Page 1

ART SCENE

NMWA’s 30th

BODY & SOUL

Canines Cure

ON THE JOB

Wildlife Brigade

LOOKING BACK

Jackson Lake Dam

SUMMER 2017

Climb JHMR’s

VIA FERRATA

Explore Jenny Lake WATCH THE WILDFLOWERS Hike the

WYOMING RANGE

Wild at Night

For a night to remember, try glamping, or stick with old-fashioned camping.


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307-739-1908 J R e s o r @ S h o ot i n g S ta r J H . co m w w w . S h o ot i n g S ta r J H . co m # 1 P R O D U C I N G R E A L E S T A T E A G E N T I N J A C K S O N H O L E I N 2 0 15 A S R E P O R T E D I N T H E WA L L S T R E E T J O U R N A L S OU RC E : R E A L T R E N D S 2016 R A N K I NG S - #1 I N J AC K S ON HOL E , 38T H I N T H E U. S .

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William R. Leigh (1866–1955), Tidbits (detail), oil on canvas, 28 × 22 inches, Estimate: $250,000-350,000


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Jackson Hole

Summer 2017

Features

Page

60 RYAN DORGAN

60 Fun(d)raisers

70 Deserted or Destroyed?

86 Wildflower Watching

Jackson Hole has one of the highest rates of nonprofits per capita, ranging from Search & Rescue to food rescue.

Immediately south of Jackson Hole, the Wyoming Range is a contradiction, with some sections overused and others rarely visited. What does that mean for its role in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem?

Look for flora instead of fauna, and you’re guaranteed a successful outing. You might even see some wildlife along the way.

BY MAGGIE THEODORA

BY WHITNEY ROYSTER

BY MIKE KOSHMRL

PHOTO GALLERY

80 The Heart of the Hole

It is a square at the center of Jackson Hole’s community. PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN DORGAN

ON THE COVER: Photographer Cole Buckhart took this shot during a two-night stay with friends at the Warm Springs campground on the western shore of Jackson Lake. Buckhart and his group spent both evenings around the campfire. “The first night, when I took this photo, was the clearest I’ve ever seen the Milky Way with my own eyes,” says Buckhart, who is the graphic designer/photographer for Orijin Media. Follow Buckhart’s Instagram @cole.mgkra 8

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017


Hand Made in the U.S.A.

307.733.5599 | 80 Center St. Jackson Hole, Wyoming w w w. h i n e s - g o l d. co m

Since 1970


Jackson Hole

Summer 2017

Best of JH GETTING OUT

JH Living 20

TETONSCAPES Solar Eclipse, Skyline Trail, Hammocraft, Dual Immersion Program

107 Climb On Jackson Hole Mountain Resort is opening assisted climbing routes. BY DINA MISHEV

112 Beyond the Tetons The Wind River Mountains are worth the trip. BY DINA MISHEV

Some of our favorite summer stuff

Q&A

32 Meet the Locals Ali Cohane, Tim Sandlin, Seth Palmquist

Page

ON THE JOB

112

38 The Crowd Goes Wild On Grand Teton National Park’s Wildlife Brigade, it’s about managing people. BY MAGGIE THEODORA

BUSINESS

42 Saving Jackson Hole What does the valley’s popularity mean for its wildness? BY MOLLY ABSOLON

DESIGN

48 Decked Out How terraces and decks help homeowners make the most of our short summer season. BY LILA EDYTHE

LOOKING BACK

94 Raising a Lake

Jackson Lake Dam helped make Idaho the potato capital of the world. BY WHITNEY ROYSTER

Page

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98

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

OUTDOORS

98 Jenny on the Rocks Making the busiest spot in GTNP more visitor-friendly. BY GERALDINE STAL

118 High on Snow King

The resort’s Treetop Adventure is a gateway to countless activities. BY JULIE FUSTANIO KLING

BODY & SOUL

124 Canines as a Cure Dogs are good for the body and soul. BY MOLLY LOOMIS

NIGHTLIFE

130 Wild at Night Try glamping, or stick with oldfashioned camping. BY ISA JONES

DINING

136 Green Giants The Cowboy State knows how to grow greens as well as cows. BY JOOHEE MUROMCEW

ART SCENE

146 The Valley’s Greatest Secret? National Museum of Wildlife Art celebrates its thirtieth anniversary. BY LILA EDYTHE

AS THE HOLE DEEPENS

156 Sit or Squat: That is the

Question BY TIM SANDLIN

158 JACKSON HOLE MAPPED 160 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

BRADLY J. BONER

28

PIQUED


GREATEST WILDLIFE TOUR in the world.


Greetings from the Editor FROM THE FULL solar eclipse to the new Skyline Trail, Jackson Hole will be buzzing even more than usual with activities and visitors this summer. Estimates say it will be the busiest summer in the valley’s history, with as many as 500,000 people (!) here during the eclipse. That’s almost as many people as live in the entire state of Wyoming, and about ten times the valley’s regular summertime population. (A more realistic estimate of the number of eclipse visitors is 100,000; 500,000 is the worst-case scenario, but not out of the realm of possibility.) While it is the area’s natural beauty, the nearby national parks, our wildlife, and events that draw visitors here, this issue of Jackson Hole magazine shines a light on some of the people and organizations involved with our parks, wildlife, and events. Without the work that these (and countless other) locals do, the wildlands and wildlife of Jackson Hole just wouldn’t be the same. “Jenny on the Rocks” on pg. 98 highlights all that has been accomplished in the last four years around Jenny Lake, the single busiest area in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP), thanks to the vision and fundraising efforts of the Grand Teton National Park Foundation. The foundation, which celebrates its twentieth anniversary in 2017, added $14 million to the $4 million the

National Park Service budgeted for the project. “Without the help of the foundation, we could have put a Band-Aid on the area,” says GTNP landscape architect Matt Hazard. “With the foundation’s help, we’re able to do things that should have a seventy-five to one-hundred-year lifespan.” On pg. 118, writer Julie Kling talks about her experience doing the Treetop Adventure, opened at Snow King by couple Christian Santelices and Sue Muncaster (“High on Snow King”). One of this issue’s three feature articles looks at many of the summer’s best events, which, in addition to being fun, raise money for some of the valley’s more than 200 nonprofits. Read “Fun(d)raisers” on pg. 60. There’s little chance you’ll venture into Grand Teton National Park without seeing its Wildlife Brigade, a group of volunteers and paid staff who manage traffic jams caused by animal sightings. To be a Wildlife Brigader must be one of the most interesting jobs out there. Read more about it in “The Crowd Goes Wild,” pg. 38, and tell us you don’t agree. This issue also offers up ideas and details on things to do, from camping and hiking to visiting the National Museum of Wildlife Art (celebrating its thirtieth anniversary this year), floating around String or Jackson Lakes in a hammock, and trading wildlife watching for wildflower watching. As always, I hope you enjoy this issue of the magazine as much as the team behind it enjoyed putting it together. – Dina Mishev @DINAMISHEV

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magazine

Jackson Hole

Rustic Elegance

Summer 2017 // jacksonholemagazine.com

What’s your favorite post-ride/hike/run treat?

PUBLISHER

Kevin Olson

A grapefruit Stiegl-Radler on the deck at Persephone.

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Adam Meyer EDITOR

Dina Mishev

Grab a beer at Grand Teton Brewing in Victor, Idaho.

ART DIRECTOR

I still love heading to the Snake River Brewery, sitting out on the deck, and grabbing a hefeweizen.

Colleen Valenstein PHOTO EDITOR

Bradly J. Boner COPY EDITOR

Pamela Periconi

A milkshake at the emporium in Victor.

Oreo ice cream at Moo’s, of course!

Chips with guac

and salsa and a margarita at Pica’s!

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

A radler, homemade, while lounging on my back patio.

Molly Absolon Lila Edythe Trading hiking boots for Chacos Mark Huffman Isa Jones and indulging in an alcoholic Julie Kling Mike Koshmrl beverage and salty food. Molly Loomis Brigid Mander Caroline Markowitz Frances Moody A beer in the evening Joohee Muromcew Whitney Royster sun at the Stagecoach. Tim Sandlin Geraldine Stal Maggie Theodora CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Price Chambers Travis J. Garner Ben Graham Rugile Kaladyte Bryan Rowe

A $10 smoothie from Jackson Whole Grocer—I earned it!

Ryan Dorgan Gibeon Photography Ryan Jones Andrew Kalat Leine Stikkel

A good nap along the Snake.

ADVERTISING SALES

Deidre Norman ADVERTISING ACCOUNT COORDINATOR

Oliver O’Connor AD DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Lydia Redzich Sarah Grengg Natalie Connell DISTRIBUTION

Kyra Griffin Russell Thompson

Hank Smith Jeff Young

OFFICE MANAGER

Kathleen Godines

J AC K S O N H O L E , W YO M I N G

© 2017 Jackson Hole magazine. All rights reserved. No part of this production may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. No responsibility will be assumed for unsolicited editorial contributions. Manuscripts or other material to be returned must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope adequate to return the material. Jackson Hole magazine is published semiannually. Send subscription requests to: Jackson Hole magazine, P.O. Box 7445, Jackson, Wyoming 83002. (307) 732-5900. Email: dina@jhmagazine.com. Visit jacksonholemagazine.com.

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SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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Originally from South Texas, Isa Jones (“Wild at Night,” p. 130) now lives in Jackson Hole and has written for various publications in print and online, including Westword, The Village Voice, The Associated Press, and The Denver Post. She is an editor at the Jackson Hole News&Guide. When she isn’t writing, Jones enjoys live music, skiing, good beer, and good company.

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JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

When Molly Loomis (“Canines as a Cure,” p. 124) isn’t working on an article or out in the mountains, you can find her in local libraries working with young readers and her sidekick, Kali, a longeared mutt with a keen sense of smell. Visit mollyloomis.com to see more of her work and a schedule of presentations and workshops. Loomis is currently at work on a book about the Himalaya.


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Teton scapes

happening

Now You See It, Now You Don’t August’s Great American Eclipse will darken the Tetons during the day for more than two minutes.

Yellowstone National Park

BY MARK HUFFMAN

Grand Teton National Park DUBOIS

THERMOPOLIS

JACKSON

PATH OF T OTAL

RIVERTON LANDER

SOL

CASPER

AR E CL

IPSE

DOUGLAS GLENDO

IT’S USUALLY GEOLOGY rather than geometry in outer space that brings tourists to Jackson Hole, but that’s changing—at least for a small window of time this summer. On August 21, 2017, the Great American Eclipse will start in Oregon and, en route to South Carolina, pass over the valley. This is the first total solar eclipse visible in the continental United States in thirty-eight years, and Jackson Hole is right in the path of totality, meaning the valley will experience complete darkness. The longest duration of darkness will be specifically at Jackson Hole Airport, seven miles from downtown Jackson, where it’s expected to last 2 minutes and 20 seconds, starting at 11:49 a.m. In the town of Jackson or in Teton Village, total darkness will be six to eight seconds less. A solar eclipse is when the moon lines up perfectly in space to block the sun as seen from Earth. When the three are aligned, a giant circle of shadow hits our home planet and travels along at more than a mile every two seconds. Dr. Douglas Duncan, director of the Fiske Planetarium and a professor of astronomy at the University of Colorado, calls it a “seventy-mile-wide black dot.” Because the shadow travels across the landscape, people 20

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

watching in Jackson can, with a little altitude, look west and see it coming. Watching from the sagebrush flats in Grand Teton National Park, you’ll see the Tetons go dark and, just for a second, you’ll still be in light. “IT LOOKS LIKE the end of the world,” says Duncan, who has seen nearly a dozen total eclipses since 1970. “When the sun finally is covered by the moon, there’s pink flamers firing out. It’ll get cold and then dark, and then the animals will freak out. And then the people will freak out.” Four years ago, Duncan booked one hundred hotel rooms in the valley. He’s organized a group of close to three hundred umbraphiles—eclipse lovers—to travel here for the event. The tour package includes astronomy talks by Duncan and the NASA shuttle pilot who launched the Hubble Telescope, Steve Hawley. Dr. Samuel Singer, executive director of Wyoming Stargazing, a group planning a Jackson Hole observatory, says the total blackout “is what people are traveling from the other side of the world to see for two minutes.” Duncan’s group is not the only one traveling here for the eclipse: Estimates are that the valley could have up to 100,000

more visitors than is usual for the end of August, prompting local officials in the area to be prepared. The Town of Jackson and Teton County earmarked $50,000 to hire an eclipse coordinator. (Kathryn Brackenridge isn’t coordinating the heavenly mechanics, but working to make sure things on the ground go safely.) Another $50,000 has been budgeted for associated public safety spending—and that doesn’t include overtime police and emergency workers in Grand Teton National Park, which spokeswoman Denise Germann says is calling for ranger reinforcements from other parks. Wyoming Stargazing’s Singer is working with Snow King Resort to put on eclipsewatching events. People at the top of the ski hill will lose only about six seconds of totality because of their distance from the center line, he says, and will be in a prime location to see the eclipse coming. He hopes for “a raucous affair” that is equal parts astronomy and party. “The shadow of the moon will be streaking across the landscape at 800 mph,” Singer says. “It will be a line of darkness, like the darkest shadow of a cloud you’ve ever seen. I’m told it hits you like a ton of bricks.” JH


Sanctuary

Find yours in Jackson Hole.

Buying Real Estate. Selling Real Estate. Let us be your guide. The Team Approach Matters.

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Teton scapes

outdoors 4 3

1

2

Head for the Skyline A new hiking and biking trail just above town offers views of at least four mountain ranges. You may also see wildflowers and wildlife.

about 25 feet to a flat rock in a sunny, open area with views down into Game Creek and of the Tetons. For those who don’t want to hike the full trail, it’s an ideal objective. For everyone, it’s an ideal picnic spot.

BY BRIGID MANDER

MOST UNUSUAL MARKER (#4). The USFS has a policy of not naming trails after individuals. However, in the case of the Skyline Trail, officials were amenable to a plaque commemorating Luke Lynch, whose time and work were integral to the trail becoming a reality. A few days after final approval for the project in 2015, Lynch died in an avalanche in the Tetons. A plaque honoring him is located at the Ferrins saddle on the west end of the trail. Lynch, a board member of Friends of Pathways and the Wyoming director of The Conservation Fund, was inspired to build the trail to honor his brother, Matt, who died in a cycling accident in Chicago in 2008.

IT TOOK FIVE years from proposal to people pedaling on the Skyline Trail, but building a new mountain biking/running/hiking trail on U.S. Forest Service (USFS) land is never an easy project. It could be argued that the backbreaking manual labor is the easiest part of it. Before the first pick hit the dirt for the Skyline Trail, four years had been spent mapping it out, studying wildlife usage of the area, securing permits, getting public comments, reacting to public comments, and raising money. In the Bridger-Teton National Forest (BTNF), the trail runs 6.3 miles along the undulating ridgeline that stretches from the top of the Ferrins trail east of the summit of Snow King to the CacheGame Divide. It opened late last August. Local groups raised about $145,000 to fund the trail’s construction, and riders, hikers, and runners donated countless hours of their time to make it a reality. BEST SCENIC LOOKOUTS (#1). This whole trail is beautiful—expect grassy alpine meadows (maybe even covered in wildflowers), thick old-growth forest, rock outcrops, aspen 22

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

groves, and mountains everywhere. But some spots are stunning. If you’re heading east (from Snow King/Ferrins toward Game), when you gain the fourth “peak,” pause at an open, flat section for spectacular Teton views. From the other direction, immediately after you gain the ridge, a small spur trail leads into a clearing with views of the Tetons and Gros Ventres. MOST TECHNICAL SECTION (#2). The first 1.5 miles from the east climbs up from the CacheGame Creek saddle. Gaining about 800 feet as it switchbacks up a steep, rocky slope, it can be brutal, whether on bike or foot. Instead of dwelling on how much it might be testing your legs, think instead of the fact that this was the only section of trail built using machinery. (Digging it by hand would have taken nearly two more years). When descending this section on your bike, be sure to keep your speed in check. BEST LUNCH SPOT (#3). Heading east on the trail from Ferrins, as you gain the first peak, look for a spur footpath to the south. Follow it for

THE WORK BEHIND THE TRAIL. Linda Merigliano, the BTNF wilderness and recreation program manager, requested community involvement in creating the Skyline Trail and she got it. Volunteers built the first 1.5 miles leading east from Ferrins in two days. Next, a mix of volunteers and BTNF trail crew continued building the trail east. Eventually, too much of their day was spent hiking along the ridge to get to the construction area. So for six weeks last summer, Montana Conservation Corps trailbuilders camped along the trail, and local volunteers hiked supplies up to them.JH


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W.H.D. Koerner (1878-1938), Indian Territory Demand for Tribute 1923, oil on canvas, 30 x 36 inches, Estimate: $40,000-$60,000

Tucker Smith (1940- ), Packer Creek oil on linen, 32 x 40 inches, Estimate: $60,000-$90,000

E. Martin Hennings (1886-1956), Taos Pueblo, ca. 1917 oil on canvas, 10 1/4 x 14 1/8 inches, Estimate: $30,000-$50,000

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Teton scapes

relaxing

The Double Float Two Jackson locals have built something that combines rafting and hammocking, and now you can buy a Hammocraft of your own.

ONE HAMMOCRAFT FRAME can hold five hammocks. Each is suspended from a simple slot-and-knot system, which allows you to adjust each hammock’s height and lets each hammock disconnect in the unusual event of a flip. While Carpenter and Hoke recommend people take the Hammocraft only on flat water, they’ve taken one down the Class III rapids in the Snake River Canyon. Randomly, the afternoon they did this a photographer from the Jackson Hole News&Guide was at the largest rapids in the canyon—Lunch Counter and Big Kahuna—and snapped a few photos. The News&Guide posted the shot on its Facebook page, and it quickly got several thousand “likes.” Carpenter and Hoke put the photo on Hammocraft’s website, too. “Our insurance company made us take the picture off, though,” Hoke says. Carpenter says, “It was one of the things we said we’d never do, and then we did it and it wasn’t that bad, but we definitely don’t recommend anyone else try it.” The raft/ Hammocraft did not flip, but, “The guy on the hammock in the back got launched out.” Hoke adds, “On Facebook, people were commenting that it looked like a certified death trap. People will think it’s going to flip over without ever really looking at it. It’s legit, though.” Hammocraft is so legit there’s one registered with the U.S. Coast Guard in California. “We had an electric motor on one in San Diego,” Carpenter says. “We got pulled over. Luckily the officer was nice. He started asking me questions about where my permits were. So now there’s a Hammocraft registered as a vessel in California.” The U.S. Navy also stopped the men while they were Hammocrafting in San Diego. “It was one of the ships with big guns on board,” Hoke says. “They flagged us down and said, ‘We need to write you a ticket,’ and then there was a pause of about five seconds, ‘ ... for being badass.’ That’s generally the response of everyone who sees it—excited and intrigued.” JH COURTESY PHOTO

BY DINA MISHEV

battery-powered motor to mount onto a SUP or raft so you don’t have to paddle. If you buy this whole kit, you’re looking at around $8,000. Renting the frame, hammocks, two SUPs, and paddles from Teton Backcountry Rentals costs $130 for a full day.

CHILDHOOD FRIENDS BRYAN Carpenter and Bland Hoke Jr. have been “messing around with floating around on different hammock situations for about ten years,” Hoke says. This April—after designing, fabricating, and testing about nine different iterations of a frame that, when strapped onto two SUPs or kayaks or a raft, allows for simultaneous floating and hammocking—the two men launched a Kickstarter campaign to get funding for their company, Hammocraft. A Hammocraft has been available to rent through Teton Backcountry Rentals since last summer, and Carpenter and Hoke have been selling them to businesses for a couple of years. (You can find a Hammocraft in Hampton, Virginia, and buy coffee from one floating in a marina in San Diego, California.) Outside Online and the Wall Street Journal have done small stories on the company and 24

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

its singular contraption. But the two friends are still waiting for it to take off as much as it deserves. The feeling of swinging in a hammock while floating on water is like nothing I had ever experienced. (I interviewed Carpenter and Hoke while Hammocrafting on the small pond in R Park.) “It’s hard to describe the double float,” Carpenter says. “Laying in a hammock and looking up and seeing things spinning around—this on the stretch of the Snake from the [Jackson Lake] dam to Pacific Creek is otherworldly. You can literally look at the clouds the whole time. It’s perfect.” Carpenter and Hoke make only the frame, which weighs fifty-nine pounds and, when disassembled, fits into a standard ski bag. It costs $795. You can buy SUPs and hammocks through Hammocraft, and even a

Visit hammocraft.com or rent one at tetonbcrentals.com.


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Win-Win Nearing its tenth anniversary, Teton County School District’s dual immersion Spanish program is a success, as judged by students, parents, and test scores.

BRADLY J. BONER

ANXIOUS FEELINGS FROM parents Elementary School. The first batch of and students spread across Kathleen students in the program reach high Gutierrez’s kindergarten classroom school this coming school year. In fall on the first day of school last year, but 2018, a new school that will house the teacher knew exactly how to ease the entire elementary dual immersion the tension by reading the children’s program opens at Munger Mountain book The Kissing Hand. In Spanish. south of Jackson. (Jackson Hole Middle Hearing this relatable story of a baby School and Jackson Hole High School raccoon leaving his mother’s side for will still have both programs.) the first time wouldn’t be the only BY FRANCES MOODY taste of Spanish the kindergartners CURRENT ELEMENTARY STUDENTS would experience throughout the learn reading in English and math in school year: As the newest students Spanish, and the middle schoolers take selected for a dual immersion program that consists of 556 students a history and language arts class in Spanish. Eighth-grader Lezly Diaz, in nine grades, the kindergartners would go on to spend half of every who entered the program when she was in first grade, remembers the school day learning in Spanish. (At all grade levels, the goal is for half excitement she felt when she realized she would spend half the day of the students to be native Spanish speakers and half to be native learning in Spanish. “When I entered kindergarten it was a struggle, English speakers.) because I didn’t know much English,” she says. “Spending half the The dual immersion program began in 2009 when Teton County day learning in Spanish helped me understand a lot more.” The School District No. 1 officials recognized the need to find a way to thirteen-year-old now fluently speaks English. close the achievement gap for Spanish-speaking students. “Staff Sisters Dylan and Izzy Visosky, native English speakers, are also in determined that data clearly show that non-English-speaking students the program. “I like that I can talk to people in Spanish and English,” do better in a dual immersion program when compared to those in says Izzy, who is in first grade. “I like that I can make new friends an English-only classroom,” says Charlotte Reynolds, information by speaking in Spanish.” Fourth-grader Dylan says she loves that coordinator for the school district. Reynolds also says research shows she consistently gets to learn about Latino cultures. Reynolds’ own a dual immersion program is the most effective educational approach daughter, ten-year-old Lucy Waldrop, likes that she is an expert in a to help students, English and Spanish speakers alike, become subject her parents don’t know (neither of them are fluent in Spanish). bilingual. “Schools don’t have to trade time from academics to study “I think it’s fun to show them how to do it,” the fourth-grader says. “It’s a foreign language,” she says. funny to correct them when they say something wrong.” Forty kids were initially enrolled in the program, which first consisted of two kindergarten and two first-grade classes at Jackson AND DATA SHOW the program is closing the student achievement gap. When the students currently in eighth grade were in first grade, they had lower Measures of Academic Progress, or MAP, scores in math than the students learning in traditional classrooms. Within three years—so by the time they were in third grade— the scores of the two groups (the dual immersion students and traditional students) were almost the same. While Teton County School District No. 1 was the first in Wyoming to create a dual program, other districts have since hopped on board. Casper has a dual program in Mandarin and also one in Spanish, and Gillette and Laramie started programs last fall. JH

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JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

Teton County School District’s dual immersion program mixes Englishand Spanish-speaking students. The program is an effective approach to help students become bilingual.


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JH Living

1/ JAMMING Bluetooth earphones are the best—if they’d just stay in our ears. When a pair fell out into a puddle during a March run, we were ready to go back to jacks. But then we met Decibullz. The company’s take on Bluetooth wireless earphones comes with earplugs that can be easily thermofitted. And they’re affordable. Whether it’s because these fit our ears so perfectly, or because of Decibullz’s acoustic technology, we’ve found the sound pretty amazing, too. $119.99, decibullz.com

piqued

1

2/ THE JACKET

2

3

We’ve got a quiver of Gore-Tex jackets that we cycle through. There’s the lightweight summer rain shell, the shell we bring climbing, the shell we use backpacking, and the shell we wear running errands in the rain. Arc’teryx’s new Alpha FL Shell (available in women’s and men’s) has killed our quiver, though. While it’s meant to be the ultimate jacket for alpinists, it’s very versatile. Since adding it to our collection, it’s the only jacket we’ve worn. At under 300 grams— about the weight of two hamsters—it’s freakishly light, yet it stands up to hard conditions, whether from the elements, Teton granite, or our cat’s claws. (Lesson learned: No more nice jackets slung over the back of the couch.) $425, available at Teton Mountaineering, arcteryx.com

3/ SWINGING IN THE BREEZE If you haven’t yet tried a camping hammock, you should. Several companies make them, and our favorite is the Kammok Roo. Made from tear-resistant diamond ripstop nylon, it holds up to 500 pounds and packs down to the size of a big grapefruit. At 1.5 pounds, it’s lighter than any camping pad we’ve yet found. We won’t even get into how much more comfortable the Roo is than sleeping on the ground. $99, available at valley outdoors stores, kammok.com

4

4/ COOLER THAN COOL

6

Last summer, we loved Yeti’s soft-sided Hopper cooler. It kept things cold forever and was easier to haul around than traditional hard-sided coolers. But we’ll admit that after a summer of hard use, we found one thing we’d improve: the zippered access into the cooler. It was sometimes difficult to get medium-size items in and out. Meet Hopper Two, which has all of the awesomeness of the original—fully leakproof, puncture-resistant, floatable, and with an antimicrobial lining—plus improved access to the goods. Offered in 20-, 30-, and 40-liter sizes, from $299, available at ACE Hardware, yeti.com

5/ OOPS, THEY DID IT AGAIN

5

Just when we thought Arc’teryx had used up all of its innovative juices, they come out with something like RotoGlide, a hip belt that rotates side to side and glides up and down, making for the world’s most comfortable backpack. You’ve never enjoyed carrying camping gear as much as you will with a new Bora AR. From $499, available at Teton Mountaineering, 170 N. Cache, arcteryx.com

6/ DINNER’S ON We’ll take your fast and raise you one. Optimus’ Elektra FE Cook System boils one liter of water in just over two minutes and uses about 20 percent less fuel than similar stoves to do it. Bonus: All together the system, which includes the Crux Lite stove, piezo igniter, Terra Weekend HE Cook set, and clip-on windshield, packs up to be no bigger than a coconut. $94.95, available at valley outdoors stores, optimusstoves.com 28

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017


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JH Living

7/ NEVER GET LOST With onXmaps’ ROAM membership, you create a map that has the information you want—trails, streams, lakes, wilderness areas, property boundaries—on your smartphone. Map downloaded (so your phone can be in airplane mode), your smartphone’s built-in GPS then tracks you on top of it. We’ve been testing different phone GPS maps for several years now, and this quickly became our favorite for ease of use and customization. $19.95/year, available in the Google Play Store and Apple Store, roam.onxmaps.com

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8/ MERINO, DONE BETTER Merino wool is naturally wicking and breathable. After Smartwool worked its latest magic on the classic material—making Corespun Merino 150 fabric out of it—it’s also lighter, more durable, and better retains its shape. The secret behind this is creating a “spine” in the fabric by mixing nylon with merino. Our top Merino 150 choice is the Pattern Tee. From $75, available at Skinny Skis, 65 W. Deloney Ave., smartwool.com

8

9/ THE SHIRT Sorry, guys: Stio’s Sidley shirt is for women only. Stylish enough for the Brewpub, but techy enough for climbing or hiking, Sidley is a summer staple for valley women. In addition to looking good—did we mention the pearl snaps and modified hem that flatters, whether tucked in or not?—it’s made from fabric with a water-resistant finish, mechanical stretch, and UPF 50+ rating. $125, available at Stio, 10 E. Broadway Ave., stio.com

10/ BEGONE, BUGS! Planning to camp somewhere with bugs? Make sure you pack Thermacell’s Backpacker insect repeller. The Backpacker, which weighs only four ounces, uses fuel from any isobutane camp canister to heat a mat treated with Allethrin, the synthetic compound found in chrysanthemums. We found the mat vaporizes the Allethrin to provide an area of (approximately) fifteen square insect-free feet. One evening of no bugs uses about as much fuel as boiling a pot of water. $39.99, available at Ace Hardware, thermacell.com

9

11/ TIME TRAVEL

10

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JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

Jackson Hole magazine’s own photo editor, Bradly J. Boner, spent months researching the images William Henry Jackson took while traveling with the 1871 Hayden Survey to Yellowstone. It is largely because of Jackson’s images that Yellowstone was named the world’s first national park. Boner, who is also the chief photographer for the Jackson Hole News&Guide, then spent three summers finding the exact spots Jackson had captured with his 8x10 plate-size camera and rephotographing them. Boner turned the project into the best coffee-table book of the area in years, Yellowstone National Park: Through the Lens of Time. $39.95, available at Valley Bookstore, 125 N. Cache


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JH Living

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RYAN DORGAN

Ali Cohane ALI COHANE EARNED degrees in art history and studio art her first time around in college. She later went back to get a degree in graphic design. Today, the thirtyfour-year-old Illinois native is one-half of the power couple behind Persephone Bakery Boulangerie & Cafe and Picnic cafe and coffee shop. (The other half is her husband, Le Cordon Bleu-trained Kevin Cohane.) Persephone Bakery opened as a wholesale-only operation in 2011. Persephone Cafe opened one block from the Town Square in 2013. Picnic opened in West Jackson in 2015. While Kevin has all the baking covered—the cafes serve everything from traditional French viennoiseries to the valley’s best brownies and chocolate chip cookies—Ali runs the physical spaces and also gets much of the credit for each cafe’s look. It’s also Ali who curates the assortment of kitcheny/homey products that each cafe sells. These products range from beautifully photographed food books to Danish ceramic coffee mugs. 32

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

Q: Would you say you have a sweet tooth? A: I could live on sweets. It’s a problem. Q: How do you describe your personal aesthetic? A: I have been struggling so much with this as we build our new website. It’s simply what I find beautiful. I am drawn to the gorgeous simplicity of Danish design and its exquisite functionality, while being mesmerized by the patina of a vintage silver pendant. Q: Do you miss graphic design? A: I miss it a lot. But I find creative outlets here. I spend hours—days—sourc-


ing products and looking at what other companies are doing. And we’re redesigning the menu and our bread bags— that’s creative. Q: What about the design of both cafes? A: I love interior design and am always designing spaces. Even now, when we don’t have any new projects, I’m still planning for one. I just can’t help it. I have Pinterest boards for unknown projects. (Follow Ali at Persephone Cafe.) Q: Was moving to Paris with Kevin a hard choice for you? A: Not at all. Easiest and best decision of my life. Q: What was your life like in Paris? A: Each day I spent about six hours just walking, so I really learned the city. We would buy a bottle of cheap wine, a baguette, some cheese and sit by the Seine as the sun set. It was really kind of magical. Q: Are you allowed a favorite between Picnic and Persephone? A: I go through phases. They have such different vibes. But if I had to pick a space, Picnic’s is more my personal style. Q: When you guys founded the wholesale bakery, was there a master plan that included cafes? A: There was not a grand vision. We’ve learned opportunities in Jackson cannot be forced. The opportunity to take the building in town was totally random. And Picnic happened because I sat next to [the property’s owner] on a chairlift. We have things we would like to do to grow the business, but it is really about seeing what kind of natural opportunities flow to us.

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Q: Persephone and Picnic are both slammed in the summer. What do you do to relax? A: We bought a crappy, 1990 speedboat. We take it out on Jackson Lake. Q: Please tell me it’s named for some baked good? A: Because there was no room to put a name on the back, the guy we bought it from had painted over the brand name to make room for one. We kept his name, Hewitt’s Escapé. With the accent over the e. Now it’s our ess-ca-pay. INTERVIEW BY DINA MISHEV

SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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BRADLY J. BONER

Tim Sandlin A MAN WHO has spent more time at Pearl Street Bagels than any of the employees, Tim Sandlin is the Hole’s best known writer, not only because he often uses the downtown cafe and bagelry as his office, but because of his success. The Oklahoma native discovered the area when his father worked in Grand Teton National Park in the 1960s. Sandlin started spending summers here in 1968 and, in 1974, after college, moved here fulltime. While starting his writing career, he slogged his way through exotic jobs: He was a cook and egg roll roller at The Lame Duck, a now-defunct Chinese restaurant with a tiki-bar feel; did trail inventories for the Forest Service; and worked as an elk skinner, though “only because I thought it would be cool on a jacket flap,” he says. Sandlin has written eleven novels; Sex and Sunsets, Skipped Parts, and Sorrow Floats have all made their way to a theater near you. He also wrote the GroVont Quartet, founded the Jackson Hole Writers Conference, and is a recent recipient of the Governor’s Arts Award. Sandlin lives in Jackson with his wife, Carol Chesney, and their kids, Kyle and Leila. 34

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

Q: How did you end up in the valley? A: I was happy and healthy in Jackson Hole, and not happy or healthy back in Oklahoma. It made sense to move here full-time. Q: Where did you live when you were new here? A: I lived outdoors the first few summers. I had a tipi on BLM land on the Snake and later up the Gros Ventre when I was doing trail inventory. Later, I moved into the Glenwood ghetto, in


1976. I paid $90 a month, maybe. I’ve forgotten most of my past. Q: What about Jackson back then do you miss? A: We all miss Jackson Drug, and the colorful old codgers who came here in the 1950s and didn’t care what anyone thought. Q: Are the people here now different than back then? A: People used to be stratified by their sport—kayakers hanging with kayakers, etc. Now they’re stratified by money.   Q: What does Jackson need? A: Jackson needs a liberal arts college for rich kids with ski scholarships, so I can have a place to work.   Q: When you were doing all those strange jobs, were you just paying your bills or gathering exotic background for novels? A: Mostly just getting by. When a job looked like it might turn into a career I’d quit so I’d stay desperate enough to keep writing. Q: What was your last job that wasn’t writing? A: I was a waiter at Jedediah’s until after my second novel.   Q: You’re known to many as that guy in Pearl Street Bagels (PSB) drinking coffee and scribbling. How did that start? A: Pearl Street opened some twenty-five years ago, I think, and I was an early regular. I wrote there in winter, and on a rock by a creek in the spring and summer. Q: Do you have a usual PSB order? A: Butter and jelly on seven-grain. And coffee.   Q: You run the Jackson Hole Writers Conference. Do people want to know how to write or how to market? A: It’s about equal between people who want to write and people who want to be a writer. We take care of both.   Q: Is there a novel you’ve been thinking of writing for forty years and still hope to pen? A: I want to write Shane after everyone forgets it’s already been written.

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SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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RYAN DORGAN

36

Seth Palmquist

Q: Do you remember your first impressions of Jackson Hole? A: It was the quietest thing I’d ever heard. I thought it was all crazy.

AT AGE ELEVEN, Seth Palmquist found himself on another planet. “Turkey is where I was raised and what I considered my home,” he says. But, in 2009, his parents’ new business—a Native American-themed coffee shop—was destroyed by the Turkish government, and the family decided to return to the U.S. for a year. They got a job managing Turpin Meadow Ranch, a guest ranch in Buffalo Valley in the northernmost part of Jackson Hole. “I went from living in an apartment in Istanbul to Moran Elementary with a graduating class of four kids,” Palmquist says. “We moved literally to the middle of nowhere. I was terrified.” The family’s year in the U.S. has been extended indefinitely, and Palmquist recently graduated from Jackson Hole High School. Now nineteen, Palmquist long ago found his Jackson groove. He plays hockey, performs in musicals, runs cross-country, and was on the debate team. In his junior year, Palmquist was elected Prom King. And, of course, he has learned how to ski.

Q: When did it stop being crazy? A: Life is always crazy, but after a month here, like any other person who comes to Jackson, I started falling in love.

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

Q: How was it making friends? A: Those four kids from Moran Elementary were my first friends. I joined hockey in the fifth grade and became friends with those guys, too. It was the hockey kids that helped me learn how to ski.


Q: Describe your friends today. A: I’m friends with a lot of rednecks, Latinos, and rich kids. I kind of float. I’ve got a lot of friends in theater. Growing up in Turkey, I watched movies of theater kids being uncool. But here, the theater kids are the cool kids. And they’re not cocky. Q: Did you ski before you moved here? A: We went skiing two times in Bulgaria. My dad wanted to teach us to ski because he grew up skiing. Here, my friends took me down these little tree paths and launched me off cliffs. I picked it up pretty quick trying to keep up with my friends. Q: Have you been back to Turkey since you were eleven? A: Stupid me, when my mom and three older sisters went back when I was in eighth grade, I was getting into Jackson and didn’t want to miss Gaper Day. I didn’t go to Turkey with them so I could stay here for that. Q: What’s Gaper Day? A: People dress up in costumes, ski on old gear, and just have a really good time at the [Jackson Hole Mountain] resort. Q: Was it worth it? A: I wish I had gone to Turkey. I haven’t had the chance to go back since. Q: What are you doing next year? A: If you had asked three months ago, I would have said I’d be taking a gap year. I have dyslexia, and that and the ACT didn’t really work out. I got a pretty, pretty bad score. But then I was able to take the SAT and that bumped me up a lot. I got a scholarship to the University of Wyoming. Everything kind of worked out, even though I was stressing out. I’m still going to [take a] gap year, but it will probably be before my final year of college instead of next year. Q: What do you feel has been one of the biggest lessons you’ve learned so far in life? A: This community and life have taught me that you’re going to want to plan and try for something, but life happens and that can be good. We planned for coffee, but ended up with cowboys.

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JH Living

on the job

The Crowd Goes Wild On Grand Teton National Park’s Wildlife Brigade, it’s more about managing people than wildlife. BY MAGGIE THEODORA • PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRADLY J. BONER

A CALL OVER the radio interrupts my interview with two members of Grand Teton National Park’s Wildlife Brigade. Dispatch is reporting a wildlife jam just south of Signal Mountain on the Inner Park Loop Road about three miles from where we are meeting. They jump into 38

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

their park service SUV, and I follow in my car. We drive for about five miles but don’t see anything. Jolene Mohr and Nancy Adams pull into a turnout and stop. I pull up beside them. “It’s a UTL,” says Mohr, who, along with Adams, is one of the original members of the

Kate Wilmot, Grand Teton National Park’s bear management specialist, was instrumental in getting the Wildlife Brigade up and running in 2007. The group, comprised of both volunteers and paid staff, responds to wildlife jams and educates visitors throughout the park.

Wildlife Brigade. “Unable to locate.” While there was no traffic jam with park visitors out of their cars getting dangerously close to wildlife this time, that’s often not the case, as the Wildlife Brigade usually finds visitors watching anything from a coyote to a grizzly sow with cubs. “Some days we get several calls; some days not,” Adams says. “As we were driving toward this one, I could tell it was breaking up because there was lots of traffic in the opposite direction. We know it’s big when we don’t see any traffic coming at us.”


When Mohr and Adams, and the twenty-some other members of the Wildlife Brigade (both paid and volunteer), aren’t managing roadside wildlife sightings, they patrol the park’s campgrounds, picnic areas, and parking lots to check that bear attractants, like bug spray and food, are properly stored. “The Wildlife Brigade alone has written over 7,000 notes we’ve left at campsites and cars where we’ve found food storage violations,” says Adams, who lives in Salt Lake City and volunteers on the Wildlife Brigade four months a year while she lives in one of the rustic cabins at Colter Bay Village. “We confiscate the stuff in violation of the regulations, too.” THE WILDLIFE BRIGADE started as a pilot program in 2007. “As grizzly bears started to reoccupy parts of their former range, the park was in a position where it didn’t have the resources to manage bear jams along the road,” says Kate Wilmot, the park’s bear management specialist. Wilmot says the park first realized this in 2004, one year before she arrived. (Previously, Wilmot worked at Glacier and Katmai National Parks, focusing on bears in both places.) A particularly bear jam-y year was 2006, the first year grizzly 399 raised cubs—three of them—within sight of roads in the Oxbow Bend, Willow Flats, and Jackson Lake Lodge areas of the park. (Grizzly 399 did this again in 2011, and the frenzy was compounded by one of her daughters born in 2006, grizzly 610, also being in the area with two cubs of her own.) In 2006, it was law enforcement rangers who were charged with manag-

Hundreds of tourists and photographers line the side of the highway last summer in Grand Teton National Park hoping to catch a glimpse of grizzly 610 foraging with her two cubs. The park’s Wildlife Brigade works to manage these situations, which often cause traffic snarls and can sometimes lead to conflicts between wildlife and humans.

ing bear jams. But, “Rangers were already overextended,” Wilmot says. It was a tough spring, summer, and fall. “That was when we knew we really had to do something to free rangers up to respond to more pressing calls, like heart attacks and accidents,” she says. In 2007, Wilmot was a seasonal law enforcement ranger in the park and the supervisor of the first two Wildlife Brigade members, Adams and Mohr. Both women were full-time. Adams had been looking for a volunteer opportunity with the NPS. “Kate called and asked if I could be here in two

weeks. I said, ‘Yes,’ and I’m still coming up every summer.” Mohr was a seasonal employee working in the park while earning her degree in biology from Metropolitan State University in Denver. Wilmot says the park decided to manage its bears the same way that Yellowstone did: “We’re sharing the same bears, and it’s many of the same visitors in both parks, so it made sense.” Also, data show it works. “It” is managing the crowds watching the bears, rather than the bears themselves. “Yellowstone initially tried to haze bears away from populated areas,” Wilmot says. “But it wasn’t working, so in 1990 they started to manage the people. Twenty-five years later, that’s what we’re doing. And it’s successful.” Managing people means educating them to be (and helping them be) one hundred yards away from any animal and to make sure bear attractants are properly stored. “We probably took what Yellowstone is doing to another level,” Wilmot says. “But we have a crew doing this now, and in Yellowstone it still falls to the rangers. We’re so much smaller than Yellowstone, too.” Since its founding, the Wildlife Visitors and photographers stop to watch a boar grizzly forage near Pilgrim Creek Road last year in GTNP. SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

39


One of the most difficult parts of a Wildlife Brigader’s job is to ask visitors to move back from wildlife. This isn’t done to prevent people from seeing the animals, but to protect the wildlife, as well as humans. Visitors must maintain a distance of one hundred feet between themselves and an animal.

helpful, especially on MooseWilson Road.” Because the Wildlife Brigade manages the crowds and not the bears, they sometimes erect brackets on a section of road to allow a bear to cross. “We can tell when a bear wants to cross,” Wilmot says. The brackets create a stretch where there is no traffic or people. “It’s successful maybe 50 percent of the time,” Wilmot says. Brigade’s responsibilities have expanded beyond bear jams. When the Wildlife Brigade does interact with a bear is “We’ve been called to a hornet’s nest,” Wilmot says. “There are when it is in a developed area—and only when it’s a black bear. moose jams, elk jams, great gray owl jams, bugling elk jams, fall “We never do this with grizzlies,” Mohr says. Even then, though, color jams. There’s always something new.” Mohr says she’s “We follow the bear where it wants to go,” Adams says. “It is worked grouse jams, fox jams, and pine marten jams. going there for a reason. We just want to help it go a little “Whatever animal is visible seems to grab visitors’ attention,” quicker.” And, “Whenever a bear comes to a road, as soon as it she says. “I don’t know that there is an underappreciated ani- hits the pavement, we want to encourage it to go faster.” mal in the park. People are so excited just to see what they can Wildlife Brigaders do this by clapping, or with light taps on the see. I was hiking recently, and there horn. “In the String Lake Picnic Area, were people going crazy over caterpilwe try to get ahead of it and tell people lars on the trail. I think that anything a bear is coming through and make “PULLING UP, THEY [PARK VISITORS] people can see alive in nature they’re sure they have all their bear attractants WERE TOTALLY LOW-KEY, BUT THEN going to stop and want to watch. I’ve properly stored,” Adams says. THEY HEAR ‘BEAR,’ AND THE DOORS seen people taking pictures of magMohr says she’s found it imporOF THEIR CAR ARE FLYING OPEN AND pies. They might be loud and annoytant to explain to visitors watching the ing at home, but in the park, they’re bear that the Wildlife Brigade isn’t THEY’RE JUMPING OUT. I’M LIKE, ‘I something different.” chasing it away so they can’t see it. KNOW IT’S EXCITING, BUT YOU STILL Adams says: “Ninety-nine percent of HAVE TO GO AND PARK YOUR CAR.’ ” ADAMS SAYS IT is bear jams that are the time people are cooperative and – JOLENE MOHR, WILDLIFE BRIGADE MEMBER the best part of the job, and the most understand what we’re trying to do. I challenging. “You’re watching the bear, want people to be exposed to the and you’re trying to get cars moving wildlife in the park so hopefully they through, and you’re trying to talk to people and maintain dis- will want to conserve and protect it and all of these wonderful tance from the bear.” Also, “Grizzly bear jams are just insane, natural resources. I love when a bear jam is controlled well especially if there are cubs,” Wilmot says. Mohr adds, “Other enough that we have time to talk to visitors. I always learn animals are exciting, but grizzly bears just bring out a different something from them, and they have so many questions. It is level of enthusiasm in people. It is so exciting for the public to fun to educate them.” see bears, especially baby bears. When people driving past see “You can’t plan your day on this job,” Mohr says. “Also, we people stopped, they slow down and ask why. When I say, ‘It’s a enjoy seeing the wildlife as much as everyone else. We feel very bear,’ they go really nuts. Pulling up, they were totally low-key, lucky that we get to see what we get to see. I think we’ve seen but then they hear ‘bear,’ and the doors of their car are flying more than a lot of people. We’ve seen grizzly and black bears open and they’re jumping out. I’m like, ‘I know it’s exciting, but mating, playing, taking down elk, nursing—all different types you still have to go and park your of natural bear behavior.” car.’ ” While traffic management is Natural bear behavior—natural INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING with the Wildlife Brigade? Get secondary to protecting the bears, it wildlife behavior—is what the is something the Wildlife Brigade Wildlife Brigade is trying to prein line. “I don’t have much turnover,” Kate Wilmot says. But, does. “We ask people to get all four serve. “We want visitors to enjoy “Folks can apply directly to the park.” Also, last summer the wheels off the road,” Adams says. watching these animals, but we’re park started a group under the Wildlife Brigade, the Lakers. Last year was the first year the trying not to habituate these bears This volunteer group specifically targets String Lake. They’re Wildlife Brigade used orange traffic so they become problem bears. We out there doing food storage information and education for cones. “I know they’re ugly,” Wilmot don’t want bears to think we’re the public, and monitoring parking and resource damage. says. “But we’ve found them to be nice,” Wilmot says. JH Email jessica_erwin@nps.gov 40

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017


business

Saving Jackson Hole Jackson Hole is known for its wildlife, wildlands, and Wild West image—a brand that is as authentic as it is alluring, and successful. But what does the valley’s popularity mean for its wildness? BY MOLLY ABSOLON

“JACKSON HOLE.” THESE two words lure like a siren song, pulling people from all over the world here to see wildlife and towering peaks, to ride a horse, ski powder, or experience a little bit of the Old West. Jackson Hole’s popularity is rooted in its proximity to Grand Teton (GTNP) and Yellowstone National Parks, but the valley has its own identity: There is a Jackson Hole brand, even if there is no single mastermind behind it. Groups that promote tourism to the valley—local businesses and events; state, town, and county government; the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce; and the Jackson Hole Travel & Tourism Joint Powers Board (JHTTB), a seven-member committee created in The bottoms of the tram cars at 2011 to increase off-season tourism—do not collaborate Jackson Hole Mountain Resort on how the area presents itself to the outside world. The are emblazoned with imagery conjures thoughts of the National Park Service (NPS) uses the Tetons and that Wild West. The resort uses a Yellowstone in its marketing campaigns, while Travel bucking bronco in many of its Wyoming, the state’s official tourism office, heavily pro- marketing materials. 42

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

COURTESY PHOTO

JH Living


motes both parks. Articles tout Jackson as a destination for western and wildlife art. And Jackson Hole Mountain Resort (JHMR) has a marketing team that works diligently on its own messaging and branding. It is the ads of the NPS, JHTTB, Travel Wyoming, and JHMR that are the most ubiquitous and widespread. Started as a small ski area with big dreams, Jackson Hole has become one of the best ski resorts in the United States and is one of the few family owned resorts to break the 500,000 skier-day mark. Its early reputation for being “too hard, too cold, and too far” has been forgotten, thanks to tens of millions of dollars of investments to improve snowmaking, establish more lift access, create more intermediate ski terrain, enhance base facilities, and partner with airlines to provide direct flights to Jackson from major cities all over the U.S. During its fiftieth anniversary year (2015-16), the mountain saw more visitors than ever before, in part because of its very focused and successful brand: “The Last of the Wild West.” That brand, which revolves around the iconic bucking horse and rider logo, capitalizes on nostalgia for the valley’s cowboy heritage and a bit of the tough-guy mystique left over from the early days. It is used in conjunction with images of the area’s abundant wildlife and its spectacular setting to create a feeling of adventure and excitement. “When you think cowboy, you think untamed spirit,” says Bill Lewkowitz, JHMR’s business development director and a resort employee for thirty-two years. “That’s what we are about. We’re kind of rough around the edges, but people tend to like that.”

our amazing resources,” says Aaron Pruzan, the owner of Rendezvous River Sports and a member of the JHTTB since its inception. “How do we move forward in a way that is good for the town’s economy and residents, and also respects place and the values we get from this place?” BEHIND MINERAL EXTRACTION, tourism is Wyoming’s No. 2 industry. But as the state faces declining energy revenues, tourism is seen as the golden egg. (Federal coal lease and mineral royalty payments have shrunk by 50 percent, or $500 million in the last decade, and Wyoming’s 2017-18 budget faces a $156 million shortfall.) The national parks remain the main draw for tourists. In 2016, 4.257 million people visited Yellowstone National Park, a 3.9 percent increase from 2015 and up more than 20 percent from 2014. In GTNP, 2016 was the third consecutive year of visitation growth. Over the last four years, visitation to GTNP has increased 23 percent. “Growing up, in elementary school

BRADLY J. BONER

WHILE IT IS JHMR that officially uses “The Last of the Wild West” identity, wild and western is the natural personality of the entire valley; the messaging of other groups is a variation Hundreds of tourists gather at Yellowstone’s Old Faithful. Both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks are experiencing record visitation that threatens the resources that inspired the parks’ creation. on that theme. Travel Wyoming ads include photos of bison in front of the Tetons. A recent JHTTB ad campaign was “Your Inner Wild is Calling.” The we learned about Yellowstone,” a tourist from China explained Grand Teton Music Festival, a seven-week summertime series last summer. “It is unlike anywhere else in the world, and it has of classical music concerts, has posters of musicians in a field long been a dream to see it in person.” In February 2016, Brand of wildflowers in front of the Tetons. USA—a private-public partnership created by the 2011 Travel Groups have different-but-the-same messaging in large Promotion Act—released an IMAX movie to theaters around part because so much of Jackson Hole is public land, whether the world called National Parks Adventure. Narrated by Robert national park, forest, or reserve. This gives the region its in- Redford, the film “takes audiences on the ultimate off-trail adcredible wildlife resource, recreational opportunities, and con- venture into the nation’s awe-inspiring great outdoors and unservation history—its wildness and West-ness. And, as Jackson tamed wilderness,” including Grand Teton and Yellowstone. Hole has become better known, more and more people are Tourists spent $3.3 billion in Wyoming in 2015, and the incoming. Since 2000, the town of Jackson’s population has dustry is responsible for 32,000 jobs, or 12 percent of the state’s grown 135 percent. “Jackson’s economic success depends on workforce. Statewide visitation grew 4.2 percent in 2014 and SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

43


BRADLY J. BONER

In Grand Teton National Park, 2016 was the third consecutive year of visitation growth. Since 2012, visitation to the park has increased 23 percent.

generated $170 million in local and state tax revenues. According to Diane Shober, the executive director of the Wyoming Office of Tourism, without tourism, the state would have to generate roughly $730 more per person to make up for the lost revenue. “We leverage [our national parks] to draw visitors to all parts of Wyoming. We talk about an emotional experience. Our marketing conjures up things like honor, America, the last bastion of wide-open spaces. But a brand only works if there is truth underneath it,” she says. HEREIN LIES THE rub. Jonathan Schechter, an economist and the founder and director of the Jackson think tank Charture Institute, says the potential paradox for a community like Jackson is that by selling a brand—the Wild West or an adventurous mountain lifestyle, for example— you monetize that image, and in monetizing it, its authenticity is lost. Jeff Golightly, the former president and CEO of the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce and a founding member of the JHTTB, points out that it isn’t the crowds of visitors that threaten Jackson’s authenticity. “We saw 1 percent growth in [hotel] occupancy over the last four years,” he says. “We’re full. You can’t get fuller than full. Two hotels have been built in [the town of] Jackson in the last twenty years, and, at the same time, four were torn down. Overall, the number of rooms in town has remained 44

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

about the same for twenty years. I think tourism is the sacrificial lamb people want to throw into the volcano to slow down growth. But, really, we aren’t growing any faster than other mountain towns in the West; in fact, we are growing slower than some.” Golightly concedes that more people are moving to Jackson Hole, but says desirable communities throughout the world are getting more crowded. “It’s a question of demographics,” says Christian Beckwith, the founder and director of the annual SHIFT gathering, which promotes working together to champion the country’s public lands. “The population of the United States is projected to grow from 300 million to 650 million. There will soon be 7 billion people in the world. These people are going to go somewhere. Jackson Hole is an incredibly desirable place. What’s happening here is happening in all desirable places.” Beckwith believes that understanding the overlap between growth and sustainability is critical for the protection of the public lands and wildlife that make the valley so unique. So it seems that part of the solution to keeping Jackson Hole wild may lie in today’s perceived problem of overcrowding. “We need to appeal to more people,” Beckwith says. “Outdoor recreation is an incredibly powerful vehicle to get people outside to fall in love with a place.” And according to Beckwith, it’s when people love a place that they want to protect it. JH


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JH Living

design

Decked Out Whether at ground level or on the roof, terraces and decks help homeowners make the most of our short-butsublime summer season.

Architect Stephen Dynia designed this rooftop deck on a 750-square-foot home at the base of Snow King to be part of the living space. 48

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

COURTESY PHOTO

BY LILA EDYTHE


P ho t og r a ph er : Ma t t h ew M i ll ma n

I nspir e d b y Pl a c e

jackson,wy

bozeman,mt

clbarchitects.com


GIBEON PHOTOGRAPHY

“IT WAS THE driving factor of the whole de- Architect Brad Hoyt had no THIS CONNECTION WITH the land is not sign,” says Doug Halsey about the rooftop choice but to do west-facing willy-nilly. “Conversations with clients start deck on a home he designed and built in East decks on this East Gros Ventre with outdoor space as part of the program, Butte home. He came up with Jackson. “I knew our lot had views of the the idea of a sliding mesh wall to and then the discussion gets deeper,” Dynia Tetons if we could get above the neighboring help provide adjustable shade. says. “We start looking at what time of day buildings. I had the idea of the rooftop deck, they want to be outside, and what they want to and we had the footprint given to us by the be doing outside: Do they want to cook out subdivision, so I built the spaces in between the two.” there? Do they want it to be an outdoor room?” In Jackson While Halsey’s dedication to a deck may seem extreme, Hole, the single biggest environmental factor to consider is the “100 percent of clients want outdoor space,” says Brad Hoyt, an sun. “Having the ability to choose between spaces that have architect at Hoyt/CTA Architects Engineers. “Outdoor space is shade and spaces that are sunny extends the amount of time a consideration in every single project we do.” Architect you can sit outside,” Hoyt says. “You would probably want to Stephen Dynia’s clients are the same. “I think everybody has an sit in the sun in the morning but might want afternoon shade.” expectation that there should be outdoor space, because our A Hoyt project near Spring Creek Ranch, at the top of East season of outdoor living is brief but very precious,” Dynia says. Gros Ventre Butte, did force him to get creative, though. “The “When you buy property in a place that is so expensive, I al- topography of the lot and resulting siting and design of the most couldn’t imagine not creating some intentionally dedi- home was such that the outdoor spaces had to be on the west cated outdoor space.” side—an aspect that can cook in the summer, especially in the Terraces (or patios) and decks both add value to a home. late afternoon.” Hoyt still wanted the homeowners to be able to In 2014, Remodeling Magazine released a study showing that sit in the sun or shade. “It became an exercise in how to provide the return on investment for a wood deck is 87 percent, which adjustable shade on the west side,” Hoyt says. The solution was a surpasses all indoor renovations. The Gallup Organization sliding mesh wall. “It is heavy enough that it doesn’t blow around has found that a terrace has a perceived increased value of 12 in the wind, and you can still see the view out over the valley and percent. to the Tetons, but it takes the intensity out of the sun.” But none of the homeowners or architects interviewed for In addition to including a dining/lounging area, this this article mentioned an increase in a home’s value as the rea- deck—which is about 1,500 square feet on three different levson for having a terrace or deck. In Jackson Hole, the financial els connected by stairs—has a firepit, a barbecue, and a hot tub. benefits of outdoor space are merely an added bonus. “People “These amenities are becoming more prevalent,” Hoyt says. who live here are interested in a lifestyle that allows them to “How many firepits did we do ten years ago? None.” connect with the landscape,” says Eric Logan, principal at Designing outdoor spaces for a 4,500-square-foot home Carney Logan Burke Architects. “Connection with the land in near Wilson, Logan wasn’t constricted like Hoyt at Spring Jackson is a big deal.” Creek. A south-facing courtyard is set between two wings of 50

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017


Photo: Gordon Gregory

M I L L E R

A R C H I T E C T S ,

406.551.6950 www.ctmarchitects.com

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JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

the house, and a west-facing terrace captures panoramic views of the Tetons and allows access to a pond. There is also a small area on the north side. “And the entry, which is on the east [side], includes a porch,” Logan says. “We were able to create a variety of opportunities to either run to the sun or run away from it.” The southern courtyard goes one step further and includes a transition zone between the indoors and outdoors and the sun and shade. A roof protects the part of this terrace immediately adjacent to the home. “If you’re cold, you walk further out into the sunshine,” Logan says. “If you’re hot, or if it starts raining or hailing, you can still be out on the terrace, under the roof.” This terrace wasn’t designed solely with being outside in mind—it is also a focal point from inside the house. “It is captured by building forms on two sides,” Logan says. “It is partially enclosed by the two wings of the house, which helps make it a defined space, and it is directly connected to the major public wing of the house. Major views from inside are focused out over this exterior space.” Having an outdoor space surrounded by indoor space like this makes it feel like another room in the house. “Spaces like this one let you cheat a little and borrow outdoor space as part of the indoor experience,” Logan says. IN DYNIA-DESIGNED “cubes” tucked into an alley near the western base of Snow King, a rooftop deck is meant to be part of the living space, not merely borrowed space. The indoor space of these homes—there are two of them, adjacent to each other and very literally cubes that are 28 feet wide, 28 feet deep, and 28 feet tall—is about 750 square feet, and the immediate area around them is tightly packed with what Dynia describes as “messy” buildings. “The question became, ‘How do you get more space, outdoor space, and views on a site like this?’ ” Dynia says. “The answer was the roof. The roof really became an essential living room for the building.” After the two cubes were finished, around 2001, Dynia lived in one for four years. “I suspect I will move back there at some point, because it is probably the most unique living environment that I’ve done out of all the houses I’ve designed,” he says. “I always try


to find the best words to describe this feeling of rising through the house and ending up in a seat where you cannot see any of the context around you; you only see the mountain. Everything around you goes away.” Unless it’s the Fourth of July, when Snow King hosts the valley’s biggest fireworks display. “Every year I lived there, I would invite clients to the Fourth of July fireworks,” Dynia says. Dynia sometimes used the roof as a bedroom. “I would often in summer sleep on the roof,” he says. Halsey does the same, accompanied by his nine-yearold daughter. “My daughter always wants to sleep up on the roof,” he says. “We’ve camped there a couple of times. We’ve been up there during meteor showers watching shooting stars. It feels like a second living room for us. Once we’re up there, it does feel like the house doubles in size.” He adds that if the

COURTESY PHOTO

This Carney Logan Burke-designed home near Wilson has outdoor spaces that face each direction, allowing the owners to find sun or shade at any time of the day.

weather is nice, the family often eats dinner on the roof as well. Halsey says that as they began planning this house, he and his wife, Sue Fleming, debated between a basement

and a rooftop deck. “We didn’t have enough in the budget for both,” he says. “We’ve never regretted our decision. As soon as we’re up there, we agree that it’s worth every penny.” JH

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53


Special Interest Feature

Peak Properties THE FACTOR THAT makes the Jackson Hole real estate market so unusual is the relative scarcity of private land. Ninety-seven percent of Teton County, Wyoming, is publicly owned—either national park, national forest, or wildlife refuge. This computes to just 75,000 privately held acres in a county spanning 2.5 million acres. The guaranteed open spaces and unobstructed views these surrounding public lands afford make the remaining private land a real treasure. Add the abundance of recreational opportunities found in and around the valley, and the quality of life one can enjoy in Jackson Hole is simply unbeatable. Moreover, many of the properties featured here are secluded, scenic retreats located in the midst of prime wildlife habitat. Most existing and prospective property owners in Jackson Hole cherish this notion, and serve—or will serve—as stewards of nature. One cannot put a dollar value on waking to the Teton skyline, skiing home for lunch, or listening to a trout stream gurgling through the backyard. In Jackson Hole, “living with nature” is not a fleeting, vicarious experience a person has while watching TV. Here it’s a fact of life, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

SNOW CREST RANCH / DRIGGS, ID

5,776

square feet

4

bedrooms

5

baths

Striking Teton views along Stateline Road between Idaho and Wyoming, this 4 bedroom, 5 bath ultra-custom home overlooks a large pond and the sprawling foothills of the Teton Mountain Range. Guests are welcomed by a dramatic vaulted great room with a mix of timbers and finely crafted wood finishes. The custom finishes and spectacular views are coupled with extensive landscaping on one of the finest building sites this development and Teton Valley has to offer.

1,195,000 dollars

17-237 MLS#

54

HOME AND 42 ACRES / ALTA, WY

3,544

square feet

3

bedrooms

4

baths

Absolutely stunning custom home on 42 acres of a productive farm ground in Alta, Wyoming. One of the “Crown Jewels” in all of Teton Valley, this mountain retreat was built with the highest attention to detail and craftsmanship. Reclaimed materials used throughout and walls of glass offer views of the Teton peaks from every room. Fully ADA designed, featuring a two-person elevator. The 1,400 square foot, heated 3+ car garage offers room for every toy.

2,750,000

Teton Valley Realty Tayson Rockefeller - (208) 709-1333 tayson@tetonvalleyrealty.com - tetonvalleyrealty.com

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

dollars

16-1677 MLS#

Teton Valley Realty William Fay - (208) 351-4446 bill@tetonvalleyrealty.com - tetonvalleyrealty.com


FALL CREEK LODGE

8,705

square feet

6

bedrooms

5.5

This premiere retreat is located twenty minutes from Teton Village and two minutes from the town of Wilson, yet it feels worlds away. The pristinely landscaped property offers stone patios, a fire pit, and ponds overlooking Fish Creek Ranch up to the Sleeping Indian. The home has a tasteful blend of mountain and rustic influences with a contemporary edge. High end finishes and quality materials throughout create this modern day lodge.

6,775,000

15-2383 MLS#

Jackson Hole Sotheby’s International Realty Huff | Vaughn | Sassi - (307) 203-3000 theteam@jhsir.com - mercedeshuff.com

MOUNTAIN CONTEMPORARY MASTERPIECE

4,127

square feet

5

bedrooms

6

baths

This showcase mountain contemporary retreat is ideally located with ski-in, ski-out access and minutes from the Town Square. A gourmet kitchen, high-end finishes throughout, spacious living areas complimented with stone and natural gas fireplaces, large windows, ample outside decking, and an outdoor spa complete this beautifully designed custom home. Steps away from endless world class recreation on the trails of the national forest that border Snow King Estates.

2,550,000 dollars

17-400 MLS#

15,335 square feet

5

bedrooms

8

baths

baths

dollars

MOUNTAIN CONTEMPORARY RETREAT IN 3 CREEK RANCH

UPON REQUEST dollars

17-330 MLS#

This stately, newly-completed 3 Creek Ranch home was masterfully crafted with a stone and timber exterior and stunning interior finishes of leathered South American specialty stone countertops, quartz tile, and Denali Rocks granite art slabs. The open-plan home design is positioned seamlessly on the 3-plus acre double homesite taking full advantage of the open views over the 18th fairway to the Grand Teton through an array of large picture windows.

3 Creek Ranch Real Estate Services LLC Todd Domenico - (307) 739-9292 TDomenico@3CreekRanch-JH.com 3CreekRanch-JH.com

STUNNING LUXURY RIVER FRONT ESTATE

5,112

square feet

3

bedrooms

3.5 baths

Prolific fishing venue on scenic North Platte River in Saratoga, Wyoming. This handsomely crafted estate is located at the historic Old Baldy Club full service retreat and premiere golf course. Exquisite 4,500 square foot home with two ensuites and self sufficient guest home. The property includes six lots totaling 4.78 acres. Offered elegantly furnished turn-key with Electric golf cart, Ford Expedition, and club membership subject to Board approval. Virtual tour: www.tourfactory.com/1599525

1,995,000

Jackson Hole Sotheby’s International Realty Peter Selkowitz - (307) 690-3843 peter.selkowitz@jhsir.com - jhsir.com

dollars

16-1735 MLS#

Diane Nodell Real Estate Inc Diane Nodell - (307) 732-0303 diane@dianenodell.com - dianenodell.com SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

55


ETNA EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

6,200

square feet

7

bedrooms

6

This fenced 50 acre estate is comprised of six individual lots which adjoin public land. One lot has an indoor arena with stalls for horses, a grooming/wash stall, tack room and feed room. Another lot has a toy barn with three oversized doors, a round pen and loafing shed and a new 3 bedroom, 2 bath 1,300 square foot guest house. A 12 acre lot has the 4,900 square foot, 4 bedroom, 4 bath main house.

baths

2,250,000 dollars

16-2742 MLS#

square feet

4

bedrooms

6

Jackson Hole Sotheby’s International Realty Jane Carhart - (307) 413-8961 jane.carhart@jhsir.com Jacksonholeluxuryproperties.com

An innovative mountain modern residence recently completed in Teton Pines. Curved rooflines and floor-toceiling windows accent the beauty of the surroundings. Located on the 18th hole of the Arnold Palmer designed golf course, this home features 4 bedrooms, bonus room, office, loft, 2 half bathrooms, an elevator, and a 3-car garage. The luxuriousness of this residence is found in every detail.

baths

17-449 MLS#

56

acres

bedrooms

Direct Teton views and easy access make these lots ones you don’t want to miss. Bring your four-legged friends to this horse-friendly subdivision just outside Driggs. These lots are at the rear of the subdivision bordering open ranch land. Designated build sites preserve stunning Teton views.

UPON REQUEST dollars

16-1239 MLS#

Jackson Hole Real Estate Associates John Farrell & Chad Budge - (917) 612-2185 budgerealtygroup@jhrea.com - budgerealestate.com

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Brokers of Jackson Hole Real Estate John McNaughton - (307) 200-9209 john.b.mcn@gmail.com - JMcNRE.com

PERFECT HOME IN TOWN

9,376

square feet

5

bedrooms

7

baths

7,500,000

5,995,000 dollars

6

baths

TETON PINES SHOWPIECE

6,021

DRY CREEK RANCH LOTS

dollars

16-2395 MLS#

Beautiful Arts & Crafts style home overlooking the 25,000 acre National Elk Refuge and just four blocks from the famous Town Square in Jackson Hole. Wonderful cherry finishes and timber woodwork throughout compliment the expansive views of the Refuge, valley, and Tetons. In addition to the gracious living room and chef’s kitchen, the home also offers a comfortable office, large rec room, swimming pool, exercise room, extensive storage and guest/caretaker apartment with private entrance.

Jackson Hole Sotheby’s International Realty Ed Liebzeit - (307) 413-1618 ed.liebzeit@jhsir.com - edinjackson.com


750 PONDEROSA DRIVE

2.25 acres

bedrooms

Enjoy Grand Teton and Teton Mountain Range vistas from this peaceful location on the western boundary of Ponderosa Drive. Bordering the 250 acre Trinity Ranch to the west provides for pastoral views both west and southwest. A seasonal water feature enhances the ambiance of the property.

MLS#

acres

bedrooms

Flat Creek Fishing Estate is a rare offering with over 1/2 mile of private fishing on 34.89 acres in Jackson Hole. The property is defined by Flat Creek as it meanders along the northern and western boundaries in an open, yet private setting. With its incredible mountain vistas and close proximity to resort town amenities, this estate is sure to satisfy even the most discerning buyer.

16-1190 MLS#

Jackson Hole Real Estate Associates Budge Realty Group - (307) 413-1364 budgerealtygroup@jhrea.com - budgerealestate.com

CONTEMPORARY CHARM ON 3 ACRES

3,446

square feet

4

bedrooms

baths

5,150,000

MLS#

dollars

3.5

baths

dollars

bedrooms

995,000

Jackson Hole Real Estate Associates Budge Realty Group - (307) 413-1364 budgerealtygroup@jhrea.com - budgerealestate.com

FLAT CREEK FISHING ESTATE

34.89

acres

Enjoy the unobstructed Grand Teton views from this private treed 12 acre parcel located mid-way up Saddle Butte. The paved road to the site is well maintained and accessible year-round. Downtown Jackson Hole is a quick 10 minute drive.

baths

750,000

16-2349

12.32

baths

dollars

SADDLE BUTTE HEIGHTS

Remodeled in 2006, this contemporary farmhouse in Polo Ranches offers a bucolic setting south of town. The private parcel features mature landscaping, yet still provides generous outdoor living spaces and stunning view corridors to the southern Teton Range. The floor plan features an upstairs master suite, two guest bedrooms and a mother-in-law apartment. The main floor affords a separate office and study plus a great room with remodeled kitchen, dining nook and living room with fireplace.

2,150,000

Live Water Properties Alex Maher, Tate Jarry, John Merritt - (307) 201-4880 info@livewaterproperties.com - livewaterproperties.com

dollars

­16-1113 MLS#

RE/MAX Obsidian Real Estate Brett McPeak - (307) 690-4335 bmcpeak@wyoming.com - 5100lake.com SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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LOT 8 HANGAR HOME AT THE REFUGE, ALPINE, WYOMING

3,740

square feet

2

bedrooms

2

baths

1,850,000 dollars

16-2932 MLS#

This custom designed hangar home is awaiting your arrival. Ideal for extended fly-a-ways to the Jackson Hole area. Two bedrooms, two baths and an open floor plan invite relaxation and provide all the comforts: Full kitchen, two car garage, laundry, expansive lounge and living areas. Incredible views in all directions. The 70’x70’x17’ steel constructed, insulated hangar will provide ample space for one or more aircraft and other assorted toys. Just 35 minutes from downtown Jackson.

TCCG Real Estate A Division of The Clear Creek Group, LLC Reynolds Pomeroy, Associate Broker - (307) 413-2429 reynoldsp@tccgjh.com - tccgrealestate.com

TETON SPRINGS LUXURY LOG HOME

4,229

square feet

5

bedrooms

5.5

12 Bannock Circle is one of two custom designed Cabins developed by the Eden Group. Designed by Ellis Nunn, built with post and beam structural design, constructed using only hydrometer checked logs and sold fully furnished with a Laurie Waterhouse furniture package, this cabin stands sentinel to all other cabins at Teton Springs. Located above the 11th hole and overlooking stocked fishing ponds. Excellent rental revenue producing property.

baths

17-217 MLS#

58

2,055

square feet

3

bedrooms

3

baths

1,550,000 dollars

— MLS#

This condominium is located in Love Ridge with three decks and room for you and your guests to spread out with multiple lock off configurations to maximize rental potential.You can stay in the one bedroom and rent the 2nd bedroom or rent the entire 3 bedroom unit. Only a couple of blocks away from the Town Square and hiking trails are out your back door. Snow King Mountain Resort provides you access to shuttle service, pool, spa, and on mountain activities.

Jackson Hole Real Estate Associates Christy & Garth Gillespie - (307) 413-5243 gillespieteam@jhexperts.com searchjacksonwyareahomes.com

KNOCK YOU OVER ... TETON VIEWS

2,996

square feet

4

bedrooms

Stare at the Tetons as you watch the migratory birds fly by this immaculate, Broker owned, Melody Ranch home. Surrounded by open space on a half acre lot with a seasonal stream running through the beautifully landscaped yard. High-end finishes throughout.

3

baths

1,295,000 dollars

UPSCALE SHORT TERM RENTAL UNIT IN TOWN

Cabin & Company Tom Hedges - (307) 690-2495 tom@cabinandcompany.com - cabinandcompany.com

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

UPON REQUEST dollars

— MLS#

RARE Properties of Jackson Hole LLC Richard Armstrong - (307) 413-4359 rick@rarejh.com - rarejh.com


PRIVACY & VIEWS NORTH OF JACKSON

6,793

square feet

6

bedrooms

6

baths

MOUNTAIN CHIC NEW CONSTRUCTION

Located adjacent to the second hole of the Jackson Hole Golf & Tennis Club this Estate Level Home offers unparalleled privacy in a serene setting. There is exceptional craftsmanship throughout both the six bedroom, 6,793 square foot main house and four bedroom, 2,188 square foot guest house. A seasonal stream meanders through the manicured grounds flowing into a large aerated pond. The well-designed one level floor plan offers great spaces for entertaining.

4,950,000 dollars

— MLS#

4,544

square feet

5

bedrooms

This newly constructed, three bedroom, three bath home with a two bedroom, two bath guest casita is located on the 14th fairway of 3 Creek Ranch golf course. With Teton views and access to some of the best private fly-fishing in Jackson, this luxe home is sure to exceed expectations.

5

baths

4,850,000

Jackson Hole Sotheby’s International Realty Brooke Walles - (307) 690-4257 brooke.walles@jhsir.com - propertiesjacksonhole.com

dollars

16-2363 MLS#

Jackson Hole Sotheby’s International Realty Spackmans & Associates - (307) 739-8156 spackmans@JHSIR.com - SpackmansinJH.com

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59


FUN(D) RAISERS 60

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017


Jackson Hole has one of the highest rates of nonprofits per capita, ranging from Search & Rescue to food rescue. BY MAGGIE THEODORA

“It’s hard to exaggerate the philanthropic spirit of this community,” says Katharine Conover, president of the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole, which grants over $15 million annually to more than 200 nonprofits in the valley. Part of it is that people want to maintain the open spaces, wildlife, and wildlands that are the reason many of us live here. “But it’s not just that we feel responsible for maintaining the vistas and wildlife that brought us here in the first place,” Conover says. “This is a unique community, because most of us came from someplace else and most of us came here not because of jobs and not because of family, but because we chose to be here. That deliberate choice of a place has instilled in us an ethic of stewardship. The standard line is that you come here because it is beautiful and you stay because of the people. It’s at that point that our commitment expands to preserving the values that make this community special, and it is our nonprofit community that really protects those values.” Listening to Conover’s explanation, it is no surprise to learn that Jackson Hole has one of the highest (if not the highest) rates of nonprofits per capita. The only thing as diverse as the valley’s nonprofits—from a children’s museum to a wildlife art museum, a search and rescue team, a music festival, and several arts programs, among others—is the variety of events these groups hold to fund their missions. While most of these events, which we have dubbed “fun(d)raisers,” are indeed as fun as they are worthy, there are too many of them for us to create an exhaustive list. So here are some of our favorites, along with who or what they support. RYAN DORGAN

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OLD BILL’S

EVENT: Old Bill’s Fun Run for Charities FUN FACTOR: Thousands of runners and walkers, some in costume, make this event the valley’s biggest race/fun run. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: Pretty much every nonprofit in the valley DETAILS: 10 a.m. September 9, 307/739-1026, cfjacksonhole.org WHERE: Jackson Town Square PRICE: Free

BRADLY J. BONER

ANYONE WHO’S LIVED in the valley for even a year knows Old Bill’s Fun Run for Charities. With more than 5,000 locals and visitors participating, no other fundraiser involves as many people. “I was in a cab a few years ago coming home from the airport, and the cab driver was explaining Old Bill’s to me,” says Conover, whose Community Foundation of Jackson Hole organizes the event. “How many communities are there where you’d be in a cab and the driver will be talking about philanthropy? The whole town feels like they own Old Bill’s, and that’s great.” Unlike most fundraisers, Old Bill’s doesn’t raise money for a specific nonprofit, but for every nonprofit in the valley that wants to participate. (Since the first Old Bill’s was held in 1997, more than a dozen

similar events have popped up across the country.) During its inaugural year, there were less than one hundred participating nonprofits; that number has since doubled. Over its life, the event has raised more than $133 million, but, “Our median gift is $250,” Conover says. “It is very much a grassroots event that the whole community gets behind, which was the goal when it was started.” In addition to the actual runs—a race and recreational 5k and 10k—nonprofits set up booths that explain what they do. Last year, Vertical Harvest, a greenhouse that employs developmentally disabled adults, had someone dressed as a tomato handing out microgreens. “One year, the Senior Center had this bowl full of slips of paper that offered advice from seniors,” Conover says. “You were supposed to pick out a piece of paper; the one I got said, ‘Mind your own business,’ which I never do.” Members of the Teton County Search & Rescue team have run the entire 5k while pushing a stretcher. Teton Science Schools did a flash-mob dance to the song “Happy.” “It’s all just so fun, because you never know what to expect,” Conover says. “Whatever happens, though, it’s a great reflection of Jackson Hole. We’re all so proud of it. It is the best reflection of ourselves.”

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EVENT: Shirley’s Heart Run FUN FACTOR: Local Alison Kyle Keffer founded this 5k run 13 years ago in memory of her mom, Shirley, and it’s truly a celebration of life. WHO YOU’RE HELPING: St. John’s Hospital Foundation’s Cardiology Fund DETAILS: 9 a.m. June 17, 307/739-7512, stjohnshospitalfoundation.org WHERE: R Park PRICE: From $25

JUNE 17

EVENT: Run and Ride for the Cure FUN FACTOR: In its 18th year, this Skinny Skissponsored race—a 5k run and 15k bike ride on Fish Creek Road done individually or as part of a team—gets bigger every year. WHO YOU’RE HELPING: Benefits the St. John’s Hospital Foundation Cancer Patient Support Fund DETAILS: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. June 4, 307/7397512, stjohnshospitalfoundation.org WHERE: Wilson Elementary School PRICE: $20 per participant

JUNE 17

JUNE 4

Additional Fun, Worthy Causes EVENT: Plein Air Fest, Etc. FUN FACTOR: Watch more than 50 artists paint on the museum’s Sculpture Trail, and maybe even bid on a piece at the end of the day. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: Everything from educational programs to acquisitions at the museum DETAILS: Starts at 10 a.m. June 17, auction at 1:30 p.m., 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org WHERE: National Museum of Wildlife Art PRICE: Free


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ART FAIR

EVENT: Art Fair Jackson Hole FUN FACTOR: Peruse fine and functional art made by more than 170 artists and artisans from across the region. WHO YOU’RE HELPING: Local art students of all ages DETAILS: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and until 4 p.m. Sundays July 7-9 and August 11-13, 307/733-6379, artassociation.org WHERE: Miller Park PRICE: $5

TUXES & TAILS

PRICE CHAMBERS

WHILE ONE ARTIST traveled all the way from Hawaii to show her work in the Art Association’s twice-annual summer Art Fair Jackson Hole, most of the more than 170 artists are regional, hailing from Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah, with “a lot from Arizona, New Mexico, and California as well,” says Molly Fetters, the director of the Art Fair. When the Art Association held its first Art Fair fifty-one years ago, never did the organization EVENT: Tuxes & Tails Gala think the event would grow into what it is today. FUN FACTOR: Walk the red carpet with your pooch What it is today is a juried art fair at which all artWHO YOU’RE HELPING: PAWS helps local pets and owners ists show original work—that’s a requirement— through spaying and neutering, adoption, and advocacy. and they have no representatives selling their work. DETAILS: 6 to 10 p.m. June 16, 307/734-2441, pawsofjh.org “So while a gallery or auction might bring in a lot WHERE: Center for the Arts of artists, our fairs allow you to meet and speak PRICE: People, $125; dogs, $100 with artists you might not get the opportunity to ever meet,” Fetters says. “While we have longtime TERRIERS IN PEARL necklaces, Shih Tzus in tuxedos, Great Danes in favorites that continue to get juried in, we have a lot tutus—no, you’re not dreaming. You’re at PAWS’ annual Tuxes & Tails of variety and different artists each year.” Gala, which, despite the silliness of pets in formal attire, has raised seriApproximately 5,000 attendees, about 40 percent ous money since it was founded in 2006 (more than $900,000 total, and locals, visit each three-day fair. $145,000 alone last year). In addition to the art—expect to see everything Amy Romaine, PAWS’ executive director, says, “People come out to from furniture to hammocks, paintings, photogracelebrate the love and connection they feel for their own pets and want phy, ceramics, jewelry, and clothing—“We work to share that with others.” And to celebrate the accomplishments of indiwith local musicians, nonprofits, and chefs to serviduals. Last year at the gala, PAWS presented Mary Ann Ahrens, presivice the fairs,” Fetters says. “It is a very family frienddent and founder of the Animal Humane Association of Star Valley, with ly event where people can find art of all mediums an award for being a local animal hero. “Mary Ann and her husband, and price ranges. The community is very supportive Ron, single-handedly changed the way stray and abandoned animals are of Art Fair Jackson Hole, since it is known to raise treated in Star Valley,” Romaine says. “When they moved to Star Valley in funds for art education in our community.” This the early 2000s, unclaimed stray pets were shot. Mary Ann and Ron year there will also be more—food trucks, a kids’ started pulling the pets out, and adopted them out from their home. This creation station, and live music. “We are working to was the start of the Animal Humane Association of Star Valley.” include activities in the park, like morning yoga or Proceeds from this year’s gala go toward PAWS’ free spay/neuter mommy and me music class, so you can be outside program. PAWS offers free spay/neuter vouchers to all residents of in the park and when your class is over, you can do Teton County and Star Valley, Wyoming, as well as Teton Valley, Idaho. a little shopping!” Fetters says. In 2016, the group distributed more than 1,100 vouchers.

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EVENT: Teton Youth & Family Services’ Annual Golf Benefit FUN FACTOR: Join about 100 players in a scramble format golf tournament WHO YOU’RE HELPING: Children with behavioral, emotional, and mental health problems, as well as their families DETAILS: June 22, 307/733-6440, tetonyouthandfamilyservices.org WHERE: Jackson Hole Golf & Tennis PRICE: $250/person

JUNE 22-24

EVENT: Dancers’ Workshop Annual Gala FUN FACTOR: Watch dancers from the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and Savion Glover, among others, perform and then enjoy a seated dinner with them. WHO YOU’RE HELPING: Aspiring dancers—DW supports the creation of new work and does education and outreach for dancers of all levels. DETAILS: July 20, 307/733-6398, dwjh.org WHERE: Center for the Arts PRICE: $450

JUNE 22

JUNE 19

Additional Fun, Worthy Causes EVENT: Jackson Hole Food & Wine Event FUN FACTOR: This new fundraiser includes 4 different events celebrating food, wine, spirits, and craft brews over 3 days. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: This year’s event benefits the Central Wyoming College Culinary and Hospitality program and Hole Food Rescue. DETAILS: June 22-24, 307/690-4824, jhfoodandwine.com WHERE: Various locations around the valley PRICE: Tickets start at $150


WILDLIFE TOURS

(307) 413-9300 R E S E R V E O N L I N E backcountrysafarisjh.com SUNRISE & SUNSET TOURS | PHOTOGRAPHY TOURS GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK DAY TOURS | YELLOWSTONE DAY TOURS


THIS EVENT, HELD for the fourth time this summer, is an example of the type of relationship to food that Slow Food in the Tetons tries to promote. Take the menu’s main course: beef. “Let’s just say for this event we need 300 pounds of meat to feed everyone,” says Ian McGregor, Slow Food in the Tetons’ board president. “To serve everyone brisket, we would likely need briskets from fifteen cows, because we’re only utilizing one of the many cuts available from the cow. And this sort of thing happens a lot with events— people want to eat something familiar, and chefs want to cook with familiar cuts.” But this party focuses on using the whole cow “in creative ways to show both the versatility of cooking methods and the resulting flavors,” McGregor says. “We can use a single cow and still have a couple of hundred pounds of meat left over.” Last year’s party did the one-cow thing, and the only complaint was “that they wanted more,” McGregor says. In addition to delicious food, this party, which raised $10,000 last year, seeks to “dispel the myth that not much more than cows can live in these mountains,” McGregor says. “Although it is a short season, creative farmers and ranchers, as well as talented chefs, have figured out ways to bring amazing and healthy food to the community year-round.” When not partying at the historic Lockhart Ranch, Slow Food in the Tetons organizes the weekly Jackson Hole People’s Market (4 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays in the summer at the base of Snow King), offers a variety of cooking classes for adults, and has farm-to-table cooking classes for third- to fifth-graders.

PRICE CHAMBERS

LOCKHART RANCH PARTY

EVENT: Lockhart Ranch Party FUN FACTOR: The Lockharts donate their ranch and lots of grass-fed beef to keep ticket prices low for this locally sourced feast with live music by The Canyon Kids. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: Proceeds benefit Slow Food in the Tetons, which supports producers and educates consumers to grow our local and regional sustainable food economy. DETAILS: 5:30 to 10 p.m. August 12, tetonslowfood.org WHERE: Lockhart Ranch PRICE: $45 (limited to 500 people)

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JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

EVENT: Fundraising Gala with Yo-Yo Ma FUN FACTOR: Hear Yo-Yo Ma perform Dvorák’s Cello Concerto with the Grand Teton Music Festival Orchestra. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: The Grand Teton Music Festival performs a 7-week symphony season in the summer and offers educational programs to Teton County students during the school year. DETAILS: August 1, 307/733-1128, gtmf.org WHERE: Walk Festival Hall PRICE: Tickets from $250 to $7,500

AUGUST 13

EVENT: Plein Air for the Park FUN FACTOR: Watch artists paint outside and enjoy an exhibit of all plein air paintings. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: Grand Teton Association supports Grand Teton National Park. DETAILS: July 5-16 (opening reception 7 to 9 p.m. July 12), 307/739-3606, grandtetonpark.org WHERE: Around GTNP; opening reception at Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center PRICE: Free

AUGUST 1

JULY 5-16

Additional Fun, Worthy Causes EVENT: Jackson Hole Land Trust 37th Annual Picnic FUN FACTOR: Last year, over 900 members of the community came to this alfresco feast. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: Keeping the valley’s wide-open spaces wide and open DETAILS: August 13, 307/733-4707, jhlandtrust.org WHERE: Hardeman North in Wilson PRICE: $50 for adults; kids under 12 are free


July 3 -August 20

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gtmf.org 307.733.1128


PRICE CHAMBERS

“WHERE ELSE CAN you climb on a fire truck, excavator, and bulldozer all in one place?” asks Sara Fagan, operations director at the Jackson Hole Children’s Museum. Sadly, you can’t do this every day at the museum, just during its annual Touch-A-Truck event, now in its fifth year. “The event epitomizes our mission of play, create, explore, and discover. It’s hands-on, it’s interactive, it’s about role play, imagination, and exploration,” Fagan says. All of the vehicles—and there could be as many as thirty, including a fire truck, ambulance, police car, street sweeper, motorcycle, helicopter, Sprinter van, loader, Airstream, heavy duty wrecker, and Zamboni, among others—have their operators/drivers standing nearby, and all vehicles come from the Jackson Hole community. “It’s a wonderful way to promote our Police Department, Fire/EMS, Public Works, Parks and Rec, and other local agencies,” Fagan says. “And it’s an opportunity for operators to connect with the community and youth.” In addition to all of the vehicles outside, the museum offers free admission that day, and there is also an Imagination Playground, a Creativity Studio activity, face painting, and two bouncy houses. After rocking the event in 2016, eight-yearold DJ Grady returns this year. Last year, 850 kids (and adults) took part in the fun. “Each year we see more people at the event,” Fagan says.

JACKSON HOLE ONE FLY

TOUCH-A-TRUCK

EVENT: Touch-A-Truck FUN FACTOR: Kids of all ages can explore their favorite big vehicles, from a fire truck to an excavator and a bulldozer. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: The Jackson Hole Children’s Museum DETAILS: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 11, 307/7333996, jhchildrensmuseum.org WHERE: King St., between Deloney and Gill (outside the museum) PRICE: Donations accepted

EVENT: Jackson Hole One Fly FUN FACTOR: A professional guide works with teams of four anglers, each of whom must choose one fly to use the entire day. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: Founded in 1986, the Jackson Hole One Fly Foundation funds educational, conservation, preservation, and rehabilitation projects that benefit trout populations in the region. DETAILS: September 7-10, jacksonholeonefly.com WHERE: Snake River and the South Fork of the Snake PRICE: Entry between $7,200 and $12,000 per team FIELD & STREAM CALLED the Jackson Hole One Fly “perhaps the most famous one-fly event” in the country. This is not only because the event is now in its thirty-first year, but also because of the quality of fishing. The One Fly sends teams to one of twelve sections of the Snake River and South Fork of the Snake, both areas that anglers from around the world dream of fishing. The Jackson Hole One Fly Foundation, which founded the event in 1986, makes sure to call this an “event” and not a “competition,” but the 170ish anglers selected to participate each year are definitely out for bragging rights. The challenge of using a single fly to catch multiple fish all day is not to be taken lightly. If a fish disappears with your fly, your day is done. How do you win the fishing event? Each trout caught by a team member is measured in inches before the team’s assigned guide releases it, unharmed, back into the water. A maximum of eight fish per angler per day are measured; the best six are counted. If the guide judges a fish to be mortally wounded, the team member responsible is penalized. All of this is done to raise money to support trout habitat in the area—from building a 288-footlong fish ladder to developing a wild, self-sustaining, and abundant brood source of westslope cutthroat trout. JH

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EVENT: Black Bear Ball FUN FACTOR: Held by the National Museum of Wildlife Art only every 5 years, this is the first time this event is outside, in a fancy tent overlooking the National Elk Refuge. This year, it celebrates the museum’s 30th anniversary. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: Everything from educational programs to acquisitions at the museum DETAILS: August 19, 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org WHERE: National Museum of Wildlife Art PRICE: $375

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

SEPTEMBER 20-21

AUGUST 19

Additional Fun, Worthy Causes EVENT: Stripping for a Cure FUN FACTOR: Custom-tied pink flies score extra points at this fly-fishing fundraiser. There are also bonuses for falling out of the boat. WHAT YOU’RE HELPING: This year, funds raised support St. John’s Hospital Foundation’s Women’s Health Care Fund, Teton Valley Hospital Foundation’s Rally For A Cure, Camp Magical Moments, and Casting for Recovery. DETAILS: September 20-21, strippingforacure.com WHERE: Teton Springs Resort, Victor, Idaho PRICE: $800


Wyoming Range

Jackson

A hiker takes in the views on the hillside above Menace Falls in the Wyoming Range, approximately thirty miles west of Daniel Junction.

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Immediately south of Jackson Hole, the Wyoming Range is a contradiction, with some sections overused and others rarely visited. ¶ What does that mean for its role in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem?

BY MIKE KOSHMRL PHOTOGRAPHY BY BEN GRAHAM

SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

71


P

AST THE CUT-OFF trail that works its way toward Cliff Creek, the imprints of horseshoes, manure, and a maintained trail quickly give way to scores of elk tracks, wolf scat, and deadfall. Although it is July, any indication that hikers have used the Wyoming Range National Recreation Trail south of Jackson Hole at any point since the snow melted off a month earlier is abThere has been oil and sent. While the trailhead is a mere gas development in the half-hour drive from the Jackson Town Square, the solitude and lower elevations of these ruggedness are expected. Kind of. mountains, and, in some Wolverines, one of the hardareas, the effect of the est-to-spot mammals in North industrial activity has been America, live in the Wyoming Range, which forms the southto wipe out the Colorado eastern arm of the Greater River strain of cutthroat Yellowstone Ecosystem and has trout from entire creeks. peaks that rise to over 11,000 feet. These mountains are perhaps the last place in the state where lynx live. Jackson resident and retired Bridger-Teton National Forest (BTNF) landscape architect Susan Marsh says that from the Fourth of July until the start of elk season (hunters travel to this range from across the state) if you pick your spot carefully, 72

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

“You can see zero people. It’s pretty amazing.” Marsh would know as well as anyone: Over the years, she has written three books that included “Wyoming Range” in the title. At the same time, the Wyoming Range has incurred the hefty hand of man, especially along its fringes. Dirt bikers and ATVers heavily use the range. Also, the U.S. Forest Service’s (USFS) mixed-used mandate of land management is clear here. Like many slices of the Northern Rockies, the range—some areas of which are in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, while other areas fall under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management—is fraught with land-use and wildlife controversies. The southern reaches of gray wolf and grizzly range in the Lower 48 are here, but land managers and locals aren’t particularly welcoming to either species. There has been oil and gas development in the lower elevations of these mountains, and, in some areas, the effect of the industrial activity has been to wipe out the Colorado River strain of cutthroat trout from entire creeks. The federal government and the state have battled over whether to manage areas here for bighorn sheep or domestic sheep. Closures of motorized routes are often ignored (including on parts of the Wyoming Range National Recreation Trail, which is sup-


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posed to be for foot and horse traffic only the entirety of its seventy-five-mile length). In places, grazing livestock have overwhelmed alpine wildflower communities and fouled streams with E. coli bacteria. This wear, and its contrast to adjoining wilderness areas and national parks, begs the questions: Is the Wyoming Range a functional wild ecosystem? And, if so, is it truly part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem? B U D G E R E A L E S TAT E . C O M

MANY JACKSON HOLE residents, who live in the range’s backyard, likely only know these mountains from reading headlines related to the aforementioned controversies. The Wyoming Range is not as sexy as the Tetons, but, at one hundred miles long, it’s easily double the size. It’s a gem of a place for outdoorsmen like me who like to hunt, fish, ski, and cover ground for the sake of seeing new sites. Despite the incur-

Chad Budge, Owner, Associate Broker 307.413.1364 chadbudge@jhrea.com Dianne Budge, Owner, Associate Broker 307.413.1362 diannebudge@jhrea.com Rebekkah Kelley, Associate Broker 307.413.5294 rebekkahkelley@jhrea.com John Farrell, Sales Associate 917.612.2185 johnfarrell@jhrea.com 80 West Broadway, Jackson, WY 83001

SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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sions of humans, sections of this range are incredibly remote, much more so than the majority of the Tetons. Just a handful of miles from the Hoback Junction roundabout, the northern start of the Wyoming Range National Recreation Trail is at Bryan Flats. Depending on the time of year, expect to see horse trailers here or, more likely, nobody. Meandering along Willow Creek through monotonous, treed terrain for the first dozen miles, the trail passes through land that in the late 1970s conservationists advocated to become the Grayback Wilderness. Nothing happened then, but, through the ongoing Wyoming Public Lands Initiative, the discussion has re-emerged. The lands initiative, in theory, has promise to culminate in a bill that would create new wilderness areas in the state. (The last time a new area was designated as wilderness in Wyoming was 1984.) In Marsh’s estimation, much of the country in the Wyoming Range has attributes—like wide-open landscapes where the effects of mankind are relatively nil—that make it eligible to be designated a Wilderness Area. “They certainly could be, but it’s up to public opinion to determine whether or not that ought to happen,” Marsh says. The author rests to study a map on the crest of the Wyoming Range, atop the divide between the Greys and Green Rivers.

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Public opinion would likely be against a wilderness designation, which is the strictest protection federal land can get. Nothing mechanized— this includes mountain bikes, dirt bikes, and snowmobiles, among other things—is allowed in a wilderness area. And the east side of the Wyoming Range is a mecca for snowmobiling. “Those people have to have someplace to go, too,” Marsh says. “You can’t just make it all wilderness.” The locals would fight any wilderness plan “tooth and Switchbacks are sparse nail,” says Cotton Guio, a Big and, the higher we climb, Piney cattle rancher whose increasingly difficult to family has recreated in the Wyoming Range for six genfollow. Traveling north to erations. “I don’t think anysouth, the trail gains nearly body would be for that. 17,000 feet over its seventyThere’s a lot of wilderness in five miles. In places, it traces Wyoming, and unless you’re twenty years old and in really the range’s crest at 9,000 or good shape, you’re only going 10,000 feet in elevation. to see a portion of it.” THE FIRST TRUE climb of the Wyoming Range National Recreation Trail is at Pickle Pass, which divides the Greys and Hoback River drainages. Herds of cow elk with still-tiny, vulnerable calves at their sides scatter at our approach. To the northeast, some forty-five miles away, the Teton Range, un-


mistakable at even this distance, cuts the horizon. The hiking is arduous and the trail loose. Switchbacks are sparse and, the higher we climb, increasingly difficult to follow. Traveling north to south, the trail gains nearly 17,000 feet over its seventy-five miles. In places, it traces the range’s crest at 9,000 or 10,000 feet in elevation. Throughout, especially up high, the trail is challenging to follow without a compass, quad map, and stellar navigation skills or a GPS. (Lacking the former, we opt for the technological solution.) Trail maintenance, even if the USFS had the manpower for it, would be a challenge with the heavy clay soils that dominate this region. “The trail was designed for foot and horse use,” Marsh says, “but a lot of it really hasn’t been engineered at all. A lot of it’s just kind of random.” The grade, looseness, and deadfall— and a prohibition against motorized travel—weren’t enough to deter a group of motorbikers from riding onto the trail near the headwaters of Cottonwood Creek, some forty miles south of the Bryan Flats trailhead. We don’t see the riders, but their passage is spelled out clearly in the mud. A legal motorized trail about five miles away may explain this illegal excursion, which, judging by the complex terrain, doesn’t look like it could have been much fun. Tracks go over things I never would have imagined a dirt bike could handle. Illegal motorized use like this can marginalize habitat for species like elk and mule deer, says Steve Kilpatrick, a Wyoming Game and Fish expat who now heads the Wyoming Wild Sheep Foundation. “There’s places where there’s just a ton of motorized access,” Kilpatrick says. “You’re just not going to see wildlife [in these areas]. As I get older, I can’t go to the high peaks like I used to. And I’m not going to request that someone give me motorized access to get there by building a two-track road. I’m not going to do that, because I know the impacts on the critters that live there, I know the visual impacts on the landscape, and I know the impacts to people who work so hard to hike or ride a horse there.” Along one four-mile stretch of the Wyoming Range Trail, between Roaring Fork Lakes and North Piney Creek, motorized use has taken over. Where a primitive trail once weaved through the landscape, denuded, rutted, and some-

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Wyoming Range Hiking Isn’t All Arduous NOT EVERYONE HAS the time, ability, or desire to take on the rugged seventy-five-mile Wyoming Range National Recreational Trail in its entirety. There are dozens of trailheads—some only a half-hour drive from Jackson—and hundreds of miles of trails elsewhere in the range. For a full rundown of options, pick up Susan Marsh and Rebecca Woods’ Beyond the Tetons. Here are several ideas, though.

Ann’s Ridge THE HIKE: This 2-mile hike up Ann’s Ridge is easy and, eventually, scenic. After winding through aspen and conifer stands, it tops out on the open slopes of a small, knobby mountain that rises up over Bryan Flats. Continue another third of a mile to the very crest of the ridge for views of the Tetons. INSIDER TIP: Don’t let your dog drink out of the algaechoked pond midway to the summit. Mine did once and got horrifically sick. DIRECTIONS: Head south from Jackson on U.S. 191/89/26. At Hoback Junction, continue on U.S. 191 toward Pinedale for about 3 miles. Turn right onto Bryan Flats Rd. (there is a large sculpture of a bull moose at the turn). Continue on the road for a mile to the Bryan Flats Trailhead’s large parking lot.

Bailey Lake THE HIKE: This 9.6-mile out-and-back hike to one of the northern Wyoming Range’s few lakes starts uphill, gaining 340 feet from the parking lot on the way to the Snake/ Greys River divide. INSIDER TIP: Fish for both cutthroat trout and a few grayling here. DIRECTIONS: Head south from Jackson on U.S. 191/89/26 for 13 miles to Hoback Junction. Continue 23 miles to Alpine on U.S. 26. Just before Alpine Market, turn left on Grey’s River Rd. In 8.3 miles, turn on Forest Service Road 10124. Bailey Lake Trailhead is 14 miles down this road.

Cliff Creek Falls THE HIKE: Passing spruce stands and ample wildflowers, the trail gains 1,135 feet over 6 miles to 68-foot-high Cliff Creek Falls. The Marsh and Woods hiking book describes the cascade as a “two-tiered silver spray” that pours over a “spruce-shadowed cliff.” The sun is often in a position to create a rainbow in the falls’ spray. INSIDER TIP: Continue 1.7 (steep) miles to Cliff Creek Pass, seated in the rolling high country of Hog Heaven Meadows, for beautiful views in all directions. DIRECTIONS: Head south from Jackson on U.S. 191/89/26 for 13 miles to Hoback Junction. Continue on U.S. 191 toward Pinedale for 14.8 miles. Turn right onto Cliff Creek Rd./Forest Road 30530. Cliff Creek Trailhead is at the south end of the junction of Cliff Creek Rd. and Sandy Marshall Creek Rd./30531. – Mike Koshmrl 76

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times paralleling four-wheeler trails scar the land today. “It used to be a single-tracked trail until about 1995, ’96 in there,” Marsh says. Now, “It’s a mess, and it’s not keeping with the purpose of the trail, which was supposed to be for nonmotorized uses. And it’s not legal, but the ranger district has never done anything about it to try to close it off, so the use continues.” The BTNF’s Big Piney District Ranger, Don Kranendonk, would not consent to an interview for this article, despite repeated requests. Guio, who’s a dirt biker himself, confirms that locals value motorized access into these mountains. “I don’t think there’s any damage in that practice, and I think they’re doing a service,” Guio says. “When you close trails, it becomes such a mess of woods that you can’t even find the trail. I think those bikers are doing a good thing.” DROPPING DOWN FROM 8,500-foot-high McDougal Gap (the only place along the trail’s length that is bisected by a road), we’re back in an area where there are no human footprints, much less dirt-bike tracks. Still, other signs of human influence—in the form of cow patties and the freeranging black heifers themselves— are everywhere. Livestock grazing has been part of the Wyoming Range for generations. At grazing’s peak, Kilpatrick says 100,000-plus domestic sheep ranged these mountains’ highlands. Cattle roam at lower elevations. Today there is such a thing as “rangeland science,” which includes studying grazing, but during the decades of the heaviest grazing in the Wyoming Range, rangeland science was in its infancy. Because of that, there were subalpine wildflower communities that were nearly destroyed. Thirty-plus years later, they’re still recovering. “The tall forb communities we just learned about twenty-five years ago are extremely sensitive ecologically,” Kilpatrick says. “They’re easily disturbed and easily overgrazed by sheep. And I’m not blaming anyone, because

we didn’t know what was going on, but we started to lose a lot of those communities.” Because many flower species are struggling to return, much of the range is nearly a monoculture. Mule’s ears, a native flower species that is yellow in color, thrives in grazing areas because neither domestic sheep nor wildlife find it palatable. At the right time of year, the range’s open meadows are a sea of yellow, Kilpatrick says. “[Mule’s ears] should be on the landscape, but not in a dominant form,” he says. “In the Wyoming Range, there’s more of it dominating the landscape than any other place I’m aware of.” Range monitoring, however, suggests that the diversity of flowers has either stabilized or is improving, and the percentage of bare, once-trampled ground is on the decline, Marsh says. And by a lot of other measures, the prospects for the range look good. For years, one of the gravest threats to the land’s wildness was oil and gas development. In 2009, U.S. Sen. John Barrasso shepherded passage of the 2009 Wyoming Range Legacy Act, which designated 1.2 million acres of the BTNF off-limits to oil and gas. (The act was envisioned and developed by the late Sen. Craig Thomas; Sen. Barrasso brought it to the finish line.) In 2012, the Trust for Public Land bought out the oil and gas drilling leases that had already been issued in Noble Basin, where the headwaters of the Hoback River are located. This $8.75 million purchase stopped a plan that would have peppered ninety square miles of the range with as many as 136 gas wells on seventeen pads. This past winter, BTNF leaders invalidated leases on sixty-two square miles of the range west of Big Piney and Merna. In doing this, the forest’s planners pointed to the intangible benefits of maintaining a wild landscape and the recreational uses it supports. Their decision was, in large part, driven by the will of nearby residents who in no uncertain terms said no more drilling in their backyard mountain range.


BUT THE HAND-size canine tracks we see imprinted in the mud along Willow Creek likely wouldn’t be here if the state of Wyoming had its way. The Snake River Canyon and the highway to Pinedale, both of which are on our backside, mark the northern edge of a “predator zone,” where wolves can be shot on sight anytime of year and without licenses or restrictions. When I hiked the National Rec trail in 2016, wolves in Wyoming were protected from that persecution by the Endangered Species Act. In March 2017, though, a ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ended those protections, setting the stage for restoring the predator zone.

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The resistance to safeguarding wolves stems in good part from livestock grazing in the Wyoming Range and the agricultural roots of Star Valley and the Green River Basin, which flank these mountains. This past summer, sheep ranchers with BTNF grazing permits lost dozens of ewes and lambs to wolves in the northernmost reaches of the range. This happened just south of the Snake River, about a day’s hike from where we admired Canis lupus tracks. “Definitely since wolves were relisted as an endangered species, we’ve seen an expansion further south into the Wyoming Range,” Wyoming Game and Fish Department large carnivore manager Dan Thompson says. “We’ve seen expansion of grizzly bears as well.” At the time this magazine is going to press, grizzlies, Ursus arctos horribilis, are still listed as a “threatened” species that cannot be hunted. But delisting grizzlies—removing them from the endan-

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gered species list—has been proposed. If this proceeds, agreements with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will give Wyoming broad latitude in how they manage bears in places on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s periphery. The state does not plan to manage grizzlies like they have wolves, as “predators” to be killed indiscriminately, but no safeguards are in place to prevent Wyoming from allowing hunters to take this range’s grizzly population down to very few or even zero.

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BACKPACKING THE WYOMING Range trail is a grueling endeavor. A hobbled hiking partner led to one early exit and lengthy hitchhiking endeavor from Little Granite Creek to McDougal Gap. On another attempt, time constraints kill our aspirations to complete the route in full. But the approximately fifty miles I do see are enough to convince me that these mountains, which start within eyeshot of the deck of my former Hoback Junction home, are an integral part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The landscape is vast, and, along much of the National Recreation Trail and beyond, the trails are primitive, wildlife abundant, and humans nonexistent for much of the year. Gary Fralick, a Game and Fish wildlife biologist who knows this range intimately, says areas of it provide immensely important habitat for species like mule deer, elk, and grizzly bears. “It provides connectivity between southwestern Wyoming and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem,” he says. Thanks to the Wyoming Range, “Animals can move from there into Montana, and even into Canada. That’s one of the more important contributions of the Wyoming Range: connectivity.” Marsh says the Wyoming Range has “every right” to be considered part of the Greater Yellowstone area. “Right now, a lot of the problems—illegal motorized use, [invasive] weeds, a few other sore spots—they’re all kind of minor in the bigger picture,” she says. “I would just like to see that contained. I think the area has the capacity to have a lot more human use without damage. We don’t want to encourage the hordes, but that’s just not going to happen.” Which means I can try to hike the entirety of the Wyoming Range trail again and likely see just as few people. I plan on it. JH


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The HEART of the Hole It is a square at the center of Jackson Hole’s community. PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN DORGAN THE OFFICIAL NAME is George Washington Memorial Park, but to Jackson Hole residents and visitors, it’s the Town Square. Or just the Square. “It’s the hub of our town and the choke point from roads to the south and west up to Grand Teton and Yellowstone,” says photographer Ryan Dorgan. “With all of that traffic, you’re always bound to meet someone or see something interesting.” That wasn’t always the case. The Town Square started off pretty dingy—a patch of dirt that didn’t even have so much as a tree. Cows, and sometimes elk, would wander through. That was around 1912, before Jackson was even incorporated. The first trees were planted in 1924. It was in 1932—when the state was looking to establish parks to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the birth of George Washington—that significant upgrades began on the Square. These upgrades were funded by public donations ($150) and by funds from the New Deal’s Civil Works Administration (more than $6,000). In 1933, trees were planted in the newly named George Washington Memorial Park. (A plaque with that name wasn’t added until 1976.) In 1953, the Rotary Club built the first elk antler arch with shed antlers from the nearby National Elk Refuge. The arch was so popular that over the next sixteen years arches were erected on the three other corners. “I tried to show the Town Square very simply for what it is,” Dorgan says. “It’s where we go each spring to catch a free concert. It’s where we take our families and friends to show off the boardwalks and western trinket shops and elk antler arches. It’s where we go to relax with some ice cream on a warm summer afternoon. It’s where we hold demonstrations and auctions and fundraisers. The Town Square—as much as locals do their best to avoid it during these busy summer months—really is the center of our little world here in Jackson Hole.” – Lila Edythe

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The annual lighting of the Town Square is the official kickoff to winter and usually happens the Friday evening after Thanksgiving. In addition to turning on all the holiday lights, the evening includes Christmas carols, cookies, and hot chocolate. SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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Top: During the annual ElkFest, private vendors sell shed antlers and mounts, but the event is most famous for the Boy Scout Antler Auction. 82

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Bottom: The Jackson Hole Shootout is the longestrunning staged western gunfight in the country. It happens at 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday between Memorial Day and Labor Day weekends.


Thousands of locals and visitors pack the Town Square for the annual fundraiser Old Bill’s Fun Run for Charities. Old Bill’s is the biggest fundraiser in the valley (in terms of money raised and number of participants). Read more about it on page 60. SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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The Town Square is perfect for concerts. The annual spring event Jackson Hole Rendezvous has held two Town Square concerts. In 2016, Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats performed.

Once only a dirt field, the Town Square now has one of the nicest lawns in town and is a frequent spot for summer naps and picnics. 84

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R WATCHING

Look for flora instead of fauna, and you’re guaranteed a successful outing. You might even see some wildlife along the way. BY WHITNEY ROYSTER

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CO

LU M

BIN

E

F BA

L SA M R

OO

A R RO

A LE

T

W

COLOR White and cream, with hints of blue HABITAT Cooler forest understories TIME July and August FACTS The blue color of the columbine, the state flower of Colorado, fades to white as it moves northward. Seeds and roots are poisonous.

COLOR Yellow HABITAT Open, sunny areas; rocky soil TIME June FACTS Its sap can be used as a topical anesthetic.

LU PI

BALSAMROOT

NE COLOR Purple HABITAT In sagebrush or lodgepole pine stands TIME June to August FACTS Poisonous in large quantities. Seedpods can look like pea pods, which some people mistake for being edible. 88

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LAST THURSDAY EVENING AT FIVE O’CLOCK, THERE WAS A BULL MOOSE IN THE WILLOWS ON THE BANK OF THE SNAKE RIVER BY THE BRIDGE IN MOOSE. AND THEN THERE WASN’T A MOOSE TO BE SEEN IN THE AREA FOR THE NEXT SEVERAL DAYS.

Even in a community named for its number of moose, you can’t always see one. (During the time moose were absent in Moose, they were spotted by hikers up Cache Creek and on the History Trail on Teton Pass.) Wildlife watching can be frustrating for its unpredictability: Seeing an animal is a stroke of luck, and then, if you’re lucky enough to spot one, it could be half-hidden behind bushes, so far in the distance it’s barely more than a speck or moving so quickly you only get a brief glimpse. Now consider wildflowers. True, they, too, come and go—depending on the species, they could be out for four to eight weeks— and different species grow in different places, but once you know


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the where and when, wildflowers are a sure thing. Think flora isn’t as exciting as fauna? Read on. Over a six-year period, on the first two miles of the old Cache Creek Road (long a popular walking route), Susan Marsh, a writer and former twenty-twoyear employee of the Bridger-Teton National Forest, counted 300 different species of flowering plants. Three hundred species in two miles. That’s a new species about every ten steps. “I was studying plants, and there were ten to twenty species I didn’t know at all,” says

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FIE

LD

MI

NT COLOR Green HABITAT Wet woods and stream banks TIME June to August FACTS Can treat arthritis

IN D

IAN PAINT

BR

US

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or “Gran dfa th

rd” Bea

P R AI

SM

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COLOR Red, white, orange, or pink HABITAT Up to 11,000 feet, moist meadows TIME Mid-June to September FACTS Some Native American tribes used it to make their hair glossy.

COLOR Pink HABITAT Open meadows and hillsides up to 8,000 feet TIME June to August FACTS Can be used as a mouthwash to cure sore throats and coughs

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Marsh, who recently wrote the book Cache Creek: A Trailside Guide to Jackson Hole’s Backyard Wilderness. “It became not a game exactly, but a challenge.” “I was doing a lot of hiking on the same trails and noticed things in bloom I hadn’t noticed before,” Marsh says. Flowers “record the seasons,” she explains. “You can follow the progression of seasons by what’s blooming.” Looking at wildflowers also means looking at the landscape—hillside or meadow, shade or sun, rocky soil or dirt. Flowers are “a way of entering the world of plants and going deeper than, ‘What color?’ or ‘What’s flowering?’ ” Marsh says. “Plants create the habitat from insects to elk. Where those things are growing is where the animals are going to be.” Looking for plants might lead to seeing animals since wildlife from bears to birds rely on them. AMY TAYLOR, A local botanist who has been involved with Teton Plants, a chapter of the Wyoming Native Plant Society, for twelve years, says looking for wildflowers is becoming more popular. Since Teton Plants began offering programs at Teton County Library, its email subscriber list has grown nearly threefold. As many as ninety people have crowded into the library’s Ordway Auditorium for meetings. The group’s field trips (held about four times in summer and once in fall, winter, and spring) can have a waiting list. Teton Plants’ organizers got the idea to do field trips in the early 1990s to offer people the chance to learn and appreciate local flora and habitats. The group heads to places like Josie’s Ridge, Cache Creek, Blacktail Butte, and the top of the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort tram. They have gone into the Wyoming Range, Grand Teton National Park, and Teton Valley. Some hikes are more than ten miles. Others are shorter than a mile. Taylor calls the latter a “botany crawl,” because there is so much to see and talk about in a short distance. Some years ago, the group partnered with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to offer a plant walk on Miller Butte and its nearby environs, areas that are closed to the public. (It is illegal to leave the roads in the National Elk Refuge.) There was a long waiting list for that excursion. Outings to wetland areas of Grand Teton National Park could have the

BRADLY J. BONER

H INDIAN PAINTBRUSH


TRAVIS J. GARNER

group looking for sundews, a carnivorous plant. Field trippers look for the first steershead in spring. They have been to Whiskey Mountain near Dubois to see Jones’ Columbine, a small columbine found growing only in limestone in subalpine/alpine areas. In July, the group heads to Phillips Canyon to see bright pink fireweed. In August, they might hike to see and eat wild, edible berries. Trips have also focused on the plight of whitebark pine. Taylor says there can sometimes be surprises for hikers looking for plants, like when the group headed to Death Canyon. “The wildflowers were wonderful along the way, but the highlight was seeing a rubber boa on the trail,” she says. “Many longtime valley residents had never seen this rarely seen snake. That’s what I love about these outings: It’s not just about the wildflowers but also about the ecosystem they share.” When Cathy Shill, who owns and runs The Hole Hiking Experience, takes clients out she shares more than the names of flowers. “I like to know an interesting fact about them, like whether they were used as a dye or a medicine or a food,” she says. “That way, you can connect on a more tangible level, relate a little more deeply to the natural world. It makes the story of the forest start to unfold.” For example, nettles sting, but relief is usually nearby. Plantains, part of the plantago species (not a banana; these are

SKYROCKET GILIA

rosettes of dark green leaves), often grow close to nettles. If you chop up a plantain, add some moisture like water or spit, and mash it together, you can then smear it on nettle-stung skin for relief. Also, if cooked, nettles can be a source of iron. Violets have edible roots and water parsnips can also be eaten. Native Americans were said to use water hemlock on the tips of arrows for hunting. A toxin in the plant is a convulsant, causing seizures and respiratory paralysis. THE TIME OF year, elevation, and terrain dictate what flowers bloom when and where. Spring’s pilgrims are on the valley floor and south-facing hillsides, the first areas to be free of snow. These early blooming flowers often grow close to the ground, because as the summer wears on, taller flowers take over. Marsh

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N

SS O P

GI A

T

HY

COLOR White and purple HABITAT Open and semiopen prairies TIME July to September FACTS Used in teas to stimulate sweating and strengthen weak hearts; also said to cure a dispirited heart

FL

AX COLOR Blue HABITAT Found in dry, rocky soil TIME June to August FACTS Flowers are very delicate; if picked, petals fall off within minutes

looks for Wyeth biscuitroot, a favorite food source of grizzly bears, in May. Shill likes steershead in the spring. “So ephemeral,” she says. As the snowline moves up, so does the bloom. By June, elevations between 7,500 and 8,500 feet are a “mosaic of color,” Shill says. It’s the big and bold that are out now—yellow balsamroot, delicately purple lupine, and Indian paintbrush, Wyoming’s state flower. Into July, as snowmelt continues to cascade down from the higher mountains, pink monkey flowers settle in alongside the water like ribbons. It is also in July that white and purple columbine, a delicate flower with five petals that extend back into tendrils, bloom. Columbine tends to favor cool understories. Into August, as the heat dries up the wildflower show at lower elevations, you have to head to places like Alaska Basin, which is near 10,000 feet on the border of Grand Teton National Park and the Jedediah Smith Wilderness. Since snow patches here linger until late July or even early August, late August is often the peak of Alaska Basin’s wildflower season. The same goes for any other water-rich area between 9,500 and 10,500 feet. Marsh says by the end of August, elevations with these conditions can have “great displays” of the mountain bog gentian—a bright blue, funnel-shaped flower that loves wet, cold mountain meadows. Different species of paintbrush and lupine can decorate the high alpine meadow, too, she says. WORRIED ABOUT MEMORIZING names? Don’t. Instead, focus on noticing things—that one side of the flower is purple, the other pink; that the forest floor has transitioned from flowers to shrubs; or that the colors have changed from bright to darker greens. One area may be getting more water or more sun, or might be shaded by a larger evergreen. The soil may be changing from dirt to rock, or the steepness of the slope might be shifting in a way so that certain plants can no longer hang on. “It gets you into the landscape, into the subtleties of the terrain,” Shill says. “It’s a much more intimate connection.” This kind of nuance brings the forest alive and roots people to it, and to the world in general. “When I see the first balsamroot or wild geranium,” Marsh says, “it’s like greeting an old friend.” JH

-F

Sticksee d”

COLOR Blue HABITAT Moist meadows, stream banks, and avalanche paths TIME July FACTS People have taken the whole plant to help with nosebleeds. Botanist Frances Clark keeps a “What’s in Bloom” blog on Teton Plants’ website, tetonplants.org. 92

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TRAVIS J. GARNER

FO RG

-NOT or “Many

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HAREBELL


JH Living

looking back

Raising a Lake Jackson Lake Dam, part of one of the oldest federal irrigation projects in the country, helped make Idaho the potato capital of the world. BY WHITNEY ROYSTER 94

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WHEN CONSTRUCTION ON the current Jackson Lake Dam was finished in 1916, historic trapper campsites and homesteads, Native American sites, and at least one sulfur hot spring were submerged. Jackson Lake is a natural lake, but the dam at its outlet raised its surface level by about thirty feet and extended it about six miles north. But it wasn’t all bad news. Jackson Lake Dam, one of five dams built between 1904 and the early 1930s on the Snake River as part of the

HARRISON CRANDALL / JACKSON HOLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Before the boundaries of Grand Teton National Park were expanded in 1950, the community of Moran was right at Jackson Lake Dam.


Minidoka Project, was responsible for the northern part of Jackson Hole getting its first telephone line and nurse. In addition, today’s Grassy Lake Road was built around 1911 to transport 300,000 tons of construction supplies and equipment to the dam site from the railroad terminal in Ashton, Idaho (at that time, it was called Reclamation Road). And the dam helped turn more than 1 million acres of dry land into farmland. Even before there was a dam, though, there was water—lots of it. Water rushed down from Colter Canyon, from Moran Canyon, and from the Skillet Glacier. The snowmelt came from Waterfalls and Leigh Canyons, and from the Snake River. All of it collected in Jackson Lake, which, although smaller in surface area than it is today, was still more than 600 feet deep. At the southeast end of the lake, water flowed out and went back to being the Snake River. The Snake snaked through Jackson Hole (sometimes flooding Wilson) and Swan Valley, Idaho, and into Oregon and Washington for about 800 miles before meeting the Columbia River and ultimately pouring into the Pacific Ocean. AS EARLY AS 1889, the U.S. Geological Survey was studying possibilities for increasing irrigation in southern Idaho. Homesteaders in the area couldn’t do anything with their land because there was no water. The Snake River was an easy target, but nothing could be done about it until the Bureau of Reclamation was created in 1902 with the goal of increasing the amount of arable land in the West. Two years later, the agency launched the Minidoka Project with the specific purpose of using a series of dams and canals to control the flow of the Snake River in Wyoming and Idaho, and distribute water to farmers in Idaho. It is one of the oldest Bureau of Reclamation projects. Jackson Lake Dam was the second of Minidoka’s five dams to be built. (The Minidoka Dam in south-central Idaho was the first; construction started in 1904 and finished in 1906.) Construction on Jackson Lake Dam began in 1906 and finished within a year. Built with rocks quarried from Signal Mountain and trees felled from nearby canyons, it raised the lake level by about ten feet. That dam failed in 1910, though. About 194,000 acre-feet—a reported

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JACKSON HOLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

The current Jackson Lake Dam was built between 1911 and 1916; construction was engineered and managed by Frank T. Crowe, who went on to build the Hoover Dam.

ten-foot wall of water at the front— burst out and severely damaged several bridges downriver. A new, sturdier dam was needed. The Bureau of Reclamation brought in Frank T. Crowe, a recent transplant to the West from New England, where he had graduated from the University of Maine with an engineering degree, to supervise construction. (Crowe went on to be the most famous dam builder in the country—as famous as a dam builder can be. After Jackson Lake Dam, he built the Arrowrock Dam in Idaho, Washington state’s Tieton Dam, and another one you may have heard of called the Hoover Dam. Because Crowe invented a new dam-building system and techniques, he finished the Hoover Dam two years ahead of schedule.) Construction on the second Jackson Lake Dam—it was made of concrete this go-round—started in 1911. At the time, the population of Jackson Hole was about 300 people, almost all of whom were clustered in the southern end of the valley. The dam was at the northern end of the valley. About 400 workers who were brought in to help with construction lived in a camp built by the Reclamation Service, more than doubling the valley’s population. Because the camp included a hospital, this part of the valley got its first nurse. Of course you can’t just go and set up camps in na96

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

tional parks, but, at the time, Grand Teton National Park didn’t yet exist. (The area of Grand Teton National Park that includes Jackson Lake and Jackson Lake Dam weren’t part of the park until 1950.) Today, three buildings from the camp are still around and in use; the current dam tender, John Bennett, lives in one and works in the others. When it was finished in 1916—it was built in stages—the level of Jackson Lake was about thirty feet higher and the lake extended more than six miles north of its natural shoreline. While an unknown number of archaeological sites here were lost, this area didn’t fare as badly as the town of American Falls, Idaho, the site of another Minidoka dam. The American Falls Dam created American Falls Reservoir, which required the relocation of most of the town of American Falls. The current Jackson Lake Dam is the one Crowe and his crew built more than a century ago, although it has been reinforced a couple of times (most recently between 1986 and 1989) to keep up with new requirements for earthquakes. ASIDE FROM ITS history, Jackson Lake Dam is unique because you can see all the mechanics—there is no machinery or mechanical room hiding anywhere. If you’ve ever been to that other Crowe construction, the Hoover Dam, or to the Buffalo Bill Dam on the east side of Yellowstone National Park, you might have noticed that their mechanics are hidden. Walk across Jackson Lake Dam, though, and you see just about all there

is to see: fifteen metal gates, each individually raised and lowered by a gate stem. It is Bennett—whose official Bureau of Reclamation title is maintenance mechanic but is more conventionally known as the “dam tender”— who raises and lowers these gates to release water as the agency’s water operations managers dictate. Bennett, who has been the dam tender since 2013, uses a tape measure to translate numbers into flowing water. The gate stems are like giant screws that come up to the dam’s deck. They’re covered with simple plastic caps. Take a cap off and an electric motor spins the stem up. (This used to be done with a gasoline engine, and, before that, by hand crank.) Bennett knows that one inch in stem height equals a release of twenty cubic feet of water per second. (Hence his tape measure.) One cubic foot of water is about 7.5 gallons. WHILE THE DAM was originally built to irrigate the arid land downriver, today its releases also consider newer user groups, including commercial rafting companies and anglers. Until he retired in January 2017, Mike Beus was responsible for determining Jackson Lake Dam’s releases. Beus, whose office was in Burley, Idaho, started this job in 1996. The water in Jackson Lake, due to laws in the Wyoming Constitution and compacts created in the 1950s, does belong to Idaho farmers. They pay the U.S. Treasury an estimated amount each year—a number that includes recon-


In the 1950s, many of Moran’s buildings were moved to the Jackson Lake Lodge complex. Three remain at the site of the dam.

So difficult is the task of managing everyone’s water needs at Jackson Lake Dam that water managers could just as well spin a wheel to determine how much water to release. What’s not difficult to determine is the success of the Minidoka Project in making otherwise parched land fertile. The project’s five main reservoirs collect

water and then distribute it via 1,600 miles of canals and 4,000 miles of ditches. It irrigates more than 1 million acres, including much of Idaho’s potato crop. JH The Jackson Lake Dam is on the Inner Park Loop Road in Grand Teton National Park, about one mile before Jackson Lake Junction.

JACKSON HOLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

struction costs, operations, and maintenance, minus any credit from water not used the year before. Because Jackson Lake is the highest reservoir in the Minidoka Project, water is taken from lower reservoirs first. While this gives water managers the flexibility to consider other local river users, it also makes their jobs more difficult since the water levels sought by each of the user groups are contradictory: Fishermen like consistent water levels, scenic rafters prefer medium water levels, and whitewater boaters favor higher levels. Beus remembers a spring meeting in Jackson in the early 1990s (before he was the official water manager) when it was obvious summer lake levels would be low. “Toward the end of the meeting a participant stood up and said, ‘Well, we might as well all go home, because we are never going to reach a consensus,’ ” Beus says. “That’s kind of how we are.”

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JH Living

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Jenny on the Rocks A five-year project making the busiest spot in Grand Teton National Park more visitor-friendly is almost finished. BY GERALDINE STAL PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRADLY J. BONER

IN THE 1930s, when the first trails were designed and built around Jenny Lake in Grand Teton National Park (GTNP), thousands of visitors used them each year. Today, more than 1 million people visit Jenny Lake; it is the single most visited spot in the park. But, “It is confusing,” says GTNP landscape architect Matt Hazard. Proof of this is in the two most frequently asked questions at Jenny Lake’s small visitor center: (1) Where are the bathrooms?; and (2) Where is the lake? Leslie Mattson, president of the nonprofit Grand Teton National Park Foundation (GTNPF), which exists to support the park, says, “We can do so much better.” For four years, the park, in conjunction with the GTNPF, has been working on doing better. Last August, the foundation’s “Inspiring Journeys: A Campaign for Jenny 98

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

Lake” initiative hit its goal of raising $14 million. Combined with $4 million from GTNP, this is enough to give Jenny Lake the biggest face-lift it’s ever had, including improved trails, new overlooks, new interpretive areas, a beautifully designed Jenny Lake is the most beach, and over 1,000 linear feet of popular area for visitors in new dry stone wall. While there is Grand Teton National Park. A five-year project (now in its still major work being done this final year) is improving trails summer, and descriptive elements and interpretive elements will be added in early summer 2018, around the lake. visitors can already enjoy some of the big improvements. The following pages offer a guide to the new Jenny Lake, along with a few reasons to come back when everything’s finished.


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THE EASTERN SHORE of Jenny Lake is the single busiest area in GTNP. But, “There was no real focal point when you arrived,” Hazard says. “Or even signs saying ‘Jenny Lake.’ ” Kim Mills, GTNPF’s director of communications, corporate relations, and estate planning, says, “People would walk in circles trying to find the lake and the boat dock. It was a spider web of trails with many of them being redundant.” Areas, especially along the lakeshore, were severely damaged. But, thankfully, all this has changed (except for the part about Jenny Lake being the most popular place in the park).

East Shore

“By doing all of this work at this level, it will last. This is a one-hundred-year project—a legacy project,” Mattson says. STAIRCASE

The surface of Rock Beach is low enough that, in high water, water spills onto it. “Someone in a wheelchair can come down and roll into the water,” Mills says. “It’s a very special place, and we want to allow everyone to experience it.” The Big Lake Overlook looks right up Cascade Canyon. “This will be an ‘aha’ experience for visitors,” Mills says.

ROCK BEACH (ABAAS)

ROCK BEACH STAIRS

LAKE OVERLOOK

OUTLET OVERLOOK

So you can be certain of which mountain you’re looking at, new viewing tubes will be installed here.

ASPEN OVERLOOK GATEWAY PLAZA

Working with the Kentuckybased group Dry Stone Conservancy, the park’s trail crew replaced aggregate mortared walls near the boat dock with dry stone walls. “The old walls were natural stone, but parts of them failed every year,” Hazard says. Dry stonework gets stronger over time.

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

INTERPRETIVE PLAZA

In addition to impressive dry stonework, Gateway Plaza has interpretive information and a 3-D relief model.

WEST ENTRY

Between seventy-five and one hundred aspen and pine trees that otherwise would have been cut down for construction were salvaged and have been living at a holding nursery in Victor, Idaho, until crews can replant them here. “The Park Service can’t just go to a nursery and buy a random tree,” Hazard says.

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The new, half-mile Discovery Trail has plenty of shaded benches, as well as interpretive areas about the park’s wildlife, ecosystems, and history. “If people don’t have the time or wherewithal to go to the western shore, they can have a nice walk here,” Mills says.

The park repurposed its original entrance station—which had been “rotting away as storage space,” Hazard says—as a new information kiosk here. “You’ll be able to walk in it and feel like the first rangers did,” Mills says. “It’s playful and historic, and a great photo op.”

Trails in this area, all of which have been widened and graded so they are ADA (Americans With Disabilities Act)-compliant, are made with granite paving. “It’s a material that is of this place,” Hazard says.

SOUTH

OVERALL SIT


Ray Haas, left, with the Dry Stone Conservancy, works with Grand Teton National Park trail crew member Justin Williams on one of two stone parapet overlooks under construction on the southeast shore of Jenny Lake last year.

Bridges over Cascade Creek have been rebuilt with a stouter, more robust construction that is meant to last decades.

H JENNY LAKE

TE PLAN

Stones are the earliest known building material, and dry stone construction has been around for millennia. The Egyptian pyramids and Peruvian temples were built without the use of mortar. And now retaining walls around Jenny Lake are, too.

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West Shore

THE WESTERN SHORE of Jenny Lake is designated “recommended wilderness,” which means there are no interpretive elements or pavement here. Also, no mechanized/motorized tools are allowed; the trail crew has done all of the work on this side using only hand tools.

EXISTING TRAIL; NOT IN SCOPE

TO STRING LAKE

EXISTING TRAIL AREAS OF WORK IMPROVED DESTINATION

JENNY LAKE TRAIL

HORSE TRAIL

(IMPROVED IN CURRENT ALIGNMENT BY NPS)

PROPOSED TRAIL RE-ROUTE ABANDONED AND RECLAIMED TRAILS & BRIDGE

Hiking trails are more than meets the eye. Beneath the dirt here there is up to twelve inches of crushed rock to help with drainage and preventing trail erosion.

A Civilian Conservation Corps-built wall dating from the 1930s was on the verge of collapse. It was torn down and reconstructed rock by rock over several weeks.

At Hidden Falls, there are places where you can get elevated for a better view of the falls. There are also now places to sit.

INSPIRATION POINT TRAIL

IMPROVED WEST BOAT DOCK POINT

NORTH CASCADE CR.TRAIL

DOCK BYPASS/ STOCK TRAIL

C

C AS

EK

RE

EC

AD

RECLAIMED TRAILS

CHASM BRIDGE

HIDDEN FALLS BRIDGES

(RELOCATED FROM CONFUSION JUNCTION)

HIDDEN FALLS OVERLOOK

The buck and rail fence that was long at Hidden Falls has been replaced by a dry stone wall. “That fence was hideous,” says GTNP ranger Kip Hulvershorn. “The downside of all the work we’ve done at the falls is that it’s now so nice people will bring their lunches and stay here for an hour.”

The western boat dock has been doubled in size.

BACKCOUNTRY TRAILS SOUTH CASCADE CR.TRAIL

One of the oldest trees in the park is on the trail to Hidden Falls.

June 12, 2013

TO SOUTH JENNY

GTNP called this spot “Confusion Junction.” “There were four ways to go; it was pretty maddening,” Hazard says. “We think we’ve redesigned the circulation to allow for a more intuitive flow without being heavy-handed on the landscape.”

Chasm Bridge is being built this summer. “We found old photos that call this cascade ‘Lower Hidden Falls,’ ” Hazard says. “For those who can’t get to Hidden Falls, they can come here and feel like they’ve seen a portion of it.”

By the time this project is finished, more than 5,000 linear feet of dry stonework will have been done at Jenny Lake.

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Trail designers wanted to retain the wilderness look and feel of the trail leading to Inspiration Point, and opted against installing a handrail or via ferrata on the most exposed section of the trail. This summer, Grand Teton National Park plans on upgrading the Inspiration Point overlook as part of the final phase of renovations in the area.

In the past, you’d get off the boat and the trail went right and immediately uphill. “People would hike for three to five minutes and be out of breath,” Mills says. The trail was reorganized to take people walking off the boat to the left, which has a gentle incline.

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Climb On Jackson Hole Mountain Resort has been working with the U.S. Forest Service for nearly ten years to build assisted climbing routes at the resort. They finally open this summer.

COURTESY PHOTO

BY DINA MISHEV

There are thousands of via ferrata climbing routes in Europe, but only a handful in the U.S. This summer, Jackson Hole Mountain Resort opens four vie ferrate that start near the top of the gondola.

“IT’S LIKE THAT scene in the Indiana Jones film where he has to step out and all he sees is a great chasm below,” says Mike Friedman about the 110-foot suspension bridge near the end of one of the new via ferrata climbing routes at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort (JHMR). “This bridge isn’t invisible, like the Indiana Jones one, and it is totally safe, but it requires a level of commitment.” The bridge hangs over an eighty-footdeep chasm. “The sense of accomplishment when you get across it is high,” Friedman says. SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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Enjoy a scenic float trip

COURTESY PHOTO

IN GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK

A 110-foot suspension bridge hangs over an 80-foot-deep chasm and gives climbers the feeling of being suspended thousands of feet above the valley floor.

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This bridge is only one of the many manmade elements built into four new climbing routes on the steep granite walls immediately behind the top of the Bridger Gondola at more than 9,000 feet in elevation. The routes are all via ferrata—Italian for “iron way.” This type of assisted climbing has its origins in World War I when it was developed to help troops move through terrain they otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. Routes include bolts, iron rungs, and strands of cable affixed to vertical rock. The rungs are made from rebar glued into holes drilled into the rock. There are more than 1,000 of these climbs in Europe. To climb a via ferrata (pl., vie ferrate), you have the natural features of the rock to stand on and hold onto, and also the rungs. To keep you from falling off the rock, you use special equipment to attach yourself to a cable that parallels the route. “This will be many people’s Grand Teton ascent,” says Friedman, a former climbing guide with Exum Mountain Guides and co-founder of Adventure Partners, which built five via ferrata routes at Amangiri resort near Page, Arizona. “It’s their moment to feel what it’s like to be a climber.”

climbing, but not totally climbing. I asked the guide what they were doing, and they were doing a via ferrata, which I had never heard of,” she says. “We got on some eventually. In our group there were people who had climbed, who hadn’t climbed, and who were even afraid of heights. We could all do it, and we all had fun.” Making vie ferrate a reality at JHMR took so long because they are the very first ones on public land in this country. There are a handful of others in the U.S., but they are all on private land, where the owners don’t need to go through steps like establishing uniform engineering and safety standards, which are required when the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) owns the land. JHMR worked closely with the forest service to develop and then engineer and design their vie ferrate to standards that can now be followed by other groups interested in building them on USFS land. (JHMR isn’t worried that now that they’ve done all the groundwork other ski areas are going to jump onto the via ferrata bandwagon, lessening the uniqueness of its new adventure. “You have to have the goods,” Friedman says.)

CONNIE KEMMERER, WHO owns JHMR with her brother, Jay, and sister, Betty, spearheaded the effort to install the vie ferrate at JHMR. “My interest goes back fifteen years, to a hiking trip I was taking in the Italian Dolomites. I saw these people up on a mountain

“IT ONLY MAKES sense that Jackson would be the home of the first via ferrata,” Friedman says. “It is special because the Tetons are the home of American mountaineering. We hope this activity communicates a little bit of that story.” Vie ferrate can communicate this story


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COURTESY PHOTO

to a wider range of people than merely tice area immediately behind the Bridger rock climbers and mountaineers. Gondola. The idea is for guides to dem“It puts the nonclimber into a climb- onstrate the via ferrata kit—two caraing situation that is safe as long as you biner-equipped lanyards each with obey the rules,” says Renny Jackson, a shock-absorbing properties to absorb former climbing ranger in Grand Teton any forces generated if you fall—to National Park, a guide with Exum, a climbers, and for climbers to get comJHMR ski patroller, and one of the few fortable with using it here. “Some people people to get to climb will probably have any of the vie ferrate enough of an advenwhen they were finture on the practice “IT’S LIKE THAT SCENE IN ished last fall. “You’re area,” Milligan says. in the alpine realm THE INDIANA JONES FILM For climbers who without having to be a WHERE HE HAS TO STEP want more, there are climber. You’re climb- OUT AND ALL HE SEES IS A two vie ferrate, each ing with the help of with about 450 feet of GREAT CHASM BELOW.” these artificial installacable, above the gontions, but the feeling is – MIKE FRIEDMAN, dola. Near the top of ADVENTURE PARTNERS CO-FOUNDER much the same.” Ridgeline is the 110Jackson says he can see foot suspension bridge. the via ferrata experi“The bridge is certainence promoting interest in going further ly fairly spectacular,” Jackson says. and trying rock climbing. “People might Friedman says the bridge was designed get up there and think, ‘This is pretty “to have a little bounce and life in it. cool. What would it be like to learn a Most people going across will have a little more about climbing and go some- firm grip on the safety line.” Four peowhere without rungs?’ ” ple are allowed on the bridge at any one Or maybe not. “We have courses de- time, but the bridge is strong enough to signed for people who this might be hold sixty people. “It’s a very high level their first and last time getting on rock,” of safety we have in everything,” says Jessica Milligan, vice president of Friedman says. product sales and service at JHMR. All But the bridge isn’t the end of the via ferrata adventures begin on a prac- Ridgeline, which is rated as intermediate.


Breathtaking Teton & Forest Views

Thanks to the installation of iron rungs and a fixed cable running alongside the route, a via ferrata allows people without technical rock climbing skills to get a high alpine experience.

“What’s really cool about this bridge is that it ends with a via ferrata. You have to climb some rungs to get out of it,” Friedman says. “Vie ferrate are a European thing, and we haven’t dumbed it down just because it’s in America. We’ve stayed true to the mountaineering culture.” JHMR’s vie ferrate are doubly European, because drinks and appetizers are only a short walk from its base, at The Deck and Piste. JH

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Best of

getting out

BRADLY J. BONER

JH

Beyond the Tetons The Wind River Mountains are home to the state’s highest peak, biggest and largest number of glaciers, and hundreds of miles of trails. They’re a two-hour drive from Jackson, and worth the trip. BY DINA MISHEV

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MY FIRST HIKE in the Wind River Mountains, the biggest range in Wyoming—and home to the state’s highest peak (Gannett), about twentyfive named glaciers, and three wilderness areas—was a spectacular failure. And I fell in love with these mountains because of it. They are wild and big, and you can go days without seeing people if you want. There are more than forty named peaks over 13,000 feet in the Winds and more than one hundred unnamed glaciers. In the Teton Range, there are exactly five lakes over 10,000 feet in elevation. If you pick your section of trail carefully, you can pass five lakes over 10,000 feet in one mile in the Winds. On


Opposite: Wyoming’s third-tallest mountain, Fremont Peak, left, looms over Island Lake in the heart of the Wind River Mountain Range.

maps, about half of the range’s lakes are described merely by their elevations rather than given names since there are so many. And then there’s the range’s abundance of open, high alpine terrain. You can walk for miles and miles and miles in grassy meadows at 10,000 feet. Here, 10,000 feet is mostly above tree line, but you’ll find just enough stands of scraggly and ancient whitebark pine to hang your food away from animals when you make camp at night. (Grizzly and black bears, marmots, picas, and coyotes—among other animals that would love to eat your dinner—live in the range.) Partly because of these high alpine meadows, and partly because the Winds are roughly the size of the entire state of Delaware, trails here are highly variable. In popular areas like Big Sandy, Cirque of the Towers, Elkhart Park, and Titcomb Basin you can trust trail maps: If there is a trail on a map, it will be there in reality. But venture away from these well-traveled spots and a trail on a map does not mean a trail in reality. Maybe there’s cairns instead of a trail. Or maybe there’s nothing at all. Or maybe—like what happened to me about four miles into my spectacularly botched first attempt at backpacking in the range—a trail just fades away. At the time, this confused and terrified me. Never before had I hiked without a trail to guide me. Could you hike without a trail? HIKING TO ISLAND Lake, Titcomb Basin, and then an unnamed basin above and east of Island Lake offers opportunities for both the ease of trail hiking and the feeling of exploration that comes when there is no trail. The guardian of the mouth of Titcomb Basin, which has some of the Winds’ most diverse climbing—everything from nontechnical scrambles to an 11-pitch climb up a 1,500-foot wall—Island Lake itself is a popular and worthy destination and camping spot. It is about eleven miles on outstandingly obvious trails from the Elkhart Park Trailhead, a long but doable distance for a day. (If you want to break

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another unique feature of the Winds: an abundance of high mountains you don’t need technical climbing skills or equipment to summit. We’re heading for the third-highest mountain in Wyoming, 13,745-foot-tall Fremont Peak. There are technical routes on Fremont, but it’s also possible to reach its summit via a Class III scramble. “Class III” terrain isn’t technically climbing, but requires that you be comfortable with exposure and ascending (and descending) using both hands and feet. Derek and I generally find scrambling exhilarating, and the southwest slope up Fremont is particularly so. Cairns are scarce, so we have to concentrate on route-finding. There are few loose rocks and plenty of lowangle granite slabs. Toward the summit, we encounter both wind and the first people we’ve seen in over twenty-four hours. From the summit we can see several hikers making their way along the Titcomb Basin Trail.

DINA MISHEV

the eleven miles up into two days, Seneca and several hundred vertical feet below Lake, as forthrightly beautiful as any lake it. While there are more than one dozen tents around Island Lake, only a thirtyin the Winds, is about halfway.) The four-mile (one-way) trail from minute hike below, we have this entire Island Lake to the back of Titcomb Basin basin to ourselves. We set off from camp around 8 a.m. is dazzling. The Titcomb Lakes are brilliantly emerald squiggles reflecting snag- The idea is to make a giant loop by hikgly granite rising on all sides. Plans my ing up Saddle 11,120+ then down to boyfriend, Derek, and I have for this trip Wall Lake and then bushwhacking up to don’t include camping at Island Lake or Indian Pass, where we can take a trail hiking into Titcomb Basin, though. back to Island Lake. We’re out for thirIsland Lake is where our exploration teen hours, during which we see between starts. We continue directly east from it, nine and twelve lakes—I lose count— bushwhacking up a steep, shrubby hill- and no other people until we reach side that eventually flattens out into an Island Lake. We’re on a trail for about expansive basin about 600 vertical feet one-third of the time. The other twoabove the lake. At the back of the basin is thirds of the time, I’m neither confused what the definitive nor terrified. I’ve actuguidebook to the range, ally come to prefer exploring the range’s trailJoe Kelsey’s Climbing From the summit of 11,284-foot White Rock, less areas. and Hiking in the Wind a mountain you can The next day, we River Mountains, calls bushwhack up, the colors head north from camp Saddle 11,120+. We of Upper Green River Lake to take advantage of yet camp about one mile look otherworldly.


BRADLY J. BONER

A ten-mile round-trip hike from the Green River Lakes trailhead, Slide Lake makes for a great introduction to hiking in the Wind River Mountains.

ABOUT THIRTY MILES from Fremont Peak as the crow flies, no one has ever called Squaretop Mountain beautiful. In his book, author Kelsey says Squaretop looks like a tree stump. A massive tree stump. It lords over the Green River Lakes area— one of the range’s closest trailheads to Jackson and where there is also a Forest Service campground— like a traffic accident you can’t look away from. Although not elegant in form, it is one of the most impressive pieces of granite I’ve ever seen. It makes sense that it’s the single most photographed peak in the range. Put the Green River Lakes, stands of aspen stretching along their northeastern shore, in Squaretop’s foreground, and the scene is beautiful. The six-mile Lakeside Trail, offering great views of Squaretop and circling Lower Green River Lake, was my first hike in this area, and it’s the reason Derek and I are back at Green River Lakes the weekend after Labor Day. (The Winds’ hiking season is bookended by mosquito season—skeeters here are notorious for their aggressive viciousness—and snow. I’ve found late August through mid-September is my favorite time to hike in the range.) The standout memory from my Lakeside Trail hike wasn’t the view of Squaretop, but the color of the

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water in the two Green River Lakes: the same milky green of the middle layer of an Andes peppermint candy. If it looked cool from the lakeshore, I imagine it’ll look extra cool from above. White Rock, an 11,284-foot-tall mountain whose eastern side is a large, low-angle grassy meadow, is directly above Green River Lakes. We follow trails for more than three miles

and then begin exploring off-trail. After an hour of navigating an area of trees downed by an avalanche, and another hour of easy walking above tree line on hummock-y grass, I see I was right. We spend thirty minutes taking photos and eating lunch before mostly retracing our steps. We take a short detour on a trail to Slide Lake. (If you want to hike only to Slide Lake, it’s about ten miles round-trip, all on trails, from the Green River

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Name: JH Magazine Summer Issue Size: 7.13” x 4.88”


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G olf Warbonnet Peak is along the well-traveled trail to Cirque of the Towers. The Cirque is to the right of Warbonnet and is one of the most popular destinations in the Winds.

Lakes Trailhead.) En route to the lake, we pass Slide Creek Falls, a steep natural waterslide stretching for several hundred feet. From a couple of spots near the falls you can see the Tetons. The Kelsey book says that, in certain light, you can also see Slide Creek Falls from the Tetons. Arriving at Slide Lake, I wish we had our camping supplies with us. Since we don’t, Derek and I lie on the small beach of aggressive sand at the lake’s northwestern end and, even though this exploration hasn’t yet ended, begin planning our next one. JH

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NUTS & BOLTS CLIMBING AND HIKING in the Wind River Mountains by Joe Kelsey is considered the ultimate guide to the range. Kelsey’s style is to present basic info and maps, and let readers figure out the rest on their own. Every place mentioned in this article is in Kelsey’s book. Earthwalk Press publishes weather- and waterproof maps of the southern and northern parts of the range. From $10.95, Teton Mountaineering, 170 N. Cache Dr., 307/733-3595. For thirty-two years, Lander Llama Company has offered custom, guided Winds trips on which llamas carry your gear. Call for pricing, 307/332-5624, landerllama.com

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getting out

High on Snow King The resort’s Treetop Adventure is a gateway to mini golf, bungee trampolines, a scenic chairlift, a mountain coaster, and an alpine slide. BY JULIE FUSTANIO KLING PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRADLY J. BONER

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Opened last summer after years of planning, the Treetop Adventure at Snow King is not a “ropes course,” but infinitely more interesting. It requires participants to negotiate obstacles between twelve and eighty feet above the ground.


Adventurers twelve and over can do three different courses, each with more difficult obstacles than the last.

AFTER GETTING OUTFITTED into harnesses and learning how to use the carabiners to click in safely, my twelveyear-old son, Ridge, and fourteen-year-old daughter, Dylan, and I are released onto the Treetop Adventure’s Green Course. We are near the midway station of the Rafferty Lift at the eastern edge of Snow King Mountain in downtown Jackson, but feel like we’re on another planet. Despite its easy rating, the Green Course consists of serious obstacles like wooden ladders and suspension bridges, all built above the ground, in trees. When we graduate from this course, which is the easiest, there are two more to go—the Red and Black Courses—and a zip line course. Each gets progressively harder and higher, but participants are able to call it quits at the end of any course.

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The Treetop Adventure has ninety-four obstacles and fourteen zip lines.

In total, the Treetop Adventure has 3,300 linear feet of cables, over which stretch ninety-four aerial challenges, including a flying skateboard, a wrecking ball, a wobbly bridge, and fourteen zip lines. On the Flying Squirrel Course,

which is designed for kids seven and up, obstacles are up to twenty feet above the ground. On the Full Course—for adults and kids over twelve, it includes the Green, Red, and Black Courses and zip lines—you can be between twelve and

eighty feet above the forest floor. Ridge and Dylan quickly get two, then three obstacles ahead of me. No one sees me lose my balance, fall to my knees, and scrape my shin when I let go of the “cheater” wire at eye level while crossing a section of ladder that goes from a horizontal plank to a vertical plank. (Every obstacle has a similar cable, about a half-inch in diameter and at eye level for an adult. You can use it as much or as little as you want or need. Not using it makes each obstacle exponentially more difficult, although even with the cheater cables on the Red and Black Courses, I think the obstacles are pretty difficult.) Finished with the ladder, I turn around and watch Christian Santelices, the founder of the Treetop Adventure with wife Sue Muncaster, smile as he skips—seriously!—across the ladder, no cheater wire needed. Santelices, one of the few Exum Mountain Guides that leads trips around the world and teaches other guides (in addition to taking clients up the Grand Teton here in Jackson Hole), is both a big kid and a proud father as he catches The Cowboy Coaster opened at Snow King the summer before the Treetop Adventure and is another worthwhile activity at the resort. The coaster hits speeds of up to twenty-seven miles per hour.

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up with my kids and points out his favorite features. Then he realizes it is me who needs the guidance and encouragement. “It’s a very different experience if you go in front of the kids,” he suggests, adding that at the Treetop Adventure kids usually get over their fears faster than adults. “There’s an obstacle on the Green Course, about four obstacles in. It’s a series of trapeze things that they cross that move—that’s the moment kids get scared,” Santelices says. “They have to dig deep and be patient, observe where they are going to put their feet. After that, there is a marked change in them. It’s a really beautiful thing; it’s so fun to watch.”

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“WHAT’S FUN AS WELL IS THAT THERE ARE SOME CHILD-PARENT RELATIONSHIPS WHERE KIDS ARE GOING TO BE COACHING THE PARENTS. IT’S A CHANCE FOR THE KIDS TO BE THE LEADERS.” – CHRISTIAN SANTELICES, TREETOP ADVENTURE CO-FOUNDER

Not that there’s any danger of injury if a kid, or adult, were to fall. The Treetop Adventure uses a safety system called CLiC-iT, which includes two giant lobster claws on two lanyards attached to your harness. Requiring you to click onto one wire with your carabiner CLiC-iT before you can unclick the other, the system is foolproof. And it makes a fool out of me more than once. “Shazam,” I say to remind myself to clip on when I can’t figure out why I can’t unclip. (Santelices calls the magnetic “c-zam” clips that open the lobster claws “shazams.”) I TAKE SANTELICES’ advice and get in front of my kids. This slows them down and allows me to listen to their reactions. As we progress through the adventure, I realize the challenges themselves are finally slowing all of us down. It wasn’t the trapeze on the Green Course, but the “skateboard” on the Red Course that throws Dylan for a loop. “How do you do this?” she asks. “I know, isn’t it scary?” I reply, starting to feel just a little more steady. “Just jump on and it will take you across.” It is rare that my teenager will ask for, much less take, my advice, so it feels

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good to mentor her. She considers, as I do, jumping on the skateboard with her knees. But in the end, after watching me, she braves it standing upright. Two trees ahead, a section of vertical logs tests the Hanuman monkey god in me. I end up stretching my legs into the splits. Dylan takes a more calculated approach with two feet on each log. Her way is easier, and less embarrassing. “For families with kids, it is a chance to spend some time together in a situation where there is some fear and to get through the next obstacle—to be together, encourage each other, and play,” Santelices says. “What’s fun as well is that there are some child-parent relationships where kids are going to be coaching the parents. It’s a chance for the kids to be the leaders.” Our hands are raw when we climb down from the Red Course (I recommend gloves, which you can buy on site), and Dylan calls it a day. I think she is more interested in zip-lining down to see her friends than in trying to straddle the log twenty feet in the air on the Black Course. Ridge is game to go all the way, though. We switch our order and he leads the way on the final, and most difficult, course. Halfway across the Black Course’s first ladder, I’m glad I didn’t chicken out. The views of the Tetons are spectacular. Even better is the confidence I have as I cross the final ladder, despite the vertigo I feel in between obstacles when the trees swing in the breeze. “It’s amazing what the body can do,” says a sixty-five-yearold man visiting from Virginia who did the Red Course and then waited for his friend at a picnic table below the Black Course. “We came out to Jackson to fish and decided to do something different. This is exhilarating.” It takes Ridge and me three hours to do the three different courses, an average amount of time, according to Santelices. The end of the Black Course isn’t the end of the fun, though. The Treetop Adventure includes a ride down the Alpine Slide, a half-mile track that descends 350 feet with banked and hairpin turns. I thought Snow King had done away with it two summers ago when they unveiled the faster and twistier Cowboy Coaster, a mountain coaster powered by gravity.


RUGILE KALADYTE

We arrive at the base to learn Dylan has gotten hired for her first-ever job, strapping little kids into harnesses and bouncing them on the resort’s bungee trampoline. A benefit of her position is that we can play mini golf and ride the Cowboy Coaster as much as we want. I know we’ll do lots of both, but I don’t expect either to compare to the thrill of the Treetop Adventure. JH

NUTS & BOLTS THE SNOW KING Treetop Adventure is open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily Memorial Day through Labor Day and weekends through the end of September. Hours are extended from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. June 17 to August 21. Kids must be 7 years old to do the Flying Squirrel Course and be accompanied by an adult chaperone on the ground, and an adult must accompany kids under 16 on the full adventure. A ticket for the full adventure is $70 and $40 for the Flying Squirrel Course. Both include a ride back to the base area on the Alpine Slide. The most cost-efficient way to experience all of Snow King’s activities—the Treetop Adventure, Alpine Slide, bungee trampoline, mini golf, scenic lift, and Cowboy Coaster—is a Big King Unlimited Pass, which is $125. 307/201-5666, snowkingmountain.com/activities/treetop-adventure/

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Best of

body & soul

Canines as a Cure Dogs are good for the body and soul. BY MOLLY LOOMIS

KALI LETS OUT a loud groan, makes a resounding thump, then gives Kyle a sloppy wet kiss on the cheek. Nearby, a librarian looks up from her desk and ... smiles? This isn’t behavior appropriate for a library’s quiet, sacred space. But Kali isn’t a rowdy, lusty patron. This sleek black dog is doing important work: helping new readers like Kyle gain literary confidence and proficiency. According to a study by the University of California, Davis, just ten 124

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weeks of reading to Rover boosted children’s reading skills by 12 percent versus the flatlined performance of their pupless classmates. Kyle giggles and squiggles in his chair. St. John’s Medical Center patient Nina Currently Kali’s han- Finnegan, seven, gets a little love dler—although at home from George in the hallways of the she’s the boss—I coax hospital. Dogs with a mild or laid-back temperament are brought to hospitals her back into a seated to offer furry relief to patients who position. Kyle gives the are undergoing medical treatment or dog a smirk, then turns recovering from injuries.

BRADLY J. BONER

JH


back to his book about colors. Some of the stiff cardboard pages he bypasses in a quick flip; others he thoughtfully shows to Kali, explaining each drawing. Often, Kyle pauses, mystified by the letters he sees scrambled on the page. Sometimes he’ll try to sound his way through, and other times he’ll simply invent his own words—some coherent, some not; most spoken in a loud whisper. Speech therapists have found that people who stutter can often communicate fluidly when speaking to animals. Kali is a nonjudgmental, patient listener. It doesn’t matter what Kyle is reading; what matters is that Kyle is reading.

ACCORDING TO THE JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH, DOG OWNERS ARE MORE LIKELY TO REACH THEIR FITNESS GOALS THAN THOSE WITHOUT A DOG. A MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY STUDY FOUND AN INCREASE IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BY 69 PERCENT, WHILE RESEARCHERS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI MEASURED A 28 PERCENT INCREASE IN WALKING SPEED.

The Read to Rover program, organized by the nonprofit Teton County Pet Partners, is just one example of the benefits—physical and mental—of the cross-species connection. Scientists and medical professionals are only beginning to explore these unique relationships and look into ways to capitalize on the health advantages from the kind of prescription most people would deem far preferable to a pill: time with a dog. “Dogs seem to unconditionally love us, and that’s something we don’t get from our human counterparts,” says Kelly Chadwick, an administrator at Teton County Pet Partners. “You see the benefits when you go to a place like MorningStar [Assisted Living of Jackson Hole]. People’s day-to-day lives might not be what they used to be, or they have trouble recalling things. We bring a therapy dog in and suddenly they’re remembering a story about their own animal, and their whole demeanor changes.” Chadwick explains the emotional bene-

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“man’s best friend” is rooted in complex, mutually beneficial neurochemical reactions. Oxytocin, the same feel-good hormone a mother releases while looking into her child’s eyes, is also unleashed when canine and human eyes lock. Oxytocin also impacts social memory and facial recognition, other noteworthy factors in social bonding. According to a Japanese study, dogs can smell the oxytocin, creating a feedback loop of feel-good sensations for dogs and humans THE HEART MELT your dog’s doey eyes can elicit alike. Other important neurochemical reactions that isn’t just a ploy for a belly scratch. It’s the result of occur with canine cuddling include an increase in 18,000 years of relational evolution between canines other warm and fuzzy hormones, like beta-endorphin, and humans. True, some of this dogged devotion is which helps with euphoria and pain relief; parenting food-based (an interchange that’s occurred for thou- bond-booster prolactin; beta-phenylethylamine, sands of years), and a dog’s unique ability to hold an which correlates to finding a romantic partner; and the pleasure stimulant dopamine. extended gaze with humans helps Other benefits of pet ownership explain their initial domestication. Sean Baruwa, nine, reads to Roxie, read like a holistic health wish list: But scientists are increasingly dis- an eleven-year-old Teton County Pet lowering of blood pressure, heart, covering that a dog’s ranking as Partners therapy dog, at the Teton fits she sees at C-Bar-V Ranch, a residential facility on Teton Village Road for disabled and emotionally disturbed youth. “Some of the kids can’t go home on weekends,” she says. “Interacting with a dog becomes something to look forward to and a reward for good behavior during the week. One of the boys has even started writing stories about the dog that comes to visit, then reads them to him.”

BRADLY J. BONER

Literacy Center. The program allows kids to practice their reading skills without pressure or inhibitions.

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and respiratory rates; a reduction in the production of harmful stress hormones; and an increase in the creation of natural painkillers and antidepressants. Of course, owning a dog typically translates into an increase in exercise. A Canadian study found that dog owners walk nearly double the distances of non-dog owners. According to the Journal of Physical Activity and Health, pup parents are more likely to reach their fitness goals than those without a dog. A Michigan State University study found an increase in physical activity by 69 percent, while researchers at the University of Missouri measured a 28 percent increase in walking speed. A 75 percent reduction in the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, a decreased risk of childhood obesity, fewer annual doctor visits than dogless counterparts—the studies in support of

BRADLY J. BONER

Amanda Soliday, president of Wyoming K9 Search & Rescue, rewards her pup, Otis, with a tug toy during a training exercise. Members of the group have dogs trained to search for humans in a variety of conditions on land, around and in water, and in avalanches.

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RYAN JONES

Isaiah, right, gives chihuahua Cecil a treat while handler the dog-loving life go on and on, to the extent that Midland National Brantley Sydnor holds onto littermate Ani during a Life Insurance Company factors into their rates whether or not clients Pet Partners program at C-Bar-V Ranch in Wilson. The older than seventy-five own a dog. therapy animal program aims to offer relief to emotionally It’s also possible that when a human does go disturbed or disabled youth who live at the school. to a medical professional, he might run into a dog. Mental health professionals are increasingly integrating dogs like Darwin and Toby of the Jackson Hole Community Counseling Center into their practices for conditions like anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Physical and ocWHILE KEEPING YOUR eyes peeled for moose, elk, and bald eagles, don’t forget to add this equally important animal to the tick list: the adoptallamus muttcommonalus. Sometimes cupational therapists can create more motivatblack in color with patches of white, this is a diverse species but identifiable by orange marking and engaging activities for patients by inings with the words “ADOPT ME” emblazoned on its sides. corporating a dog into therapies. For example: At the Animal Adoption Center in downtown Jackson, dogs of all shapes and sizes are Brushing a dog can improve hand-eye coordiavailable for viewing, petting, taking on walks around town, and even overnight stays. Since nation and muscle control.

Animal Adoption Center

opening in 2004, the center has rescued thousands of animals from kill shelters around the region. After romping at the free-range facility all day, AAC’s animals are swooped away every night to foster homes until finding their “furever” family. Animals available for adoption can be viewed at animaladoptioncenter.org. 270 E. Broadway Visitors to the Tetons’ west side can pay a visit to Idaho’s Teton Valley Community Animal Shelter. If heading south, don’t forget Lucky’s Place in Star Valley. Both are no-kill shelters, with animals worthy of and wanting of a home. tvshelter.org, ahasv.org

AROUND THE VALLEY you may catch a glimpse of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort’s ski patrol canines, dogs that are rigorously trained to aid in the search for avalanche victims. There is also a cadre of similarly skilled dogs working on local search and rescue teams specializing in water, cadaver, and live searches. But the lifesaving services a dog’s nose can provide go far beyond search and rescue applications. Today, doctors are putting dogs’ keen sense of smell to good use to sniff out conditions like cancer, narcolepsy, migraines, low blood sugar, allergens, and seizures. Former Lander, Wyoming, resident Sylvi Schneider has a yellow Lab named Simba from Diabetic Alert Dogs of America. Sylvi, age 128

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eight, has a form of glycogen storage disease that leaves her body unable to store sugar. This means Sylvi has extremely limited energy reserves and is susceptible to chronic hypoglycemia. Simba can sniff out plummeting blood sugar, alerting Sylvi to dangerous levels by pawing at her or by alerting her parents. Eventually, with Simba’s help, Sylvi may be able to wean off the nearly one dozen fingersticks she must perform daily.

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for all seasons

THE STUDIES IN SUPPORT OF THE PHYSICAL AND MENTAL BENEFITS OF DOG OWNERSHIP ARE SO POWERFUL THAT MIDLAND NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY FACTORS INTO THEIR RATES WHETHER OR NOT CLIENTS OLDER THAN SEVENTY-FIVE OWN A DOG.

Avery, another yellow Lab, and Anya, a ten-year-old survivor of retinoblastoma, met through the Stink Bug Project, a Rocky Mountain Children’s Health This affordable private home and Foundation program founded by a young property is your hub to adventure right girl with brain cancer who believed that out the door, and centrally located just dogs could play an important role in sup35 minutes to both the Jackson Hole porting other kids with serious medical conditions. The project serves the Rocky and Grand Targhee ski resorts as well Mountains. Stink Bug pulls candidate as the Jackson town square. dogs from shelters and has them complete an obedience program with women prisoners as their trainers. Successful dogs A Gathering A romantic like Avery are placed with children like OR reprieve place for Anya. “Avery took my mind off getting up to ten. for two. chemo at the hospital and all the tests. I would pet her and focus on that more than, ‘In an hour I have to go get a test done,’ ” Anya says. “She makes me feel happy because she’s just so cute.” It’s not just young kids who benefit from puppy love. Some schools, like Chapman University in California, recruit dogs for petting sessions during fipet accessories andand supplies 250 W. Pearl pet gear groceries nal exams as a way for students to destress. At American University’s Kogod School of Business, students have started practicing their speeches and presentations on dogs. Who knows—someday Kyle, the boy from Read to Rover, could practice his pitch for a life-changing product or a multimillion-dollar transaction on a long-eared, squirrel-obsessed 307-739-9247 www.tetontails.com open pet accessories250 and w supplies petpearl accessories 250 and W. Pearl suppliespet accessories 250 W. Pearland supplies 250 W.daily Pearl listener similar to Kali. JH

VRBO #891074

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Best of

JH

nightlife

Wild at Night

For a night to remember, try glamping, or stick with old-fashioned camping. BY ISA JONES

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THE FIRE IS crackling, the constellations are shining crystal clear, and in the distance the moon reflects off the Tetons, providing a natural nightlight. What is just another summer evening in Jackson Hole is also the stuff that dreams, and countless commercials, are made of. There are plenty of options for spending the night out under the stars, whether you want to rough it or prefer five-star treatment. After all, a tent on the ground and going to the bathroom in the wild isn’t for everyone. Meet glamping, which is short for “glamorous camping.” What is glamorous camping? Take the main element of camping—sleeping


Explore the History of Jackson Hole! Two Museums for One Low Price Homesteading Museum: 225 N. Cache St. Indians of the Greater Yellowstone museum: corner of Deloney & Glenwood Open all summer: Tuesday-Saturday 10am until 5pm | 307-733-2414 Exhibits - Research - Tours

Jackson Hole’s most famous under-the-radar camping area, the Observatory, is in the BridgerTeton National Forest and offers spectacular views of the Tetons.

somewhere nature-y—and combine it with many of the amenities you’d have at a hotel, like power, down comforters, and carpets. Glamping is ideal for firsttime camping experiences and for people who know they don’t want to give up modern-day luxuries. No matter what level of glamping you choose, make a plan to enjoy the valley’s wildest nightlife, whether in a rustic cabin or a luxury tent, at least once this summer. (Fear not: If you like your camping the oldfashioned way, we’ve got some car camping suggestions, too.)

RYAN DORGAN

What every visitor to Grand Teton National Park needs, all in one place.

A FULL SERVICE RESORT, OFFERING: • • • • • • • • • •

Lodging 2 Restaurants, Pizzeria and a Full Service Bar Camping (electric hookups) Public Showers and Laundromat Boat Rentals Gift Shops Guided Fishing Scenic Snake River Float Trips Gas/General Store Located on Jackson Lake, 25 miles from Yellowstone

(307 ) 543-2831 signalmtnlodge.com Signal Mountain Lodge L.L.C. is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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Right: Fireside Resort on Teton Village Road has twenty-three cabins with high ceilings, large windows, and a fireplace or fire pits. Bottom: Luxury tents at the Linn Canyon Ranch in Victor, Idaho

LINN CANYON RANCH

BRYAN ROWE

Linn Canyon Ranch might be on the backside of the Tetons, in Teton Valley, Idaho, but there’s just as much to ogle on that side of the range as the Jackson Hole side. This ranch proves there’s just as much to do on the mountains’ western slopes as well. For sleeping comfortably after your days of play, Linn Canyon Ranch has two lodging options: Cabins have feather beds and a breakfast nook inside, with a wraparound deck outside, while the ranch’s luxury tents have carpeted floors, queen- or king-size beds, and custom linens. As gorgeous as both of these options sound, neither is why you go to Linn Canyon Ranch. The ranch has guided half- and full-day trail rides—including a lunch ride and a sunset ride—into the Caribou-Targhee National Forest, where you might see bald eagles, moose, and black bears. Other options include day

hikes and overnight pack trips. The ranch’s main lodge serves gourmet dinner nightly. Dessert? Relaxing in front of a roaring outdoor fire. Cabins from $185/night, tents from $99; 1300 E. 6000 S., Victor, Idaho; 208/787-5466, linncanyonranch.com FIRESIDE RESORT

COURTESY LINN CANYON RANCH

At Fireside Resort, between the town of Jackson and Teton Village, you may feel like you’re in the woods, but you’re only a short drive from a wine shop and a gourmet grocery market. There are twenty-three individual cabins. While each varies, generally Wedge Cabins feel like a tiny home (and sleep up to four people), while Caboose Cabins are larger (sleeping up to six guests). All cabins have large windows, high ceilings, and contemporary western decor—like furniture made from reclaimed wood, fireplaces, tailored leather sofas, and clean white walls. Modern amenities include Wi-Fi, private decks, full kitchens, and flat-screen TVs. Each cabin has its own fire pit, with a bundle of wood included. A bonus: Fireside rents Jeeps, so you can go explore the great outdoors before coming home to your cozy cabin. From $219 a night, 2780 Moose Wilson Rd., Wilson, 307/733-1177, firesidejacksonhole.com

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At Colter Bay Village in Grand Teton National Park, there are rustic cabins, tent cabins, and tent sites. Pictured here, each tent cabin has a wood-burning stove and four bunks that pull down from two wooden walls.

COLTER BAY VILLAGE

ANDREW KALAT

If you’re a traditional camper, but your tent needs drying out or you want a social scene, Colter Bay Village in Grand Teton National Park is the place for you. Colter Bay offers the amenities of a real vacation village—a Laundromat, a small grocery store, a restaurant, visitor center, museum, boat rentals, guided fishing trips, horseback rides, rustic cabins, tent cabins, and tent sites—and the outdoor feel of the park’s tent/RV campgrounds. And then there is Colter Bay’s view of the Tetons across Jackson Lake, which is drool-worthy. Colter Bay’s cabins, which aren’t much to

look at but do have comfortable mattresses in addition to toilets, sinks, and showers, are historic. Most date from the 1920s and ’30s, but some are from the 1890s. Colter Bay’s cabins were moved to this site in the 1950s from the Teton Lodges at Moran, the old Jackson Lake

Lodge Resort, and the Square G Ranch (located near Jenny Lake), among other places in the valley. They welcomed their first guests in 1957. Each of the tent cabins has a woodburning stove (BYOW—Bring Your Own Wood) and four bunks that pull down

SANTA BARBARA

JACKSON HOLE WOOD FIRED PIZZA

luccatruck.com 541-840-9959 SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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RYAN DORGAN

Enjoy

The aurora spreads over a campsite at the Observatory, east of Grand Teton National Park in the Bridger-Teton National Forest.

Horseback Trail Rides 2 hour and 1/2 day Guided Fly Fishing or Hiking Tours into Yellowstone Restaurant and Bar open for lunch and dinner Newly renovated cabins and chalets

turpinmeadowranch.com | 307.543.2000 | 24505 Buffalo Valley Road, Moran, WY Turpin Meadow Ranch is an Authorized Permittee of the Bridger-Teton National Forest and an Equal Opportunity Provider

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from the walls. These “tents” have two wooden walls and two canvas walls (the bunks are attached to the wooden walls) and are more bare-bones than the cabins; they have only a thin mattress on each bunk and do not have bathrooms. Toilets and showers are in a nearby bathhouse. The tent cabins do have a picnic table and grilling area. Colter Bay also has 335 individual campsites, each equipped with a fire ring and picnic table, as well as eleven large group campsites that can be reserved in advance (individual campsites are first-come, firstserved). While Colter Bay is the most rustic “glamping” option, its social life is anything but peaceful or quiet. This isn’t the place for privacy or solitude. Expect to make new friends and maybe share drinks around the campfire. Cabins from $189, tent cabins from $70, and campsites from $26; 101 Colter Bay Village Rd., Moran, 307/543-3100, gtlc.com


CLASSIC CAMPING For the best car-camping spot in Jackson Hole, remember one word: Observatory. The Observatory is the locals’ name for a gorgeous spot on the edge of the Bridger-Teton National Forest (BTNF) and Grand Teton National Park. Since it is actually located in the BTNF, there are no permits or fees necessary for camping there. The Observatory is twenty-seven miles from Jackson’s Town Square. Follow U.S. 191 for twenty-four miles, and then, directly opposite the historic Cunningham Cabin site, turn right at Forest Road 30310. The last bit of this road is pretty steep; as soon as you hit this section, the campsites start. There are several to choose from, so if you’re the first there, take the time to check them all out. They’ve all got good views, but some good views are better than others.

AS SOON AS YOU ARRIVE, IT’S OBVIOUS HOW THIS SPOT COMES BY ITS NAME. ON A CLEAR NIGHT, THE STARS LOOK SO CLOSE YOU FEEL YOU CAN TOUCH THEM.

E X P E R I E N C E P AY S

L E T US P R OV E IT

Your leading resource for buying and selling real estate in the Jackson Hole region. MICHAEL PRUETT Associate Broker

307.413.2700 REBEKKAH KELLEY Associate Broker

307.413.5294 DIANNE BUDGE Owner, Associate Broker

307.413.1362

As soon as you arrive, it’s obvious how this spot comes by its name. On a clear night, the stars look so close you feel you can touch them. At sunset, the Tetons are purple and pink. If you camp close to a full moon, the range shines back at you all night. The view is panoramic, and stunning. There’s even a wolf den nearby, so howls may be your nighttime soundtrack. (Know that there have been no fatal attacks of people by wild wolves in the Lower 48 states going back to at least the early 1900s.) At the Observatory, you get the amenities you pay for: nothing. Bring everything you need for the night, and make sure to store your food safely away from bears. A bear coming into a camp and tearing into the food stash is a little wilder than we like our nightlife here to be. (Also, it is dangerous for both bears and humans when the bruins learn to associate humans with food. Bears that lose their fear of humans are often killed by wildlife managers.) Free, 307/739-5500, fs.usda.gov JH

Over 25 years of real estate experience. BUDGEREALESTATE.COM budgerealtygroup@jhrea.com 80 W. Broadway, Jackson, WY

CHAD BUDGE Owner, Associate Broker

307.413.1364

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Best of

JH

dining

Lotus’ organic and gluten-free Kale-Avocado Salad keeps it simple: The dish features baby kale leaves and sliced avocado topped with Caesar dressing.

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Green Giants

nture Book Your Adve Package Today!

Valley restaurants show that The Cowboy State knows how to grow greens as well as cows. BY JOOHEE MUROMCEW PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN DORGAN

JACKSON HOLE CUISINE has come a long way from dude-ranch cowboy fare. This valley loves to eat and eat well—with locally grown produce and meats always a priority, and leafy green salads on nearly every menu. Here are our favorite green giants: TETON SALAD AT RENDEZVOUS BISTRO Fine Dining Restaurant Group’s Gavin Fine could teach a master class in customer satisfaction at Rendezvous Bistro. A local favorite for every occasion from quick bar bites to graduation dinners, the Bistro’s French-American menu changes just enough to encourage regulars to try something different, while never losing sight of what keeps their menu favorites so popular. Relatively new to their offerings is the Teton Salad, and patrons can expect it to evolve just a bit over the seasons. The menu simply states “greens” from Vertical Harvest and the Huidekoper Ranch in Wilson. Look for executive chef Jesse Rezin to select what’s freshest, from garden gem lettuces at Vertical Harvest to Huidekoper Ranch watercress. Pistachios, shaved red onions, and tart green apples add a sweet-savory crunch, while a Meyer lemonprosecco vinaigrette ties it all together. Pair it with a glass of Château Riotor Rosé or King Estate Pinot Gris. rendezvousbistro.net

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JOIN THE FUN Over 800 Slot Machines Blackjack • Poker Roulette • 3 Restaurants 2 Gift Shops

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NewWestKnifeWorks.com America’s Premier Boutique Cutlery Manufacturer is located at the corner of Center and Deloney. Right off the Town Square

KALE-AVOCADO SALAD AT LOTUS MTNMENGIFTS.com

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This delectable salad is another skillful creation of Lotus owner/chef Amy Young. Young presents cuisines of all origins—bison burgers topped with kimchi, anyone?—reinterpreted for vegetarian, vegan, Paleo, and dairy- and gluten-free sensibilities. In its airy new space on Cache Street, Lotus satisfies cravings for healthy, full-flavored eating. I suggest the Kale-Avocado Salad as “Lotus 101” fare when we bring out-oftown guests here for the first time. Tender young kale leaves and sliced avocado might sound pedestrian, but they take on a satisfyingly luxurious mouthfeel when topped with Young’s unimaginably tasty vegan Caesar dressing made with grapeseed oil. I usually add panfried tofu to my salad, though a variety of proteins are available as add-ons, in-

Snake River Farms ham, chicken, baby kale, chickpeas, walnuts, dried cherries, bacon, smoked blue cheese, sliced farm egg, and buttermilk dressing make up Picnic’s Cobb Salad.

cluding Lockhart Cattle Company sirloin, house-made cashew-shiitake cakes, and ground bison. Young is a strict buyer of only organic ingredients. Let’s not talk about that winter with the avocado shortage. theorganiclotus.com COBB SALAD AT PICNIC “Everyone loves a Cobb!” says Ali Cohane, who founded and owns Picnic with her husband, Kevin. This is no ordinary Cobb Salad, however, and owes its complex flavors to local and artisan ingredients like Red Bird Farms all-nat-


Local’s Crispy Duck Salad is a highbrow remake of a classic Chinese chicken salad, with duck leg confit, rice noodles, pickled carrots, and more, all topped with a miso vinaigrette.

ural chicken, eggs from the Wyoming Chicken Ranch, and ham from Snake River Farms. Cohane explains, “It’s really just about taking a classic to its best possible end with the best local ingredients.” Dried cherries, chickpeas, and walnuts round out this unexpected Cobb, which is pleasantly not too filling, so you still have room for a slice of gluten-free citrus cake or a fig pop-tart from the pastry counter. picnicjh.com CRISPY DUCK SALAD AT LOCAL AND LOCAL BUTCHER I have a hard time not ordering this salad every time I go to Local or its sister takeaway shop around the corner, Local Butcher. The crispy duck leg confit is a rich foil to the greens, carrots, red cabbage, cucumber, and rice noodles. Lightly dressed with rice wine vinegar and a touch of sesame, it strikes the right balance between the indulgent duck leg and its virtuous slaw. Moving here from California, I love it as a highbrow remake of a classic Chinese chicken salad. Available only on Local’s lunch menu, it is a gratifying entree salad, though starting with a shared order of spicy sambal chicken wings would be entirely acceptable. localjh.com and localbutcherjh.com GRILLED SALMON SALAD AT TETON PINES

T HE T ETONS A RE C ALLING

& you should answer.

A dedicated Realtor for the past twenty-nine years and Jackson Hole resident since 1976 sharing my knowledge and history of the valley is paramount helping clients achieve their real estate goals. I have built my professional reputation on personalized service and it would be a privilege to offer you the ultimate choices in buying and selling real estate in Jackson Hole, Teton Village, Wilson, Star Valley, Pinedale and Dubois, WY.

NANCY MARTINO Associate Broker

Certified Residential Specialist Graduate Realtors Institute

A favorite spot for the Jackson Hole old guard and ladies who lunch, The Restaurant at the Teton Pines Country

307.690.1022 • 307.733.6060 • 888.733.6060 • www.nancymartino.com www.jhrea.com • nancymartino@jhrea.com • 80 W. Broadway, Jackson, WY

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Westbank Grill at Four Seasons offers quite the brawny salad, featuring thick-cut boar bacon, cured tomato, scallion, smoked blue cheese, and horseradish ranch dressing. Sommelier AJ Puccia recommends Jackson Hole Winery’s Chardonnay to accompany the dish.

duce and meats at the bottom of its menu, you know they’re paying attention to their salads. The Mixed Local Greens Salad features mixed greens from nearby farms like Vertical Harvest in Jackson and Snowdrift Farms in Idaho, with apples, pears, and peaches from not too much further away, all dressed in a sunny sangria vinaigrette. jacksonhole.com STEAK AND KNIFE WEDGE SALAD AT WESTBANK GRILL

Club and Resort boasts one of the most consistent kitchens in the valley. Classics like Brown Derby Chopped Salad and Egg Salad sandwiches are served in a clubby, recently redecorated atmosphere that is both warm and formal. The standout among salads is the Grilled Salmon Salad, a generous portion of perfectly grilled salmon that is juicy and slightly crisp on the exterior. Crumbled blue cheese, strands of fried shallot, sweet roasted tomatoes, artichoke hearts, and a balsamic vinaigrette add up to a perfect post-tennis or -golf luncheon. “That is my favorite salad. I have it once a week,” recommends Amy Bickley, The Pines’ director of membership and communications. Friday lunch is lively and packed with regulars, who are often there for the salad special topped with fresh pan-seared walleye. VERTICAL HARVEST, A labor of love and ingenuity in downtown Jackson, is a three-story hydrotetonpines.com ponic greenhouse scaling an entire exterior wall of a parking garage. Its greenhouse glass and

Where’s That Farm Downtown?

MIXED LOCAL GREENS SALAD AT PISTE For years, all of the restaurants at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort (JHMR) have supported local farms and growers. JHMR was among the first to prioritize seasonality and sustainability in its menus. Nothing can compete with the 9,000-foot views at Piste, the newest restaurant at the top of the Bridger Gondola, but when a restaurant lists twenty local suppliers of pro140

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neon lights may first appear to be an art installation, but the beauty and magic happens inside, where rotating beds of hydroponically grown greens, tomatoes, and herbs annually replace over 100,000 pounds of produce that would otherwise be trucked in from outside the region. Regular tours of the greenhouse are offered throughout the week by appointment, but the ground-floor market is open to the public. Among the market’s locally crafted goods like the Grand Pan, an impressive work of usable farm-to-table industrial art, look for Vertical Harvest’s own produce. A rotation of just-picked salad greens, tomatoes, and herbs are offered along with pickles, jams, and condiments from Bozeman’s Roots Kitchen & Cannery. At press time, Rebelski beefsteak tomatoes and Bumble Bee cherry tomatoes were in hot demand. In the cooler are boxed microgreens, an infinitely tastier hostess gift than a bouquet of supermarket flowers. These tiny first leaves of sunflower, daikon, sweet pea, and other greens can be sweet, sharp, nutty, and intensely flavorful. They are also supercute on a countertop. verticalharvest.com

BRADLY J. BONER

Some salads are just too hard to resist. When the first ingredient is thick-cut boar bacon, the answer is always yes. Having muscled its way onto the salad menu, the Steak and Knife is shamelessly brawny. Cold iceberg lettuce is topped with a shower of said bacon, umami bombs of cured tomato, scallion, smoked blue cheese, and a sharp and creamy horseradish ranch dressing. This take-no-prisoners steakhouse classic is hearty enough to have as an entree, perhaps with the Dungeness crab cakes to start. But, come on, man—you’re in Jackson Hole! Order the salad and the twelve-ounce Rocky Mountain elk chop. It’s been aged for thirty-five days. Ask for the huckleberry barbecue sauce and the roasted mushrooms sizzling in Wyoming Whiskey and nuggets of garlic confit. Sommelier AJ Puccia recommends Jackson Hole Winery’s Chardonnay for the salad, and might even continue with it for the steak. fourseasons.com/jacksonhole JH


JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING • JHFINEDINING.COM

Distinctive

DINING EXPERIENCES

IN-TOWN

French-American Bistro 380 S. Broadway • Jackson 307-739-1100 • rendezvousbistro.net

Wine & Tapas Bar, Specialty Grocer and Bottle Shop

Modern American Cuisine

200 W. Broadway • Downtown Jackson

307-734-1633 • thekitchenjacksonhole.com

307-739-9463 • bin22jacksonhole.com

155 N. Glenwood • Downtown Jackson

WESTBANK & TETON VILLAGE CMYK

C=0 M=22 Y=100 K=89 C=0 M=26 Y=100 K=26

Gastropub and Craft Brewery

Rustic Italian Fare

2550 Moose-Wilson Rd • Wilson

3335 W. Village Dr, Hotel Terra • Teton Village

Locally-Focused Specialty Grocer, Bottle Shop and Fried Chicken Food Truck

307-739-0700 • roadhousebeer.com

307-739-4100 • jhosteria.com

3200 W. McCollister Dr • Teton Village

C=0 M=0 Y=25 K=10

307-200-4666 • bodegajacksonhole.com

Weddings - Rehearsal Dinners - Private & Corporate Events • 307-739-4682 • bistrocatering.net


Best of

JH

dining out

RESTAURANT

LOCATION

PHONE

BREAKFAST

LUNCH

DINNER

Branding Iron Grill

Grand Targhee Resort

307-353-2300

$$

$$ $$$

The Bunnery Bakery & Restaurant

Jackson

307-733-5474

$

$

FIGS

Jackson

307-733-2200

$

$$

$$$

Bin22

Jackson

307-739-9463

$/$$

$/$$

Bodega

Teton Village

307-200-4666

$

$/$$

The Kitchen

Jackson

307-734-1633 $/$$$

Il Villaggio Osteria

Teton Village

307-739-4100

Rendezvous Bistro

Jackson

307-739-1100

Roadhouse Gastropub

Teton Village Road

307-739-0700

Ascent Lounge

Teton Village

307-732-5673

$$

The Handle Bar

Teton Village

307-732-5156

$$

$$

Westbank Grill

Teton Village

307-732-5156

$$

$$$

Gather

Jackson

307-264-1820 $ $$

Grand Teton Lodge Company

Grand Teton National Park

Fine Dining Restaurant Group

$

$$

$/$$$ $/$$$

$/$$

Four Seasons Resort

142

$

Mural Dining Room

Jackson Lake Lodge

307-543-2811

$

$/$$

$$$

Pioneer Grill

Jackson Lake Lodge

307-543-2811

$

$

$/$$

Blue Heron Lounge

Jackson Lake Lodge

307-543-2811

$

$

Ranch House Restaurant

Colter Bay

307-543-2811 $ $ $$/$$$

John Colter Café Court

Colter Bay

307-543-2811

$

$

$

Jenny Lake Dining Room

Jenny Lake Lodge

307-733-4647

$

$

$$$$

Kim’s Cafe

Jackson

307-200-6544

$

$

$

Palate

Jackson

307-733-5771

$$$ $$

Piste Mountain Bistro

Top of Bridger Gondola

307-732-3177

$$

Signal Mountain Lodge

Grand Teton National Park $$/$$$

$$$

Peaks Dining Room

Signal Mountain Lodge

307-543-2831 x220

Trapper Grill

Signal Mountain Lodge

307-543-2831 x220

$ $/$$ $/$$

The Silver Dollar Bar and Grill

Jackson

307-732-3939

$

Snake River Brewing Company

Jackson

307-739-2337

Snake River Grill

Jackson

307-733-0557 $$$

Spur Restaurant & Bar

Teton Village

307-732-6932 $ $$ $$$

Teton Thai

Teton Village

307-733-0022 $$ $$

Turpin Meadow Ranch

Buffalo Valley

307-543-2000

The White Buffalo Club

Jackson

307-734-4900

The Wildwood Room

Victor, Idaho

208-787-2667

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

$

$$$

$

$/$$

Guest Only $$

$$$ $$$


LIQUOR

KIDS’ MENU

TAKEOUT

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Rocky Mountain fare made with fresh, local ingredients

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Breakfast, lunch, and Jackson’s freshest baked goods

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Spectacularly fresh Lebanese-influenced cuisine

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Wine, tapas bar, specialty grocer, and bottle shop

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Bottle shop, grab & go food, provisions, butcher

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Modern American cuisine in the heart of Jackson

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Wood-oven-fired pizzas, house-made pasta

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Locals’ favorite, French American bistro fare, raw bar

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Gastropub, draft beer, and brewery

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American steakhouse inspired by indigenous flavors

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Modern American cuisine

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OPEN NIGHTLY FOR DINNER 5:30 - 9 PM

Mediterranean small plates, crudo, and flatbreads

A culinary experience with panoramic Teton views

Classic 1950s-style counter service J R s Casual dining on the deck overlooking the Tetons

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Quick meals, picnic take-out, or casual Mexican fare

J

Burgers, fries, ricebowls, noodles, breakfast

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Teton views, sustainable Western bistro-style menu

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Teton views, family casual menu, outdoor seating

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Regional cuisine, live music, happy hour

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Award-winning craft beers and delicious food

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Five course dining in Grand Teton National Park

Lunch and Sunday bruch, seasonal food and patio

Contemporary fine dining at 9,095 feet

Locals’ choice for rustic elegance

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Voted Jackson’s Best Chef and Best Aprés in 2017

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Outdoor patio and amazing views

Creative farm to table restaurant

R

USDA prime steakhouse, exquisite cuisine

Teton Valley’s catering for great events!

Located at the top of the Bridger Gondola, Piste Mountain Bistro combines the elegance of fine dining with a casual, alpine atmosphere. Cozy booths and tables, complimented by floor to ceiling windows, bring the beautiful valley views inside. Make your reservation today and get ready to enjoy one of the best dining experiences in the valley.

OPENTABLE.COM | 307.732.3177

Average entree; $= under $15, $$= $16-20, $$$= $21+ SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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Handcrafted, award-winning fine wine made locally in Jackson, Wyoming.

“Teton “Teton wedding catering at at its its finest finest for forover over20 20years” years” hospitality

Make an appointment Today! Teton Valley’s best special occasion venue 800.787.9178 or 208.787.2667 | diningincateringinc.com 800.787.9178 or 208.787.2667 | diningincateringinc.com

Jackson Winery 2800 Boyles Hill Road Jackson, WY 307-201-1057 www.jacksonholewinery.com

Gallery on Main 3rd & Main Dayton, WY 307-655-2443 www.galleryonmaindayton.com

info@jacksonholewinery.com

ALL TRAILS END HERE

WWW.TETONTHAIVILLAGE.COM

307 733 0022

$9

WINNER BEST THAI RESTAURANT ‘09 - ’16

SNAKE RIVER BREWING 265 S. Millward | 307.739.BEER

www.snakeriverbrewing.com

Gold/Silver BEST TAKE OUT FOOD ‘09 - ’16

- JH Weekly


JACKSON'S FINEST

USDA PRIME STEAKHOUSE Exquisite Wines | Fresh Seafood Private Dining | Downtown Jackson

307.734.4900 / WhiteBuffaloClub.com

GREAT FOOD • LIBATIONS • MUSIC

Lunch to Brunch Patio Seating

palateJH.com (307) 201-5208

National Museum of Wildlife Art 2820 Rungius Road

gatherJH.com (307) 264-1820

Downtown Jackson Hole 72 South Glenwood

Dinner & Catering Relaxed Atmosphere

©2017 JH Hospitality. All rights reserved. Photo by Matt Payne

Inside the Historic Wort Hotel • Broadway@Glenwood Just off the Town Square • 307-732-3939 • worthotel.com


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art scene

The Valley’s Greatest Secret? The National Museum of Wildlife Art celebrates its thirtieth anniversary this year, and has been recognized by Congress and the American Alliance of Museums. BY LILA EDYTHE

THE OAKLEY QUARTZITE façade of the National visitors to the valley finds their way here. Just because Museum of Wildlife Art (NMWA) blends into the it’s understandable, though, doesn’t mean it’s right. rocky hillside it sits on opposite the “We’re the best-kept secret in National Elk Refuge a couple of miles The design of the Jackson,” says chairwoman of the munorth of downtown Jackson. Combine National Museum of seum board Debbie Petersen. Less bithis natural camouflage with the fact Wildlife Art was inspired ased visitors agree. Tourists in on the that “wildlife art” is a genre that, at best, by a sixteenth-century secret titled their reviews on castle; inside, is often misunderstood, and, at worst, is Scottish TripAdvisor, “A hidden gem,” “A mustthere are more than misinterpreted to be taxidermy, and it’s 5,000 pieces in its see,” “Great Collections,” “Beautiful art understandable that less than one in fifty permanent collection. in a beautiful setting,” and “Glad we

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Left: Bill Kerr, one of the museum’s founders, sits in the institution’s first home, a 5,000-square-foot building on the northeast corner of the Town Square. Bottom: Wyoming native Dr. Adam Duncan Harris has been the Petersen curator of art and research at the museum since 2000. At least eight exhibits curated under his direction have gone on to tour other museums across the country. Last year, Harris was one of three recipients of the Governor’s Arts Award by the Wyoming Arts Council.

BRADLY J. BONER

went!” Petersen says, “Secrets are great, but it’s frustrating. Visitors to this valley have no idea what they’re missing if they don’t understand what we have.” What the National Museum of Wildlife Art has is a permanent collection of more than 5,000 objects, from 2500 BC Native American birdstones to work by Thomas Moran, Carl Rungius, Albert Bierstadt, Georgia O’Keeffe, Maynard Dixon, Andy Warhol, and Paul Manship. (Manship’s sculptures Indian and Pronghorn Antelope are in the museum’s permanent collection, but you might know him better for his gilded, cast bronze sculpture Prometheus, which is on display in front of Rockefeller Center in New York City.) “One of the most often repeated visitor comments is about the breadth and scope of the collection,” says Dr. Adam Duncan Harris, the museum’s Petersen curator of art and research. “Almost everybody in the world has depicted wildlife.” The first time Petersen herself walked into the museum, years before she joined its board, she says she was “struck by the quality of the art. I did not expect fine art in a museum to exist in this valley. Walking in was explosive.”

FOUNDED IN 1987 as the Museum of the American West in a 5,000-square-foot rented space on the Town Square, the museum’s original permanent collection was the personal collection of locals Joffa and Bill Kerr. Approximately 220 pieces of art were on exhibit. The museum moved to its current space, a building inspired by a sixteenth-century Scottish castle, and changed its name in 1994. Harris was hired as curator in 2000. With Harris’ curatorial direction and a long-serving, dedicated staff and board, the NMWA, if a secret in Jackson Hole, has made itself known nationally in the art world. In 2002, the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) granted the museum accreditation, an honor less than 3 percent of the country’s 35,000 museums can claim. (The AAM reaccredited the NMWA earlier this year.) In 2008, Congress voted to recognize the museum as the “National Museum of Wildlife Art of the United States.” In the last ten years, eight exhibits curated by the NMWA have gone on to tour other museums across the country. In 2015, the museum’s sculpture trail, designed by Oakland, California-based landscape architect Walter Hood, hosted Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s Zodiac Heads. Other museums that were part of the Zodiac Heads world tour were Prague’s National Gallery, Tuileries Garden in Paris, and the Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. In 2016, Dr. Harris was one of three Wyoming residents to be awarded a Governor’s Arts Award by the Wyoming Arts Council.

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In 1983, environmentalists and gallery owners Ronald and Frayda Feldman commissioned Andy Warhol to do a series of prints of endangered species. In 2006, the NMWA added a full set of the series to its permanent collection. It is on exhibit from May 17 through November 5. 148

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taste THE WILD Witness the magnificent Yellowstone & Grand Teton National Park while touring with us...

Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda), St. Louis Zoo, Missouri is one of more than 6,500 portraits National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore has taken to date for his Photo Ark project, in which he seeks to capture images of captive animals that are endangered or could become endangered. A selection of Sartore’s portraits hangs at the museum from June 10 through August 20.

AS AMAZING AS the NMWA’s collec- into a museum and see renderings of tion and temporary exhibits are, the im- that same animal by a diverse group of portance of the artwork is magnified by artists working in a range of styles and the museum’s location. “One of the most from different time periods. powerful things about the museum is that it is in the middle of the Greater THE MUSEUM PLANS important temYellowstone Ecosystem, at the bottom of porary exhibits for every summer, but this amazing wildlife corridor that the three major exhibitions hanging this stretches up to the Yukon,” Harris says. summer, during which it’s celebrating its “It is such an appropriate place for a mu- thirtieth anniversary, are particularly seum of this subject to be located. noteworthy: Andy Warhol: Endangered There’s this whole synchronicity be- Species; Photo Ark: Photographs by Joel tween what is happening outside the Sartore; and Iridescence: John Gould’s building, the architecture of the build- Hummingbirds. “I was spellbound the ing, and then what is happening inside.” first time I saw Joel’s Photo Ark images,” Visitors to the NMWA regularly re- Petersen says. Petersen first saw Sartore’s port seeing and/or hearing elk, bison, images at the National Geographic coyotes, foxes, and bighorn sheep while Museum in Washington, D.C. “As soon walking from the parking lot into the as I saw it, I was amazed and felt it was museum. When I interviewed Petersen an exhibit that was made for us, not only at the museum this past January, she because it was Joel Sartore—who is no apologized for being five minutes late. “I was here, but couldn’t bring myself to come inside,” she said. “I was standing outside lisAndy Warhol: Endangered Species: May 17 to November 5 tening to coyotes or wolves howling like crazy on the Photo Ark: Photographs by Joel Sartore: June 10 to August 20 elk refuge.” There are few, if any, other places in the Iridescence: John Gould’s Hummingbirds: May 27 to August 27 world where you can see a moose, bighorn sheep, biPlein Air Fest, Etc.: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 17, free son, wolf, or elk in real life Black Bear Ball: 6 p.m., August 19, tickets $375 and, minutes later, walk

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This summer, National Geographic releases a 400-page book of portraits Sartore has taken for his Photo Ark project. The book includes the curl-crested araçari, shown above, and the Florida panther, below.

Share these local stories worldwide. JacksonHoleMagazine.com 150

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

stranger to us as someone who has previously had a one-man show here—but because it’s about the multitude and diversity of endangered animals.” Petersen immediately spoke with Kathryn Keane, National Geographic’s vice president of exhibits. Even though a curated selection of Sartore’s Photo Ark images had never before been exhibited outside of the National Geographic Museum, “Kathryn got it,” Petersen says. “She knew our museum and agreed absolutely that the Photo Ark needed to come here.” Dr. Harris says, “It is an honor to be one of the first venues to host this exhibit after it premiered at the National Geographic Society.” While the Sartore photographs are

on loan, the eighty prints that make up Iridescence: John Gould’s Hummingbirds are now part of the NMWA’s permanent collection. Harris says, “These pieces are the reason why you can’t not answer your phone.” A Colorado collector called Harris and, “He said, ‘I’ve got eighty hummingbird prints from John Gould from the 1800s. Do you want them?’ I was like, ‘We’d love them!’ ” Harris recalls. In 2014, the museum did an exhibit, Parade of Plumage, which was entirely of one artist’s (Francois-Niçolas Martinet) engravings. “It really resonated with visitors,” Harris says. “Having this many pieces on exhibit at the same time from the same artist gives you an


IN 2002, THE AMERICAN ALLIANCE OF MUSEUMS GRANTED THE MUSEUM ACCREDITATION, AN HONOR LESS THAN 3 PERCENT OF THE COUNTRY’S 35,000 MUSEUMS CAN CLAIM. (THE AAM REACCREDITED THE NMWA EARLIER THIS YEAR.) IN 2008, CONGRESS VOTED TO RECOGNIZE THE MUSEUM AS THE “NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WILDLIFE ART OF THE UNITED STATES.” And then there’s Andy Warhol’s Endangered Species portfolio. “One of the main goals in almost any installation we do is to show people that what they think wildlife art is, is not necessarily all that it is,” Harris says. “I love hearing that people are surprised by what we have.” Harris isn’t speaking specifically to this Warhol exhibit, but he might as well be. None of the four local friends I poll know that: (1) Andy Warhol did a series of paintings of animals; or (2) this series, Endangered Species, has been part of the NMWA’s permanent collection since 2006. Harris says, “These fall into the same category as our Georgia O’Keeffe painting. Visitors come in here assuming they are going to see one kind of art, and then they realize the diversity of what we have and are astounded.” JH

VISIT THE WORLD’S PREMIER

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WILDIFE ART

Robert Bateman (Canadian, b. 1930), Chief. 1997. Acrylic on Canvas. 71 x 98 inches. Gift of Birgit & Robert Bateman, National Museum of Wildlife Art

amazing sense of their artistic capability.” The curator and preserver of the Zoological Society of London, Gould had a sixty-year career in ornithology, during which he worked with a number of artists to produce approximately 3,000 plates of birds. Gould spent twelve years working on A Monograph of the Trochilidae or Humming-birds. This monograph was completed in 1861 and includes 280 plates in addition to the eighty in this exhibition. Harris says the Gould and Sartore exhibits “complement each other really well. Both are cataloguing projects. One shares knowledge about new species with the public, while [the other] one is on the opposite end, trying to bring to light the plight of animals in trouble.”

Exploring Wildlife Art

Opens May 17

Now Open

Andy Warhol: Endangered Species

Iridescence: John Gould’s Hummingbirds

National Geographic Photo Ark:

Western Visions® Show and Sale

May 17 November 5

May 27 August 27

June 10 August 20

September 9 October 8

Photographs by Joel Sartore

L o c a t e d 2 . 5 m i l e s f r o m t h e To w n o f J a c k s o n .

www.WildlifeAr t.or g | 2820 Rungius Road, Jack son, Wyoming

75 Renowned Artists

FREE TO THE PUBLIC Artist Demos, Paint Outs, Quick Draws, Symphony on Sunday, Shakespeare in the Park, Music on Main, Awards Ceremony

$14/adults, $12/seniors, $6/kids; open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 2820 Rungius Rd., 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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ALTAMIRA FINE ART

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galleries

WHETHER YOU’RE PASSIONATE about plein-air, a serious collector of western paintings by contemporary or deceased masters, or a casual art fan searching for a keepsake to remind you of your time spent here, in Jackson Hole you have the opportunity to enjoy art in its multitude of forms. Over the past two decades, Jackson Hole has grown to become one of the most heralded art

Altamira Fine Art specializes in the exhibition and sale of Western Contemporary artwork, offering an active exhibition schedule year round between the two gallery locations in Jackson, Wyoming and Scottsdale, Arizona. The gallery works with estate collections and offers expertise with auctions, conservation and other curatorial concerns. Altamira is a wonderful resource for design firms and corporate collections. The gallery also buys and consigns quality artwork—currently seeking work from Fritz Scholder, Ed Mell, Maynard Dixon, Taos Society artists, Santa Fe Art Colony and others. Contact the gallery for details.

centers of the West, popping off the tongues of aficionados alongside the likes of Santa Fe, Palo Alto, and Scottsdale. Begin by visiting some of the galleries highlighted here, where you can pick up a copy of our summer/fall arts magazine, Images West. In it you will learn more about the valley’s artists, galleries, and arts-related classes and events.

CAYUSE WESTERN AMERICANA

Cayuse Western Americana offers a carefully curated selection of antique Native American, Cowboy, and National Park art and handwork. In addition, the gallery houses an incredible selection of antique Navajo and Zuni turquoise, bits, spurs, saddles, chaps and vintage silver and gold buckles.

255 North Glenwood (307) 739-1940 cayusewa.com 152

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DANSHELLEY JEWELERS

A visit to this gallery is an experience you’ll never forget! Designer/owner Daniel Harrison shares his 41 years of creative designs in a multitude of expressions. Complementing his work are collections from international and regional artists. Come in and see why “Inspiration begins at 6,000 feet.”

125 North Cache Street (307) 733-2259 danshelley.com

172 Center Street (307) 739-4700 altamiraart.com

HINES GOLDSMITHS

Jackson’s original Fine Jewelry Store and exclusive designers of the Teton Jewelry Collection since 1970. Our collection features Teton pendants, charms, rings and earrings ranging in size and price range with our stunning Diamond pave and Gemstone inlay pieces being the highlight. In our Jackson studio we also handcraft the Wyoming Bucking Bronco jewelry and extraordinary Elk Ivory jewelry. We have created Wyoming’s largest selection of unique gold and silver charms indicative of the area. Our entire collection is also available in Sterling Silver. We also specialize in a dazzling selection of hand etched crystal and barware.

80 Center Street (307) 733-5599 hinesgold.com


JACKSON HOLE HISTORY MUSEUM

Historic prints and exhibits on display in both of our museums. Visit us this summer TuesdaySaturday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at each of our locations: Homesteading Museum (225 N. Cache) and the Indians of the Greater Yellowstone museum (corner of Deloney & Glenwood). See many of our historic reproductions all around Jackson, then stop by to decorate your home or office from among our 16,000 historic photos.

225 North Cache (307) 733-2414 jacksonholehistory.org

THE LEGACY GALLERY

NATIVE JACKSON HOLE

CRAZY HORSE JEWELRY

Native has been serving clients in Jackson Hole since 1983. We feature contemporary, museum quality fine artwork, bronzes, and artisan, precious, and semi-precious jewelry. We specialize in local landscapes, wildlife, Western and one-of-a-kind Native American art. Whether you are searching for a specialty item such as a bull skull intricately adorned with historic buffalo pennies or a hand-crafted piece of unique, fine jewelry, our curated selection and decades of experience will to connect you to Jackson Hole’s rich living history.

Crazy Horse Jewelry opened in 1978 and has the largest collection of authentic, handmade Native American Indian jewelry and crafts in Jackson Hole. Visit our store in Gaslight Alley to explore intricate sterling and precious stone jewelry, home wares, rugs, authentic Zuni Fetishes, storytellers, baskets, pottery and spectacular beadwork. Our artists from Zuni, Navajo, Hopi and Santo Domingo peoples handcraft each item we carry, from contemporary to historical.

10 West Broadway (800) 726-1803 nativejh.com

125 North Cache (307) 733-4028 crazyhorsejewelry.com

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WILDLIFE ART

The Legacy Gallery features a large selection of representational art with an emphasis on western, landscape, figurative and wildlife paintings, and bronze sculptures. This 7,000 square foot gallery is located on the northwest corner of the square and caters to the beginning collector and to the art connoisseur. Legacy Gallery is proud to celebrate its 29th Anniversary and has two other locations in Scottsdale, Arizona and Bozeman, Montana.

The National Museum of Wildlife Art, founded in 1987, is a world-class art museum holding more than 5,000 artworks representing wild animals from around the world. Featuring work by prominent artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Andy Warhol, Robert Kuhn, John James Audubon, and Carl Rungius, the Museum’s unsurpassed permanent collection chronicles the history of wildlife art, from 2500 B.C. to the present. Boasting a museum shop, interactive children’s gallery, restaurant, and outdoor sculpture trail, the Museum is only two-and-a-half miles north of Jackson Town Square.

75 North Cache (307) 733-2353 legacygallery.com

2820 Rungius Road (307) 733-5771 wildlifeart.org

RARE GALLERY OF JACKSON HOLE

RARE Gallery, a collector’s destination! At 6,100 square feet, one of Jackson Hole’s largest and most acclaimed galleries, we represent nationally and internationally collected artists. Featuring museum exhibited artists in mediums of painting, sculpture, photography, glass, 3 dimensional art, and designer jewelry. RARE Gallery was named Mountain Living Magazine “Hot Shop in Jackson Hole.” Our Curator is available for private gallery or in home consultations.

60 East Broadway (307) 733-8726 raregalleryjacksonhole.com SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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TRAILSIDE GALLERIES

WEST LIVES ON TRADITIONAL & CONTEMPORARY GALLERIES

TRIO FINE ART

Since 1963, Trailside Galleries has been regarded as one of the preeminent dealers in American representational art, specializing in a rich and varied collection of works by the leading western, wildlife, figurative, impressionist, and landscape artists in the country. The artist roster includes award-winning members of the Cowboy Artists of America, The National Academy of Design, the Society of Animal Artists, Plein-Air Painters of America, the National Sculpture Society, and Oil Painters of America among other noted organizations.

Since 1998 clients have been discovering an extraordinary collection of original western art at the WEST LIVES ON GALLERIES. Both galleries have an impressive collection of fine art reflecting the rich heritage of the American West. Featuring Western, wildlife and landscape art in original oils, acrylics, watercolors, and bronze. We represent over 100 national and regional artists. Our knowledgeable staff will work with you to locate that special piece for your home or office.

With a celebrated reputation as one of the freshest, most vibrant galleries in Jackson, Trio Fine Art gallery is where collectors and art lovers not only find top quality original artwork but also the artists who create it. Our mission is to support the artistic success of each artist, to enthusiastically share the finest art with the community, and to foster relationships with collectors.

130 East Broadway (307) 733-3186 trailsidegalleries.com

545 North Cache (307) 734-4444 triofineart.com

55 & 75 North Glenwood (307) 734-2888 westliveson.com

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For over 40 years, visitors and locals have turned the pages of Jackson Hole’s leading glossy magazines for insights on the character and characters of our Valley. Find our titles on magazine stands throughout the region.

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as the hole deepens

Sit or Squat: That is the Question BY TIM SANDLIN ILLUSTRATIONS BY BIRGITTA SIF

MY FIRST ENCOUNTER with the international no squatting sign was in the national park outhouse at Kelly Warm Springs. This outhouse is something of a destination bathroom. If the Four Seasons had privies, the Warm Springs john is what they would look like. There, next to please don’t dump trash down the hole - it is hard to get out, was a figure in a circle with a slash across the middle—universal language for Don’t. In the circle a stick figure squatted, his (or her) feet planted on both sides of the commode. I knew what the symbol meant because I’ve been to China and seen the opposite sign: don’t sit on our toilet. Some of the higher-end hotels have segregated bathroom stalls— four squats and two sits. Always more squats than sits. Let Americans wait in line if they can’t balance like a Thanksgiving balloon over Macy’s. What I don’t know is why the park cares. Besides seat splatter and footprints on the porcelain, what does it matter how people go? I mean, this is an outhouse. So I drove up to park headquarters in Moose to find out, only to discover there’s a new Trump rule against the Park Information Officer giving out information. I shuffled from office to office, most of the bureaucrats afraid to even tell me what office to go to next. When I asked a secretary where the water fountain was, she ran off. Finally, I found a man we’ll call Larry Langtree, because that’s not his name. Larry was willing to leak commode policy. He said, “They break them.” 156

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

“Who’s they?” “Asian tourists. They stand on the rims and the rims splinter down the middle. We replaced over twenty commodes last summer. Why would a woman stand on the toity to pee?” “They squat, and it’s a cultural deal. In China, they think we’re disgusting for sitting with our bum touching the wet surface where someone else’s bum has been.” “Yeah, well no wonder the seat gets wet, if you hover like a helicopter filling a hot tub.” “Once you leave the Chinese cities, a lot of the toilets are holes in the floor with yellow stenciled footprints on both sides to show you which way to face, and they have a gallon bucket for soiled toilet paper. They don’t allow toilet paper in those small-town toilets.” Larry Langtree made a face I would call thoughtful as he worked out the nuances. He said, “We’ve had a 30 percent rise in Asian bus tours the last two years. They flood the valley in April and May when the tour operators can get cheap room rates.” “Do the operators tell their clients the only days it doesn’t rain in May are the days it snows?” Larry kind of chuckled. “I’ve seen waves of umbrellas and selfie sticks in front of the elkhorn arches. There’ll be even more this summer unless Trump starts a war with China.” “Trade or literal?” Larry went furtive on me. “I’m not allowed to say.” Herman Walsowski-Smith, Heather Heidi’s grandson, wrote his master’s thesis at Grand


Canyon University on tourist toilets the world over. I drove by to see him. “My favorites are those spaceship things in Paris.” He showed me a photograph. “After every use they self-clean. There’s a sign in front that says unaccompanied children under ten may drown. Imagine an American can that kills kids. There would be a social media firestorm.” As I admired his portfolio, I felt especially close to the outhouses. “When I was a kid, I was scared of outhouses. I knew I’d fall down the hole and never be seen again.” Herman said, “Statistically, you’re more likely to be bitten by spiders or rats coming up than you falling down.” “That’s a comfort.” I pointed to the red stenciled footprints on either side of a hole in a concrete floor. “Is this China?” “France,” Herman said. “In France, they call these Turkish water closets. The rest of Europe calls them French thrones. Look at this thermochromatic wall urinal.” It was a two-by-four in front of a colorful wall with a gutter running at the base. Herman said, “The wall is heatsensitive, so when you go on it the colors pulsate and change. You can draw cartoons.” “What’s your favorite toilet story?” Herman considered. “Right here. In Jackson. Do you know the story of Penny Wort?” “This is true, right? Not fake news?” “Totally true. Charlie Craighead did the research. His cousin Karen and her friend Julia were driving from the

Village to Moose, and they stopped at the Wort Hotel to use the bathroom.” “When was this?” “Winter of 1967. Julie heard weird gurgles in the next stall and when that woman left, Julie checked it out and found a newborn baby in the toilet.” “Ish.” “Julie ran out to get cocktail waitresses, who fished the baby out and took her to the hospital where they named her Penny Wort. No one ever discovered the birth mother. “Penny was adopted by a couple in Kansas, got a new name, then went to work in Florida, where the eerie part of the story happens.” “The eerie part wasn’t being born in a Wort toilet?” “This part is even more unlikely. By then her name was Wendi. Wendi met and fell in love with a man from Moose, Wyoming. She married him. What are the odds? They live in North Carolina.” My brain went Twilight Zone. How many men grew up in Moose? Twelve, maybe. “Okay, Herman, that’s a bizarre story, but what I need to know, what my readers need to know, is why are the stenciled toilet-hole footprints yellow in China but in France they are red?” Herman closed his portfolio. “Kind of self-evident, don’t you think?” “Not to me.” “It’s so Keith Richards can tell what continent he’s peeing on.” JH SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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JUST A FEW THINGS TO DO IN

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JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

JACKSON n Poke around Cache Creek looking at wildflowers

(p. 86).

n Do an obstacle course in the trees (p. 118).

n Borrow a dog from the Animal Adoption Center and go for a walk (p. 124). n Get a sweet treat at Picnic or Persephone (p. 32).

n Hike or bike the Skyline Trail (p. 22).

n Buy a book by Tim Sandlin at Valley Bookstore (p. 34).

n Hit the Farmers Market.

TETON VILLAGE

n Run Old Bill’s Fun Run (p. 60).

n Climb a via ferrata (p. 107).

n Visit the National Museum of Wildlife Art and eat lunch at its new restaurant, Palate (p. 146).

n Enjoy the Steak and Knife Wedge Salad at Westbank Grill (p. 136).


n Catch a free show at Concerts on the Commons.

WILSON

FURTHER AFIELD

n Ride your bike from Moose to

n Enjoy the pedestrian/bike bridge over the Snake River.

n Visit historic Jackson Lake Dam

n Hammocraft in the pond at R Park (p. 24).

n Camp at Lower Green River Lake in the Wind River Mountains (p. 112).

n Say “thank you” to a member of

n Listen to the Stagecoach Band play Sunday nights at the Coach.

n Spend a night at Colter Bay (p. 130).

GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK

Jenny Lake.

n Hammocraft on String Lake

(p. 94).

(p. 24).

n Check out the improvements at

the Wildlife Brigade (p. 38).

n Hike to Hidden Falls (p. 98).

n Late in the season, look for wildflowers in Alaska Basin (p. 86).

Jenny Lake (p. 98).

n Hike in the Wyoming Range (p. 70). n Scramble up the second-highest mountain in the state (p. 112).

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Best of

JH

calendar of events

Summer/Fall 2017 ONGOING JACKSON HOLE RODEO: A long-standing tradition, the rodeo shows off Jackson’s cowboy culture. 8 p.m. Wednesdays, Saturdays, and some Fridays through September 2, Teton County Fairgrounds, tickets start at $15, 307/733-7927, jhrodeo.com AERIAL TRAM RIDES: Just because you can’t ski it doesn’t mean the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort aerial tram stops running. From the top of Rendezvous Mountain, 4,139 vertical feet from the base of Teton Village, enjoy beautiful views of Jackson Hole, Grand Teton National Park, and the Gros Ventre Range, access to hiking trails, and endless photo-ops. From May 20 to October 8, 307/733-2292, jacksonhole.com GRAND TETON MUSIC FESTIVAL CHAMBER MUSIC: GTMF musicians curate and perform chamber music spanning a wide variety of genres. 8 p.m. Thursdays from July 13 to August 17, Walk Festival Hall, tickets start at $25, 307/733-1128, gtmf.org 160

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

GRAND TETON MUSIC FESTIVAL OPEN REHEARSAL: Watch the Festival Orchestra as it prepares for its weekend performances. 10 a.m. Fridays from July 7 to August 18, Walk Festival Hall, $15, 307/733-1128, gtmf.org GRAND TETON MUSIC FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA: Enjoy some of the country’s best musicians as they play in an unparalleled setting. Fridays (8 p.m.) and Saturdays (6 p.m.) from July 7 to August 19, Walk Festival Hall, from $25, 307/733-1128, gtmf.org JACKSON HOLE PARAGLIDING: Tour Teton Village from above. No experience necessary to fly tandem with a professional pilot. Daily at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort base, from $245, 307/690-8726, jhparagliding.com JACKSON HOLE PEOPLE’S MARKET: Browse fresh, local produce while enjoying prepared foods, music, and beer. 4 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays from June 15 to September 24, base of Snow King, free, jhpeoplesmarket.org JACKSON HOLE FARMERS MARKET: This

weekly event at the Town Square is the perfect way to start your weekend—with a fabulous showcase of fresh produce and goodies grown and made nearby. Local chef/restaurant demonstrations and entertainment changes weekly. 8 a.m. to noon, Saturdays from July 8 through September 23, Town Square, jacksonholefarmersmarket.com JACKSON HOLE SHOOTOUT: The longest continuously running gunfight in the U.S., the Jackson Hole Shootout has been a Wyoming tradition since 1957. 6 p.m. Monday to Saturday through Labor Day, Town Square, free, 307/733-3316 STAGECOACH RIDES: Take a ten-minute ride in a stagecoach around downtown Jackson. Daily through Labor Day, corner of Broadway and Cache, tickets start at $4 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WILDLIFE ART: Celebrating its thirtieth anniversary this year, the NMWA takes an expansive view of the wildlife art genre with its 5,000-pluspiece permanent collection. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

RYAN DORGAN

Fourth of July festivities in Jackson Hole culminate with two fireworks displays— one at the base of Snow King Mountain in Jackson, the other at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort in Teton Village.


Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday; tickets $14 (adults), $12 (seniors), $6 (1 child), $2 (additional children), free (5 & under), 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org

MAY 26-29: 36TH ANNUAL OLD WEST DAYS celebrate Jackson’s rich history with live music, theatrical entertainment, arts and crafts, food, rodeo events, and more. 307/733-3316, jacksonholechamber.com

JUNE 4: 18TH ANNUAL RUN AND RIDE FOR THE CURE is a race benefiting the cancer patient support fund at St. John’s Medical Center. 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Old Wilson Schoolhouse, $20-$25, 307/733-6094, skinnyskis.com 9-10: THE LAFF STAFF IMPROV is a chance to laugh at original improv comedy. 8 p.m., The Black Box Theater at Center for the Arts, $10, 307/733-4900, jhcenterforthearts.org 10: JACKSON HOLE HALF MARATHON & 5K is a unique opportunity to run from Teton Village to East Jackson. 8 a.m. run start/7 a.m. walk start (half only), $70 for half marathon/$25 for 5k, Phil Baux Park (finish), jhhalf.com 17: SHIRLEY’S HEART RUN is a community fun run supporting the cardiology fund at St. John’s Medical Center. 9 a.m., R Park in Wilson, $25, 307/739-7517, stjohnshospitalfoundation.org 17: TETON OGRE ADVENTURE RACE is an eight-hour multisport adventure race that includes trekking/trail running and mountain biking. Teton Valley, Idaho, starts at $80, 208/970-0999, tetonogrear.com 17: PLEIN AIR FEST, ETC. has over fifty invited artists painting outside. Collectors bid on the artwork later in the afternoon. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Sculpture Trail, free, 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org 22-24: JACKSON HOLE FOOD & WINE EVENT is a three-day festival celebrating food, wine, spirits, and brews. Tickets start at $150, 307/690-4824, jhfoodandwine.com 24: RUNNING WILD is a 5k and 10k walk/run race in memory of Dick Jennings. The race

begins and ends at the National Museum of Wildlife Art. Registration starts at $20, 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org

the summer. 6 to 9 p.m., National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Sculpture Trail, free, 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org

24: WRUN FOR WRAY, THE GRAND TARGHEE HILL CLIMB is a roughly three-mile uphill run beginning at the base of the Dreamcatcher chairlift and ending after a 1,840-foot climb at the top of Fred’s Mountain. 9 a.m., Grand Targhee Resort, wrunforwray.athlete360.com

21-30: TETON COUNTY FAIR is the ultimate slice of local life, with games, rides, 4-H competitions, and concerts. Teton County Fairgrounds, 307/733-5289, tetoncountyfair.com

24-25: TETON OGRE ADVENTURE RACE is a twenty-four-hour multisport adventure race that includes trekking/trail running, mountain biking, and paddling. Teton Valley, Idaho, starts at $200, 208/9700999, tetonogrear.com 30: “POP-UP TO THE ECLIPSE” SKY PARTY celebrates in advance the total solar eclipse happening August 21. The Art Association has teamed up with photographer/astronomer/author Dr. Tyler Nordgren and Denver-based EUREKAS educators to host a presentation followed by stargazing at R Park. 5 to 8 p.m., Old Wilson Schoolhouse, 307/733-6379, artassociation.org

JULY 4: FOURTH OF JULY 10K is a sure way to get your Independence Day off to a great start. 8 a.m., Owen-Bircher Park in Wilson, 307/733-6094, skinnyskis.com 4: PATRIOTIC POPS is a free concert by the Grand Teton Music Festival celebrating the Fourth of July. 6 p.m., Walk Festival Hall, 307/733-1128, gtmf.org 5: THE MET: LIVE IN HD – DER ROSENKAVALIER is presented by Grand Teton Music Festival and Center of Wonder. 6 p.m., The Center Theater at Center for the Arts, $12-$20, 307/733-4900, jhcenterforthearts.org 7-9: ANNUAL ART FAIR JACKSON HOLE is an outdoor, juried art fair that draws artists and artisans from across the country. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Miller Park, $5, 307/7336379, artassociation.org 20: MIX’D MEDIA: “ANDY WARHOL: ENDANGERED SPECIES” celebrates the ten prints Warhol did of endangered species. The prints are on display through

22: 49TH ANNUAL SNOW KING HILL CLIMB begins at the Town Square; runners do 2.3 miles to the top of Snow King Mountain. 9 a.m., Town Square, 307/733-5056, tetonparksandrec.org 23-29: 6TH ANNUAL DRIGGS PLEIN AIR FESTIVAL is a week full of wonderful art experiences in Teton Valley, Idaho. driggspleinair.org

AUGUST 1: FUNDRAISING GALA WITH YO-YO MA supports the Grand Teton Music Festival’s yearlong music education programs and outreach activities. 7 p.m., Walk Festival Hall, tickets start at $250, 307/733-1128, gtmf.org 3: MIX’D MEDIA: “IRIDESCENCE: JOHN GOULD’S HUMMINGBIRDS” celebrates the summer show of eighty hummingbird prints by British ornithologist and artist John Gould. 6 to 9 p.m., National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Sculpture Trail, free, 307/7335771, wildlifeart.org 5: RENDEZVOUS MOUNTAIN HILL CLIMB to the top of the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort tram. 8:30 a.m., Teton Village, $30-$50, 307/7332292, rendezvousmountainhillclimb.com 11-12: THE GRAND TETON RELAY is a 180mile team running relay beginning in Ashton, Idaho, and ending in Jackson Hole. 801/636-4439,grandtetonrelay.com 11-13: 30TH ANNUAL GRAND TARGHEE BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL Grand Targhee Resort, $79-$189, 208/353-2300, grandtarghee.com 11-13: ANNUAL ART FAIR JACKSON HOLE is an outdoor, juried art fair that draws artists and artisans from across the country. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Miller Park, $5, 307/7336379, artassociation.org SUMMER 2017 JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE

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BRADLY J. BONER

Catch the excitement of the Jackson Hole Rodeo at 8 p.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day, Fridays from June 30 to July 21, and every Friday in August.

13: JACKSON HOLE LAND TRUST 37TH ANNUAL PICNIC is a celebration of Jackson’s present and future land conservation efforts. 4 to 8 p.m., $50 adults, free for children 12 & under, 307/733-4707, jhlandtrust.org 19: BLACK BEAR BALL celebrates the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s thirtieth anniversary with music, cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and a multicourse dinner, all overlooking the National Elk Refuge. 6 to 10 p.m., $375, National Museum of Wildlife Art, 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org

SEPTEMBER 1-4: 8TH ANNUAL WYDAHO MOUNTAIN BIKE FESTIVAL is a weekend of talking bikes, guided group rides, live music, races, and parties. Grand Targhee Resort, passes start at $35, 208/201-1622, tetonbikefest.org 2: JACKSON HOLE MARATHON AND HALF MARATHON is one of the most beautiful runs in America. 7 a.m. start on Center Street (marathon) and South Park Loop (half marathon), registration starts at $60, 307/733-3318, jacksonholemarathon.com 162

JACKSON HOLE MAGAZINE SUMMER 2017

6: JEWELRY & ARTISAN LUNCHEON combines an elegant lunch with beautiful jewelry, clothing, and accessories crafted by artisans from across the country. A percentage of sales benefit the National Museum of Wildlife Art. 11 a.m to 3 p.m., Four Seasons Resort Jackson Hole, 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org 6-17: 33RD ANNUAL JACKSON HOLE FALL ARTS FESTIVAL is one of the premier cultural events in the Rocky Mountain West. 307/733-3316, jacksonholechamber.com 8: PALATES AND PALETTES GALLERY WALK is the Fall Arts Festival’s official kick-off. More than thirty galleries partner with local restaurants to participate. Free, 307/7333316, jacksonholechamber.com 9: LOTOJA challenges amateur cyclists to complete 206 miles over three mountain passes and through Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, all in one day. It ends at Teton Village. 801/546-0090, lotojaclassic.com 9: OLD BILL’S FUN RUN Jackson Hole’s biggest community fundraiser celebrates its twentieth anniversary this year. 10 a.m.,

Jackson Town Square, 307/739-1026, cfjacksonhole.org 15: 30TH ANNUAL WESTERN VISIONS SHOW & SALE features works by the country’s leading wildlife artists and is the final opportunity to bid on beautiful pieces of art. From $125, 5 to 8 p.m., National Museum of Wildlife Art, 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org 25-29: JACKSON HOLE WILDLIFE FILM FESTIVAL is an unparalleled gathering of broadcast and media stakeholders, writers, scientists, and conservationists. Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park, 307/200-3286, jhfestival.org

OCTOBER 20: SNEAK PEEK: “30 WONDERS/30 YEARS: A HISTORY OF THE MUSEUM IN 30 WORKS” celebrates the opening of an exhibit of a diverse range of objects that trace the history of the National Museum of Wildlife Art since its founding in 1987. 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., National Museum of Wildlife Art, 307/733-5771, wildlifeart.org JH


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Jackson Hole magazine // Summer 2017  

Jackson Hole magazine // Summer 2017  

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