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ISSUE 6 / 2017

ARTISAN —

Schmidt’s Custom Framing NEIGHBORHOOD —

John Dodge DESIGN —

Life Change A San Francisco couple decide to remodel their lives and home.

RangeJH.com

COMPLIMENTARY

Iron Age


S PACK M AN S & AS S O C I AT E S RIVERFRONT RANCH Bar B Bar Ranch, North of Town $17,900,000 72.96 Acres MLS# 16-776

BRANDON STEPHANIE DAVE LIZ BABBS


Jackson Hole Sothebyʼs International Realtyʼs #1 Real Estate Team

FALL CREEK VIEW HOME .73 ACRES 4 BEDS | 4.5 BATHS | 5,846 SF $5,200,000, MLS# 17-767

Rivermeadows, South of Wilson

ELEGANT PINES ESTATE 2.25 ACRES 4 BEDS | 4.5 BATHS | 8,467 SF $7,950,000, MLS# 15-1364

Teton Pines Country Club, Wilson

MOUNTAIN SKI HOME .87 ACRES 5 BEDS | 5.5 BATHS | 7,616 SF $10,250,000, MLS# 16-1978

Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, Teton Village For more information on these or any other property in Jackson Hole, please call or email.

WWW.SPACKMANSINJH.COM SPACKMANS@JHSIR.COM 307. 739.8156


TABLE OF CONTENTS features

page 58

44 —

LIFE CHANGE

While remodeling their vacation home in the valley, a San Francisco couple decide to remodel their lives as well, by making the home—and Jackson Hole—their main residence. By Lila Edythe

52 —

A DIFFERENT TAKE

Where everyone else saw a tear-down, Lauren and Chris Dickey saw their future home. By Maggie Theodora

MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE

Homes at Shooting Star might look similar on the outside, but inside they showcase owners’ styles and lifestyles. By Dina Mishev

RANGE ISSUE SIX 2

Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy

58 —


ARCHITECTS | ENGINEERS 1 1 1 0 M A P L E W AY J A C K S O N , W Y | 3 0 7 . 7 3 3 . 9 9 5 5 | H O Y T C TA . H O U Z Z . C O M


26

TABLE OF CONTENTS departments

34

30

16 12

40

10 / WHAT INSPIRES ME Jacque Jenkins-Stireman, interior designer

30 / ARCHITECTURE: FORM-FITTING “Bending” a home in Wilson maximizes views without breaking up the main form.

12 / FAVORITES What we want this season

32 / ON THE MARKET Properties currently for sale, from $529K to $10 million +

16 / MUST HAVE: WHIMSY Designers share ways to add fun to any decor.

34 / SHOPPING TRIP: NEW YORK CITY An insider’s guide to the ultimate big-city getaway

18 / NEIGHBORHOOD: JOHN DODGE This exclusive subdivision has humble beginnings.

40 / DESIGN: IRON AGE While much has changed in the kitchen in the last 150 years, cast-iron cookware endures.

20 / TEN TIPS: LET THERE BE LIGHT Valley architects and designers offer tips for lighting your home.

64 / HOME SWEET HOME Twenty-somethings sign their first lease in the valley.

26 / ARTISAN: HARVEY AND MARY SCHMIDT It’s not necessarily just what’s inside a frame that’s a work of art.

ON THE COVER Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy RANGE ISSUE SIX 4


FISH CREEK RIDGE

5 BD | 5.5 BR | 4,923 SF | 2.24 AC | $5,200,000

Inspired by a mountain lifestyle with a sleek refined edge. Overlooking Fish Creek and Sleeping Indian. MERCEDES COLLIN HUFF VAUGHN JILL

LAURIE

SASSI-NEISON HUFF #1 team for sales transactions in 2016 2015 & 2016 - Realtor of the Year

theTEAM@jhsir.com | 307.203.3000 | mercedeshuff.com


A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

Photograph by Ryan Dorgan

THIS SUMMER—AUGUST 5, to be exact—was my twentieth anniversary of living in Jackson. My coming-to-the-valley story is the usual one: I arrived after college to ski for one year. At the end of that year, I planned to return East to go to law school. I never went to law school, or left Jackson. My reason for not leaving Jackson Hole is as common as my reason for coming in the first place: I fell in love with this valley—the landscape, the wildlife, the possibility for adventure, the community, the culture, and the amenities. (I’ll spare you the details of my reasons for never going to law school.) Jackson Hole does that to people. Those who live here love the area for as many different reasons as there are dories floating the Snake on a bluebird August morning. What matters most is that we all love this place. While Range focuses on the best architecture and design happening in the area, my goal as editor is bigger than merely showcasing interesting and gorgeous homes: I seek to use the architecture and design as windows into why and how people love Jackson Hole and, since this isn’t an easy place to live— it’s expensive, it can be difficult to get to, and good careers are hard to come by—how they make it their home. “A Different Take” (p. 52) reveals why thirty-somethings Lauren and Chris Dickey love Jackson and also how they made the move from a condo to a home here, which became important after their daughter, Harper, was born in May 2016 and the rent on Chris’ office space suddenly doubled. The couple bought and remodeled—while Lauren was pregnant— what everyone else thought was a tear-down in East Jackson. “We didn’t really know what we were getting ourselves into, but now that it’s done, I’m so glad we did so much ourselves,” Chris says. “Having put in the time and effort, we’re so much more tied to it and the valley.” Chad and Edward didn’t do the physical remodeling of their West Gros Ventre Butte home themselves (“Life Change,” p. 44), and they still have a small place in San Francisco (where they moved from to Jackson Hole), but after talking to them about this valley and their home here, it’s obvious the couple have strong feelings for both. We have strong feelings (love, love, love!) about the fact that most everything—from an oversize mug shaped and painted to look like a pirate’s head on the bar in the great room to a

collection of Fornasetti plates hanging near the dining table—in their house is tied to memories, whether of family or from their travels. Their house is full of personality. In this issue’s “Must Have” department (“Whimsy,” p. 16), several local design professionals offer up ideas and items that would add some personality to your home. As usual, in “Favorites” (p. 12), we share some products we want for our own homes because we love them so much. And, of course, I hope you love this issue of Range as much as I’ve loved putting it together.

– Dina Mishev

RANGE ISSUE SIX 6

@dinamishev


Jackson, Wyoming Denver, Colorado

| |

307.733.3766 303.339.9910 dynia.com


CONTRIBUTORS

No one has made cast-iron skillets as interesting as JOOHEE MUROMCEW in her article for this issue’s Design department (“Iron Age,” p. 40). A freelance writer living in Jackson Hole with her husband and four children, Muromcew also wrote this issue’s Artisan department (“Framed,” p. 26). In addition to Range, she writes for Condé Nast Traveler, Departures, Town & Country, and City Secrets: Paris, and serves on the board of directors of the Teton Science Schools. Muromcew is currently at work on her first novel, The Goodyears.

For the last three issues, journalist MARK HUFFMAN has reported the magazine’s Neighborhood department, which takes a look at the history and development of one specific area of Jackson Hole. He has previously written about The Aspens (Issue 3), the Gill Addition (Issue 4), and Rafter J (Issue 5). For this edition, Huffman, who also writes for Jackson Hole magazine and edits copy for the Jackson Hole News&Guide, delves into the West Bank’s John Dodge neighborhood (p. 18).

PUBLISHER Kevin Olson ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Adam Meyer EDITOR Dina Mishev ART DIRECTOR Colleen Valenstein COPY EDITOR Pamela Periconi CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lila Edythe Mark Huffman Joohee Muromcew Jeremy Pugh Maggie Theodora CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS David Agnello Cole Buckhart Tuck Fauntleroy

ADVERTISING SALES Deidre Norman - deidre@tetonmediaworks.com

page 52 RANGE ISSUE SIX 8

Lydia Redzich

Kyra Griffin

AD DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Sarah Grengg Colleen Valenstein DISTRIBUTION Hank Smith Jeff Young

Russell Thompson

Range magazine is published twice yearly. P.O. Box 7445, Jackson, WY 83002 (307) 732-5900 / RangeJH.com © 2017 Teton Media Works. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this magazine’s original contents, whether in whole or part, requires written permission from the publisher.

Photograph lower left by Tuck Fauntleroy

JEREMY PUGH gives us the inside scoop on New York City in this issue’s “Shopping Trip: New York City” (p. 34). Although Pugh knows New York inside and out, his home base is Salt Lake City—he has authored the book 100 Things to Do in Salt Lake City Before You Die and is the former editor of Salt Lake magazine. Pugh’s writing also appears in SKI, Sunset, Utah Style & Design, and Salt Lake magazines. His book is available on Amazon and at VeryDynamite.com, and he invites you to share your SLC experiences on Twitter at @100ThingsSLC.


www.shawwyoming.com

Trust. Value. Insight. Build On.

Chase Beninga Managing Partner

460 South Cache Jackson Hole, WY 307-733-8401


WHAT INSPIRES ME

JACQUE JENKINS-STIREMAN Principal designer at Jacque Jenkins-Stireman

By Dina Mishev ∙ Portrait by David Agnello

SCENIC MESA – BUFFALO LEATHER CUBE My father is a clothing and shoe designer; he worked a lot in leather. Now he owns a leather and textile company that designs and manufactures tack, custom saddlery, and leather goods, and sells hides. I thought about bringing some of his material into furniture. I designed these custom bison leather cubes with exposed stitching with Scenic Mesa. They are one of a kind and, because of the craftsmanship behind them, will last forever. These work in different-style homes, too. The bison hide and stitch is a nod to the Mountain West, but the lines can be really contemporary. Price upon request, scenicmesa.com

SPANISH OAK AND LUCITE TABLE I’m over walnut; I prefer Spanish oak. It is just refreshing, and it works well when I’m looking to use organic materials in a more contemporary way. For example, a Spanish oak slab—it’s rustic and organic, but elegant. Pair it with Lucite, like we did in this custom dining table, and the juxtaposition of the slab’s mass and the appearance that it’s floating in space (since the Lucite practically disappears) is intriguing. Details upon request RANGE ISSUE SIX 10

ALPACA SHAWL My niece gave me this alpaca shawl one Christmas, and it has become a year-round wardrobe staple. It is versatile—from a blanket on an airplane to something I wear to work. Hand-crafted in Austin, Texas, the shawl’s fabric is undyed and soft. The darn thing is pajamas half the time. To purchase: Armadillo Christmas Bazaar in Austin, Texas INTERIOR DESIGNER Jacque Jenkins-Stireman “loves the feeling when I get home—when my feet hit the dirt, and I can let out a deep breath.” JenkinsStireman wants her clients to love coming home, too. But she doesn’t want them or their guests to love a sofa or chair she selected too much. “You never want to get in an architect’s way,” she says. “If someone walks into a room I did and says, ‘I love that sofa,’ that would be bad. We’re less furniture and more supporting the architecture.” A native of California, Jenkins-Stireman moved to Jackson Hole twenty years ago and immediately opened her own design studio, Inside Design. It has evolved over the years. “When I first came here from the Southern California area, white was my favorite color,” she says. “But in Jackson, I quickly learned that there are shades of white and also greens, reds, blues, browns, and grays that can be neutral. Jenkins-Stireman says her front porch— she loves front porches, and they are often the first part of any project that she tackles—is a favorite example of neutrals playing with bold colors. “The view from it is full of the organic bold neutrals that I’ve become a big fan of,” she says. Read on for other things that inspire Jenkins-Stireman.

SIMON PEARCE STEMWARE AND DAKOTA SHY CABERNET SAUVIGNON Simon Pearce has built a brand by creating timeless pieces that can be used in everyday life. The classic stemware has a sturdy base and elegant wide bowl, perfect for a deepbodied California cabernet. I like glasses with stems. When we feel like splurging, the frontrunner is Napa Valley winemaker Dakota Shy. It’s low-production with limited release, so their cabs do sell out. We explored the estate quite a bit over the years, and it’s a small operation—just two guys and a golden retriever, and they produce some of the best wine. Stemware from $65, simonpearce.com; wine from $89.99, dakotashywine.com


LOOK DOWN Twenty Two Home has been getting into vintage Peruvian wool rugs and modern Turkish and Moroccan kilims. “They’re just different, and they’re beautiful,” says owner and interior designer Elisa Chambers, and we agree. The white and off-white kilims are especially striking, and the colors—from natural dyes—in the Peruvian pieces are rich and bold, despite being decades old. From $625, Twenty Two Home, 45 E. Deloney, 307/733-9922, twentytwohome.com

BEAUTY IN SIMPLICITY Taiwan-based Tools to Liveby creates desk accessories that highlight the beauty in common things. Sometimes the company does its own designs, like brass scissors and pens. Other times it resurrects forgotten classics, like brass paperclips from the early 1900s. A pile of paper never looked as good as when wearing an “owl” (1908), “ideal” (1903), or “mogul” (1918) style paperclip. From $14, Paper and Grace, 55 Glenwood St., 307/733-8900, paperandgrace.com

ORIGAMI OR KAYAK? As much a work of art as of engineering and design, Oru Kayak’s original foldable kayak (the Bay ST) is in the permanent collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The company’s Beach LT model was improved in 2017. Its hull is still made from a custom polypropylene with a ten-year UV treatment, and it still takes only about three minutes to assemble (and it can still be folded down so that you can carry in on your back and keep it stored in a small closet), but the cockpit has been expanded to make it more comfortable and easier to use. String Lake has never seen such style. $1,299, orukayak.com

CATCH-ALL There’s never been a cuter way to tidy up in the kids’ room than Petit Pehr’s Noah’s Ark hamper. The 18-x-20-inch, 100 percent cotton canvas hamper can hold everything from dirty clothes to books and craft supplies. Outside, all you see are illustrations based on the classic tale. $95, Scandia Down, 165 Center St., 307/733-1038, scandiahome.com

CHEERS Because your whiskey deserves to look good, consider putting it in a flask covered in leather or emblazoned with a Jackson Hole Mountain Resort trail map, a bucking bronco, or “83001,” Jackson’s zip code. From $26, MADE, 125 N. Cache St., 307/690-7957, madejacksonhole.com

Photography by (kilim and flasks) Cole Buckhart

FAVORITES


T H E S PA C E W I T H I N

DEFINE becomes the reality of the building. space. T H E SYour PA C E WITHIN

becomes the reality of the building. –Frank Lloyd Wright –Frank Lloyd Wright

STUDIO@JJSTIREMANDESIGN.COM | 307-739-3008

jjstiremandesign.com 307-739-3008 307-739-3008jacque@jjstiremandesign.com jjstireman@wyoming.com jjstiremandesign.com


FAVORITES

STUFFED ANIMALS Looking for something fun for the wall in your kids’ room? Fairgame’s Wildlife plush mounts include skunks, deer, bears, moose, mountain goats, and more. Each comes with grooming tips and a spirit message like “Work hard. Don’t ever give up.” From $19.99, Jackson Hole Toy Store, 165 Center St., 307/734-2663, jacksonholetoystore.com

SNOW SHOWER The brainchild of longtime valley local Johnny Verdon, Powder Curtains brings the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort winter trail map into your shower. Other ski areas will be coming— not that you’d want the trail map of any other resort hanging in your Jackson Hole home. $60, 307/734-8885, powdercurtains.com

AFFORDABLE ART For a Donna Howell-Sickles painting, you have to go to Mountain Trails Gallery. And spend thousands of dollars. We love her work—she specializes in colorful cowgirls— reprinted on affordable coffee mugs and serving platters. From $19.99, Willow Creek Interior Design, 115 E. Broadway, 307/733-7868, willowcreekhf.com

“She’s a total soap geek,” says Paper and Grace manager Cassie Dean of the Washingtonbased soap maker behind the bespoke bars the shop sells. These soaps are gorgeous and made from natural ingredients. Scents come from pure essential oils and include black sugar, almond, lemongrass, coconut lime, honeysuckle and fig, and 1851. The formulation and fragrance of the last soap, which is a warm blend of citrus and spice, was a favorite of Napoleon and Queen Victoria’s, and used by troops fighting in the Civil War. $6, Paper and Grace, 55 Glenwood St., 307/7338900, paperandgrace.com

SPELL IT OUT Whatever it is you want to say at your next party, it’ll look best when spelled out in gold letter balloons. From $3/letter, Paper and Grace, 55 Glenwood St., 307/733-8900, paperandgrace.com

RANGE ISSUE SIX 14

Photography by (mount, platter/coffee mug, and soaps) Cole Buckhart

COMING CLEAN


PO Box 642 970 W Broadway #216 Jackson, WY 83001 Phone - 307-734-5245 info@jhbuildersinc.com www.jhbuildersinc.com


MUST HAVE

WHIMSY

By Lila Edythe

“WHIMSY” MIGHT BE simultaneously the most desired and feared element of interior design. “I think people like their interiors to have a little bit of the unexpected—where everything isn’t matchy-matchy,” says Kristin Fay, an owner/ designer at Trauner Fay Designs. But the unexpected always

comes with a bit of risk. “It requires some sense of adventure,” says Fay, who doesn’t typically use the term “whimsy” with clients, preferring instead “contrasting” or “eclectic.” Whatever it’s called, these whimsical favorites of area designers show you can add flair without having to redo your existing aesthetic.

Lights Take Flight Interior designer Hayden Jones, who owns Victor, Idaho’s Festive Living boutique, likes when clients are up for incorporating “fun, quirky things that add a design element,” she says. The paper mache Funky Chunky Bird Sconce is available in eleven colors, from white to Bahaman Sea Blue and hot pink. $435, Festive Living, 13 S. Main St., Victor, Idaho, 208/787-3378

Sweet Scent “Whimsy is a little bit about breaking the rules,” says Megan Griswold, the Jackson Hole- and Venice, California-based writer/designer and founder/curator of the lifestyle website Little Moving Spaces. “Incense has this reputation of being a crunchy, hippie thing,” she says. “But Fornasetti Profumi’s Flora incense is high-fashion and elegant—it’s unexpected.” $73, artedona.com

Trays For All Types Made Goods’ Frans Tray Set is an easy way to add some whimsy to an already done space. Because of its neutral color and rustic/ modern style, this set of two trays works on any coffee table or sideboard. $510, madegoods.com

Fun Geometry This Icosahedron Coffee Table “has such an unusual shape, it’s a statement piece in a living room— something you’ve probably never seen before, which is why it’s so perfect,” Jones says. $3,000, Festive Living, 13 S. Main St., Victor, Idaho, 208/787-3378 RANGE ISSUE SIX 16

Pillow Talk Fay says the youthful colors on this wool, cotton, and chindi Loloi pillow (P0094) are “bold without being overwhelming, giving it a timeless feel.” $119 (with a down insert), available through Trauner Fay Designs, 307/733-0902, loloirugs.com


Waiting in the Wires It’s hard not to smile when you see Kettal’s Cala chair. Its dimensions are majestic, but still, “It’s a fun play on a traditional wingback,” Fay says. $6,019, available through Trauner Fay Designs, 307/733-0902, kettal.com

BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPES START HERE

Swing Time “Whimsy taps into childhood pleasures and that’s what a swing does,” Griswold says. The Svvving, designed for indoor use, does it in style with wooden seats and cushioned textiles. $1,058, svvving.com

A Key Piece “Who doesn’t need a red rhino keychain with a blue tassel in their life?” asks John Frechette, who cofounded Mountain Dandy in 2014. “Sage [Craighead’s] animal keychains are all one of a kind, with combinations of color and funk.” $12, Penny Lane Cooperative, 185 Scott Ln., 307/203-2323, pennylanecooperative.com

Landscaping & Design Excavation • Rock & Pavers Water Features Maintenance & Irrigation

A Moveable Soak Meet the world’s only woodburning, mobile outdoor pool: the Weltevree Dutchtub Original. “This makes the everyday—a hot tub— playful,” Griswold says. From $6,000, littlemovingspaces.com 208.354.8816 • 2389 S. Hwy 33 • Driggs, ID

www.mdlandscapinginc.com Open Year Round 9-6 Monday – Saturday

17


NEIGHBORHOOD

JOHN DODGE

JOHN DODGE WHEN VALLEY RANCHER Earl Hardeman wanted to expand his operation in the 1970s, he looked at the land along the west bank of the Snake River that is now the John Dodge subdivision. It was about 800 acres, dry and scrubby except in the years when high water flooded it. In country where the land is harsh and getting anything out of it unlikely, Hardeman, a descendant of homesteaders, didn’t want any part of this area, recalls longtime Jackson Hole real estate agent and developer Bland Hoke. As Hoke remembers, Hardeman pronounced the John Dodge area “the craziest piece of property I’ve ever seen.” Hoke says, “It had no value to him.” But Hoke himself saw value. In the 1970s he was selling condos at the Racquet Club, now The Aspens, across Highway 390, and thought John Dodge, named after its original homesteader (see sidebar), looked like a nice place for a subdivision. It was near Jackson Hole Mountain Resort and bordered the Snake River. A dike built along the river by the Army Corps of Engineers in the 1950s

This exclusive subdivision has humble beginnings.

By Mark Huffman ∙ Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy

kept high water (in all but the highest years) at bay. In the late 1970s, Hoke approached Dodge’s nephew, Hunter Scott, a Fresno, California, advertising man who used to spend time each summer on his uncle’s land with his wife. Scott had, after a long battle about the title, inherited the land from his uncle. Dodge had done little with his acreage beyond what the Homesteading Act required. He built a small cabin and planted some grass for a half-dozen cattle and as many horses. (By the time Scott spent time each summer here, the log cabin was in disrepair, so he and his wife stayed in a trailer on the land.) Hoke saw the little work Dodge put into the land as an opportunity. “I knew it was a unique piece of land; it was totally untouched,” he says.

IN 1980, WHEN HOKE WAS SELLING LOTS FOR $150,000, A PROSPECTIVE BUYER TOLD HIM, “BLAND, YOU’RE CRAZY. YOU’LL NEVER GET THAT.”

RANGE ISSUE SIX 18


there’s little turnover. From selling Racquet Club units he knew that This past June, Kurt Harland, owner/broker “people liked their condos, but they wanted some at Brokers of Jackson Hole, the local Berkshireland. ... I had a good sense there was a demand for Hathaway real estate affiliate, had the only John it.” It was the first big-lot subdivision of its type in Dodge house listed on the market: a 5,500-squareJackson Hole. foot house and guesthouse for $4.295 million. At first Scott didn’t want to sell, though. He “There’s not much available out there,” Harland didn’t even want to talk. But an intermediary says. “There’ll be something that goes on the finally got Hoke in Scott’s door, and Scott market and then nothing for a long time. People admitted that “it’s stupid I have all this land.” He tend to hang onto the [John Dodge] properties finally decided to let it go, but only bit by bit. “He longer than not.” Harland agrees with Hoke that would never sell more than forty acres to me” at over the years more of the homes have become a time, Hoke remembers. Hoke bought the first vacation places, but said it’s still a fine place forty and divided them into 6 six-acre lots in to live. “I love the area, the proximity to Teton 1978. The same thing happened to the second Village and to The Aspens. It’s kind of its own forty acres two years later. (Hoke himself built a little hideaway,” he says. “I would love to raise house in these second forty acres; he and his wife my family there. It’s a great neighborhood, with still live in that house.) The lots sold for $150,000. plenty of privacy and limited traffic.” The biggest bit was the fifth parcel, officially John Today there are few open lots, and a sale of Dodge 5th Filing, which consisted of 137 acres a home here often means a rebuild because of that Hoke divided into sixty lots. Hoke eventually sharply higher prices over the years. In 1980, bought about 600 of Dodge’s 800 acres, from when Hoke was selling lots for $150,000, a which he created about one hundred lots that prospective buyer told him, “Bland, you’re crazy. ranged from three acres to six. The last parcel You’ll never get that.” He recently sold that same was subdivided in the early 1990s. Two other buyer the same lot she looked at in 1980, albeit developers took smaller parts of the ranch and with a house, for $5.5 million. She plans to knock created their own subdivisions. the house down and build anew. Scott made it easy for Hoke to buy his land. John Dodge was the first big step in Hoke’s His terms were 10 percent down and a signature career, which later included many other on a thirty-year note. “He was willing to wait development projects, including recently for his money,” Hoke says, and “that allowed me to be able to do it.” Scott’s patience for payment wasn’t the only unorthodox aspect of this subdivision: His method was to — talk out the deal and then tell JOHN DODGE HOMESTEADED 800 acres of the west bank of the Snake River in Hoke, “You send me the money 1902, when you paid a filing fee and promised to improve the land. He was and I’ll send you a deed.” the odd son of a wealthy Iowa family and had some kind of breakdown after Hoke walked the land—“you going to Harvard. His kin sent him West. He was a “remittance man,” paid by couldn’t get through a lot of it” his family to stay away. because of the thick sage and In the valley, Dodge earned a reputation as an eccentric. He lived alone. He brush and trees—and laid out showed up when there was a horse race but always finished poorly, and rode the streets. He named the main broncs in the rodeo but was always thrown. He was known to stand outside street John Dodge Road and naked in the winter and bathe from a bucket of well water. He paid kids to the rest after wildflowers and bring him squirrels for the coyote pups he adopted. bushes: Goldeneye, Goatsbeard, A neighbor, Lawrence Cheney, once passed by Dodge’s place and saw Phlox, Foxglove, Steershead, him behind a plow, reading a book as four mules wandered around plowing Stonecrop, Prairiesmoke, and random, meandering furrows. Cheney pointed out that the mules—Hobo, Bobo, Yellow Bell. New at the time, Brownie, and Jack—could use some direction. Dodge’s reply: “Oh, it all has to each lot had an approved be plowed anyway, they’ll get it.” Dodge lived into his nineties, dying in 1958. building envelope chosen to keep the development from looking crowded and also to completed commercial space on Gregory Lane in preserve views. The development’s covenants west Jackson. With Scott’s easy financing terms, banned fences. Although built to keep the area Hoke was able to buy the land and turn it around from flooding, the Snake River Dike along the quickly for lot sales. He never had much money subdivision’s eastern boundary is a nice place invested. He put in a lot of work, but says now to bike and walk. Hoke had several accesses to it that being the man who developed one of the built for the use of property owners. valley’s more exclusive subdivisions was “all luck Hoke saw John Dodge as a neighborhood ... being in the right place at the right time.” That where people would live year-round, and he and being in Jackson at the end of one era and thinks there’s still some of that. But now you the start of another, when land was available and don’t see as many young kids, he says, and more deals informal. “You can’t do now what we did of the houses are vacation homes. The area is back then,” Hoke says. much busier in summer than in winter, and

THE ORIGINAL JOHN DODGE

19

Seasonal Home & Garden Décor Full Service Florist Unique Gifts

208.354.8816 • 2389 S. Hwy 33 • Driggs, ID

www.mdlandscapinginc.com Open Year Round 9-6 Monday – Saturday


TEN TIPS

LET THERE BE

LIGHT

Valley architects and designers share their tips for lighting your home.

By Maggie Theodora LIKE MANY THINGS in design, good lighting can be difficult to describe, but you know it when you see it. The same goes for bad lighting, although that is often easy to describe. For instance, fluorescent lighting is horrible. While a lighting engineer is a thing now—and worth the money if you can afford one when designing a space—thanks to the following tips, you can brighten up your home on your own.

CLIENTS CAME TO DESIGNER NANETTE MATTEI LOOKING TO ADD WARMTH TO THIS MASTER BEDROOM. “I DON’T KNOW THAT I’D EVER LOWERED THE CEILING IN A SPACE BEFORE,” SAYS MATTEI, WHO PREVIOUSLY WORKED AS AN ART CONSULTANT IN NEW YORK CITY AND ALSO FOR THE HOME FURNISHINGS COMPANY KRAVET. “BUT IT WAS JUST SO HIGH, WHICH MADE IT ECHOEY. ALSO, THERE WASN’T ENOUGH WARMTH IN THE ROOM.” IN ADDITION TO LOWERING THE CEILING TO MEET THE CLIENTS’ REQUEST TO WARM UP THE ROOM, MATTEI USED LIGHTING. These clients have a great art collection, so we installed some LEDs specifically to light up pieces of their collection. The existing lighting didn’t have any order. Now the lighting in the room is functional on multiple levels.

We put recessed LED lights in the hardwood ceiling and cast some of them to show off the craftsmanship of it. It’s really spectacular. 1

2

This room has windows on both sides, so it gets flooded with natural light in the morning and afternoon. It’s because of all this natural light that I was able to go with a little darker design palette. I do love drapes, and here they allow in (or keep out) as much light as wanted. They also add warmth to the room.

Photograph courtesy Nanette Mattei

3

I love three layers of lighting, and running 4 both horizontally and vertically. Each layer functions differently, and together they subtly add interest to a space. RANGE ISSUE SIX 20


TEN TIPS

Choose centerpiece lighting as an aesthetic focal point. Here, a strong perpendicular reflects the architecture’s dramatic beams, and the fixture’s grand scale and lower placement brings the living area into focus.

A dimmer switch for strategically placed wall sconces ensures the right level of overall illumination, creating atmosphere without stealing the show.

1

2

Natural light boosts mood and helps colors pop. Sheer window treatments can diffuse too-bright sunshine. 3

Pair floor lamps for the classic appeal of symmetry—and to double as adjustable task lighting, which is crucial for reading.

THE LAYERING OF LUSH TEXTURES AND SUBTLE COLORS IS A SIGNATURE ELEMENT OF WRJ DESIGN’S SOPHISTICATED YET COMFORTABLE INTERIORS. THAT SAME LAYERING APPROACH IS IMPORTANT TO A ROOM’S LIGHTING, SAYS THE FIRM’S PRESIDENT AND COFOUNDER, RUSH JENKINS: “MULTIPLE LIGHT SOURCES ARE KEY; CONSIDER THE RHYTHM AND PATTERN OF CAST LIGHT AND SHADOWS FOR THE BEST RESULTS.” RANGE ISSUE SIX 22

Photograph courtesy WRJ Design

4


SNAKERIVERINTERIORS.COM 164 EAST DELONEY AVE, JACKSON, WY | 307-733-3005

TWENTYTWOHOME.COM 45 EAST DELONEY AVE, JACKSON, WY | 307-733-9922


TEN TIPS

DESIGN ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS WAS ONE OF THE VALLEY’S FIRST ARCHITECTURE FIRMS WHEN IT OPENED IN THE LATE 1960S. CHRISTOPHER LEE, WHO TOOK OVER THE FIRM FROM HIS FATHER IN 2000, SAYS, “LIGHTING HAS BECOME A BIG DEAL, AND OUR OPTIONS HAVE REALLY IMPROVED.”

1

LEDs came out about ten years ago, but they were so expensive. They’re more affordable now, and they’re all we really use anymore. Because they don’t run as hot as halogens, we can now put recessed lighting in vaulted ceilings. Because they last for ten-plus years, we’re putting lights in hard-to-reach places since you don’t need to worry about replacing the bulb.

People don’t really like interior bathrooms very well, no matter how good the lighting is. I always try to get a bathroom on an outside wall. The quality of natural light is as good as it gets. 2 3

5

There’s no practical benefit to lights at the toe kick, but they’re fun and look cool. The toe kick is usually a shadowy thing and lighting it kind of makes the vanity look like it’s floating a bit. 4

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People used to prefer halogen lights in high-end homes—they’re bright and have a great color. Fluorescents are blue, a terrible color of light. Incandescents are perfect—soft and white like a candle. Early LEDs had a problem getting a warm color, but if halogens are a 10, today LEDs are a 9.5.

Photograph courtesy Design Associates Architects

In a bathroom, you have to hit a technical aspect—you have to have a certain amount of light in the room in the right places. At the vanity, you don’t want only lights from above because then you’ll be getting shadows while you’re in front of the mirror. A sconce is the perfect way to do vanity light.


R E TA I L S TO R E

STOCKTONANDSHIRK.COM

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(307) 733-0274

DESIGN FIRM

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745 W. BROADWAY

|

JACKSON, WY


ARTISAN

FRAMED HARVEY SCHMIDT ASKS ME to hold out my hand so I can touch the gold leaf. Each square of it rests between pages of paper and comes from a beautifully labeled box that reminds me of the Farmacia Santa Maria Novella in Florence, Italy. Harvey picks up a leaf with the brush of his gilder’s tip and explains, “You can’t touch twenty-two-karat gold leaf with your hands. The moisture and warmth will destroy it.” Even before it reaches my fingers, the delicate leaf seizes up and disintegrates into flakes into my notebook. Such is the ephemeral finish to this old craft as practiced by Harvey, who owns Schmidt’s Custom Framing with his wife of over forty years, Mary.

It’s not necessarily just what’s inside a frame that’s a work of art.

By Joohee Muromcew ∙ Photography by Cole Buckhart

The Schmidts moved to the valley from Montana in the mid-1980s, seeing in Jackson’s robust arts culture a viable market for a frame shop with an eye toward fine art framing. Their work ranges from high school diplomas to hand-carved, hand-gilded frames for important works of fine art, though Mary considers all of their work to be “custom,” as every frame is cut, joined, and finished inhouse. Mary recalls an impressive Tom Gilleon painting they framed a few years ago for a collector. A massive eightby-four-foot work, its owner desired an equally distinctive frame. Harvey gilded the entire floating frame by hand— not just the front but the whole frame, an extravagance of detail that speaks to the importance of the frame as a completion of the artwork in its owner’s eyes. The idea that a painting by a renowned artist can be RANGE ISSUE SIX 26


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ARTISAN

uplifted by its frame is key to the Schmidts’ passion for their work. Both come from an arts background and spend their free time traveling the world’s art museums to study frames. Trips to the Louvre and Musée d’Orsay in Paris, the Legion of Honor in San Francisco, and the Denver Art Museum have informed their eye for detail and subtlety. About 10 percent of their customers ask for a true custom frame. The Schmidts begin by first considering the artwork itself, but also ask about the home’s interiors, the furnishings, and the lighting. Many contemporary works call for a floating frame, where the painting appears to be suspended in its frame. Other works call for more richness of detail. Harvey begins with a template made of basswood, a softer hardwood in the poplar tree family that is very stable and easy to carve. He carves a design of his own or is inspired by frame designs he keeps in a library of images. A layer of rabbit skin glue is applied, followed by up to six layers of gesso, necessary for the gold leaf to adhere to. Then a clay “bole,” either yellow or red, is applied and polished with agate burnishing stones. The bole is dampened with gilder’s “liquor” (Harvey uses a mixture of Everclear alcohol and distilled water), and then the individual sheets of twentytwo-karat gold leaf are applied with the gilder’s tip. Although twelve-

RANGE ISSUE SIX 28


karat gold is silvery in appearance, it is still gold. The leaf seems to immediately melt onto the surface of the frame, draping weightlessly into the carvings and grooves. Additional burnishing can reveal a rich patina with some of that yellow or red bole revealing itself. Harvey finishes with a lacquer or shellac, depending on the style of the artwork and frame. For a two-by-three-foot piece of art, this kind of custom work could cost up to $4,000 and take up to two weeks just on the gilding. Pricing comes down with fewer intricacies to the frame, though even with a much simpler frame, expect to pay for the Schmidts’ careful attention to detail: perfectly sanded surfaces and corners so precisely joined and finished that they seem to disappear. [ HARVEY SCHMIDT, OWNER, On a recent trip to the Buffalo SCHMIDT’S CUSTOM FRAMING ] Bill Museum in Cody, one framed painting in its galleries in particular fascinated Harvey. He later woke up in the middle of the night when he realized it was his frame adorning this important painting in a seminal museum of western art. Harvey could only smile and think to himself, “Nice frame!”

“YOU CAN’T TOUCH TWENTY-TWO-KARAT GOLD LEAF WITH YOUR HANDS. THE MOISTURE AND WARMTH WILL DESTROY IT.”

Schmidt’s Custom Framing, 307/733-2306

Don’t bank on it, guarantee it! Don’t use a local bank to get a home loan. Call your local mortgage expert instead!

Benefits of working with me include: • The only originator in the region recognized as a National Mortgage News 2016 Top Producer*

• 15-plus years of mortgage experience • Digital process for signing and document gathering.

• 24/7 client communication

Contact me to corral a low, low rate on your home loan.

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ARCHITECTURE

FORM-FITTING “Bending” this house maximizes views without breaking up the main form.

By Maggie Theodora

MASTER

OFFICE

KITCHEN / DINING / LIVING OFFICE

BED 1

BED 2

GARAGE

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5 0

10

20

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“I THINK IT IS HARDER to make a single building than to put buildings here and there and connect them,” says architect Stephen Dynia. A Dynia-designed home in Wilson’s Schofield Patent subdivision rises to this challenge. People building homes in Jackson Hole often want specific views from specific rooms. Dynia says it is because of this that homes are often “pavilionized” (buildings connected to other buildings). The couple designing and building this home wanted to sit in the living room and see a certain canyon in the foreground and the Grand Teton in the distance. Dynia didn’t want to do pavilions. “We spent a lot of time bending the house to get the views they wanted,” Dynia says. “I call it a ‘faceted snake.’ It is one building, but you’re looking at different parts of the landscape, and each room has a slightly different relationship to the line of the mountains. Once we decided on a strategy where we could just bend the house where we needed to, the objective was to get the best views from each room and not be limited by orthogonal geometry.” This snake has three facets. The center one, which is an open kitchen, dining, and living room bookended by his and her offices, is the largest. Since the views from this section are the main ones the couple were interested in, its northern aspect is mostly glass. The offices were put at either end of

Renderings and floor plan courtesy Dynia Architects

SQUARE FEET: 5,000 | BEDROOMS: 3 | BATHS: 3.5 | LOT ACREAGE: 3.5 | COMPLETION DATE: SPRING 2018


Brad Overton

ALTAMIRA FINE ART

“THE SINGULAR STRATEGY OF BENDING THE PLAN AT KEY LOCATIONS RESULTS IN A SIMPLICITY RICH IN ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE LANDSCAPE, FROM INSIDE AND OUT.”

Theodore Waddell

Dennis Ziemienski

David Grossmann

this house together,” this section because the Dynia says. Because of husband wanted to see Mt. the unity provided by the Glory from his office, while roof, he was able to use an the wife wanted to look exterior material palette at Sleeping Indian. The that includes both stone northern facet is the master and reclaimed wind fence bedroom. The master suite without complicating the was designed so “the bed design. (Using reclaimed is directly related to the wind fence was important Grand,” Dynia says. The to the husband, a native southern facet has the [ STEPHEN DYNIA, DYNIA ARCHITECTS ] of Wyoming who spent garage and two guest suites. summers as a youth Like many homes now working on highway being built, this one is very wind fences.) Wind fence clads the center (main) open inside. To create warmth, Dynia designed a section, while stone covers the two ends. floating ceiling that runs the length of the center In addition to capturing the views the clients section, eventually turning down to create a wanted, the bending of this home created feature wall with a fireplace. “Using wood floors interesting outdoor spaces. “Where the house and this wood ceiling we took what is a relatively creases, there are outdoor spaces where you feel clean and modern interior and connected it to like you’re partially enclosed,” Dynia says. Facing the rusticity of the landscape,” Dynia says. the mountains between the main and north To highlight this home’s single move, Dynia sections is an expansive deck the house partially designed a prominent roof, which has sevenwraps around. Dynia says, “The singular strategy foot overhangs all the way around, giving it the of bending the plan at key locations results appearance of floating in space. Approaching in a simplicity rich in its relationship to the the home, it is the roof that grabs your attention. landscape, from inside and out.” And, “It is the continuity of the roof that holds

172 Center Street, Jackson, WY 307.739.4700 7038 E. Main Street, Scottsdale, AZ 480.949.1256 For more information visit www.altamiraart.com

31


ON THE MARKET

RANGE ISSUE SIX 32

A window into what you can buy—or dream about—in the area’s real estate market.


UNDER $750K The basics: This 1,048-square-foot two-bedroom, one-bathroom

Creekside townhome was remodeled in 2017 and has a deck and two-car garage. Why you want it: Location, location, location—the post office, pathways, grocery stores, library, bus stops, and trailheads are a short walk away. Can be yours for: $529,000 Why it’s worth it: It’s a townhome in Jackson Hole in good

condition with a great location. Contact: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices-Brokers of Jackson

Hole Real Estate, 307/733-4339, bhhsjacksonhole.com

$2 MILLION - $5 MILLION The basics: This 3,700-square-foot timber frame/straw bale home in Teton Valley, Idaho, sits on 60 acres, a portion of which is certified organic by the USDA and has been leased by a farmer who sells produce to local restaurants. Why you want it: You could never get this much in Jackson

Hole for the same amount. Can be yours for: $2.9 million Why it’s worth it: Eco-conscious living—solar panels,

a water catchment system, wind turbine, 900-square-foot greenhouse—that is just a five-minute drive from Victor (access to national forest is even closer) Contact: Eric Spitzer, Spitzer Realty, 307/413-5477

$10 MILLION+ The basics: Designed by Carney Logan Burke Architects, this

newly constructed 7,300-square-foot home on 35 acres south of Wilson has three bedrooms and a separate 1,500-square-foot owners’ level with a library, office, master bedroom, and his-andhers baths. Why you want it: Gorgeous, thoughtful, contemporary

architecture in a prime location Can be yours for: $18 million Why it’s worth it: In the Crescent H subdivision, this home

comes with access to the ranch’s blue ribbon fishing and hiking, riding, and cross-country ski trails. Contact: The NeVille Group, Jackson Hole Real Estate Associates/

Christie’s International Real Estate, 307/690-3209, jhrea.com

33


SHOPPING TRIP

NEW YORK. They say that if you can make it here, you can make it anywhere. But how hard can it be? The streets are numbered, there is fantastic food and drink around every corner, fabulous clothing and home and hearth stores, and it’s all 24-7! (Or 24-6, if you keep kosher.) Jackson Hole in February? That’s hard. New York? Easy! However, the city—for all its bounty of food, shopping, culture, and even outdoorsy fun—can be intimidating. There are so many choices that it’s easy to lose focus and wander into mediocre tourist traps. Suddenly you find yourself in Times Square at a Bubba Gump restaurant wondering where it all went wrong. Do not let this happen to you. For a trip to see what’s new in the Big Apple, we’re recommending you avoid Midtown altogether and stick to three of the city’s coolest areas: the West Side, the East Village, and, gasp, Williamsburg, across the East River in Brooklyn. (And we’ve included one foray to the Upper East Side to check out the new subway line, which is a once-in-a-lifetime thing.)

NEW YORK CITY The High Line

Take a walk along The High Line, a 1.45-mile-long linear park above the (increasingly former) Meatpacking District on Manhattan’s West Side. The park, created by a grassroots group called the Friends of the High Line (thehighline. org), is a triumph of urban renewal. Thoughtfully landscaped with native plants and designed with quiet reflection in mind, the easement, built atop an old elevated train line, offers unique train-level By Jeremy Pugh views into Manhattan to the east and the Hudson River to the west. Plan your High Line ramble to include a lunchtime visit to the Chelsea Market (75 9th Ave., 212/652-2121, chelseamarket.com). Primarily a food hall featuring a range of delicious options from Australian meat pies to full-on lobster meals, the old brick biscuit factory is also a permanent home for Artists and Fleas, an everchanging selling space for artists, designers, collectors, and makers from around the city. You may even catch a designer sample sale in one of the market’s rotating spaces. Since you’re on the West Side, head to the new home of The Whitney Museum of American Art (99 Gansevoort St., 212/570-3600, whitney.org), with its reassuring Helvetica logos. The new Whitney building is capital “G” Gorgeous, and the art contained within is on the bloody edge of the American contemporary scene. Be sure to take in the views of the city and waterfront from the patio levels. Although the garishly named Freedom Tower isn’t one of America’s architectural treasures, the two installations at its base—the haunting 9/11 Memorial and the Oculus—are interesting footnotes to a tragic chapter in American history. The Oculus is a stunning (or overblown, depending on your critical eye) $4 billion transportation hub/train station/mall/event space designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava.

RANGE ISSUE SIX 34

Photography by Shutterstock.com

GET YOUR ART AND ARCHITECTURE ON

Williamsburg Bridge


BLURRING THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN ART AND CRAFT

Chelsea Market And then that new Second Avenue Subway Line (mta.org): The Upper East Side line, which extends the Q line from 63rd to 96th Streets, was envisioned in 1919 and now, nearly one hundred years later, is finally up and running. How’s that for efficiency? The new stations are filled with lovely mosaics that represent life in New York. The beautiful artworks are almost as amazing as the joy of passing through a shiny and clean subway station. But hurry—all these new-station thrills will soon be worn down by the more than 200,000 New Yorkers who ride the line every day.

ASHLEY DAVIS IMAGES

BRING IT HOME (FROM WILLIAMSBURG) Brooklyn Reclamation (676 Driggs Ave., Brooklyn, 718/218-8012, brooklynreclamation.com) is a family run, custom midcentury industrial and vintage furniture store. Think 1950s bowling alley, from where the design store gathers much of the reclaimed wood used in its retro-styled creations. The storefront in Williamsburg has a mix of both vintage finds and custom creations. The custom creations can be shipped anywhere in the U.S. from BR’s workshop in West Virginia. For a less-curated but still-thrilling dive, visit

The Oculus Photography by (Oculus) Shutterstock.com

HandsOn Design PAUL DUNCKER, ARCHITECT

307 732 1645 125 EAST PEARL IN JACKSON HANDS-ON-DESIGN.COM

35

Wyoming


SHOPPING TRIP Clockwise from top left: 9/11 Memorial, a mosaic in the Second Avenue Subway Line, the Tramway to Roosevelt Island, Brooklyn Flea

next station (using the bike share’s killer smartphone app) and a good workout (as well as some pulse-pounding riding moments in NYC traffic). The best routes run alongside the rivers. For example, you can pick up a bike near The Whitney (consider making a stop at the home of the cronut, Dominique Ansel Bakery, 189 Spring St., 212/2192773, dominiqueansel.com), and then head from bike station to bike station through Battery Park as you wave at Lady Liberty. Continue past the Staten Island Ferry terminal and ride underneath the Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Williamsburg Bridges to the East Village (about 6th and D Street). This is mostly on riverside trails without cars. Citi Bikes are also a great way to enjoy Central Park. There are no stations inside the park, but they are located just outside the famous green space and go all the way up to 110th Street. Finally, try riding across the Williamsburg Bridge, with its dedicated bike lane, and weave station-to-station through nearby Mother of Junk (567 Driggs Ave., Williamsburg and Brooklyn to attend Brooklyn), a giant pile of unorganized Smorgasburg, a weekly foodie paradise estate sale bric-a-brac at firesale prices. on the waterfront (90 Kent Ave., Brooklyn, smorgasburg.com) or Brooklyn Men will love the custom-designed deliciousness at Robert James (193 Flea, a weekly hipster flea market (80 Pearl St., brooklynflea.com). (Know that Grand St., Brooklyn, 347/529-6392, byrobertjames.com), and women will the Brooklyn Bridge is not very fun to ride a bike across due to too many enjoy a stop in one of Brooklyn’s most fabulous boutiques, Bird (220 Smith slow-walking tourists.) St., Brooklyn, 718/797-3774, birdbrooklyn.com), which features a collection For another off-the-beaten path of independently designed clothing excursion take the Tramway to curated by Jen Mankins, a former Roosevelt Island (59th St. and 2nd big-time retail buyer gone rogue. The Ave., mta.org). The tramway is part of Quality Mending Company (705 Driggs — the MTA system, so the trip costs a Ave., 212/334-5339, qualitymending.co) YOU JUST HAD TO HAVE that beautiful midcentury modern armoire, didn’t you? Now that mere MetroCard swipe. You’ll soar out rehabs vintage clothing into classic as the thrill of the hunt has worn off, you’re standing in SoHo wondering, “How am I going across the East River to a teeny island well as new and playful designs. Check to get this bloody thing back to Wyoming?” with great views back at the city and out the killer old-school sunglasses We spoke to Jackson Hole’s WRJ Design Associates (30 S. King St., 307/200-4881, the United Nations Building, while behind the counter. wrjdesign.com/) inventory manager and shipping ninja David Stanko about solving this you enjoy wandering around a quiet bugaboo. riverside memorial to Franklin Delano “You really have two options,” Stanko says. “You can work with a broker who can Roosevelt. take care of everything and get it here for you, or you can work directly with a freight

SHIPPING YOUR SHOPPING

See the city via Citi Bike. The bike share system, prominently sponsored by Citibank (hence the name), has stations throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. They are designed as transportation, not tourist bike rentals, so you can only “rent” a Citi Bike for thirty minutes at a time. The trick is to ride from station to station and change bikes every twenty to thirty minutes. This leapfrogging technique provides a scavenger hunt adventure as you plot your path to the

company and handle it yourself.” Stanko, hands down, prefers the former option, specifically the services of the thirdparty logistics firm C.H. Robinson (855/229-6128, chrobinson.com). You have to think about the amount of time and worry you’re going to invest trying to handle it yourself, he says. Plus, brokers have the advantage of being able to negotiate with a range of freight companies and find the right balance of speed and cost for you. If you are a micromanager, however, Stanko suggests contacting North Park Transportation Co. (1225 S. Gregory Ln., 307/733-5644, nopk.com), which has a freight terminal in Jackson Hole. Boutiques and stores in Manhattan often have some advice on getting your piece to a major city, like Salt Lake or Denver, and NPT can handle the remaining leg of transit. WRJ also helps its clients with both international and domestic issues arising from their love of fine furnishings (and subsequent impulse buys). RANGE ISSUE SIX 36

EAT (AND DRINK) WELL Vannessa’s Dumpling House in Williamsburg (310 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, 718/218-8809, vanessas.com) isn’t a fivestar restaurant with an excellent wine list, but its gooey, starchy dumplings are the perfect reminder that good food in NYC doesn’t have to break the bank. For something also inexpensive but with a little more style, find a seat at the bar

Photography by Shutterstock.com

PLAY


W

WESTERN +D ESIGN

September 7-10, 2017

SNOW KING CENTER • JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ANNA TRZEBINSKI, BRIAN BOGGS CHAIRMAKERS, ELLIE THOMPSON + CO., J.B. HILL BOOT COMPANY, J. BOOTH ART, J. HILL FELT, HARKER DESIGN

2 5 T H

A N N U A L

C O N F E R E N C E

TICKETS: WesternDesignConference.com

OPENING PREVIEW PARTY • RUNWAY FASHION SHOW DESIGNER SHOW HOUSE • RETAIL ROW • 3-DAY EXHIBIT + SALE

2 0 1 7


SHOPPING TRIP The Ludlow lounge

2151, porchettany.com) a walk-up and takeout Italian pork joint. Finally, the best burger (really the best burger) in NYC (perhaps anywhere) is at The Brindle Room (277 E. 10th St., 212/529-9702, brindleroom.com). Call ahead for reservations. Craft beer lovers can stop into nearby Proletariat (102 St. Marks Place, 212/777-6707, proletariatny. com) to quaff a pint from the ever-changing menu. Dress up a little and venture into the Gramercy area for a craft cocktail from (and in) another era at Dear Irving (55 Irving Place, dearirving.com).

SIXTY LES lounge RANGE ISSUE SIX 38

REST UP On the highest end of funky is The Wythe Hotel (80 Wythe Ave. at N. 11th, Williamsburg, 718/460-8000, wythehotel. com). You’ll have killer views back across the river to Manhattan along with a civilized rooftop bar and groundfloor restaurant (Reynard). Bonus: The Wythe is located across the street from the famed Brooklyn Bowl (music venue plus bowling alley, naturally) in the heart of what’s hot Williamsburg. The Ludlow, on Manhattan’s Lower East Side (180 Ludlow St., 212/432-1818, ludlowhotel.com), is a mash-up of the Overlook Hotel from The Shining and something that would resemble the Chelsea Hotel circa 1978. Basically, spooky-cool. It’s located in the heart of the SIXTY LES and East Village’s thumping nightlife scene. The fact that the LES (190 Allen St., 877/460-8888, sixtyhotels.com/lower-east-side) has an original Warhol design at the bottom of its rooftop pool should clue you in to the pedigree of style you’ll find at this swanky branch of the ultraluxury hotel chain.

Photography by (The Ludlow) Annie Schlechter, (SIXTY LES) Michael Weber

for happy hour at Marlow & Sons (81 Broadway, Brooklyn, 718/384-1441, marlowandsons.com) to enjoy craft cocktails and tray after tray of $1 to $2 oysters. While you’re on Bedford Avenue, stop into the Bedford Cheese Shop (265 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, 718/599-7588, bedfordcheeseshop.com) and spend some time reading the cheeky cheese descriptions and nibbling on samples (since they do ship). In the East Village, it’s a fried-chicken battle royale between Root & Bone (200 E. 3rd St., 646/ 682-7076, rootnbone.com) and Bobwhite Counter (bobwhitecounter.com). You’ll also need to save a key meal for Porchetta (110 E. 7th St., 212/777-


Distinctive Interiors Made Easy 1705 High School Rd. Suite 120, Jackson, WY • 307.200.4195 | 108 W Center #4, Victor, ID • 208.787.7100 www.tetonfloors.com & www. tetonblinds.com

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DESIGN

Griswold No. 12

Lodge 10.25 inch

Smithey Ironware Co. No. 10

Le Creuset Oval Dutch Oven

Le Creuset Signature Skillet & Signature Saucepan registry. It seemed extravagant and grown-up, sort of like asking for a BMW for your sixteenth birthday. The iconic enameled cast-iron cookware seemed to say that a Viking range and Sub-Zero fridge could not be far behind. Over the By Joohee Muromcew years I’ve acquired a few more pieces, most recently the red (“cerise”) crepe pan, which gets much more enthusiastic use in our home than that self-righteous Breville juicer. Le Creuset was founded in 1925, their initial product an orange (“flame”) cocotte, and nearly a century later, they are still the first name in enameled cast-iron cookware. Staub, another French company,

RANGE ISSUE SIX 40

Photograph by Cole Buckhart

IRON AGE

A FEW YEARS AGO, my mother-inlaw set about to “declutter” the stately Washington, D.C., home my husband, Alex, grew up in. Nearly fifty years of elegant urban living had accumulated in the attic and basement, and Mary told me to poke around for things we might want for our new home. Sterling silver cake combs and crystal champagne coupes aside, the items I most coveted were in her collection of Le Creuset cookware. Some of it was new, with yellowed paper tags still attached. When Alex and I married in 1999, I boldly included a cobalt blue (“Marseille”) Le Creuset Dutch oven on our Williams-Sonoma

While much has changed in the kitchen in the last 150 years, cast-iron cookware endures.


ENGAGE YOUR AUDIENCE:

TRENDS IN PROPERTY MARKETING 58%

of buyers want and expect to see video of a home they’re looking at online. (1)

4x

as many consumers would prefer to watch a video about a product than to read about it. (2)

85%

of buyers and sellers want to work with an agent who uses video in their marketing. (3)

Try something new with a creative agency that can deliver the refined multimedia experience that clients expect.

307-732-5912 | orijinmedia.com 1. https://www.virtuets.com/10-great-digital-video-statistics-realtors-2/ 2. www.animoto.com/blog/business/video-marketing-cheat-sheet-infographic 3. www.inman.com/next/by-the-numbers-how-to-focus-your-video-marketing-for-the-biggest-return-on-investment


DESIGN

Field Company

from top to bottom: chris mummert, Meadows & Mountains jeremy browne, Taking Shelter ron kingswood, Companions 130 East Broadway

307 733-3186 : trailsidegalleries.com info@trailsidegalleries.com

followed in the mid-1970s with its clever trademark innovation in lids dotted with spikes on the inside to promote self-basting. Meanwhile, across the pond, the last sputtering of the Industrial Revolution was giving way to a deeply American sense of pride in manufacturing. Joseph Lodge founded the Blacklock Foundry in South Pittsburg, Tennessee, producing castiron home goods such as tea kettles, clothing irons, and a cast-iron skillet with a signature teardrop handle and pour spout to the side. The design has not changed since, though the company has added new lines, including colorful enamels and preseasoned models. The skillets, and Lodge’s iconic skillet and egg logo, are products of their reverence for history and craft. Henry Lodge, current CEO and great-grandson of Joseph Lodge, explains the enduring appeal: “Over the last forty-five years of running a business, I’ve discovered that the key ingredients for success are a passion for your work and a love for your people. A high-quality cast-iron skillet can cook family recipes for generations. Foundry workers that know they’re respected by their peers and by their employer will put their own RANGE ISSUE SIX 42

passion and heart into their work. And a business that puts its people first is more likely to endure.” Lodge’s down-to-earth brand and price points—a basic skillet can start at $20—have made its products ubiquitous in home kitchens and around campsite fires. It was only a matter of time, of course, before the craft-brew-drinking crowd discovered cast-iron cookware. FINEX, based in Portland, Oregon, exudes small-scale integrity with their trademark eight-sided skillets and coiled stainless steel handles. An eight-inch skillet retails for about $100, and they are becoming a fast favorite among kitchen cognoscenti. Smithey Ironware Co., with just two skillet designs hand-finished in trendy-quaint Charleston, South Carolina, is the newest addition to the cast-iron crew. Founder Isaac

Photography (top) courtesy Field Company, (bottom) courtesy Smithey

Smithey Ironware Co.


Photograph courtesy Lodge

Lodge

OVER THE YEARS I’VE ACQUIRED A FEW MORE PIECES, MOST RECENTLY THE RED (“CERISE”) CREPE PAN, WHICH GETS MUCH MORE ENTHUSIASTIC USE IN OUR HOME THAN THAT SELF-RIGHTEOUS BREVILLE JUICER.

Morton’s passion for ironworks began with restoring old iron cookware to give as gifts. All cast-iron cookware has distinctive makers’ marks on the bottom, and Smithey’s artfully designed hallmark is easily recognizable by its jaunty bird. However, the true signature of a Smithey skillet is the glassy-smooth patina of its hand-polished, nonstick interior. There’s even a new cast-iron skillet company, Field Company, with an early presence on Kickstarter, complete with metallurgical studies and millennial appeal (“lighter than a MacBook Pro!”). As new cast-iron cookware companies reassert its enduring appeal, the greatest testament to this old-world craft may be seen on eBay, where an ardent subculture of cast-iron aficionados trade valuable pieces like art. At press time, a waffle iron dating from 1888, made by the Griswold Manufacturing Company in Erie, Pennsylvania, was starting bids at $9,000—campfire not included. 43

MTNMENGIFTS.com


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Life Change While remodeling their vacation home in the valley, a San Francisco couple decide to remodel their lives as well, by making the home—and Jackson Hole—their main residence.

By Lila Edythe ∙ Photography by Tuck Fauntleroy

T

he plan was for Jackson Hole to be a vacation home, a place where Chad and Edward could escape the busyness of San Francisco and their lives in the city’s trendy Noe Valley neighborhood. “I thought we’d get bored if we were in Jackson full-time,” says Edward, who works in corporate financial consulting. “But every time we were at the Jackson airport flying home to San Francisco, I didn’t want to leave.” Chad, a former advertising director who now cares for the couple’s toddler twins, Violet Genevieve and Ethan Bennett, says, “I almost had a hangover every time I went back to San Francisco. That’s when we knew we loved Jackson, and it was our home.” This realization came after the couple bought their vacation home here, though. “We looked at about a dozen houses,” Chad says. “When we started looking, we thought a condo would be great—you can lock the door when you leave and not worry about it— but the condo that we really liked had zero outdoor space and overlooked the jail. We already had a house in the city. We decided that if we were going to live here, we needed something with space.” The couple looked at houses all over the valley—from Teton Village to Wilson to South Park— before settling on a home built in 1993 on seven acres on West Gros Ventre Butte.

“My personal design approach has always been that if I like something, I get it, and then I figure out where it works for us,” says Chad, pictured here at right with his partner of twenty-five years, Edward, and their twins, Violet and Ethan. “And we like using a lot of family stuff.” In the great room, the ceramic heads on the bar were Chad’s grandmother’s, as was the penguin ice bucket. Chad bought the orange angel, done by a Chinese sculptor, on the bookshelves to the right of the fireplace while on a business trip to Beijing. “We’re both into having the kind of stuff around that we think is fun and beautiful, whether it has value or not.”

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It looks like a bookshelf, but this wall in Edward’s office is wallpaper. Chad and Edward styled a bookshelf with the help of John Frechette and Christian Burch of Mountain Dandy Showroom. Chad and Edward incorporated favorite books and family mementoes. Jackson Hole-based photographer Tuck Fauntleroy then shot the styled shelves and sent the images off to Flavor Paper in Brooklyn, New York, which specializes in custom wallpaper.

The house, which was designed by Ellis Nunn and Danny Egan, was not love at first sight. “Edward liked it more than I did initially,” Chad says. “I had a harder time getting past the pickle-bleached oak and pink. The snarky me would describe the decor as ‘Golden Girls meets early 1990s condo in Boca, meets the mountains,’ and I had an issue coming from a 1,200-square-foot house in San Francisco to 5,000 square feet. I thought it was way too big of a house for us.” Edward immediately saw the home’s possibility, though. “For being designed and built in the nineties, it was pretty contemporary with high ceilings and lots of light in the great room,” he says.

Chad and Edward spent time in the home for a year. “We wanted to find out what we liked and what we didn’t,” Edward says. Once they had ideas of what they wanted to do, the couple went directly to Carney Logan Burke Architects (CLBA); they had seen a condo the firm did and knew they liked their style. The couple and CLBA worked on designs for about one year, redoing everything. “Nothing of the original house, outside of the footprint itself, was left untouched,” Chad says. Walls were knocked out, a new staircase was manufactured, windows were added, and doors were put in downstairs guest rooms for direct outdoor access. The men made the kitchen all white, “despite RANGE ISSUE SIX 46

Opposite top: In the kitchen, Falls Cabinet and Millwork fabricated custom white lacquer cabinets. The owners picked an Eero Saarinen (by Knoll) kitchen table, highchairs by Phil & Teds, and Kartell’s “Mr. Super Impossible” chairs. The painting of the former Teton Theatre is by Jackson-based artist Travis Walker. The black wood and leather barstools are by Hee Welling for Hay, and the subway tiles in the backsplash are from Heath Ceramics. Opposite bottom: In the living/dining room, Chad and Edward paired the quirky digital print Madame Blush by designers Brendan Young and Vanessa Battaglia (working together as Minehart) with Cole and Son’s “woods” wallpaper and went with a Nido dining table. Dining chairs are from Nido and Moooi.


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the contractor trying to talk us out of it,” Edward says. It wasn’t just in the kitchen that the men knew what they wanted. Chad, who traveled widely for work, fell in love with wallpaper he saw in a hotel restaurant in Sydney, Australia. “The hotel didn’t know anything about it, so I took a bunch of photos and did Google image searches,” Chad says. “After weeks of searching, I finally found out it was a limited-edition wall covering by Catherine Martin, wife of director Baz Luhrmann and herself the Academy Award-winning set and costume designer of Moulin Rouge and The Great Gatsby.” Chad found one online wallpaper company who had it, but it was listed as unavailable. The mother (who lived in Sydney) of CLBA’s Australian-born interior designer Sarah Kennedy “found the one roll that was left,” Chad says. One roll was exactly the amount needed to cover one wall in the media room. The wallpaper in Edward’s office is custom and is the easiest way to see the couple’s pleasure in personal touches and attention to detail. The print is lifelike and of a bookshelf. On the wallpaper’s “shelves” are favorite books of the couple’s, photographs of Chad’s dad and

Left: Sjoerd Vroonland for Moooi’s “extension chair” sits at the base of custom underlit, translucent stairs by 3form.

“AFTER WEEKS OF SEARCHING, I FINALLY FOUND OUT IT WAS A LIMITED-EDITION WALL COVERING BY CATHERINE MARTIN, WIFE OF DIRECTOR BAZ LUHRMANN AND HERSELF THE ACADEMY AWARD-WINNING SET AND COSTUME DESIGNER OF MOULIN ROUGE AND THE GREAT GATSBY.” [ CHAD, HOMEOWNER ]

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Right: In a powder room, Tom Dixon “Melt” minipendants in chrome hang above a custom vanity in walnut made by Falls Cabinet and Millwork. The tiles are a nod to the couple’s history with San Francisco. Made by Subway Ceramics, the tiles are replicas of the hexagonal dome subway tiles used in San Francisco’s BART stations in 1973. San Francisco architect Kelly Melendez designed the tiles’ random pattern. Opposite: Chad first saw this Catherine Martin wallpaper in a hotel in Sydney, Australia, while traveling for business. Also in the media room are a wood and copper table from Leitmotiv, a copper chair from CB2, and a unicorn skull bell jar by Imm Living.


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“WE’RE SO EXCITED AT THE IDEA OF OUR KIDS GROWING UP HERE.” [ CHAD, HOMEOWNER ]

Opposite: A mixed media piece by Dolan Geiman, a native of Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, hangs in the master bedroom. Chad and Edward found it at an art fair in Sausalito, California. “As soon as we saw it, we knew it’d be perfect in this house,” Chad says. The lighting fixture above Italian Collection’s “Wing” acrylic and leather platform bed is Luceplan’s “Hope” suspension pendant. Bedding is by Sferra. The landscape architecture firm Agrostis, Inc. did the home’s landscaping. While the owners collaborated with architects Carney Logan Burke on the remodel, “We had much fewer design thoughts on the landscape,” Chad says. “[Agrostis] had some great ideas, though.”

his twin brother as babies and a photo of Chad’s grandmother from the 1940s, Edward’s bronzed baby shoe, a pair of Chad’s childhood sneakers, a replica of a roadside attraction from Chad’s hometown in Wisconsin, and even some superhero action figures from Chad’s collections. “It took time and effort to make this happen, but it was fun and worth it,” Chad says. “Even if this isn’t Edward’s office anymore right now.” This office became the bedroom of Violet and Ethan when they were born in July 2016. “We designed this house for two guys who maybe have friends coming in,” Chad says. “I refer to it now as ‘Baby Hunger Games.’ There is not a single thing about this house that is family friendly—we’ve got concrete floors and sharp metal edges. We would have had different considerations entirely had we known we were going to have two little ones running around here.” At the time I toured the house, Violet and Ethan were not yet walking, so the floors and edges weren’t an issue. “But we know we’re going to have some pretty serious modifications as soon as they’re walking,” Chad says. “And when we do that, it—and Jackson—will feel even more like our true home. We’re so excited at the idea of our kids growing up here.”

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A

Different TAKE

Where everyone else saw a tear-down, Lauren and Chris Dickey saw their future home.

By Maggie Theodora ∙ Photography by Tuck Fauntleroy

L

auren and Chris Dickey weren’t looking for a huge remodel project; the thirty-somethings were looking to start a family. Still, there was this property in East Jackson that had a house and a commercial industrial building, albeit both in serious disrepair, that Lauren passed by a lot. “I biked past most days,” she says. It had been for sale forever. And then the rent at Chris’ office space—he’s the founder of Purple Orange Media Group—doubled. One day Lauren suggested to Chris the “crazy idea” of looking at this interesting-but-dilapidated property. “People had been overlooking this property for years,” Chris says. “It really was a tear-down, and it was being sold like it was a tear-down.” But the Dickeys didn’t look at it that way. “We walked through and got a vision of what we could do with it—take the garage and turn it into an ARU (accessory residential structure, which can be rented out), and make the industrial building Chris’ office. With all of this, our mortgage would be less,” Lauren and Chris Dickey spent says Lauren, the education director eighteen months remodeling their for Friends of Pathways. “It seemed home, an attached apartment, and like a no-brainer.” Chris adds, a separate office building near “What we glossed over was how the base of Snow King in East much work it would take to get it Jackson. Doing as much of the work to our vision.” The day Lauren and themselves as they could, they were Chris learned they were having a able to keep to a budget of about baby, they put in an offer on the $150 per square foot. property. It was accepted.

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“JACKSON HOMES HAVE MORE CHARACTER THAN PEOPLE GIVE THEM CREDIT FOR, AND I THINK WITH SOME WORK YOU CAN CREATE A REALLY UNIQUE, COOL AESTHETIC BLENDING MODERN AND OLD SCHOOL.” [ CHRIS DICKEY, HOMEOWNER ]

Opposite top: To make the kitchen larger, the couple made the master bedroom a little smaller. Opposite bottom: The couple ripped up all the carpeting and refinished the oak flooring hidden beneath it. They also refinished all of the interior doors.

That was in November 2015. The following January, the couple, acting as the general contractor, started remodeling the main house. About one Top: The kitchen cabinets are all original, month later, while the Dickeys and the open shelving is made from two-by were out of town, pipes burst ten-inch planks formerly in the home’s and flooded the basement. “The carport that Chris refinished. The tile original plan was to do a lot of backsplash is new. “I wanted really fun tile work on the place, but not to in the kitchen,” Lauren says. tear it apart,” Chris says. “That changed with the pipes, though. Bottom: The original doorknob to the front We decided to rebuild the entire door was lost long before the Dickeys home.” bought the home, but they salvaged a There were times during similar one from a home across the street the reconstruction when you that was razed while they were remodeling. could look all the way through the house from the side yard. The couple replaced every wire, pipe, piece of insulation, and window. But most of the doors are original, as are the kitchen cabinets and the floor. The rough-sawn, two-byten-inch open shelves in the kitchen were formerly part of the carport. “We enjoy the modern look,” Chris says, “but I think it’s cool when you can blend old and new. Jackson homes have more character than people give them credit for, and I think with some work you can create a really unique, cool aesthetic blending modern and old school.” Lauren and Chris’ home was built in 1934 and added onto in the 1950s. They found everything from tools to 55


old newspapers when they tore out walls. The couple guess the solid wood kitchen cabinets they refinished date from the 1950s. The cabinets have heavy-duty hardware, and you have to press a button on each handle to open them. “You couldn’t find kitchen cabinets and hardware like this today,” Chris says. “Or if you did, it’d be expensive.” The front door has a thick glass pane in the center. “We spent a ton of time, not money, refinishing that door,” Chris says. The couple found a doorknob dating from the same time as their door—their original knob was long gone—on the front door of a small house across the street. That house sold during the Dickeys’ remodeling, and its new owners had plans to raze it. “We asked if we could take the doorknob,” Lauren says. “I grew up in a town that had a lot of old railroad houses,” Lauren says. “I always thought I’d own an old house there and redo it. This one is better, though—a house, an apartment, and an office building. It’s been fun to give something everyone else saw as a tear-down a new life.”

Top: The accessory residential unit (ARU) and the house were finished (respectively in July 2016 and October 2016). The office, which had been a working machine shop, was completed this spring; it took nearly one year to get the permit to remodel it. “We were taking out the blowtorches and putting in computers,” Chris says, “but that is a change from commercial industrial use to office, so it was more complicated.”

The couple had to show that their use of the 947-square-foot building would be lighter impact than the original. Bottom: The Dickeys knew what they had with all of the old wood at the property. In addition to the carport planks now serving as kitchen shelving, there is enough old wood to make shelves for Chris’ new office.

Opposite: The windows dividing offices from the main open-air workspace in the remodeled office are the building’s original external windows. “They were old steel window frames with poor energy insulation,” Chris says. “But they were really cool, at least after we cleaned them off painstakingly.” Chris even made a homemade oxidation solution “to return the shiny metal bits back to a gunmetal RANGE ISSUE SIX 56

gray.” The original glass was also replaced by tempered glass. “We had plenty more of these steel windows that we didn’t use but couldn’t find a home [for them], even for free via Facebook and classified ads. It was painful to take them to the recycling center,” Chris says.


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MORE than MEETS THE EYE

In the great room, most of the furniture is custom by Jacque Jenkins-Stireman. On the modern frame sectional she designed, Jenkins-Stireman used a Holly Hunt performance fabric. Her matching cocktail table and side table are the perfect blend of western and contemporary: binding stacked milled logs with steel. The rug is from Azadi Fine Rugs in downtown Jackson. Opposite: This house immediately announces its modern aesthetic. Its reclaimed barnwood front door opens to two contemporary benches (on either side of the door) made with brushed steel and reclaimed flamed oak along with custom bronze mirrors by Berman | Rosetti.

Homes at Shooting Star might look similar from the outside, but inside they showcase owners’ styles and lifestyles.

By Dina Mishev ∙ Photography by Tuck Fauntleroy

T

he design guidelines for building at Shooting Star, the golf and resort community near the base of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, are fairly strict. In designing their homes owners here are advised to, among other things, “capture elements of 1900-1940s national park architecture” and also use an exterior palette of natural materials. The idea is to give the community a consistent look and “preserve the landscape’s special

characteristics.” Aesthetically and financially for Shooting Star’s developers, the guidelines have worked. (More than eighty of the available one hundred home sites and half of the eighty-two cabins/lodges are sold.) While Shooting Star homes adhere to a uniform style and materials palette on the outside, inside anything can go. Jacque Jenkins-Stireman, the founder of Jacque Jenkins-Stireman Design and a member of Shooting Star’s design/development team, has done the interiors of about twelve homes here. In these, “There is such a broad range of design styles, every project takes on the personality and lifestyle of each client,” she says. Jenkins-Stireman has done a “very traditional” home for clients with an extensive western art collection, another home with 59


This Lucite and Spanish oak dining table seats ten and is a collaboration between Jenkins-Stireman and L.A.-based furniture company Mimi London, which is celebrating its fortieth anniversary this year. Dining chairs are by Thayer Coggin. A painting by Walton Ford hangs next to the fireplace.

“calm and contemporary” interiors, and one she describes as “transitional.” “There are East Coast-style homes with red, white, and blue and classic plaid everywhere,” she says. “They have a sort of Adirondack, campy feel.” And then there is the second Shooting Star home of a New York-based client. “We took modern, clean lines and incorporated a little organic, Mountain West local flavor,” Jenkins-Stireman says. The home, in Shooting Star’s North Cabins neighborhood, is contemporary and sophisticated. “I say this home is my Shooting Star showcase not only because it was recently finished, but because it’s so different,” she says. Designed by Logan Leachman of JLF & Associates, the home is one of twelve and is 5,400 square feet. (There is also a 3,500-square-foot North Cabin model.) All the North Cabins feature exterior elements like reclaimed log timbers, barnwood, and snow fence and Montana Moss Rock. Inside, there is stone and reclaimed RANGE ISSUE SIX 60


Bottom: Jenkins-Stireman had a Holly Hunt chair upholstered with a Sandra Jordan alpaca fabric for the great room. Right: In the media/bunk room, an Italian five-piece modular sectional sofa from Resource Furniture in New York City allows for both lounging and sleeping. The rift oak side tables and matching media console are custom designs by Jenkins-Stireman.

timbers, but “all of the other finishes are very light,” Jenkins-Stireman says. “Walls are white, and there is just the right amount of drywall. One of the design objectives of the North Cabins phase was to respond to an international, urban, sophisticated, second-time buyer. [Leachman’s] design works with a variety of interior styles.” To achieve the contemporary, sophisticated feel of this home, Jenkins-Stireman designed custom furniture pieces. There is a table made of brass and oak and, in the master bedroom, an upholstered iron canopy bed. “I’m not a big fan of art above a bed, so I wanted to create a piece that’s a bit of art itself,” she says. “The headboard

TO DATE, SHOOTING STAR HAS SOLD MORE THAN $200 MILLION OF REAL ESTATE, AND, EVEN THOUGH THE INITIAL MEMBERSHIP FEE IS IN THE SIX FIGURES, AS OF LAST FALL THE ONLY OPTIONS LEFT TO BECOME A MEMBER WERE TO GET ON THE WAITING LIST OR BUY PROPERTY.

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Jenkins-Stireman designed custom beds for this bedroom, which she is higher than usual and has planks of upholstered Holly Hunt fabric, calls the “king conversion sleeping room.” An iron barn track slide glides which keep the canopy open and create an artistic approach.” Throughout together (or apart) to convert extra-long twin beds into a king-size bed. the home, colors are subtle and lines are clean. In this home Jenkins-Stireman wasn’t aiming merely to make the interior unique among the eleven other North Cabins; she also wanted to make it different from the client’s first Shooting Star home, for which she did the interiors about seven years ago. Jenkins-Stireman describes the older home, which is about 1,400 square feet smaller — than the North Cabin, as “pretty edgy—it’s industrial SINCE OPENING IN 2009, Shooting Star has become one of the most popular golf courses modern with bold color and bold patterns in the and high-end communities in the valley. To date, it has sold more than $200 million of real fabric. It has a loft-like feel and a reverse living setup.” estate, and, even though the initial membership fee is in the six figures, as of last fall the only She says, “It’s a whole different feeling. [The owner] options left to become a member were to get on the waiting list or buy property. (The number isn’t sure which one he likes more.” The plan was to of memberships is capped at 335, and the remaining available memberships are being held for use the second home and keep the first as a rental future homeowners.) property, but early this summer Jenkins-Stireman Developed by the third generation of a family—the Resors—that has been ranching in the says the owner “got an offer he couldn’t refuse” and valley since the 1930s, Shooting Star opened its clubhouse and $29 million Tom Fazio-designed sold the original home. It’s no wonder he got such an core golf course in 2009 at the beginning of the Great Recession, but has been successful from offer. As of late July, there were only two Shooting the start. In 2010, Golfweek named it the third-best new course in the country. Homeowners Star sites available, four single-family homes under appreciate its 1,300 acres of open space protected by conservation easements. To the south and construction for sale, and one resale cabin. east is the Snake River Ranch, the Resors’ working cattle ranch.

BIRTH OF A NEW NEIGHBORHOOD

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HOME sweet HOME

MAKING A HOME As told by Andy Eckl (left) and Taka Kondo (right) ∙ Photograph by Cole Buckhart WE DON’T KNOW THAT WE have any friends here with secure housing. The best situation involves coworkers at Red Top Meadows [a residential treatment center for troubled male teens run by Teton Youth & Family Services] who live in a house for eleven months a year, until its owners come out, and then they need to find something else for that month. I [Andy] had been looking to sign a yearlong lease since getting here in August 2015, but wasn’t able to find that until April 2017. It’s amazing what a lease does. Aside from giving you housing security, it’s proof of residency. You can’t get a driver’s license here or library card without proof of residency. I finally got my Wyoming license this past May. When I [Taka] first moved out here last summer to work as a direct chair worker at Red Top—I’m one of the few who did not come to Jackson for the plethora of outdoor activities; I came for the troubled teens—I did live out of my car for a week or so before finding

a month-to-month situation in Victor, Idaho. But that place was an absolute sty. I eventually found a place in Jackson, but it was month-to-month. Now it feels really great to have the security of knowing we have somewhere to live for a year. The fact that it’s in East Jackson—where the wilderness is so close, but so is downtown—makes it that much better. When we were looking, we were hoping for East Jackson, but our first priority was getting our names on a lease and being in charge of who we put in the house. Now that we’re in, we’re finding it nice to have a home we can help improve and decorate. We got all of our furniture for less than $100 total! In Jackson, furniture, like work, is easy to come by. We painted the whole place, too. I [Andy] have painted professionally before, but I’ve never had the chance to live in a space where I’ve been able to paint for myself. We’ve never been in a place before where it’s been worthwhile to invest our time.

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Range 2017 Issue 6  

Meet Range, Jackson Hole’s premiere magazine about the area’s architecture, design, style, and art. Using only the region’s best writers and...

Range 2017 Issue 6  

Meet Range, Jackson Hole’s premiere magazine about the area’s architecture, design, style, and art. Using only the region’s best writers and...

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