7,156foot summit. (Blackcomb Peak’s summit is even higher, nearly 8,000 feet, but isn’t served by a lift.) From Whistler Mountain’s summit, you’ll have the entirety of the Fitzsimmons Range laid out at your feet. Most of what you’re looking at is Garibaldi Provincial Park, a wilderness area unsullied by the development and luxury cabins that increasingly junk up alpine scenery in the United States. Where you go from here is up to you, but with 200 marked runs, 8,171 acres of terrain, sixteen alpine bowls, and three glaciers to explore, there’s no shortage of options. Don’t worry, Jackson Hole never needs to know.

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Whistler Blackcomb

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TRAVEL

GET YOUR ART AND ARCHITECTURE ON

Audain Art Museum

Keir Fine Jewellery

BRING IT HOME

The Whistler Museum RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 36

Amid the usual resort suspects—gear and T-shirt shops—are some one-off gems, literally in the case of Keir Fine Jewellery (4321 Village Gate Blvd., 604/932-2944, keirfinejewellery.com). The boutique jewelry store specializes in inspired settings for Canadian diamonds and other stones. If you do find yourself with a hankering for gear, pop into the Whistler Clearance Centre, (4204 Village Square, 604/905-3347); it’s not fancy, and requires digging through its racks, but here that’s part of the fun. Plaza Galleries (22-4314 Main St., 604/938-6233, plazagalleries.com) is that ski town gallery but offers an eclectically curated selection of work by international artists that you won’t find in Jackson.

Photography courtesy of Tourism of Whistler: Mike Crane & Justa Jeskova

Apart from the quad-burning ski days that are the center of this visit, you’ll want to make sure you don’t miss the Audain Art Museum (4350 Blackcomb Way, 604/962-0413, audainartmuseum.com). Home of a fascinating collection of First Nation artworks, as well as contemporary works by Canadian artists, the 56,000-square-foot building designed by architect John Patkau is itself a work of art. The Audain is a must-see along Whistler’s Cultural Connector (whistler.ca), a scenic path that links six of the ski village’s major cultural institutions. On your stroll, also stop into the Maury Young Arts Centre (4335 Blackcomb Way, 604/935-8410, artswhistler.com), the home of Arts Whistler, a gallery and hub of local artistic and cultural activity. Check the center’s calendar before you visit to find activities for all ages. The Whistler Museum (4333 Main St., 604/932-2019, whistlermuseum. org) gives a funky, fun rundown of the timeline from Whistler being a tiny fishing village to its Olympic glory days. Also along the Cultural Connector, you’ll find two notable works of public art—Susan Point’s bronze sculpture, A Timeless Circle, and James Stewart’s Jeri, a compelling figure study of a Brazilian Capoeira fighter ready to spring into action.


PLAY Most of your time will surely be spent exploring the vast resort you came to Canada to ski, and there is a lot to explore. Break it down into smaller chunks by joining one of the free mountain tours given daily on each of the two peaks. The colorful volunteers who lead the tours are Whistler lifers who will ensure that you see the best each mountain offers (whistlerblackcomb.com). For a break from downhill skiing, book a self-guided snowshoeing or cross-country ski excursion with Cross Country Connection (604/905-0071, crosscountryconnection.ca). Or join a guided zip line, snowmobile, or snowshoe tour with The Adventure Group (855/824-9955, tagwhistler.com). Finally, ditch the gear and the cold completely and book (in advance) an afternoon or evening at Scandinave Spa (8010 Mons Rd., 604/935-2424, scandinave.com). This place is no joke—very hot and very cold pools sit in a beautiful garden that also has cozy chill-out rooms where you can catch your breath.

Crystal Hut waffle

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Scandinave Spa

EAT (AND DRINK) Let’s talk waffles, gorgeously decorated with blueberries and frothy whipped cream, served next to a steaming cup of coffee. On a gondola ride, “Have you had the waffles?” is the answer to our question, “Where should we eat?” So, make sure at least one of your ski days includes a midmorning or mid-afternoon break at Crystal Hut on Blackcomb’s Crystal Ridge (800/766-0449). The après scene at Whistler truly is a scene. Garibaldi Lift Company Bar & Grill (4165 Springs Ln., 604/905-2220) is the big show with the see-and-be-seen crowd. For a quieter wind down, try Bar Oso (150-4222 Village Square, 604/962-4540, baroso.ca) a tapas joint with an interesting and extensive wine list of Spanish

varietals. Wherever you après, try a Bloody Caesar, a Canadian variant on the Bloody Mary made with Clamato juice. The bartenders around Whistler attempt to outdo each other with both classic and ridiculously adorned Bloody Caesars. For the former, stop into Dusty’s Bar & BBQ in Creekside Village (2040 London Ln., RR 2, 604/905-2171). For the latter, clomp those ski boots into Merlin’s Bar & Grill (4553 Blackcomb Way, 604/938-7700) and, with a straight face, ask for “The Jester.” Chances are you won’t be able to keep that straight face: The Jester comes garnished with chicken wings, onion rings, cured bacon, and beef jerky. 37

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TRAVEL The premier dining destination in the Whistler area is Rimrock Café (2117 Whistler Rd., 604/932.5565, rimrockcafe.com). Here the servers are lifer ski bums who are not only hospitality pros, but also offer great beta on tomorrow’s ski plans. For something more casual, try Creekbread Pizza (2021 Karen Crescent, 604/9056666, creekbread.com), a convivial wood-fired

pizza joint near Creekside Village. Craft beer lovers who like hipster menus will love Hunter Gather (101-4368 Main St., 604/966-2372, huntergatherwhistler.com). Take in the views over lunch at Christine’s on Blackcomb, a beautifully designed nouvelle cuisine restaurant in the Rendezvous Lodge perched high on Blackcomb Peak (604/938-7437).

Fairmont Chateau Whistler

REST UP Whistler is a sprawling ski area with many options for places to stay, including a wideranging selection of vacation rentals, bed and breakfasts, and a solid lineup of full-service hotels. As you consider the options, know that where you stay is a big factor in determining the kind of trip you’ll have. Creekside Village, which links to the Creekside Gondola, is a quiet(ish) residential community, with a smaller selection of restaurants and bars than Whistler Village. Whistler Village has easy access to both the Blackcomb Excalibur and Whistler Village gondolas, and is the heart of the resort’s activity and action. There’s a well-run bus system between and around both areas. In Creekside Village, Nita Lake Lodge (2131 Lake Placid Rd., 604/966-5700, nitalakelodge.com) is perched on the shore of (frozen) Nita Lake. A scenic boutique hotel, it’s a getaway from your getaway, designed in “mountain modern” chic

style (yes, there are hipster stag heads on the wall). Whistler Village’s counterpart to Nita Lake is Fairmont Chateau Whistler (4599 Chateau Blvd., 604/938-8000, fairmont.com/whistler). Looming over the village like something out of a Disney fairy tale, it’s basically a castle, with turndown service. The Pan Pacific Whistler Mountainside (4320 Sundial Crescent, 888/905 9995, panpacific. com) has rooms with views of the gondola lines. Listel Hotel Whistler (4121 Village Green, 604/9321133, listelhotel.com) is a business-class property with a groovy modern lobby. It’s also home to the Bearfoot Bistro (604/932-3433, bearfootbistro.com), which features the work of Canadian cooking star Melissa Craig, who spins modern twists on Canadian comfort foods. The Blackcomb Lodge (4220 Gate Way Dr., 604/935-5700, blackcomblodge. com) offers reasonably priced rooms right in the center of Whistler Village.

Seasonal Home & Garden Décor Full Service Florist Unique Gifts Marigold Café

TRANSPORT: RIDE THE SEA-TO-SKY HIGHWAY Whistler Blackcomb is about a two-hour drive north from Vancouver. While renting a car is an option, take a shuttle: You’ll want to sightsee along the well-named Sea-to-Sky Highway. Whistler Connection (604/938-9711, whistlerconnectiontravel.com) offers airport transfers to stops in both Creekside and Whistler villages, meet-and-greet services, and more. If you’re in a hurry, make like James Bond and book a helicopter (800/944-7853, whistler.com). This will have you in Whistler in a mere thirty minutes,

but at an impressive cost: about $3,400. The views are amazing, though. Once you’re checked in and ready to mingle, it’s easy to get around here. Lyft and Uber are only just expanding into Canada, so don’t use up your international data plan trying to summon either one. Instead go old school and utilize the area’s reliable cab services. Bonus: The local drivers are a colorful lot who are invariably listening to a hockey game on the radio and speak the Queen’s English with a thick Canadian brogue. Nice one, eh? 39

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DESIGN

By Joohee Muromcew

FEW HOUSES IN THE VALLEY fill me with more curiosity and wistful envy than a relatively modest one across the street from the picture-perfect Wilson Elementary School, mostly because it exudes a sense of warm and gracious family life from its front porch. Panels of red fabric provide privacy and shade, and also part to reveal a cozy lounging area and a much-loved porch swing. The swing is from Skycurve and looks like a small trampoline. Hung from simple chains, it’s the sort of porch swing that’s not only comfortable but fun to swing in. The kids use driftwood sticks to push themselves around on it. The wonderful thing about a swing is that it’s perfectly acceptable to just sit and swing—no need to multitask here. According to Preserving Porches by Renee Kahn and Ellen Meagher, front porches came into vogue before the Civil War as industrial innovations freed up leisure time for homeowners and walkable neighborhoods bloomed across the country. Protected by roofs, porches provided cool and open social spaces. Porch swings, along with rockers and hanging chairs, offered pleasant seats from which residents could observe passersby and welcome neighborhood visitors. The unfortunate noise and pollution that came with the automotive age—and the inventions of air conditioning and broadcast television— eventually diminished the pleasures of front porches. However, while not officially in the Merriam-Webster dictionary, “porching” remains a way of life, particularly in the American South, and the porch swing continues to be a popular decorative element across the country. Historic photographs from the early twentieth century show that porch swing designs have not changed much.

This double-sided, custom-made swing was fabricated from five pairs of the owner’s skis. The swing was too big for the front porch, and was instead hung in the front yard so the owner could see Snow King Mountain—where she says all five of these pairs of skis made turns—while sitting in it.

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Photograph by Cole Buckhart

SWING TIME

Porch swings, always a good idea, come in all shapes and sizes.


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DESIGN

THE WONDERFUL THING ABOUT A SWING IS THAT IT’S PERFECTLY ACCEPTABLE TO JUST SIT AND SWING— NO NEED TO MULTITASK HERE.

They were then made of hardwood or pine—often left over from home construction—with slatted seats and backs, and hung from chains. There were also many wicker porch swings, none of which would look out of place at most home and garden shops today. Newer, more modern swings seem to have come about with the cross-cultural pollination of design and lifestyle seen in the past thirty years. Dedon, an award-winning, high-end outdoor furniture design company founded in the Philippines in 1990, produces what must be the most luxurious swing—a six-foot-wide circular bed encased in aluminum and polyethylene fiber. Dedon’s designs hover between a relaxed beachy glamour and refined ergonomics and engineering. Swings vary greatly, from sumptuous beds to works of minimalist art, and many are now made for indoor use or of repurposed materials such as doors and pallets. Actress Gwyneth Paltrow’s former Tribeca loft in New York City featured a regal swing made of a carved antique Indian door, covered in silk cushions and pillows, floating above the shaggiest of rugs and under a vintage Venini pendant light. What could be groovier? Svvvings (svvving.com), founded by European designers Marie Najdovski and Radek Podsiadlo, are designed for spacious lofts—and mind you, only chic airy lofts, please. Offered in about nineteen colors and finishes, the Svvving can be whimsical in playful, folksy striped wool (“Lindy”) or dominatrix-sexy in polished black vachette leather and black lacquer (“Faust”).

Dedon’s six-foot-wide Swingrest hanging lounger beckons.

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SwingLab (swinglab.co), a company based in Jackson, Mississippi, produces streamlined swings that at first appear as rigid as a schoolmarm’s wooden ruler, though loyal customers swear by their comfort. Crafted in aluminum and polished cypress, they’re designed to be somewhat customizable with removable seat backs that can be moved to desired places, even to allow two people to swing back-to-back. Classic porch swings made of durable teak and more commonly used outdoor furniture materials abound here and online. A small but attractive selection can be found at Festive Living (festive-living.com) in Victor, Idaho. And for yet another option, Bland Hoke, a local artist and pied piper of fun ideas, recently launched Hammocraft (hammocraft.com), a modular, expandable frame for hammocks designed with the blithe and breezy idea of being able to attach them to stand-up paddleboards. In between drifting on the Snake River, Hammocrafts often appear at music festivals and campsites, and on many a shady porch.

Svvvings are available with leather and fabric seats, and walnut, polished lacquer, or colorvarnished benches.

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TREADING LIGHTLY After years of RV life, retirees build a house they and the landscape can live with.

By Dina Mishev Photography by David Agnello

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“O

f course we had a groundbreaking celebration,” Carol Schoner says as if it were as usual as filing for a building permit. Sitting at the dining table of the home she and husband Phil moved into in December 2016, she pushes a paper titled “Groundbreaking Words” toward me. “These are the promises we made then,” she says. “To these majestic mountains: You are why we selected this spot to build our home. We promise every morning we will look to the west in appreciation. “To the wildlife: This was your home before it was ours. We will respect your space and minimize our intrusion into it. “To the great sea of sagebrush: Please be patient. We will disturb the terrain as little as

possible. We will do all we can to repair and restore this space. “Our goal is for our house to sit lightly on the land.” Before the Schoners built on a two-and-ahalf acre site in the sagebrush flats behind the Jackson Hole Airport, they looked everywhere in the valley, from condos at the Four Seasons to a Jackson Hole Golf & Tennis cottage to scrappers to other lots. But then they decided views were their primary consideration. This lot was the clear winner, Carol says, adding, “I thought, if nothing else, whatever happens to us with our health, if I can wake up and see these mountains, everything would be all right.” Now 67 (Carol) and 75 (Phil), the Schoners plan to live in this house until “we go to the old

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cowboys’ home,” Carol says. “It’s a very elderfriendly home. There is not a step anywhere. And that was the whole idea.” When the couple hired architectural firm kt814 to design the house, they asked for an age-in-place, open-space design that was clean and contemporary and that, of course, made the most of the property’s views, which are unobstructed and of the entire Teton Range. The area is also rich in wildlife; it’s in a migration corridor. “When we were inside, I wanted to feel that the outside came in to us,” Carol says. “I wanted to lie in bed and watch moose wander by between my feet.” But now that they’ve been in the house for almost two years, Carol says she’s not sure she is living up to the promises made at the groundbreaking ceremony. “It’s hard to maintain


...TO THE GREAT SEA OF SAGEBRUSH: PLEASE BE PATIENT. WE WILL DISTURB THE TERRAIN AS LITTLE AS POSSIBLE. WE WILL DO ALL WE CAN TO REPAIR AND RESTORE THIS SPACE.” [ CAROL SCHONER, HOMEOWNER ]

Opening spread: The goals of architectural firm kt814, founded by Rich Assenberg and Nathan Gray, and owners Carol and Phil Schoner aligned in this project: “We wanted to respect the nature of the site,” the architects say. “We wanted the planar landscape to feel like it was traveling through the home—letting the outside in, and back out again.” Left: The architects advised the Schoners to invest in the home’s windows and cabinetry. “They were right,” Carol says. In the combined kitchen/dining/living space, a 10-foot tall, 24-foot-wide lift-slide window/ sliding door by Zola opens to bring the outside in. Interior designer Jacque Jenkins-Stireman worked with the couple to fill the interior space with simple, yet interesting, furniture, fixtures, and accents including the SONNEMAN Lighting Stix LED pendant above the dining table. Cabinets are by Brian Stepek Custom Carpentry. Right: Built-in cabinets and closets line the western wall of the master bedroom.

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Carol and Phil worked closely with architects kt814 on their home’s design to get it just right. Making the home even more personal is that Carol’s son-in-law, Alex Everett, founder of Alex Everett Building, built it. The home takes advantage of gorgeous Teton Range views as seen from the master bath, above, and the front entrance, below. RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 48


An oversize sliding glass door opens directly from the master bedroom onto the sage flats that surround the home.

that sense of wonder,” she says. Her excitement as she talks about watching a bison wallow in a patch of dirt twenty feet from the dining table just the day before suggests otherwise, though. Phil talks about one night when he woke up around 2 a.m.: “I just happened to look out the windows from the bed and the Big Dipper was perfectly framed,” he says. He woke up Carol and the two sat together on the outside patio and wondered at the stars and Milky Way for about an hour. “The stars were actually shimmering,” Carol says. “It was amazing.” The day after I visited with them, vegetation restoration consultants were coming to replant sagebrush in the area nearest the home, the only part of the lot, other than the house site itself, that was disturbed during construction.

When weather permits, Phil starts off his mornings with a cup of coffee on the patio on the north side of the house. “I’ll spend an hour out there, listening to the meadowlarks and just sitting,” he says. “They’re lovely to listen to.” When the weather’s too inclement, Phil sits on the sofa in the main living area, where walls on two sides are glass and the northern one frames the Tetons. “The views are always changing,” he says. “Clouds make it different, the angle of the sun. Every day, every hour, is a different view, but they are the same mountains.” During our chat, Phil spies a bluebird perched in a small aspen tree outside and points it out. “They were my mom’s favorite bird,” he says. With how well Carol and Phil live in this home, it’s hard to imagine they spent the

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thirteen years prior to moving into it living in an RV. In 2005, when they learned that neither of Carol’s kids (the youngest of whom was away at college) would return to Cincinnati, Ohio, where they had lived for more than thirty years, they became what Phil calls “RV road warriors.” Their RV was big, and living in it “was not roughing it at all,” Carol says. The couple didn’t spend all their time driving around, but instead would arrive at a place and stay there for several months. They volunteered at national parks during the summer. After three summers at Bryce Canyon, they came to Grand Teton National Park and volunteered on the park’s Wildlife Brigade. (Carol’s daughter had recently moved to Victor, Idaho.)


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Carol and Phil, who’ve been married for more than twenty years, agree that living in an RV taught them a lot, most importantly, “You don’t need a lot of stuff,” Carol says. When they sold their Cincinnati house, a historic Tudor that they loved so much an oil painting of it hangs in the entrance of this new home, “We kept only things that were exceptionally beautiful or had deep sentimental value,” Carol says. Phil adds, “That rules out a couch.” Items they did keep include a rocking chair made by an Appalachian craftsman, Phil’s mother’s cedar chest, an oil painting from Phil’s childhood home, and artwork made by their children when they were young. Specific design elements were inspired by their RV life, too: “RVs have lots of built-ins,” Carol says. “I came to like them, so we did a lot of built-ins in this home.” “I think it is important when you go into a big project like this—and for us it was a huge financial decision—you have to decide up front what your values are,” Phil says. “We decided at the beginning that we weren’t worried about resale. We didn’t worry if someone else would like the design. If we liked it, that was all that mattered.” Carol adds, “And that it disturbed the land and wildlife as little as possible.”

Left: Architects Rich Assenberg and Nathan Gray say they worked to “position the house on the site to take the greatest advantages of views, while detaching neighboring houses from the experience inside and offering a sense of protection.”

Appalachian craftsman Chester Cornett made this rocking chair from walnut trees felled by a tornado on the farm of one of Carol’s friends. Carol often visited Cornett’s workshop while he was making the chair. Since his death in 1981, Cornett’s work has gained considerable recognition: In 2014, the Kentucky Folk Art Center at Morehead State University curated the exhibit Chester Cornett: Beyond the Narrow Sky.

Above: A painting of the Cincinnati Tudor home the owners lived in for more than twenty years hangs in the entrance.

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Kristan and Eric Burba worked with Chicago- (and now Jackson-) based Northworks Architects + Planners to design a modern farmhouse. “It seemed like a style that was timeless. Something that was über contemporary might fall out of style; also, for this neighborhood, which is older and where houses are traditional, contemporary wouldn’t fit,” Eric says. “But we didn’t want a house that was brown and log. So this is what we came up with.” RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 52


FARMHOUSERising A couple with contemporary style builds their dream home in a traditional neighborhood.

By Maggie Theodora Photography by David Agnello

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W

ould the fireplaces in the home they were building in Shootin’ Iron Ranches be wood-burning or natural gas? Kristan Clarke Burba wanted the convenience of natural gas. Husband Eric Burba wanted the coziness and crackling sound that comes from wood. “We got married, got pregnant, and started building this house—we weren’t together for all that long,” Kristan says. “I was nervous going into this that, being newlyweds, it could destroy us. But in reality it made us stronger faster.” The fireplaces were the biggest disagreement in the design/ build process. “I think we did okay,” Kristan says. Eric, senior vice president of mortgage lending and Jackson branch manager for Guaranteed Rate, had previously flipped three houses. He says that “[this] was the most emotional house I have ever moved into. I started to cry when I walked in. It sank in that this was the culmination of fifteen years of hard work and busting our butts to make this happen, and that this is where we’d live and grow up as a family.” The couple, with then three-year-old daughter Saige, moved into their new house on December 8, 2017, Kristan’s birthday. “It was the best birthday present,” she says. They celebrated—in front of a gas-burning fireplace—with wine and pizza, relaxing afterward on a distressed-leather couch that they brought from their former house in East Jackson. Many houses currently under construction in the valley have a modern farmhouse form. Kristan and Eric’s is one of the first of this type to be built and inhabited here. “It was the style we knew we wanted from the beginning,” says Kristan, who founded and runs Rendezvous Event Management, a boutique public relations company. Eric says, “We both like contemporary design, and I’ve lived in some über contemporary spaces, but I thought this would be something we could grow old with and it wouldn’t go out of style. Also, this is an established neighborhood with more traditional houses. We weren’t going to do log, but were sensitive that this wasn’t the place for something really contemporary.”

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[THIS] WAS THE MOST EMOTIONAL HOUSE I HAVE EVER MOVED INTO. I STARTED TO CRY WHEN I WALKED IN. IT SANK IN THAT THIS WAS THE CULMINATION OF FIFTEEN YEARS OF HARD WORK AND BUSTING OUR BUTTS TO MAKE THIS HAPPEN, AND THAT THIS IS WHERE WE’D LIVE AND GROW UP AS A FAMILY.” [ ERIC BURBA, HOMEOWNER ]

Top: Kristan loves “how open and bright” the kitchen is so much she often finds herself using the island as her home office. The pendants above the island are by Rejuvenation and the chairs are by Cherner Chair Company. The kitchen faucet is an ONO HighFlex faucet by KWC. The kitchen sink, a model by The Galley, isn’t merely a sink, but, thanks to numerous attachments and accessories, a workstation at which Kristan and Eric can prep, cook, serve, entertain, and clean up. Left: Eric found Studio McGee on Instagram and liked the design firm’s style. “When he realized they were in Salt Lake City we thought it might be perfect,” Kristan says. The couple were initially skeptical of the large Restoration Hardware table the firm suggested for the dining room. “We thought that it would be too large and feel too big,” Eric says, “but it ended up being kind of perfect for our needs.” The elk antler chandelier is vintage from Kristan’s family’s house on Cape Cod. “My mom died when I was twenty-five, but my dad kept this,” she says. The couple found it in the barn when they were at the Cape Cod house for their wedding. “We actually hung it up in the barn for an after-party,” Kristan says. “I love that it’s in this house now.” Eric found the 1950s Disques Radio Tele poster at Chicago’s Randolph Steet Market. “I fell in love with it because it’s a character in a lab coat with a big vinyl record head,” Eric says. “I have always collected vinyl and been a DJ and just loved the imagery and colors.” Right: The exterior materials palette includes cedar and granite. 55


When the couple first saw this property, Kristan says they weren’t seriously looking. “I just saw this pop up on the MLS,” she says. “This” was a nearly four-acre lot in Shootin’ Iron Ranches, in the Snake River bottoms southwest of Melody Ranch. “I was happy with our place in East Jackson, but ready for a change, and Eric wanted to get out of town, so we drove down and checked it out.” They liked it, but were a little hesitant. “It was a good price, so we wondered what was wrong with it,” Kristan says, laughing. There was a small hiccup: Prior to the installation of levees on the Snake River, during high water the river would flow through part of the property. “So parts of it were classified as wetlands and there were setbacks because of that,” Eric says. “We had to spend significant money and time on due diligence before we even owned the land.” This was frustrating at the time, but Eric now says, “Because it wasn’t easy to obtain—there was some level of having to earn it—that makes it even more rewarding. I think the due diligence work scared off people who weren’t willing to put in that work. But we liked the detective work.” Kristan and Eric closed on the property the week Saige was born. When Saige was six weeks old, they met architect Austin DePree of Chicago-based Northworks Architects + Planners, which now has a Jackson office. The Burbas said they spoke with and interviewed numerous local architects, and that “everyone wanted to do this style of house, but no one we interviewed had actually done it yet,” Kristan says. “No one had it in their portfolio to show us. Austin did, and that was reassuring. And then when we met him in person, we totally hit it off.” In their finished home, the room the family hung out in the night of Kristan’s birthday is the couple’s favorite space. “I love how open and bright it is,” Kristan says. Eric adds, “There are these huge windows looking out at mountains, and light coming in from every direction. It is the heart of our home.” Standing at the kitchen sink at the opposite end of this space from the stone fireplace, Kristan points out that from that spot, on clear days there’s a beautiful view of the Grand Teton. “We both had ideas of what this house would be like, and the reality is even better,” she says.

In the living room, Kristan and Eric worked with Studio McGee to mix pieces they already had (and loved) with new pieces. The leather couch is one the couple had in their prior home. “We knew we were keeping it,” Kristan says. The chairs, by Brazilian designer Roberta Schilling, were a find by Studio McGee. RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 56


70 S. King St., Jackson, WY 83002 | (307) 699-0133 | office@tkgconstruction.com 57


A RIVER Runs Through IT Not everyone thinks the best views in the valley are of the Tetons.

By Lila Edythe Photography by Tuck Fauntleroy

RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 58


Opposite: Page Bingham loved this townhome at 810 West the first time she saw it. “I just walked in and was like, ‘This is it,’ ” she says. Before moving to Jackson, Bingham and her then-husband spent fourteen years sailing around the Mediterranean Sea, and also lived in Boston, close to the ocean. “Water is hugely important,” she says. Above: Bingham describes her style as “casual yet comfortable, with a little sophistication.” She enjoys combining antiques and modern pieces with items she has collected on her world travels. In the master bedroom are two small paintings by an artist from Hvar, Croatia.

P

age Bingham can sit in her West Jackson townhome and watch birds all day, and also watch Flat Creek flow through her backyard. “So many people think the Tetons are the big views you want to have, but I love the more intimate views,” she says, “especially when they are filled with as much wildlife and live water as I have here.” It was partially because she loves these views so much that a smallish kitchen remodel grew to include the living area and its fireplace. “I love to sit by fires, but the existing fireplace was very dated,” says Bingham. “I wanted to create something I’d love to sit by.” While the update to the kitchen is nice, it is the new fireplace that has transformed the space. “I wanted the fireplace to be sleek, yet not too big to overwhelm the space or one’s eye,” Bingham says. Formerly set unobtrusively into a bamboopaneled wall—to match the bamboo floors—the fireplace is now set in a Venetian plaster wall with a patinaed steel hearth. “It went from something

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that was nice to something I love,” Bingham says. Bingham’s remodel was designer John Martin’s first official project at his own firm, John Martin Design. “I met John through a friend of mine when he was working at WRJ [Design] and he and I eventually became friends,” Bingham says. “I started thinking about updating my kitchen at the same time he was thinking about starting his own firm. I asked him, ‘Why don’t I be your first client?’ ” Bingham’s townhome is one of thirty-six in the 810 West development, between the Teton County Library and Flat Creek. When these dwellings designed by architect Stephen Dynia were finished in 2005, they were unique, both for their modern aesthetic and mix of market, affordable, and employment-based homes. Fastforward a decade though, “and the inside was a little dated,” says Bingham, who lives in one of the market-priced townhomes. “There were these big, recessed lights in the kitchen that drove me crazy.”


Designer John Martin says, “I wanted to pull a bit of the outside architecture to the inside of the space. The exterior of Page’s condo has a lot of lines and edges. It has a very contemporary feel. I wanted a similar feel with the new fireplace and wanted the fireplace to stand out and be dramatic, but at the same time not dominate the space. It needed to be architecture. I felt like I was creating a piece of art in a sense.” RANGE ISSUE EIGHT 60


Above: The owl in Bingham’s dining room is part of a larger collection she started after her father’s death eight years ago. “He loved owls and, since his death, every year in September, the month he died, two owls have frequented my childhood home in Northern California,” she says. Bingham’s mother also has a big collection of owls.

Right: In the passageway between the dining room and the kitchen hangs one of two Chinese ancestor paintings Bingham bought in New York City. (The second one hangs just out of view to the left of the one pictured.) “They’re a man and a woman,” Bingham says. “I would never hang one without the other.”

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When Bingham bought her townhome in 2014, she wasn’t thinking about a remodel. “It was just after living here for a while that I realized there were things I wanted to change,” she says. While Martin reworked the kitchen lighting and the fireplace, the furniture and artwork in the two areas were collected by Bingham, often on her travels to Asia. (Bingham lived in Burma, now Myanmar, for two years while researching a cookbook, A Taste of Shan, about that country’s cuisine.) Prior to moving to Jackson, she and her then-husband lived in a nineteenth-century Greek revival home in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “It was done by a well-known designer from New York City and

was totally different,” she says. “But some of the art from that house came to Jackson with me, and John worked with me to pull things together and make the space flow.” Because Bingham was more interested in a remodel and not redecorating, only two chairs—right in front of the fireplace—were changed out. One of Martin’s goals with the fireplace redesign was to make it a piece of art. “Why does a fireplace have to just be a fireplace?” Martin asks. Bingham adds, “It’s like a sculpture that just happens to have a wonderful function. It’s sleek but not too big to overwhelm the space or one’s eye, yet totally transforms the space. I love that such a relatively small change made such a big difference.”

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Bingham’s home office is a distillation of her style. She bought the baskets on the top shelf while visiting Mombasa, Kenya, almost twenty-five years ago. Bingham bought the yellow desk chair about twenty years ago at a vintage store in Boston. She says, “It’s been everywhere with me!” Truman, her thirteen-year-old beagle, rests in her favorite Togo (by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset) chair. “I love orange and fell in love with this the minute I saw it,” she says.


810 WEST

Meet one of Jackson’s first developments that combine market and deed-restricted housing.

IN 2003, THE TOWN OF Jackson put out a request for proposals (RFP) for a development on the parcel of land that is today 810 West. At the time, this land included an old home, a collection of sheds, and a horse pasture, among other things. “I heard that it had been an oyster farm in the 1960s,” says Greg Prugh, a Jackson native and the project’s eventual developer. At the time the town put out the RFP, Prugh had recently moved back to the valley and had obtained his real estate license. He had been living in Japan and San Francisco, and in both places, he says, “There was such cool, mixed architecture and I was thinking how we could bring some of that to Jackson.” Prugh teamed up with Jackson-based architect Stephen Dynia and the two answered the RFP with an idea that included 50 percent deed-restricted affordable housing based on employment and 50 percent market housing. “Town

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was on board and was a great partner,” Prugh says. “The Town Council and [Town Manager] Bob McLaurin were huge proponents of working through the ideas and seeing it through to completion.” The 810 West project was Prugh and Dynia’s first collaboration. The duo has since collaborated on the Seven Ten Split building (home of Picnic eatery), the Margaret Jaster and Daisy Bush additions in East Jackson, and the Pine Box live/work loft development on Alpine Lane, among others. “Steve is one of the best designers of small spaces I have worked with,” says Prugh, who himself lived at 810 West from 2005 to 2007. At 810 West the goals were “low maintenance and simple design—a space that people wanted to live in and enjoy,” Prugh says. “It was important that it was space that worked, and that it be light, open, and airy.”


HOME sweet HOME

MOVING ON

As told by Colleen Valenstein ∙ Photograph by Cole Buckhart RANGE HAS BEEN SO MUCH fun to create and grow. This is the last issue I was involved with and leaving was such a difficult decision, not only because I love the magazine, but also because my own home life has changed so much during the years I’ve worked on it. In the time I’ve been Range’s art director, my husband, Ethan, and I had two sons, Cormac, who’s now three years old, and Laird, almost one; we sold our house on Crabtree Lane; and moved into a house we built together. Designing and decorating a home while I was working on an architecture and design magazine gave me inspiration. I have realized over the years that there is so much local talent here— people who have started their businesses from scratch and have thrived, and newcomers who have brought big-city mentality and cutting-edge design. It’s really quite impressive for such a small community.

As exciting as it should have been to move into a new house that Ethan and I had been working on since before Cormac was even conceived—honestly, I’ve blocked out much of that time. Laird was two weeks old when we moved into our new house. It’s funny, but looking back, I had these thoughts of spending the first night together among the boxes in our brand new house, but I shared our bedroom with Laird while Ethan slept upstairs in the baby’s room. Now, nearly a year later, this beautiful house has become our home. We have this entire community to thank, as well as the Range family, for the craftsmanship, the advice, the design, the ideas, and the professionalism. — Colleen was the driving force behind the transition of Teton Home & Living into Range magazine and served as Range’s art director until this past June, when she left to pursue a new career as a homeowner relations manager at a local property management firm.

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Range JH: Issue 8  
Range JH: Issue 8  
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