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ISSUE 5 / 2017

DESIGN that BINDS Mixing business with friendship makes a home in Wilson a true retreat.

NEIGHBORHOOD

TEN TIPS

ARCHITECTURE

Rafter J

Hanging Art

Glass House


S PACK M AN S & AS S O C I AT E S SNAKE RIVER SANCTUARY JACKSON HOLE North of Town $16,000,000 70.88 Acres MLS# 15-1417

BRANDON STEPHANIE DAVE LIZ BABBS


The #1 Real Estate Team in Jackson Hole

LINGER LONGER RANCH 7B 35.06 ACRES $4,300,000, MLS# 12-1860

Bar B Bar Ranch, North of Town

3 CREEK NEW CONSTRUCTION 1.91 ACRES MAIN HOME: 3 BEDS | 3 BATHS | 3,541 SF CASITA: 2 BEDS | 2 BATHS | 1,000 SF $4,850,000, MLS# 16-2363

3 Creek Ranch, South of Town

EXCLUSIVE LAKE CREEK RANCH 3.99 ACRES 4 BEDS | 4.5 BATHS | 7,125 SF $8,975,000, MLS# 16-2296

Lake Creek Ranch, Westbank of the Snake River For more information on these or any other property in Jackson Hole, please call or email.

WWW.SPACKMANSINJH.COM SPACKMANS@JHSIR.COM 307. 739.8156


TABLE OF CONTENTS features

44

44 —

GRATEFUL

A new house helps a young widow and her three sons move forward. By Dina Mishev

50 —

FRIENDSHIPS THAT WORK

Mixing business with friendship makes a home in Wilson a true retreat. By Maggie Theodora

56 —

A chance detour on a road trip leads to a family building a life and new home in the valley. The latter was designed to be beautiful but practical, and fun. By Dina Mishev

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Photograph by David Agnello

MEANT TO BE


Architects | engineers 1 1 1 0 M A p l e W Ay J A c k s o n , W y | 3 0 7 . 7 3 3 . 9 9 5 5 | h o y t c tA . h o u z z . c o M


TABLE OF CONTENTS departments

26

16 20 12 10 10 / WHAT INSPIRES ME Shari Brownfield, fine art consultant

30 / ARCHITECTURE: GLASS HOUSE This family home blurs the lines between inside and out.

12 / FAVORITES What we want this season

32 / ON THE MARKET Properties currently for sale, from $750K to $10 million +

16 / MUST HAVE: OUTDOOR ACCESSORIES Valley tastemakers share their favorite outdoor accessories for summer.

34 / SHOPPING TRIP: LAGUNA BEACH A California town with art and architecture you don’t need a car to explore.

18 / NEIGHBORHOOD: RAFTER J Built for living

40 / DESIGN: TO THE POINT Form meets function at New West KnifeWorks.

20 / TEN TIPS: HANGING ART Advice from pros to help you style your walls.

64 / HOME SWEET HOME The wildlife in the front yard is cool, but it is the history of this Kelly home that makes it most special to its owners.

26 / ARTISAN: BRETT HULL Brett Hull has spent his life—as his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather did—perfecting the ancient art of plastering.

ON THE COVER Photograph by Carrie Patterson RANGE ISSUE FIVE 4


welcome home

Mountain RetReat - Wilson, WY 6 bd | 5.5 bR | 8,705 sf | 2.9 acRes

This premier retreat is located 20 minutes from Teton Village and two minutes from the town of Wilson, yet it feels worlds away. The pristinely landscaped property offers stone patios, a fire pit and ponds overlooking Fish Creek Ranch up to the Sleeping Indian. The home has a tasteful blend of mountain and rustic influences with a contemporary edge. High end finishes and quality materials were used throughout to create this modern day lodge.

theTEAM@jhsir.com 307-203-3000


Photograph by Ryan Dorgan

A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

CONCURRENTLY WITH EDITING this issue, I’m in the middle stages of planning an extended trip away from the valley, and from the home I share with my boyfriend and the best dog in the world. The plan is to be away for up to eight weeks. This summer. It has taken me twenty years, but I’m finally voluntarily ready to check out for a chunk of Jackson Hole’s fabulous summer—the season responsible for keeping me here nineteen years longer than I had planned. Or, I was ready to leave for almost two months. When Derek and I first started talking about the idea of temporarily uprooting ourselves and leaving our home, it sounded much better than it does now, especially after I’ve spent the last couple of months reading the articles in this issue and being reminded of what a gorgeous community this is, inside and out. If I’m gone for a chunk of this summer, how can I make the most of the recommendations from local design pros of fun outdoorsy things, from the perfect croquet set to a sculptural, hotrolled steel portable firepit (“Must Have,” p. 16)? I’ll have to live without Persephone Bakery’s homemade Nutella. A confession: Since I’ve discovered it, I don’t think I’ve

gone a full day without having at least a little taste of it, and most of the time I eat it right off a spoon. And I won’t have the chance to smile every time I look at another “Favorites” (p. 12) item, Aruliden’s Glasscape bowl, sitting on our kitchen counter. But it’s not simply these physical and material things that are giving me second thoughts. I’ve put much thought and time into my house, and love how everything in it adds up to a cozy familiarity. But I know I can live without it for two months. The doubts come mostly when I read this issue’s stories featuring residents of our community. There are crazy beautiful homes in Jackson Hole, and there are $28 million homes you won’t find the likes of anywhere else (“On the Market,” p. 32), but as beautiful and unique as the homes in this valley are, the people who live here are more so. Take Kathy Lynch, who shares her home with us in “Grateful” (p. 44). I can’t say I’ve ever reacted this way to a feature in a design magazine, but every time I read Kathy’s story about the home she made for herself and her three young sons after her husband unexpectedly died, I get tearyeyed, and am inspired and in awe. Through my RANGE ISSUE FIVE 6

tears, I do notice the photos showing a nineteenfoot lift-and-slide door and Tulikivi hearth, but it’s Kathy’s gratitude rather than the material things that is my takeaway. It didn’t make it into the article, but Kathy said that when it came time for the four of them to move into the house, several months after Luke’s death, “It seemed like the whole community helped. That was when I realized how big our family truly was, and that whatever house we lived in, it was the valley that was home.” If you’re a Jackson Hole resident, thanks for being such an unbelievable extended family and making this whole valley my home. I’ll miss you this summer. If you’re visiting for a week, welcome to the family; I hope we make you feel at home. However long you’re here, I hope you enjoy the material items featured in this issue alongside the things that truly matter.

– Dina Mishev @dinamishev


Jackson, Wyoming Denver, Colorado

| |

307.733.3766 303.339.9910 dynia.com


CONTRIBUTORS

The author of the book 100 Things to Do in Salt Lake City Before You Die, JEREMY PUGH brings us some Southern California magic for this issue’s “Shopping Trip: Laguna Beach” (p. 34). A former editor of Salt Lake magazine, Jeremy also writes for SKI, Sunset, Utah Style & Design, and Salt Lake magazines. A lifelong Utahn, he travels extensively, but always loves returning home to Salt Lake City. Jeremy’s book is available on Amazon and at VeryDynamite.com, and he invites you to share your SLC experiences on Twitter at @100ThingsSLC.

Born and raised in southwest Virginia, ANNA COLE (“Must Have,” p. 16) moved to Jackson in 2005 after graduating from Vanderbilt University. Like so many others, her plan was to “ski bum” for one winter. Last year, Anna—along with her husband, Eric, and dog Maple—moved into a new home south of Wilson that they designed with E/Ye Design. Ever since, Anna has been elbows deep in design and decorating. Current obsessions are Sturgill Simpson on vinyl and Scandinavian design books.

JOOHEE MUROMCEW (“Mud Man,” p. 26) is a freelance writer living in Jackson Hole with her husband and four children. Most recently, her work has appeared in Condé Nast Traveler, Departures, Town & Country, and City Secrets: Paris. She is the author of The Baby Bistro Cookbook (Rodale Books, 2003), was senior fashion editor for the original LVMH e-commerce site, and editor in chief of RedEnvelope. Joohee serves on the board of directors of Teton Science Schools and is currently at work on her first novel, The Goodyears.

PUBLISHER Kevin Olson ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Adam Meyer EDITOR Dina Mishev ART DIRECTOR Colleen Valenstein COPY EDITOR Pamela Periconi CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Anna Cole Lila Edythe Mark Huffman Joohee Muromcew Jeremy Pugh Maggie Theodora CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS David Agnello Bradly J. Boner Ryan Dorgan Tuck Fauntleroy Matthew Millman Carrie Patterson David Swift ADVERTISING SALES Deidre Norman - deidre@tetonmediaworks.com Lydia Redzich

Kyra Griffin

AD DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Sarah Grengg Natalie Connell DISTRIBUTION Hank Smith Jeff Young

Russell Thompson

Range magazine is published twice yearly.

page 24

P.O. Box 7445, Jackson, WY 83002 (307) 732-5900 / RangeJH.com © 2017 Teton Media Works. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this magazine’s original contents, whether in whole or part, requires written permission from the publisher. RANGE ISSUE FIVE 8

Photograph lower left by David Agnello


www.shawwyoming.com

Trust. Value. Insight. Build On.

Chase Beninga Managing Partner

460 South Cache Jackson Hole, WY 307-733-8401


WHAT INSPIRES ME

Teton County Library I’m inspired by the calmness here. I’ve always been someone who did her homework at the library rather than at home. I love our library. I think it is a mix of nostalgia, but they’ve done a great job with the pods of seating and ottomans you can move around. I like sitting by the fire, where there is such great light coming in through the windows. And then the installation in the front lobby: It is my favorite public art installation. It piques my curiosity by showing what people all around the state are searching for at that exact moment. How cool is that? Free, 125 Virginian Ln., 307/733-2164, tclib.org

Jenny Dowd Ceramics I have a few of Jenny Dowd’s things. On my desk I’ve got one of the cups from her series of chairs and lamps with all of my pens and pencils in it. I love the creamy glaze she typically uses and her delicate line work. Her drawing is almost childlike; there is an innocence to it that feels very natural and raw. You hear people say, “My kid can draw like that,” but it is actually very hard to accomplish. There is a mastery to this kind of drawing. dowdhousestudios.com, also available at Vertical Harvest Market, 155 W. Simpson Ave., 307/201-4452

Pilot G2 .38 mm pen This is not glamorous by any means, but I am inspired when I am on top of everything. I keep organized to-do lists, but not electronically. I’m a visual person and need to see it laid out for me. My hand needs to write it down. And even though I surround myself with beautiful objects all day every day, when it comes to organizing my life and my schedule, it’s about function. I’ve got a cup full of Pilot G2 .38 mm pens that I buy by the box. From $4.99, pilotpen.us

SHARI BROWNFIELD Fine art consultant at Shari Brownfield Fine Art

By Maggie Theodora ∙ Photography by David Agnello

Glass blocks by artist Steven Glass Steven Glass does this thing—this is something I did in art school myself— where he uses color that people don’t necessarily like normally, but he has a way of putting it together that is appealing and draws you in. His work reminds me of Basquiat’s, in that it is portraiture, but graphic and animated rather than representational. I had seen his work around town and liked it, and then when I met him in person—he’s a graphic designer for the Art Association—I liked it even more. He has such a curious mind and a creative spirit about him that is refreshing. It’s youthful, kind of like Jenny Dowd’s work, but in a different way. Jenny’s is innocent. Steven’s maybe has a dark story hiding behind the surface. stevenglassart.com

AT AGE NINETEEN, while studying for her Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting and art history, Shari Brownfield emptied her savings account, not to buy a car or a designer bag or a fabulous spring break trip, but a lithograph by painter Antoni Tàpies. “I’m an art geek,” says the fifteen-year valley resident. Formerly the director of Heather James Fine Art, today Brownfield is a fine art consultant at Shari Brownfield Fine Art. “The whole world is now my gallery,” she says. Brownfield’s the only candidate member of the American Society of Appraisers in Wyoming specializing in fine art, a member of the boards of the local arts nonprofits Center of Wonder and the Art Association of Jackson Hole, and a newly minted U.S. citizen. (She’s a native of Canada.) Mom to daughter Finley, who turns eleven in June, Brownfield says she works with clients to grow collections that evoke emotions and tell a layered story of their lives. “I don’t believe in decorating a home all at once,” she says. “Then you’re creating a snapshot in time, as opposed to a layer of stories of your life.” Here, Shari shares some of the local artists and places that inspire her to do this. RANGE ISSUE FIVE 10

Mad Mattr Finley loves this Play-Doh kind of object called Mad Mattr. I’ve come to love it, too. Sometimes, Finley and I will just sit for hours and talk while we knead this. Talking with her—simplifying a big message into something real and true—is inspiring and also informs my work. Walking into an art fair is overwhelming, but I do what I do when I talk with Finley: distill it. A great compliment from a client I was at an art show with was, “I wanted to go to everything, but you saw what was good from across the room.” Who knew talking with a ten-yearold while playing with Mad Mattr could be training for art fairs? $12.99, Jackson Hole Toy Store, 165 Center St., 307/734-2663, jacksonholetoystore.com


FAVORITES

COLORFUL CARAFE At first we thought this 16-ounce, glass water bottle by Aquaovo was covered in leather—which was cool, but a little highmaintenance, right? We like a stylish water bottle as much as the next person, but won’t sacrifice practicality for good looks. (And it’s just not practical to have a water bottle covered in something that shouldn’t get wet.) But it turns out the zippered protective sleeve is made from silicone. So we bought ourselves one. $25, Persephone Bakery, 145 E. Broadway Ave., 307/200-6708, persephonebakery.com

DRINK TO THE MOUNTAINS Whether you’re a fish person or not, there’s no denying the stylishness and originality of Aruliden’s hand-blown Glasscape fishbowl. The Glasscape comes in two sizes and seems like the only proper home for a Jackson Hole fish, but it’s just as eye-catching when empty or when filled with air plants. And you can improve the quality of any cocktail by serving it in one of Aruliden’s new Escape hand-blown glass tumblers, which have the same mountainous interior landscape as the Glasscape bowl. From $48, use code “JH2017” at aruliden.com/shop to get 10% off Glasscape and Escape

SMELLS LIKE YELLOWSTONE

Photography (candle and bears): Bradly J. Boner

Bring Yellowstone into your home with Ethics Supply Co.’s Yellowstone National Park candle. The candle, made from coconut-soy beeswax, is handpoured in small batches in California. It doesn’t smell like sulfur, but instead like the park’s more pleasant scents— subalpine fir, thermal moss, and wild strawberry. While we were initially skeptical of the “thermal moss” part, the end result is a lively but graceful fragrance. This candle will burn for an estimated forty-five hours. $45, Paper and Grace, 55 Glenwood St., 307/733-8900, paperandgrace.com

BEARLY SEASONED When you want just a touch of western wildlife on your table, go for this set of pewter bear salt and pepper shakers. $145, Belle Cose, 48 E. Broadway Ave., 307/733-2640, bellecose.com

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T H E S PA C E W I T H I N

Define becomes the reality of the building. space. T H E SYour PA C E WITHIN

becomes the reality of the building. –Frank Lloyd Wright –Frank Lloyd Wright

STUDIO@JJSTIREMANDESIGN.COM | 307-739-3008

jjstiremandesign.com 307-739-3008 307-739-3008jacque@jjstiremandesign.com jjstireman@wyoming.com jjstiremandesign.com


FAVORITES

THE BEST FLOAT We don’t understand why every valley home worth its private pond doesn’t have a Hammocraft yet. Dreamt up and designed by lifetime valley locals Bland Hoke and Bryan Carpenter, Hammocraft is exactly what it sounds like: a raft full of hammocks. Up to five hammocks, in fact. The two friends have spent more than a decade designing an ingenious, lightweight aluminum frame capable of easily mounting onto two SUPs or kayaks, and supporting up to five hammocks. It’s possible you’ve seen an iteration of a Hammocraft out in the wild—the men and their friends regularly take them to String Lake, R Park, and down various stretches of the Snake, among other valley waters. And they’re finally happy enough with their design that they’re selling it. If you have your own pond, there’s no reason you shouldn’t have a Hammocraft for it. You can also rent one from Teton Backcountry Rentals. Buy from $895 (full setups are $2,495), 307/690-0097, hammocraft.com. Rent from $130/day, 307/828-1885, tetonbcrentals.com

THE LAST WORD Made from formaldehyde-free MDF finished with white epoxy, “The End” bookends bring style and smiles to any bookshelf. $28 each, Nest, 50 King St., 612/220-8076, nestjacksonhole.com

WRITTEN IN STONE

BETTER THAN THE ORIGINAL No kitchen is complete without Persephone Bakery’s homemade Nutella. It’s 1,000 times better than the supermarket stuff—think less sweet and more texture—and has only six ingredients, all easily pronounceable: hazelnuts, hazelnut oil, confectionary sugar, Tahitian vanilla, cocoa powder, and salt. $12, Persephone Bakery, 145 E. Broadway Ave., 307/200-6708, persephonebakery.com RANGE ISSUE FIVE 14

BIRD ART Why settle for just a bird feeder when you can get a bird feeder/bird camera combo? Seriously. Meet Bird Photo Booth, which recently launched 2.0 of its product. The feeder is exactly what its name implies. Hidden in a weatherproof compartment that is part of the feeder is a 4k motion-activated Wi-Fi camera (or you can buy the base model and use your own smartphone or GoPro with the included Bluetooth remote). Now you can take the most amazing photos and videos of birds from the couch. The feeder looks good, too; the weatherproof camera compartment hides behind a facade inspired by twin-lens reflex cameras from the 1930s. From $60, birdphotobooth.com

Photography (bookends and Nutella): Bradly J. Boner

Some valley residents amass a quiver of skis. Design nerds like us have our quivers, too—of pens. 22 Design Studio’s (no relation to Teton County) concrete rollerball pen is: 1) supercool; and 2) only gets better with age. From the start we loved the feel of its ridged, high-density concrete barrel; as we began to use it, we noticed the ridges erode, making the pen precisely perfect for our hands. $89, shop.gessato.com


PO Box 642 970 W Broadway #216 Jackson, WY 83001 Phone - 307-734-5245 info@jhbuildersinc.com www.jhbuildersinc.com


MUST HAVE

OUTDOOR ACCESSORIES By Anna Cole

Whether you’ve spent the day floating on the Snake River, climbing high in the Tetons, or biking on Teton Pass, the fun shouldn’t stop when you get home. Make sure your backyard and deck are properly styled for summer with these finds from local pros.

Run With It There’s no doubt the modern-butorganic look and feel of Caroline Z Hurley’s Natural Moons Table Runner will be a star at your next outdoor dinner. The 6-footlong, 100 percent linen runner is individually block-printed by hand with nontoxic acrylic ink. “The contemporary design adds some serious style to any dinner party,” says Grace Home Design associate Kate Dreher Swanson. $70, available from Grace Home Design, 960 Alpine Ln. #1, 307/733-9893, gracehomedesign.com

Lounge Local design team Pamela Stockton and Melinda Shirk love Loloi’s new collab with Joanna Gaines of Magnolia Farms. Her line of rugs and pillows done with the award-winning textile manufacturer Loloi has patterns that “embody mountain chic,” Shirk says. For this season, the indoor/ outdoor pillow collection is a fav of Shirk’s, both for its stain-, water-, and sun-resistant fabrics and its affordability. Starting at $135, available at Stockton & Shirk Interior Designs, 745 W. Broadway Ave., 307/733-0274, stocktonandshirk.com

A Sense Of Place (Setting)

Play Ball Every lawn needs a croquet set. Meet Jaques London, the British company that invented the game way back in 1851 and the maker of the world’s finest croquet sets since. If money is no object, interior designer Melinda Shirk likes the company’s Great Exhibition Croquet Set, one of its finest. It comes with pairs of four different types of mallets, eight matching composite balls, and a variety of zipped canvas bags to keep everything organized. Jaques’ Tonbridge set is equally as functional but not as fancy, and has a more affordable price to reflect that. Great Exhibition set from $1,200, Tonbridge from $60; available at Stockton & Shirk, 745 W. Broadway Ave., 307/733-0274, stocktonandshirk.com RANGE ISSUE FIVE 16

Photography (plates and silverware): Bradly J. Boner

It’s the Fourth of July and you’re having a party. You don’t want to use your good flatware and dishes, but neither do you want guests to feel like they’re at a frat party with paper plates and plastic forks. Meet the Fallen Leaves Plates, made from heat-pressed, fallen palm fronds and “so sturdy,” says Cassie Dean, shopkeeper at Paper and Grace. Designer Michael Aram’s Madhouse Cutlery is made from plastic but is dishwasher-safe, so you can get multiple uses out of it, which you’ll want to do since it’s the perfect design for Jackson Hole—the handles are shaped like twigs. Plates $27 for 25, cutlery $7 for a set of 4; Paper and Grace, 55 N. Glenwood, 307/733-8900, paperandgrace.com


Swinging In The Breeze Range editor Dina Mishev can’t get enough of Loll’s Rope Swing. She hung one on her front porch, greeting guests with a touch of whimsy, but this swing (made from 100 percent recycled plastic) works most anywhere. $277, lolldesigns.com

Cool, But Hot Made from nonpowder-coated, hot-rolled steel, a Stahl Firepit’s color matures over time. It starts dark and, say, about three years later (depending on weather), the patina will have matured into a rich, autumnal yellow. This firepit isn’t just about color, though. “I love the geometric form,” says Sarah Kennedy, an interior designer at Carney Logan Burke Architects. “It’s a unique departure from the expected circular or box shapes that you see everywhere.” The same design comes in three sizes, all easy to assemble (and disassemble) without needing so much as a screwdriver. From $499, stahlfirepit.com

All the Pleasures of Home & Garden

All Tied Up The signature move of Milan-based Paola Lenti is crafting pieces—from rugs to chairs and swings— from braided rope. The company’s Ray Modular Rug is resistant to environmental factors like UV rays and water. “Using an outdoor rug helps ground the seating configuration and makes the space feel more intimate,” says Cynthia Harms, interior design coordinator at Carney Logan Burke Architects. Complement Lenti’s rug with one of her Nido poufs. “The simple design allows for so much versatility— they can be used indoors or outdoors, with coordinating Paola Lenti furniture or with pieces from a completely different vendor,” Harms says. Price upon request, clbarchitects.com, paolalenti.it/en 17

208.354.8816 • 2389 S. Hwy 33 • Driggs, ID

www.mdlandscapinginc.com Open Year Round 9-6 Monday – Saturday


NEIGHBORHOOD

Mount Glory

Grand Teton

Walden Pond

Hwy 89/191

The Cedarwoods

Northeast Forty Big Trail Dr.

End of the Trail Twinhomes

RAFTER J

Built for living

By Mark Huffman ∙ Photography by Tuck Fauntleroy

WHEN CHARLES LEWTON planned a middle-class subdivision south of Jackson, he heard one thing over and over. “All the local people said that no one would ever live that far out of town,” says Lewton, who’s now eighty. How far was too far in 1978? Farther than Alpine? A longer drive than over the pass to Victor, Idaho? No. People were talking about the road trip to what is now Rafter J Ranch—around 3.5 miles from the Town Square. There were only about 4,000 people in Jackson at the time, and a mile south of the “Y” intersection (where Albertsons is now) took you beyond civilization. To the west of the highway, where Lewton filed his plat, was Brownie Brown’s cattle ranch. Few people lived outside of town back then, Lewton recalls, but he anticipated growth. He bought Brown’s 660-acre ranch and divided it for 500 units—332 single-family houses and the remainder for several condo developments. He aimed for full-time residents: “Everyone I dealt with were local folks,” Lewton says. “Every subdivision I started was because of locals. I never thought about anybody from outside moving here to one of my places.” That was the case for Gary and Karen Hodges, who bought a lot the first year they went on the market. “Charles Lewton just wanted people to be able to own property,” Karen Hodges says. “He gave really good deals and did financing. It’s the only way we could have afforded to own a house here, even back then.”

Lewton moved to Jackson in 1966 from Ten Sleep, Wyoming. (Both Lewton’s and his wife’s grandparents homesteaded ranches in the area.) One of his first projects in Jackson was the High Country Subdivision, a tiny neighborhood of big horse properties just south of Rafter J. Then, in 1971, Lewton and Jackson attorney Floyd King, who was also his partner in developing Rafter J, created The Aspens subdivision off Teton Village Road. Besides developing, Lewton also built houses. He says he completed one for $15,000, “and that included the dirt.” The low-lying Rafter J land—Flat Creek flows through it—was flat, and if Lewton and King had followed the usual developer’s playbook, they would have laid out streets at right angles. But they didn’t. Lewton knew from the start that “I did not want any straight streets. We wanted to slow traffic and keep it more like a family place.” The result: streets that seem to wander, cul-de-sacs, and branching roads leading to minineighborhoods. “We went out and walked through it, and I said, ‘This is where I want my roads to be.’ ” Working with Lewton and King were hired architects and engineers, including Bob Corbet, who designed some

WHEN CHARLES LEWTON PLANNED A MIDDLECLASS SUBDIVISION SOUTH OF JACKSON, HE HEARD ONE THING OVER AND OVER: “ALL THE LOCAL PEOPLE SAID THAT NO ONE WOULD EVER LIVE THAT FAR OUT OF TOWN.”

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Lewton accomplished his goal of creating a place where people who work in the area can live nearby. “It was designed for people to live in,” MacMillan says, “and it worked. It’s a neighborhood, not just a subdivision.” He mentions looking out his window this past winter as he prepared to go out to clear snow, Tensleep Dr. Hwy 89/191 and “somebody was already doing it. It was a neighbor, someone I Southeast Forty recognized but didn’t really know.” While it’s homier than many Jackson Hole residential areas, Rafter J mirrors the local real estate market. When Lewton found buyers for his first lots—he sold most of them himself—he let one go to a friend for $10,000. His high sale was $35,000. He told one buyer to hold onto his lot for five years and that he’d make $20,000 or $30,000. He was right. Realtor Dan Visosky of Prugh Real Estate had one of only four vacant residential lots in Rafter J on the market of the original buildings at Teton Village (and this winter. The one-third acre was priced at the namesake of the famous Corbet’s Couloir ski $375,000. Visosky calls Rafter J “a great place for run). They brought their own ideas to Lewton. locals” and a place where even new people “feel “I said, ‘OK, I want you guys to go out and draw like they’re part of the Jackson Hole community.” what you think it should be.’ Then we’d meet and It’s the same for homes. Houses at Rafter J are then take another week and do it again.” mostly unassuming—“These are not mansions,” Along with the meandering street design, MacMillan says—but the valley’s desirability has Lewton and King decided to keep open space pushed prices up and tightened the market. between developed areas. The plat called for 448 Lewton says he paid under $3,000 an acre acres of development and 194 acres free of homes. for the ranch. Hodges recalls that she and her Today, that open-space land includes a park and husband bought a lot and built a house for about bike paths. Lewton also “put aside the prettiest $100,000. Houses now top $900,000. MacMillan spot in the project and gave it to the Lord”—that’s says buying at Rafter J was “the best investment the location now of River Crossing Church. I ever made.” Visosky says that during 2016, only The land was near empty, according to about fifteen properties were sold in Rafter J, and Hodges, director of operations at Jackson Hole only four homes were on the market in January. Community School. She recalls that her husband, People who move in mostly stay. “We find a lot a Lower Valley Energy employee, went with of people do not have any intention of leaving Lewton to see a lot. They had to ford Flat Creek. Rafter J,” Visosky says. “It’s very stable.” “It was just a field with a marker in it,” she says. “There wasn’t anything out there.” Even after the Hodges built, Karen says, “You could see all  the way to the highway; there were no other houses or — trees in the way—it was wide ONE OF THE THINGS people notice about Rafter J is the street names. It’s typical for open.” Rafter J today, thirtydevelopers to come up with names that evoke the past, but they usually stick to the eight years later, doesn’t seem mundane. Not developer Charles Lewton. This grandson of Wyoming ranchers went for so far away as it did. “This is not names that recalled his history. “Those names were all mine,” he says. “They were all a long way out of town by any ranch names, things we used on the ranch, where I was born and raised.” stretch,” says Kip MacMillan, Many are for ranch equipment: There’s Pitch Fork Drive, and Bull Rake, Beaver Slide, a resident since 1990 with his Buck Rake, Fresno Drive, and Hay Slide Drive. Others are for cattle and horses: Angus, wife, Lin, and the head of the Hereford, Longhorn, Short Horn, Brahma, Arabian, Percheron, Clydesdale, Appaloosa, homeowners association. “I can Quarter Horse, Pinto, and Colt. There are drives named for ducks: King Eider, Cinnamon get home in ten minutes.” Teal, and American Brandt. There are also Pack Saddle and Stirrup drives, and drives MacMillan, a retired cop and called Bunkhouse, Barb Wire, Cow Camp, Hay Loft, and Saddle. “It was to honor what the Snow King employee, thinks West was,” Lewton says, “where those of us who grew up in rural country came from.”

BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPES START HERE

Landscaping & Design Excavation • Rock & Pavers Water Features Maintenance & Irrigation

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

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HANGING ART

TEN TIPS

By Maggie Theodora

ACCORDING TO AN INFORMAL Range poll—read, I asked five stylish friends—the only home decorating task more intimidating than deciding where to hang art is picking paint colors. When I pointed out to my friends, errr ... respondents, that hanging art isn’t just about considering where to hang pieces (or display, in the case of sculptures) but also how to display them, half changed their answers to hanging art being more difficult

than picking paint colors. To quote one friend, “Painting over a swatch of a color you decide you don’t like is easier than filling in holes in the wall and then repainting that area.” With the results of the informal poll finalized, we set out to do a more formal poll. The goal? To make the decision of where and how to display art less stressful. We did this by asking local art and design pros for their advice. Happy hanging.

AFTER WORKING FOR A LARGE ART SHIPPING COMPANY IN SAN FRANCISCO (AND SPENDING WINTERS SKIING HERE IN JACKSON), SPENCER RANK FOUNDED TETON ART SERVICES IN 2007 TO SPECIALIZE IN THE DELIVERY AND INSTALLATION OF HIGH-VALUE PIECES THROUGHOUT THE INTERMOUNTAIN WEST. THE COMPANY WORKS WITH GALLERIES AND DESIGNERS, MUSEUMS (INCLUDING THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WILDLIFE ART), AND AUCTION HOUSES CHRISTIE’S AND SOTHEBY’S.

2 Understand scale. Every piece of artwork looks best with some 1 space around it. Avoid crowding pieces next to doors or window trim, or into an alcove with less than 4 to 5 inches around it.

Consider sunlight—photography and works on paper are very sensitive to UV rays and can fade quickly at our high altitude. Hang these out of direct sunlight and/or place them on north-facing walls. On glazed or glossy artwork, sunlight can cause unwanted reflection, obscuring the artwork almost completely.

60”

3

5 Don’t use architectural features as cues for layout, like making the top of a piece even with the top of a door or window. This ends up looking forced and awkward, rather than flowing and beautiful. Do hang pieces in relationship to furniture like headboards, sideboards, or fireplace mantels; typically, I like the bottoms of pieces to be within 4 to 6 inches of the tops of headboards or mantels. RANGE ISSUE FIVE 20

Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy

To keep pieces level, use two hooks to hang them. The best practice is to hang artwork from D-rings on the side, but 4 this is difficult, so most people opt for a wire. With a wire, hang the two hooks as wide as possible, to reduce the need to relevel the piece.

Don’t hang things too high. The gallery/museum standard is 60” to the center of the artwork. This can be modified up or down a few inches to taste, but I wouldn’t deviate too much.


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TEN TIPS

ROSANNA MITCHELL HAD ALREADY BEEN AN ARTIST HERSELF FOR THIRTY YEARS WHEN, IN 2001, SHE FOUNDED WILLOW CREEK INTERIOR DESIGN WITH COLLEEN WALLS. MITCHELL, KNOWN FOR HER STRONG SENSE OF SPACE AND COLOR, LEFT WILLOW CREEK IN 2015, BUT STILL WORKS WITH WALLS AS A DESIGN/ART CONSULTANT ON CERTAIN PROJECTS. IN HER OWN HOME—A LIVE/WORK STUDIO IN THE STEPHEN DYNIA-DESIGNED METRO PLATEAU DEVELOPMENT—MITCHELL COLLECTS WORKS BY ARTISTS SHE HAS STUDIED WITH. ALSO, “I COLLECT SMALL, INTERESTING SCULPTURES WHEN I TRAVEL,” SHE SAYS.

Don’t be afraid to juxtapose paintings, but tie them together with something. This large, abstract Jeremy Morgan piece is very strong in subject matter and 1 color, while the Robert Moore oil painting is serene and traditional and has softer tones. To unify the two paintings, I took the gold frame off the Morgan so that it “matched” the abstract piece.

Because the space is generally modern, I like the artwork to be 2 unframed—it has a more modern look and feel than a framed piece.

If you have a room with high ceilings or a large great room, grouping smaller sculptures with paintings holds the space better than having them stand alone—a sculpture could get lost if displayed with no other items with mass. Here, since the sculptures are shorter in height and not heavy in mass, they work beside the painting and do not block or overpower it in any way.

Consider the size of the painting in relation to the size of the wall space available, what is going on under the painting (i.e., is there a sofa or a credenza?), and what is on either side. Making a decision about where to hang these paintings 4 was a challenge. I had to consider the wall space available after the built-in wall system and floating console were in place. The TV height was also in the mix, as well as the extremely high ceilings and windows.

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Photograph by Tuck Fauntleroy

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TEN TIPS

NINETEEN YEARS AGO, TAYLOE PIGGOTT TOOK OVER PART OF A HIGH-END FRAME SHOP AND BEGAN SELLING WORK BY LOCAL ARTISTS. IT DIDN’T TAKE LONG BEFORE THE SPACE WAS MORE ART GALLERY THAN FRAMES. TEN YEARS AGO, THE FRAME SHOP DISAPPEARED COMPLETELY AND PIGGOTT OPENED TAYLOE PIGGOTT GALLERY IN DOWNTOWN JACKSON. BY THEN, SHE REPRESENTED MORE THAN LOCAL ARTISTS. “I HAD STARTED REACHING OUT TO SOME OF MY FAVORITE ARTISTS, LIKE CAIO FONSECA AND SQUEAK CARNWATH,” SHE SAYS. “EVENTUALLY, I WON THEIR TRUST.” PIGGOTT HAS SINCE EXPANDED HER GALLERY TO INCLUDE A DESIGN STUDIO.

1 Play with light, both natural and artificial. Where do shadows fall throughout the day? How would a piece look with light from a lamp? Light can drastically affect not only a specific piece, but also the overall mood of a room. I always think about how a room will transition from daytime to evening.

Choose work that speaks directly to you. Curating your space is an opportunity to share the journey of your life and personality with those who visit your home. While that might sound intimidating, I don’t see it that way. It’s freeing. Instead of buying pieces you think you should have, purchase ones that you connect with and that mean something. 2

4

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Check out the space at different angles: What does it look like from the doorway? From the couch? Around the corner? The space should evoke compelling emotions from every vantage point.

Photograph by David Agnello

3

Encourage a conversation between pieces. A work of art should be able to stand on its own, but also engage with other art in the space, as well as with the architecture. When I curate a room, I always look for the common thread. That’s not to say pieces match, but that they talk to one another.


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ARTISAN

MUD MAN

Brett Hull has spent his life—as his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather did—perfecting the ancient art of plastering.

By Joohee Muromcew ∙ Photography by Ryan Dorgan

TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES IN HOMEBUILDING can leave laypeople marveling that home design once began with pencil on paper at a drafting table. From just decades-old CAD/CAM technologies to the latest app-enabled appliances and home security systems, technology has brought efficiency and precision to homes. Homebuilding, however, remains a craft, and perhaps no aspect of the craft is more enduring than plasterwork. Plaster dates back to ancient civilizations all over the world—in places as disparate as ancient Rome, China, and the Middle East. Wherever it was applied, it was a mixture of lime or gypsum (gypsum plaster is also known as plaster of Paris), sand or cement, and water. Crushed stone, horsehair, or other finely ground materials act as binders or textural elements, but the basic method of plastering has been the same for more than millennia. This is for good reason. If built properly, a plaster wall can last for decades, even a century. Plaster walls are mold-resistant, create highly effective sound barriers, and can even improve acoustics. The finish can vary from flat, lacquer-like gloss to rich textures and bas-relief. RANGE ISSUE FIVE 26


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High-quality, time-tested construction and artful finishing comes at a price, of course, but the greatest barrier to installing plaster (or stucco for exterior walls) is finding a true master of plasterwork. Once a wall has been primed, the mud must be mixed with a pastry chef’s instinct for humidity, temperature, and density. Then, the plasterer must cover the entire wall expertly in one sitting. Walls that are completed piecemeal eventually reveal telltale seams or cracks. Brett Hull of Imperial Plaster in St. Anthony, Idaho, is a fourth-generation plasterer and deeply proud of his family’s history in the trade. While growing up in Utah, Hull’s greatgrandfather learned the art from Roman immigrants. Hull’s grandfather learned the trade

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for detail deter most in the construction field from an early age, as did Hull’s father, Doug, and from pursuing plastering as a career. “There’s a then Brett. The Hulls became known for their certain caliber of person who can do it,” he says. work on Latter Day Saint temples and were asked “Once the mud is mixed, you can’t answer your to work on temples in Hawaii. Their reputation phone, there’s no going to the bathroom. If you quickly spread, and the family moved to Hawaii have an imperfection, you have to strip it, start in response to the demand. Among their many over or else it looks patched. It’s very stressful.” large-scale projects was the plasterwork for Hull began working alongside his father finance titan Charles Schwab’s private golf cleaning tools and mixing mud around age ten. resort. It required a backbreaking, one-day sprint “You can’t just teach some guy to do this,” he says. to plaster a continuous 2,000-square-foot ceiling “It takes years to learn and a lot of patience. The in the main clubhouse. The artisans worked on only way to do that is with family.” stilts, and the finished veneer was a custom color that Schwab personally designed. “It was flawless, no blemishes. All in one set, all of us on stilts,” recalls Brett Hull with humble pride. Hull is now the primary plasterer for his company, though his crew once included his father, brother, and cousin. While he has a team that can prep walls, set up, clean up, and even mix the mud, it is Hull—with hawk and trowel in hand— who applies each coat of plaster to every wall. He can coat a wall as large as 800 square feet in one day. Pictured here, from left to right: Brett Hull’s father, Doug; his brother, Don; and Brett working on a Hull admits the physical project in Kona, Hawaii. demands and exacting eye RANGE ISSUE FIVE 28

Photograph courtesy Brett Hull

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ARCHITECTURE

SQUARE FEET: 6,500 | BEDROOMS: 4 IN MAIN HOUSE | BATHS: 4.5 IN MAIN HOUSE | LOT ACREAGE: APPROX. 18 | COMPLETION DATE: 2018

GLASS HOUSE This family home blurs the lines between inside and out.

By Dina Mishev

FOR AN EIGHTEEN-SOME-ACRE parcel of land adjacent to the Snake River, the architects at Carney Logan Burke designed a simple structure. “It’s one move—a bar,” says principal Eric Logan. “Simple is good.” In this home slated to be completed in 2018, simple is also stunning, and not just because the “bar’s” views to the north are unimpeded and include the Snake River and the Tetons. The bar form was a solution to two constraints: the clients’ desire to disturb the land as little as possible, and the location of the Snake River Levee 150 yards from the north end of the building envelope. “They know they have a very special piece of property and are very sensitive about disturbing it,” Logan says. “The team, which includes a biologist in addition to a landscape architect, is putting lots of effort into being sure we’re making the lightest footprint possible.” The problem presented by the levee is that its top is six feet higher than ground level. If the home’s first floor were built at grade, any windows to the north would frame a dirt berm. RANGE ISSUE FIVE 30


its own barbecue and pizza oven, as well as inLogan says the simplest way to elevate the your-face Teton views. Twenty-four-foot-wide main living spaces—an upside-down design stairs gradually cascade down from the “room” where the kitchen, master suite, and dining and to grade. The master bathroom is inside, but, living rooms are on the second story—wasn’t because of a wall of glass behind the vanity, it appropriate for this site, or for the owners’ feels like you’re outside. program. On this lot, a twoA design challenge story mass would stick (given the extensive use of out, and, Logan says, “This glass and steel) was to keep is a legacy project for the the home from feeling family. This is intended to commercial or cold. While be a place where they can the clients were looking come with their kids now for something with a and, in the future, kids and modern aesthetic, they did grandkids. We’re entering appreciate the warmth, this with the mindset that scale, and coziness of their we’re doing a one-hundredcurrent valley home, which year building.” When Logan describes as “a very considering a family using different proposition—it a home down through [ ERIC LOGAN, PRINCIPAL, has small windows and generations and into the short overhangs, and twenty-second century, CARNEY LOGAN BURKE ] a comfy, in-the-woods upside-down living can be character.” Logan says the fussy. “Once we get fussy, clients “stressed that there it’s not workable in the were lots of things about long-term,” Logan says. their current house they Instead of designing found comforting and reassuring and didn’t a second-story living space, Logan slightly want to lose.” elevated the entire home. The main floor, While this home has ten-foot overhangs and which has the kitchen, living and dining rooms, walls of windows, these features work with other master suite, and the kids’ bedrooms, is five design decisions to arrive at an end result similar feet above grade. Walking in the home’s front to the couple’s current home—a space that is entrance, “People are gracefully welcomed and nothing if not comfy in the woods. encouraged to go to the upper level,” he says. (There is a modest ground floor with a bathroom and a guest suite with doors that open directly onto the north yard.) To create a seamless transition between inside and outside spaces, and to keep the home from looking like it is on an artificial perch, landscape architect Mark Hershberger developed a plan that raised the grade on sections of the north and south sides of the house. Concrete masses anchor the east and west sides of the home, but the north and south sides are mostly glass. With Hershberger’s landscaping, the glass meets grass. The building is a filter for the views and the experience of the surrounding landscape, and is also a gateway to the landscape. “Very intentionally, we wanted to get this feeling that the inside and the outside are together,” Logan says. The “river room” is on the north side of the house. Off the home’s main volume—the living/dining/kitchen space— it is completely outside, but it feels like an indoor aerie: It has

“VERY INTENTIONALLY, WE WANTED TO GET THIS FEELING THAT THE INSIDE AND THE OUTSIDE ARE TOGETHER.”

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ON THE MARKET

RANGE ISSUE FIVE 32


UNDER $750K The basics: This 1,173-square-foot, three-bedroom, two-bathroom townhome in East Jackson was recently remodeled with new tile and carpet and has a finished basement. Why you want it: Pickings in East Jackson are slim these

days, especially around this price. Chances of finding another property this nicely upgraded are even slimmer. Can be yours for: $499,000 Why it’s worth it: Walk to the Town Square or to

Cache Creek trailheads. Contact: Greg Prugh, Prugh Real Estate, 307/733-9888,

prughrealestate.com

$2 MILLION - $5 MILLION The basics: This 5,000-square-foot log home with four bedrooms, six bathrooms, and a heated full-log, three-car garage sits on 12.23 acres in the Gros Ventre North subdivision. Why you want it: It’s a classic Jackson Hole log home, with

heartwood pine flooring and a two-story river rock fireplace in a great room with vaulted ceilings and exposed log beams. Can be yours for: $3,995,000 Why it’s worth it: This home sits on more than 12 acres

and then overlooks 560 acres of working ranchland forever protected under a conservation easement. Contact: David A. NeVille, Jackson Hole Real Estate Associates,

307/734-9949, tngjh.com

$10 MILLION+ The basics: This is a contemporary western home with four

en-suite bedrooms on 40 acres north of town with views of the Tetons and Sleeping Indian. Why you want it: The landscaped property includes 3/4 of a

mile of private, trout-filled spring creeks and a golf practice facility built to PGA specs, with tee areas in the shadow of the Tetons. Can be yours for: $28,000,000 Why it’s worth it: Designing the home, architect Tom Ward (Ward + Blake) included thoughtful details, like a living roof above the three-car garage. There is also an exercise room, library, media room, and private rooftop decks off each bedroom suite. Contact: Ed Liebzeit, Jackson Hole Sotheby’s International

Realty, 307/739-8010

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SHOPPING TRIP

LAGUNA BEACH

LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA, is an oasis on the edge of the inland sea of Orange County sprawl—a dreamy place where surfers stroll to the next swell via city sidewalks, and the whole town makes it a point to drop everything and watch the sunset every day. Just a twenty-five-minute drive from John Wayne Airport (SNA), this tightly knit beach community is surrounded by rolling hills that are part of a vast conservation easement, staving off the threatening stucco empires to the west. Meanwhile, its waters and beaches are protected as a California State Marine Reserve. Laguna Beach is quintessential Southern California. Initially populated by weekenders who eventually chose to stay, the community’s isolation and its scenic beauty attracted plein air painters in the 1920s and, later, filmmakers and photographers, creating the seaside village’s reputation as an artists’ enclave. Those early bohemian beachgoers built studios, summer cottages, and dream dwellings (Laguna is home to more than 700 historically and architecturally significant buildings). They created a town known for its

By Jeremy Pugh

emphasis on whiling away the days in languid creative pursuit. Hildegarde Hawthorne (granddaughter of Scarlet Letter scribe Nathaniel Hawthorne) described Laguna “as a child of that deathless search, particularly by persons who devote their lives to painting or writing, for some place where beauty and cheapness and a trifle of remoteness hobnob together in a delightful companionship.” And, except for the “cheapness” Hawthorne describes (Laguna’s limitations on development make its land exponentially more dear each year), much remains the same. Filled with public art, galleries, museums, and aloe bloom-festooned neighborhoods all situated on a gorgeous strand of grade-A California beach, this walkable town feels remote and far away from the traffic and headaches that plague the rest of Orange County. Its winking scruffiness sounds just like the opening strains of track one, side one of The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds, and looks just like the silhouette of a tousle-haired blonde emerging from the surf as the sun sets. It is the perfect antidote to a long Wyoming winter.

RANGE ISSUE FIVE 34


Laguna Beach Transit Shuttle

GET YOUR ART AND ARCHITECTURE ON There are two historic Laguna neighborhoods, Laguna north and south. The northern hood is one of the town’s oldest, originally subdivided in 1906. It boomed in the 1920s and is abundant with Craftsman-style bungalows endemic to the area. The southern neighborhood grew around a resort hotel near Arch Beach. The hotel failed, but the summer cottages and beach houses built around it are known for their individuality and variety. Both areas are served by the town’s free trolley and bus service, and the Laguna Beach Historical Society (278 Ocean Ave., Laguna Beach, 949/497-6834, lagunabeachhistory.org) publishes a walking tour guide that, coupled with the friendly bus drivers, serves as a hop-on, hop-off education in Laguna’s architectural treasures.

In the 1940s, silver-screen legend Bette Davis lived in a Tudor-style home (1991 Ocean Way) in Laguna’s Wood’s Cove neighborhood. She reportedly read the script for All About Eve—a film that led to an Academy Award nomination—while rattling around this house and, presumably, gazing longingly out to sea with those famous eyes. The excellent Laguna Art Museum (307 Cliff Dr., 949/494-8971, lagunaartmuseum.org) focuses exclusively on California artists and features rotating exhibitions from its permanent collection, as well as special exhibitions. By the by, it’s situated next door to Las Brisas restaurant (see page 39) if you fancy a postmuseum cocktail with a stellar view.

Laguna Art Museum

Photography by (trolley) Dave Vornberger

STYLING | DESIGN LOCATION SCOUTING PHOTO SHOOTS & PRODUCTION DANE TTE BUR R @ G MA IL. COM

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stylejacksonhole.com 35


SHOPPING TRIP

Sawdust Art Festival

BRING IT HOME Downtown Laguna’s old downtown is also its central shopping district, filled with the requisite cutesy boutiques, galleries, and trinket shops common in touristy towns. The discerning art lover will make sure to see what’s up at the Peter Blake Gallery (435 Ocean Ave., 949/376-9994, peterblakegallery.com). Blake specializes in singleartist exhibits of emerging modern talents. Add a touch of SoCal style to your home decor and visit AREOhome (207 Ocean Ave., 949/3760535, areohome.com) and Cottage Furnishings (802 South Coast Hwy., 949/497-3121, cottagefurnishings. com), where you will find modern and tasteful selections around a beach theme. Laguna Supply is a standout clothing and accessory boutique (210 Beach St., 949/497-8850, lagunasupply.com). South Laguna South Laguna is home to the one-of-a-kind boutique Merrilee’s Swimwear (790 S. Coast Hwy., 949/497-6743, merrileeswimwear.com), which has been in this location since 1977. Merilee herself— RANGE ISSUE FIVE 36

no joke—designs and crafts a line of swimwear that has created a loyal following among clients who return year after year. The store also has a lovely collection of beachy clothing and accessories. And although you will surely feel like you’ve walked into some toocool millennial clubhouse, be sure to visit the Poler “space” (1360 S. Coast Hwy., 949/715-9918, polerstuff.com/ pages/flagship). The Portland, Oregon, brand’s location in Laguna is in a large, open gathering area complete with a cold-press coffee/ beer/kombucha bar that hosts music, spoken word, and other hipster happenings. Plus, the gear is cool and well-built, with a camping-cummasonic lumberjack vibe. Sawdust The Sawdust Art Festival (935 Laguna Canyon Rd., 949/494-3030, sawdustartfestival.org) has been running in Laguna since 1965. The permanent, year-round artists’ market is the heart of Laguna’s Arts District. In addition to the market, Sawdust is home to a selection of hands-on art classes, including pottery, glassblowing, jewelry making, and screen-printing.

PLAY Wake up to your first morning in paradise with Laughter Club Yoga on Main Beach (107 S. Coast Hwy., lyinstitute.org/the-laughter-club-experience). The free, daily yoga session (BYO mat) on the beach will center you and get you ready for adventure. This is a surfing town, after all. But the

Photography by (art festival) Bob Torrez

AREOhome


MARKETING SNAPSHOT: TRENDS IN PROPERTY MARKETING As business owners, we live in a world where the internet has democratized access to potential clients. Those leaders who effectively market and manage their communications can rise to the top of the fray. In real estate sectors, from architecture firms and

interior designers to agents, contractors and property managers, this means offering clients high quality visual media. Increasingly, consumers expect and are highly influenced by great photos, videos and digital experiences.

Just look at the data and trends, which are favoring quality visual media at an increasing rate each year:

4x

as many consumers would prefer to watch a video about a product than to read about it. (1)

75%

Including video in emails doubles the click through rate and reduces optouts by 75 percent. (2)

4x

Homes listed with video get four times the inquiries of homes listed without video. (2)

85%

of buyers and sellers want to work with an agent who uses video in their marketing. (2)

If you want to try something new with a creative agency that can deliver the refined multimedia experience that clients expect, consider Orijin.

307-732-5912 | orijinmedia.com 1. www.animoto.com/blog/business/video-marketing-cheat-sheet-infographic 2. www.inman.com/next/by-the-numbers-how-to-focus-your-video-marketing-for-the-biggest-return-on-investment


SHOPPING TRIP

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Laughter Club Yoga

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Sunset at 1,000 Steps Beach

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waves that crash on the shore, it should be noted, aren’t for amateurs. Take a lesson. La Vida Laguna (1257 S. Coast Hwy., 949/275-7544, lavidalaguna. com) offers two-hour sessions to get you started. But, honestly, surfing is hard! And a little scary. La Vida Laguna also offers sea kayak tours; guides take you up the coast and narrate Laguna history (and tell you which megamillionaire lives in which mansion). Another option for ocean play is to rent a stand-up paddleboard from Costa Azul (689 S. Coast Hwy., 949/497-1423, casurfshop. com). Once you’re out past the breakers, you’ll paddle atop placid waters with the sun on your shoulders. More of a land person? The hills above Laguna are riddled with single-track mountain biking trails. Stop by Laguna Beach Cyclery for rentals and trail advice (240 Thalia St., 949/4941522, lagunabeachcyclery.com). If observing the waves from a beach chair is more your style, RANGE ISSUE FIVE 38

make it exciting and watch some of the world’s best amateur and pro skimboarders (the sport was invented in Laguna) at 1,000 Steps Beach (31972 Pacific Coast Hwy.), named for the steep staircase access that feels like 1,000 steps but is only an actual 225. Note: 1,000 Steps Beach is beautiful, but the shore break that makes it perfect for young, athletic skimboarders makes it exceedingly dangerous for you. Finally, do not. Miss. Sunset.

EAT (AND DRINK) WELL Eating out in Laguna is as much of a sport as playing in the waves. The morning meal in a surf town is truly the most important meal of the day, and, for that reason, breakfast and brunch options abound. Let’s start with the fresh and organic offerings at Zinc Cafe & Market (350 Ocean Ave., 949/494-6302, zinccafe.com), where you can pound a protein drink alongside lowcarb options or throw caution to the wind and get the avocado toast. Visit a local institution

Photography by (yoga) David Tosti, (surfer) Scott Sporleder

Driftwood Kitchen


NO CAR? IN CALIFORNIA? YEP. —

and get yourself a mess of eggs, LAGUNA IS AMAZINGLY WALKABLE considering that it’s in the heart of carbacon, and potatoes at the Orange dependent Orange County. Visit Laguna Beach (visitlagunabeach.com) has Inn (703 S. Coast Hwy., 949/494-6085, created a smartphone app (visitlagunabeach.com/plan/app/, iOS, Android) that cafelagunabeachca.com). shows the real-time location of the free trolleys and buses, as well as the stops. For the ultimate beach-town This, coupled with an Uber or Lyft ride from the airport (approximately $30 each brunch, don’t miss Las Brisas way) and some good walking shoes, makes it unnecessary to rent a car. (361 Cliff Dr., 949/497-5434, lasbrisaslagunabeach.com). Stunning views of the coast from its perch on Chef Rainer Schwarz is plating some of the finest the edge of Heisler Park are made better with California coastal cuisine in the state (619 Sleepy perfect eggs Benedict and bloody marys. For Hollow Ln., 949/715-7700, driftwoodkitchen.com). lunch, keep it simple and munch on fresh fish tacos at Taco Loco (640 S. Coast Hwy., 949/497-1635, tacoloco.net), or nibble on a light, pan-Asian set of small plates at Another Kind Cafe (793 Laguna Canyon Rd., 949/715-9688, anotherkindcafe.com). Come dinnertime, ask to dine beachside Located right on the beach (and by “right on” at Splashes (1555 S. Coast Hwy., 888/281-3502, we mean the back gate is at the high-tide mark), surfandsandresort.com/splashes) and rest assured Sunset Cove Villas is a full-suite, extended-stay that your surf and turf will be prepared to property that will make you feel like a local (683 exacting perfection. And make sure to include on Sleepy Hollow Ln., 888/845-5271, sunsetcove.com). your dining itinerary Driftwood Kitchen, where There’s a Ralphs grocery store across the road to stock up on provisions to cook in your full kitchen, and then there are the floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking Splashes the oh-so-close ocean. For a classic Laguna hotel experience, enjoy a dose of old Hollywood glamour at La Casa del Camino (1289 S. Coast Hwy., 949/497-6029, lacasadelcamino.com). The Spanish-style hotel has played host to the hoi polloi since 1929 but has kept up with the times with clean, modern rooms. For a beachside boutique experience complete with killer views, try The Inn at Laguna Beach (211 N. Pacific Coast Hwy., 800/544-4479, innatlagunabeach.com).

REST UP

Photography by (Splashes) Gary Payne

Las Brisas

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DESIGN

TO THE POINT Form meets function at New West KnifeWorks.

By Lila Edythe ∙ Photography by David Swift RANGE ISSUE FIVE 40


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September 7-10, 2017

SNOW KING CENTER • JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING

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COREY MILLIGAN BELIEVES everything should be as good and as beautiful as it can be. Beauty and performance are not mutually exclusive. “This holds in life, and in knives,” he says. Knives? Twenty years ago, while working as a chef and unhappy with his knives, Milligan tried making his own. He hasn’t stopped since. He first sold them at juried art fairs across the country, then online, and, since 2010, at brick and mortar stores, initially on the West Bank and currently on Center Street in downtown Jackson. Milligan’s New West KnifeWorks knives have been listed in Bon Appétit’s “What to Buy Now” section. In Saveur, New York City celebrity chef (and frequent judge on Food Network’s Chopped) Alex Guarnaschelli raved that her New West KnifeWorks blade “makes me feel like I can achieve anything.” What gives Milligan’s knives such power? Good design applied to good materials. Until three years ago, New West KnifeWorks used birch laminate for all of its handles. But then, the Vermont factory that made the handles burned down. “It was the only factory in the country that did that work,” Milligan says. He had to find a replacement. After months of searching, Milligan discovered G10, a glass-epoxy composite originally developed for use in computer motherboards. Extremely heat- and water-resistant, it had never before been used as the handle of a kitchen knife. “Before I started using it, as far as knives go, it was only used to make Rambo-type, military-grade knives,” Milligan says. “It is literally the most bombproof thing anyone has ever made a kitchen knife out of.” Milligan has used several different types of steel—sourcing it from as far away as Sweden and Japan—for his blades since founding New West KnifeWorks. Six years ago, S35VN Powder Metal Steel became commercially available. Made in the U.S., the technology behind this steel makes astrophysics sound simple. The result is steel that is amazingly light and capable of maintaining its structural integrity even when thin. Also, it is durable and stain-resistant. “Steel has been around RANGE ISSUE FIVE 42


“MY BROTHER IS A POET, AND HE COMES UP WITH ALL OF THESE BEAUTIFUL SAYINGS. ONE IS, ‘COOKING IS A FINE ART, AND THE KNIFE IS THE ARTIST’S BRUSH.’ ”

shapes his handles and blades. “A knife’s handle is its interface with the chef,” he says. “My brother is a poet, and he comes up with all of these beautiful sayings. One is, ‘Cooking is a fine art, and the knife is the artist’s brush.’ A welldesigned handle allows you to wield a knife as an extension of your hand.” Also considered in [ COREY MILLIGAN, NEW WEST KNIFEWORKS ] handle design is the repetitive nature of cutting. Joel Tate, culinary director for Fine Dining Restaurant Group, says finding a good knife “is like a pair of shoes for a chef. If they don’t properly fit and feel right,” forever, but this steel was literally they can’t stand up to twelve- to fifteen-hour days. just invented when we found it. And carpal tunnel syndrome can be a crippling And I would say it’s the perfect affliction for a chef. steel for what we make,” Milligan A well-designed blade has a shape, profile, says. and thickness suited to its function. “If you’re Milligan says the cost of a New chopping through bones, you can’t have too thin West KnifeWorks knife—they of a knife,” Milligan says. New West KnifeWorks start at $119 and go up to more has more than one dozen shapes of blade, made than $300—has more to do with to fillet, pare, chop, or cut bread. these materials than with design. When asked if he’s more artist or engineer, “Good design doesn’t need to Milligan says “definitely not an engineer.” But he cost more,” he says. “But if you struggles with the word “artist.” “I’ve always felt want good design made from like if I called myself an ‘artist,’ people wouldn’t materials that will stand up to the take me seriously as a businessperson. Maybe test of time, that will cost more.” now, after twenty years and having proven Every New West KnifeWorks knife comes with a myself in the business part, I am willing to say I lifetime guarantee. am an artist. Maybe.” But Milligan couldn’t quite It is from these two boringly named get it out before this interview ended. materials—G10 and S35VN—that Milligan

midcentury furnishings + fine upholstery + interior design boutique

(307) 699-7947 150 Scott Lane - Jackson

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Grateful A new house helps a young widow and her three sons move forward.

By Dina Mishev ∙ Photography by David Agnello

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here is a beautiful dining room table in Kathy Lynch’s home in the Gill Addition. Natural light spills onto it; if you sit at it, you can see Snow King in the distance through south-facing windows. Between the table and the windows is an open living area anchored by a freestanding, glassfronted Tulikivi soapstone wood-burning stove. A wall of glass on the north side of the table looks onto an outdoor patio where colorful Buddhist prayer flags flutter in the wind. Lynch’s dining table is about as perfectly situated as can be. But the family rarely uses it. RANGE ISSUE FIVE 44


Kathy Lynch went with a neutral palette so “I can change things around with the furniture,” she says. “Right now I’m into chartreuse and turquoise, but, because those colors are just in the furniture, that can be changed easily.” The turquoise sofa is from L.A.-based Thrive Furniture. The chartreuse sofa in front of the Tulikivi wood-burning stove is a find from the home of a friend’s parents. “I took it to Nalley’s [Steamway] and got it cleaned, and it’s perfect,” Kathy says. “For better or worse, I did the interiors myself. I’d say I took my time with it. By being patient, you can find the really cool, unique thing that works perfectly.”

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The siding is Douglas fir sourced from Idaho and prestained “to make it look like barnwood,” Lynch says. “We were looking at using old snow fence, and it was superexpensive. This was reasonably priced, though.” Opposite top: “So much of the design was driven by natural light,” Lynch says. Opposite the kitchen is a nineteen-foot lift-and-slide door that allows for inside/outside living in the summer. Opposite bottom: Two of Lynch’s three sons play on the dining room table in the main living space, where the floors are ash and cabinets are hemlock. “We wanted it to be light,” Lynch says. “I wanted ash or maple. I think [architect] Rich [Assenberg] was worried maple would look too orange.”

“WE HAD SUGGESTED SOME [ENERGY] EFFICIENCIES TO PRIOR CLIENTS, BUT THIS WAS THE FIRST INSTANCE WHERE THE CLIENTS WERE PUSHING US ON IT.” [ NATHAN GRAY, ARCHITECT, kt814 ]

The table they do use is an extension of the kitchen island and made of the same light-colored ash as the home’s floors. Five chairs surround it. “I’m proud to say this table was my idea,” Lynch says. It is here that Lynch and her three sons—ages seven, five, and three—spend most of their time. “We eat almost every meal here. This is the homework spot, where we do art projects, and where I have meetings,” she says. (It is at this table that I’m interviewing Lynch about the home.) “If this table could talk, well, that’d be cool.” The family has only been in the house since August 2015, but it is already full of memories and stories. Lynch’s husband, Luke, died in an avalanche in May 2015, a couple of months before the house was supposed to be finished. Kathy and Luke designed the home together, but, “There was one thing that he really wanted to have: a Tulikivi. I teased him about it, that he had this unhealthy relationship with the fireplace. But they are so beautiful and efficient.” Lynch has a fire going most winter days. One of her favorite spots is on the chartreuse sofa (salvaged from a home belonging to a friend’s parents) in front of the fireplace. “The fireplace is a piece of Luke in this house,” she says. After Luke’s death, “I was sure I was never going to move into that house,” Lynch says. “I had to re-evaluate everything.” Eventually, several months after Luke’s death and one month after the house was finished, Lynch began to think she could move in: “Enough time had to pass for me to accept and readjust. I needed time to get to a point where I could see a path forward. When tragedy hits, you don’t see that path right away. I came to see that this house was part of that path, though.” While it is only pieces of the house like the Tulikivi that remind her of RANGE ISSUE FIVE 46


Luke, the entire space reminds Lynch of Jackson. That was one of the ideas she and Luke took to architectural firm kt814, founded by Rich Assenberg and Nathan Gray. “We live in this beautiful, natural place and we wanted the house to reflect that,” Lynch says. In the kitchen, the Douglas fir used on the home’s exterior wraps inside as paneling above the sink and counter. The hemlock used on the area inside the front entrance extends outside. A nineteen-foot-wide lift-and-slide door off the kitchen is open much of the summer, and, “When it’s open, the indoors and outdoors are one,” Lynch says. She worked with local design firm Matterhouse to select drapery fabric with a texture that reminds her of flowing water. In addition to the home feeling natural, it was also important to the Lynches that it be energy-efficient. Gray says this is the most efficient project kt814 has done to date. “We had suggested some efficiencies to prior clients, but this was the first instance where the clients were pushing us on it,” he says. The home has an exterior 9 1/2-inch TJI wall and an interior 2x6 structural wall. “It’s like it was framed twice,” Lynch says. Between these two layers, dense-pack cellulose insulation was blown in; the resulting R-value, a measure of how well insulated the home is, is fifty-eight—two and a half times that required by current building code. The three boys’ bedrooms look out on a green roof. A solar evacuated tube collector on the roof heats hot water. (In the summer, it heats enough to cover 90 percent

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The bedrooms for Lynch’s three sons are “more like sleeping pods than bedrooms,” she says. Each pod is similar in size and shape, and opens into a common space where each boy has his own closet and there’s plenty of room to play. “I don’t know what to call it—the locker room?” Lynch says. “They spend a lot of time playing there. They’re Lego maniacs.”

of the home’s water usage; it also helps with the hydronic in-floor heat.) Lynch says the home could be LEED-certified, but, “We chose not to pursue that; we put money into the house instead. We’re not building to get certification, we just want it to be efficient—as efficient as a new build can be.” Kt814 calls Lynch’s home the SoFa house, which is short for “south-facing.” All of the bedrooms, the kitchen, and the dining/living room have access to southern light. “I wanted as much natural light as possible,” says Lynch, who, in the summer, hangs out in a hammock on the private, south-facing deck off the master bedroom. To do this, Gray and Assenberg broke the home into three masses: the living/ dining space; the kitchen (ground level)/master bedroom (upstairs); and the boys’ bedrooms. “They nailed it,” Lynch says of the design. Sitting at the kitchen table she envisioned, with Spot and Shiny the goldfish swimming around their tank in a corner of the kitchen counter, Lynch explains the garland of fish and birds hanging above the sink. “A good girlfriend made that for us,” she says. “For a good year, every night at dinner we would go around and talk about what we were grateful for.” Lynch would write what she and her sons said on a fish or bird shape, and add it to the garland. The garland is now dense with fish and birds. “This house is a material thing and it doesn’t matter, but it’s a nice home—a place of safety and shelter. I’m beyond grateful for it.” RANGE ISSUE FIVE 48


Top: In summer, one of Lynch’s favorite spots in the house is this hammock on the deck off the master bedroom. “It was a present from a girlfriend,” she says. “We went to Belize last fall to go fishing, and they had hammocks there that I loved. She got me one and gave it to me as a gift last Christmas.” Bottom: The boys’ rooms look out on a green roof you can also see from the ground-level patio off the kitchen.

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FRIENDSHIPS THAT WORK Mixing business with friendship makes a home in Wilson a true retreat.

By Maggie Theodora ∙ Photography by Carrie Patterson

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Opposite: The dining area includes Berman/Rosetti’s Hippo table and Madeline Weinrib’s shag rug. The chairs are upholstered in Glant’s mosaic fabric on the inside and Designers Guild Astasia Marese fabric on the outside. The Roman shade is a Pierre Frey fabric.

he 3,000-square-foot log cabin south of Wilson where I meet gallerist Mariam Diehl and interior designer Jen Visosky does not belong to either woman, but both are as comfortable in it as if it did. The two longtime friends have collaborated countless times on projects, including this one. But it is not because this home’s interior design is Visosky’s work or because the work of Diehl Gallery artists hang on its walls that the women are relaxed here. “Our relationship [with the owner] blossomed from business to a friendship,” Diehl says. Visosky adds, “When your client is also a friend, projects turn out more organic and honest.” Visosky (who started Grace Home Design), Diehl (the founder of Diehl Gallery), and this owner have done several homes together. “Since the first time we worked together, Jen has shown she has great instincts,” the owner says. The owner says she didn’t give Visosky any direction for this house, and not because all of her homes have the same look. “They’re all quite different experiences,” Visosky says. “Knowing her as I do and knowing where she is in life, I just knew this home needed to be a retreat.” And it is. 51


The owner and Mariam Diehl selected Jeremy Houghton’s painting Come Fly With Me to hang above the fireplace. The “coffee table” is a grouping of six Bleu Nature Kisimi blocks of acrylic glass with wood suspended inside them. Opposite top: The kitchen includes custom, hand-tooled leather barstools, a drawing by the owner’s son, a painting, Untitled, by Diehl Gallery artist Hunt Slonem, and a David Adler rug. Opposite bottom: A small sculpture, Baby Elephants, Child, by Diehl Gallery artist Heather Jansch sits among dishes on an open shelf in the kitchen.

“There are days I spend twelve hours working, but at least the fire is roaring,” the owner says. When asked about her favorite spot in the house, she says: “I love standing in front of the fireplace and staring at the birds [the painting Come Fly With Me by Jeremy Houghton hangs above the mantel]. I walk closer and then the painting becomes abstract. I also love standing in the hallway looking at the butterflies [a painting by Diehl Gallery artist Hunt Slonem]. I love the texture and that they are suspended.” Diehl says she was brought into this project “late in the game. But that is usual. In most instances, art wants to complement the design rather than drive it. I know that very often Jen has a vision and sense of how a piece will play with the design. Because we’re friends, I trust her.” Still, Diehl wasn’t shy about suggesting pieces for this home. “I think that because of our friendship, that has relaxed me a little in making suggestions for her art collection,” Diehl says. Also, the owner’s style “has blossomed over the years from a more conservative and less vibrant approach,” Diehl says. “There were always undertones of that, but I like to think that part of it is how well we all know each other, too.” But “as much as you think you know a client, and a friend, you can’t ever 100 percent know someone,” Visosky says. RANGE ISSUE FIVE 52


“I LOVE STANDING IN FRONT OF THE FIREPLACE AND STARING AT THE BIRDS [THE PAINTING COME FLY WITH ME BY JEREMY HOUGHTON HANGS ABOVE THE MANTEL]. I WALK CLOSER AND THEN THE PAINTING BECOMES ABSTRACT.” [ HOMEOWNER ]

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Left: Even though the owner only uses the cabin’s first floor, she hung Anastasia Kimmett’s Through the Lodgepoles in the stairway. Right: The rug is a David E. Adler Tivoli design, and the two twin small pillows are from ABC Carpet & Home. Opposite: Élitis’ Opulence wallpaper covers the wall behind the master bed, which is Dmitriy & Co’s Brampton bed. The Patterson bedside lamp is from Currey & Company.

Case in point: The three women agree that the owner knows immediately “yes” or “no” about something, whether it’s a carpet or a piece of art. “I don’t change my mind in three days,” the owner says. “Things that aren’t ‘yes’ or ‘no’ are, ‘I love it, but I don’t need to own it.’ Jen’s shown me plenty of things that fall into that category.” Wallpaper was one of the few things that fell in her design gray area. “I never did wallpaper before Jen,” the owner says. Visosky thought the biggest wall in the bedroom would be a fabulous spot for wallpaper, though; she would just have to find the right kind. Knowing that her friend loves texture, Visosky sought out textured wallpaper. She found one she thought her friend would go for, “But I wasn’t totally sure,” Visosky says. “I knew that if she did, though, it would look insanely good.” That bedroom wall, and the gently ribbed, floral-patterned wallpaper covering it, is now one of the biggest statements in the house. “I immediately thought it was beautiful when Jen showed it to me,” the owner says, “but I wasn’t sure how I would do living with it. It turns out I love it. It begs to be touched and is so pretty. I don’t know that a designer who didn’t know me could have made that move.” RANGE ISSUE FIVE 54


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MEANT to BE

A chance detour on a road trip leads to a family building a life and new home in the valley. The latter was designed to be beautiful but practical, and fun.

RANGE ISSUE FIVE 56


Each end of this valley home is clad in reclaimed Montana barnwood and prairie stone. The center volume is log, and the glass connectors between the three forms are clad with a patinaed copper. The roof is cedar shingle with copper flashing.

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Top: Because the owners wanted to bring the outside in, and they knew they’d be using the outdoor patio a lot, they chose to have these doors swing out. Bottom: An alcove was created in the prairie stone wall to store firewood. Opposite: To achieve the dark color of the timbers in the great room, they were burned prior to being installed. The floors throughout the home are red oak.

By Dina Mishev ∙ Photography by Matthew Millman

T

wo bathrooms—a first-floor powder room and the master bath—perfectly sum up a new house built north of Jackson for a family of six. In the powder room, there is a giant palm frond that separates the toilet from the vanity. In the master bath, there is a massive sheet of natural stone. The owner sourced the palm frond herself with no specific purpose, but “thought it was supercool,” she says. She went to Utah on a buying trip purposefully looking for stone, but unsure of the specifics. As she was looking at the slab of onyx that is now mounted in the master bath, someone opened the garage door behind it, which backlit the stone. “As soon as it was illuminated, it had all of this movement and life. It looked like lava,” she says. “I’m getting it,” she told a member of the construction team who was there with her. “Let’s figure out how we’re going to use it.” Then she added, “And it has to be backlit.” “That’s what a lot of this project was: fortunate happenstance and the team coming up with creative solutions to my imagination,” the owner says. The fact that this family came to build a home in Jackson Hole at all is due to happenstance. About seven years ago, while on a mission to drive to all of the states in the continental U.S. with their four boys (now ages fourteen to twenty), the family was in Montana—state forty-five for them. They were about to head home. “But since Wyoming was so close, we decided to drive through Jackson,” the wife says. The family pulled into the Town Square and “got that last parking spot in front of Moo’s [Gourmet Ice Cream] that is never open. I haven’t seen that space empty since. We parked and got out, and I immediately knew this was where we wanted to be.” (Part of the idea behind touring all fifty states was to look for a place to buy a second home.)


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In the master bathroom, a backlit slab of onyx makes a statement, especially when surrounded by neutrals like hemlock millwork and Thassos white marble. “The marble is simple, but with depth,” says project architect Maria James. Opposite: There is a glass “connector” on each side of the house. During the day you can see right through it. “At night, when it’s lit up, it really makes a statement,” James says.

The family first saw and fell in love with Jackson in the summertime. A couple of weeks before Christmas that year, the wife flew out with one of their sons to see the valley in winter. They still loved it. When they were due to fly home, a big snowstorm temporarily closed the airport. It was during this unanticipated extra time in the valley that the wife found the property they ended up buying. “Again, it was happenstance,” she says. The property was a 1980s home with a log guesthouse on ten acres that included Snake River access, a small pond, and several spring creeks. The main house, one of the first homes built in the subdivision, didn’t exactly suit the couple’s taste or needs. They looked at remodeling it. “It had been built prior to the county’s earthquake codes, though,” the wife says. “If we remodeled, the only thing that would have been left standing was the garage. I think RANGE ISSUE FIVE 60

you should redo instead of undo, but it just wasn’t feasible in this instance.” (The family lives in a renovated, onehundred-year-old house when not in Jackson.) They went to Carney Logan Burke (CLB) Architects with a clear idea of the big picture. “I had had that home built in my head for years and years,” says the wife, who was the most active family member in the design (although the oldest son did a short internship at CLB). “My idea was a log cabin that looked like it had been built onto. I wanted it to look like it had been there forever.” Also important was that, visually, the house interact lightly with the land. “I wanted to be able to see the mountains through parts of the house,” the owner says. “I wanted it to be included in nature, not obstruct nature.” The glass “connectors” between the main mass and the two wings allow for this.


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Top: Fifty percent of the lighting in the house is traditional, and the other half is more modern. Above the kitchen island and breakfast nook, the lighting fixtures are a modern riff on a traditional design. Bottom: The owners have four sons, and each of the boys’ bedrooms is different. The four rooms are similar in size and shape, but each son chose his own finishes. “The boys came into the office, and we dug through the material library in the basement,” says Carney Logan Burke interior design coordinator Cynthia Harms. “They had a blast.” Each son picked wallpaper they liked, too. “Each was really able to pick their own style.” Opposite: The owners wanted to accommodate as many of their sons’ friends as possible. This bunkroom has beds for six and is “superdurable,” says project architect James. “We did whitewash on the wood—paint would chip,” James says. “Whitewash is more integrated into the material.”

While the original home didn’t work for the family long-term, they lived in it for several years as the new home was being designed and built. “We really came to know how the world worked in that little section,” the owner says. “I learned there was a bald eagle that sits in the same tree almost every day, and I knew I wanted to be able to see it from the new house.” Principal architect John Carney says, “When you live on a site, you get to know it intimately.” The owner says: “Even though we knew when we moved into it that it wasn’t forever, leaving the original house was hard for me. It had become more than a physical structure; we had made memories there. I like knowing that the original house informed the design and details in the new one.” RANGE ISSUE FIVE 62


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HOME sweet HOME

HOME WITH HISTORY By Laura Lynn, as told to Lila Edythe ∙ Photograph by Ryan Dorgan WILL [DAVENPORT] AND I live on a bluff in the timber across the river from Kelly. The view from our house covers most of the Teton Range. I was raised on the Teton Valley Ranch. After college and moving around the country for twenty years, ten years ago I was fortunate enough to come back to live in the house where I grew up. Will’s first job in the valley, in 1990, was at the Teton Valley Ranch Camp, which my grandfather founded in 1939. We didn’t meet at the ranch, though, but dancing at the Stagecoach one Sunday night. Living in a home surrounded by the elk refuge and the national park means there’s wildlife all around. Elk, bison, deer, and moose are often in our driveway. A fox lives just around the corner. We even had a grizzly bear try to get into the chicken house. In the summer or fall, I’ll hop on my horse bareback and ride to Kelly or along the river [the Gros Ventre]. I would go get the mail on horseback if there were a hitching rail at the post office. We don’t see that Kelly has changed too much. It is still the eclectic community I grew up in. Many of the same families I grew up with are still here. A couple of years ago, I was substitute teaching at Kelly School alongside the same teacher who taught me in third grade. The history I have from growing up here gives us a sense of belonging and a connection to this land. This is a place where you find yourself numerous times during the day stopping and holding your rake, and just taking it all in. We don’t take it for granted, and we realize this isn’t normal. RANGE ISSUE FIVE 64


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Range 2017 Issue 5  

Meet Range, Jackson Hole’s premiere magazine about the area’s architecture, design, style, and art. Using only the region’s best writers and...

Range 2017 Issue 5  

Meet Range, Jackson Hole’s premiere magazine about the area’s architecture, design, style, and art. Using only the region’s best writers and...

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