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2013 PLANNING & ALLOCATIONS

COMMITTEE REPORT

Approved by Jewish Federation Board of Directors


TABLE OF CONTENTS Chair’s Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Committee Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Planning & Allocations Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Summary of 2013-14 Allocations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Local Agency Unrestricted Allocations . . . . . . . . . . 6 Strategic Program Grant Allocations . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Allocations to Beneficiary Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 National Agency Allocations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Israel Multi-Year Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Naturally Occurring Retirement Community . . . . . 20 Government Relations Office of Missouri . . . . . . . 22 Programmatic Funding Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . 24 Oversight of Funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Planning and Allocations Volunteers and Staff . . . 28

“May the One who blessed our ancestors, bless … those who occupy themselves with the needs of the community.”

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CHAIR’S INTRODUCTION It gives me much pleasure to pause and reflect on the implementation to date of the new Planning and Allocations (P&A) model, which is driven by the Jewish Federation of St. Louis’ Strategic Plan. UNRESTRICTED ALLOCATIONS Under our P&A model, Federation remains committed to providing an unrestricted allocation to its beneficiary agencies to ensure a measure of financial stability for infrastructure and basic operating costs. Last year, we began the process of reducing these unrestricted allocations to free up dollars for programs and services that are the highest priorities of the strategic plan. This plan was continued this year. The reduction is being phased in over a two- to three-year period, after which there will be periodic reviews of the unrestricted allocation at least once every six years, unless circumstances necessitate an earlier review. For the 2013 to 2014 allocation cycle, the reduction to unrestricted allocations overall is approximately 5 percent. STRATEGIC PROGRAM GRANTS After determining unrestricted allocations, the remainder of the allocable funds and designated program dollars are distributed as strategic program grants to programs that have been identified as critical to advancing the Federation’s Strategic Plan. Both beneficiary agencies and other organizations are eligible for strategic program funding, but our preference is to give to our beneficiary agencies.

MICHAEL OBERLANDER Planning & Allocations Chair

Strategic programs can develop through the P&A subcommittees or through agencies and organizations. They can also be shaped by donors’ interests. What is essential is that they advance the strategic planning agenda of the Federation and the community. The distribution of strategic program grants will now occur systematically in January and July and at other times if warranted. To facilitate maximum accessibility to these strategic program grant funds, the guidelines have been posted on Jewish Federation of St. Louis’ new website, www.JFedSTL.org. In the last year, through the strategic program grants process, historic targeted-allocation programs continued to be funded, including local programs such as senior nutrition, the Jewish Student Union, Israel Experience Center, and PJ Library; overseas programs such as summer camps in the Former Soviet Union; and many more. At the same time, new programs, such as mental health first aid training; an Israel Campus Fellow at Washington University; a progressive community in Megiddo; a trip to Israel for Missouri legislators; and a program for economic empowerment for women in Israel received strategic program grants. Very shortly we anticipate launching a process for innovation grants. Unfortunately, implementation of some of the strategic planning grant proposals took longer than anticipated or had to be deferred and will be considered for funding in the next fiscal year. The significant reserves were kept in some of the strategic program subcommittees in anticipation of the programs and projects that we expect to come to fruition in 2013–2014.

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Last year, recognizing that the day schools had limited access to strategic program grants, the Federation approved using the unallocated funds from the day school funding pool to address merger costs related to Saul Mirowitz Jewish Community School. For 2012–2013, representatives from the P&A Committee met with the principals of the three schools and explored ways to use the funds to help move the schools toward the virtuous cycle by elevating their profiles in the eyes of the St. Louis Jewish community. The schools felt that assistance with the costs of consulting, professional development and alumni development/ recruitment would be the best use of the funds. Proposals of approximately $36,500 from each of the three schools were approved and distributed. Through the focus on planning facilitated by the new P&A model, a relationship has been forged between Federation and the Central Agency for MERGED SCHOOL ENCOURAGES STUDENTS TO GROW Jewish Education (CAJE), by which the executive director of the agency also staffs one of the key subcommittees whose work is closely aligned to that of the agency. During the past year, we conducted a review of the Saul Brodsky Jewish Community Library and have also engaged with students from the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis to help us determine the needs of isolated vulnerable seniors in our community. Recently, we also initiated a study to examine how we might effectively address the needs of people with disabilities in the Jewish community. Through this type of research and the application of strategic program funds, we hope to begin to address these and other challenges in our community. The Standards and Capacity-Building Subcommittee continues to provide leadership in training agencies and organizations on the outcome-based logic model of evaluation and in other areas. At the same time, it continues to annually review beneficiary agency compliance with local performance standards and the compliance by non-beneficiary agencies/organizations of the standards applicable to them to qualify for Federation support. This year, the subcommittee also reviewed and revised the Guidelines for Inclusion of Local Agencies and Guidelines for Strategic Program Grants. P&A COMMITTEE Implementation of the current P&A model benefitted from the encouragement, assistance and support of Federation’s chair, Robert Millstone; former president and CEO, Barry Rosenberg; and Barry’s successor, Andrew Rehfeld. They and the members of the P&A Committee, the subcommittee volunteers, the members of the professional advisory groups and the professional staff of P&A have shown enormous commitment and dedication, and their efforts are greatly appreciated.

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PLANNING & ALLOCATIONS COMMITTEE STRUCTURE Board Of Directors Budget, Finance & Administration Committee Planning & Allocations Committee Government Relations Office of the Missouri Jewish Federations

Local Agency Performance Standards & Capacity Building Subcommittee

Ensuring the Jewish Future Subcommittee

Jewish Loan Association Ephraim Block Charitable Trust Jossem Fund Bohm Fund Jewish Family Education Grants

Community Engagement Subcommittee

Caring for Jews in Need–Domestic Subcommittee

Caring for - Jews in Need–Overseas Subcommittee

PLANNING AND ALLOCATIONS PROCESS To link allocations more directly to the strategic plan’s vision and priorities, funding for all strategic program grants is contingent on the programs having defined, measurable outcomes that are evaluated through the logic-based model to demonstrate the impact of the particular program. The strategic planning process operates under the oversight of four Planning and Allocations (P&A) subcommittees: • Ensuring the Jewish Future • Community Engagement

• Caring for Jews in Need–Domestic • Caring for Jews in Need–Overseas

Each of the subcommittees is staffed by a professional whose knowledge and expertise will help to shape, frame and advance the work of the subcommittee. The subcommittees are responsible for reviewing national agencies and programs under their purview and for making funding recommendations to the P&A Committee. All the subcommittees except Caring for Jews in Need–Overseas have a professional advisory group comprising professionals working in agencies and organizations related to the focus of the particular subcommittee. The overarching P&A Committee, which includes the chairs of each of the subcommittees and at-large members, operates as a “think tank,” the forum in which issues are laid out and overarching decisions and recommendations are made. P&A’s responsibilities also include making recommendations on the continuance of existing agencies or admission of new beneficiary agencies, level of unrestricted allocations, the proportion of the allocable pool assigned to each subcommittee and the programs to be recommended for strategic program funding.

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SUMMARY OF 2013-14 ALLOCATIONS 2012-13 Actual Net Funds Available Carryover From Previous Year–Unspent and Unallocated Total Allocable Dollars

$8,075,880 $443,448 $8,519,328

2013-14 Proposed

% Change

$8,180,760 $314,696 $8,495,456

1.3% -29.0% -0.3%

Unrestricted Local Agencies % of Allocable

$3,661,233 43%

$3,462,425 40.8%

-5.4%

Israel & Overseas % of Allocable

$2,257,225 26.5%

$2,092,721 24.6%

-7.3%

National Agencies % of Allocable

$137,426 1.6%

$116,951 1.4%

-14.9%

$6,055,884 71.1%

$5,672,097 66.8%

-6.3%

Jewish Federation Reserve Fund % of Allocable

$100,000 1.2%

$68,000 0.8%

-32.0%

Strategic Program Grants Ensuring the Jewish Future % of Allocable

$934,473 11.0%

$1,099,689 12.9%

17.7%

Caring for Jews in Need–Domestic % of Allocable

$431,250 5.1%

$582,522 6.9%

35.1%

Caring for Jews in Need–Overseas % of Allocable

$508,520 6.0%

$532,489 6.3%

4.7%

Community Engagement % of Allocable

$124,525 1.5%

$182,125 2.1%

46.3%

$1,998,768 23.5%

$2,396,825 28.2%

19.9%

Subtotal Unrestricted % of Allocable

Subtotal Strategic Program Grants % of Allocable Jewish Federations of North America Dues Subtotal JFNA % of Allocable

$364,676 4.3%

$358,534 4.4%

Total Allocated

$8,519,328

$8,495,456

Unallocated

$0

$0

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-1.7%


The 2012 Annual Community Campaign ended at a higher level than the 2011 Campaign. When combined with our income from endowments and a few other sources, there was a 1.3% increase in new allocable dollars for 2013-14. However, because of better planning there were fewer carryover dollars from unspent allocations this year, so the result was a slightly lower pool of allocable resources. The total amount available to allocate to agencies and programs for 2013-14 was $8,495,456. This is a very slight decrease (0.28%) from 2012-13.

FEDERATION ALLOCATIONS • Total unrestricted allocations decreased 6.3% to $5,672,097 so that funds could be shifted to program grants that address Federation strategic priorities. • Unrestricted allocations decreased from 71.1% of total allocated in 2012–13 to 66.8% in 2013–14. • Strategic program grants increased from 23.5% of total allocated in 2012–13 to 28.2% in 2013–14. • Total strategic program grants increased by 19.9%, to $2,396,825. • Reserve fund was reduced by 32% to reflect previous years’ actual expenditures.

$9,000,000 $8,000,000 $7,000,000 $6,000,000 $5,000,000

2012-13

$4,000,000

2013-14

$3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $0 Unrestricted

Strategic Other (JFNA Program Grants and Reserve)

Total

STRATEGIC PROGRAM GRANT ALLOCATIONS • The largest share of program grant funding ($1,099,689 or 45.9% of total) was allocated through the Ensuring the Jewish Future subcommittee. • Program grants were also made through the Caring for Jews in Need–Domestic ($582,522 or 24.3% of total), Caring for Jews in Need–Overseas ($532,489 or 22.2%) and Community Engagement ($182,125 or 7.6%) subcommittees.

$1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000

2012-13

$600,000

2013-14 $400,000 $200,000 $0 Ensuring the Community Caring for Jews in Need–Domestic Jewish Future Engagement

Caring for Jews in Need–Overseas

NATIONAL AGENCIES ALLOCATIONS • Total allocations to national agencies, including dues to Jewish Federations of North America, decreased 5.3%. • Dues to Jewish Federations of North America accounted for approximately three-fourths (75.4%) of the total national allocations.

$600,000 $500,000 $400,000 National Agencies

$300,000

JFNA

$200,000 $100,000 $0 2012-13

2013-14

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LOCAL AGENCY UNRESTRICTED ALLOCATIONS Beneficiary agencies’ unrestricted allocations continue to be reduced in order to free dollars for programs and services that are the highest priorities of the strategic plan. 2012-13 Actual

Agency Central Agency for Jewish Education

2013-14 Proposed

% Change

699,403

653,942

-6.5%

69,887

69,887

0.0%

495,989

495,989

0.0%

59,597

59,597

0.0%

212,068

205,706

-3.0%

1,083,503

991,405

-8.5%

Jewish Community Relations Council

296,932

285,055

-4.0%

Jewish Family & Children's Service

360,222

329,603

-8.5%

43,650

41,904

-4.0%

111,922

107,445

-4.0%

80,385

77,170

-4.0%

147,676

144,722

-2.0%

3,661,233

3,462,425

-5.4%

Community Aging Corporation (Covenant/CHAI) Day School Pool Hillel–University of Missouri Holocaust Museum & Learning Center Jewish Community Center

MERS/Goodwill St. Louis Hillel at Washington University St. Louis Jewish Light Saul Brodsky Jewish Community Library TOTAL LOCAL UNRESTRICTED ALLOCATIONS

Local agencies also receive strategic program grants. See page 14 for total allocations for beneficiary agencies.

SUPPORTING DISCOVERY AT JCC EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER

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YOUNG PROFESSIONALS DIVISION KICK OFF THE CAMPAIGN

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STRATEGIC PROGRAM GRANT ALLOCATIONS Strategic Program Grant Allocations for 2012–2013 are made to beneficiary agencies and other organizations for programs to advance the Federation’s Strategic Plan. Reserve dollars are available to fund programs in development throughout 2013–14.

SUMMARY OF STRATEGIC PROGRAM GRANTS 2012-13 Actual Restricted program Restricted program grant funds July 2012- Other grant funds June 2012 * March 2013 Funds * Caring for Jews in Need– Domestic Subcommittee Ensuring the Jewish Future Subcommittee Community Engagement Subcommittee Caring for Jews in Need– Overseas Subcommittee TOTAL ALL STRATEGIC PROGRAM GRANTS

2013-14 Proposed Total 2012-2013 Distribution

Restricted program grant funds *

Total % Other Total Funds * Distribution Change

268,698

162,552

26,007

457,257

582,522

27,574

610,096

33.4%

893,623

40,850

196,141

1,130,614

1,099,689

180,944

1,280,633

13.3%

124,525

-

-

124,525

182,125

-

182,125

46.3%

493,520

15,000

-

508,520

532,489

-

532,489

4.7%

218,402 222,148

2,220,916

2,396,825

208,518

2,605,343

17.3%

1,780,366

CARING FOR JEWS IN NEED–DOMESTIC SUBCOMMITTEE

Agency/Program JCC/Social Nutrition Program Crown Center/Social Nutrition Program Crown Center/Russian Case Manager JF&CS/Homemaker Services Waiting List Behavioral Health Response/ Mental Health First Aid Study of Orthodox Community Service Needs B'nai Amoona/Rosh Pina Inclusion Certification JF&CS/CovCHAI Homemaker Services JF&CS/Food Pantry Kosher Meat JF&CS/Lifeline Program JCC/Adult Day Center Scholarships Reserve–Caring for Jews in Need–Domestic Subtotal 1 Income from endowment fund

2012-13 Actual Restricted Restricted program program grant funds grant funds July 2012- Other June 2012 * March 2013 Funds *

2013-14 Proposed Total 2012-2013 Distribution

Restricted program grant funds *

Other Funds

Total % Total * Distribution Change

130,950

13,000

-

143,950

143,950

-

143,950

0.0%

29,100 5,000

32,302 -

-

61,402 5,000

61,402 5,000

-

61,402 5,000

0.0% 0.0%

49,920

-

-

49,920

-

-

-

-100.0%

2,800

-

-

2,800

-

-

-

-100.0%

-

-

-

-

5,000

-

5,000

-

-

-

2,500

-

2,500

28,500 68,750 20,000

26,007 -

162,552

26,007

25,000 25,928 268,698

2

2 Third party grant

1

51,007 28,500 68,750 20,000

25,000 -

25,928 457,257

339,670 582,522

2 3 3 3

27,574 27,574

3 Will be considered for CY2014 funding

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1

52,574 -

3.1% -100.0% -100.0% -100.0%

339,670 1210.1% 610,096 33.4%


JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER ADULT DAY CENTER The Caring for Jews in Need Subcommittee provided a strategic program grant in January 2013 to the Jewish Community Center (JCC) for scholarships for Jewish clients eligible for the Adult Day Center program. Currently, the program serves 61 seniors living with early to moderate stages of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and other conditions that require 24/7 care. The program provides door-to-door transportation, activities, exercise, kosher meals, nursing and bathing assistance, and critical respite for caregivers so they can work and care for their family members. Support groups for caregivers are also available. In the past year, there has been an exponential increase in scholarship requests because of the poor economic climate and low interest rates that affect those living on fixed incomes. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch recently profiled caregiver Roman Patrick, whose wife, Evelyn, suffers from Alzheimer’s disease. He chose the JCC’s Adult Day Center at the recommendation of the Alzheimer’s Association. He said, “I wanted Evelyn to stay engaged. And they had so many programs. There is no TV, there is no napping. When they pick her up, she can’t wait to get on the bus, and when she gets home, she doesn’t want to get off.”

ACTIVITIES AT THE ADULT DAY CENTER

MOBIO TRIP One of the priorities outlined in the Jewish Federation’s 2010 Strategic Plan was to “educate and advocate for a strong Israel and a safe Jewish world.” As a result, funding has been set aside to support Israel travel subsidies for influential members of the community. A successful trip to Israel was organized in December 2012 for the Missouri Biotechnology Association (MOBIO). The delegation included seven state legislators, some of their spouses, two leaders of MOBIO, Governor Nixon’s policy director, the deputy director for Missouri’s Department of Economic Development, Federation Chair Bob Millstone, and David Winton, head of the Government Relations Office of the Missouri Jewish Federations in Jefferson City. Some of the highlights of the trip included meetings with the Joint Distribution Committee, government ministry and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. Throughout the trip, the Missouri legislative delegation was exposed to the vibrant public/private partnership that creates solutions to many of the country's most pressing social issues. Lawmakers brought these lessons back to Missouri and used them in the budget process, designating a $1 million pool for nonprofit proposals to address key child welfare issues. The lawmakers were exposed to the incredible economic development model used by the Israeli government to incubate the biotech industry throughout the nation. Finally, Jewish Federation created a key partnership with the Missouri biotech industry, which will enhance the effectiveness of both.

MOBIO GROUP IN ISRAEL

The trip helped participants have a much better appreciation for the nuances of life in Israel and connect with the members of the biotech industry in Israel.

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CROSSROADS Crossroads is an addiction-prevention program that operates in Jerusalem and was founded approximately 12 years ago. Most of its clients are 15- to 22-year-old immigrants who speak English. Crossroads works with teens who are at moderate to high risk for addiction and, when possible, with their families as well. While open to youth of all denominations, it tends to serve a high number of young men and women from the Orthodox community. Crossroads is a drop-in center open five days and three nights a week. Social workers from the program go out onto the streets to find clients, and on the evenings when it is open, there is an average drop-in rate of 40 to 70 young people. Evening programs at the center include films, art classes, access to computers, cooking and GED classes. More than 650 young adults currently come to the center. The program’s caseload for longerterm individual therapy is 60 to 80 clients at any one time, and during a year it reaches approximately 120. Although any participant in the therapeutic program has open access to a social worker, the agency recently implemented a hotline to assist other youth needing access to a social worker. Crossroads has implemented a mobile unit that visits Modiin and Beit Shemesh to serve teens in those communities and is looking to broaden its services to include parent and family counseling.

YOUNG ADULTS AT CROSSROADS CENTER

Crossroads employs three full-time and two part-time social workers. It also has 10 volunteers at the drop-in center who are involved in a mentoring role.

ORR SHALOM Orr Shalom was started more than 30 years ago to provide a home alternative to boarding school. As many as 10 children live with house parents in one of a number of group homes, attending the local school and living as normal a life as possible given their circumstances. The work of the house mother in these homes is supported by young women doing alternative military service (Sherut Leumi).

SUPPORTING CHILDREN WHO NEED A HOME

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Today, Orr Shalom cares for 1,300 children (800 of whom are eligible for foster care) in 21 group homes from Haifa to Eilat, with separate homes for Haredi and Arab girls.


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SUBCOMMITTEE 2012-13 Actual Restricted program grant funds June 2012

Agency/Program JCRC/Israel Business & Technology Committee Jewish People Policy Institute (JPPI) St. Louis Hillel/Israel Campus Fellows Israel Travel Subsidies for "Influentials" Enhanced Services for Israel Engagement on Campus United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) Reserve-Community Engagement Subtotal

2013–14 Proposed

Total 2012–2013 Distribution

Restricted program grant funds

12,125 10,000 26,200 30,000 20,000 26,200

12,125 10,000 26,200 30,000 20,000 26,200

12,125 11,000 20,000 139,000

124,525

124,525

182,125

*

1 1

Total Distribution

Total % Change

12,125 11,000 20,000 139,000

0.0% 10.0% -100.0% -100.0% -100.0%

182,125

46.3%

430.5%

1 Will be considered for CY2014 funding

CARING FOR JEWS IN NEED–OVERSEAS SUBCOMMITTEE

Agency/Program Gilor-Megiddo Elderly Services Association for the Aged–Yokneam Elderly Jews in the FSU Leket Israel Muzot Economic Empowerment for Women Strive Jaffa Institute Israel Trauma Coalition (ITC)–Helping the Helpers Crossroads Victims of Terror Project Orr Shalom Yokneam Megiddo Project Terror Relief Fund–fair share ITC–Emergency Preparedness Yokneam Reserve–Caring for Jews in Need–Overseas Subtotal

2012–13 Actual Restricted Restricted program program grant funds grant funds July 2012– June 2012 March 2013 9,000 9,000 52,500 20,000 20,000 12,000 10,000 10,000 15,000 10,000 7,000 15,000 287,680 16,340 493,520

15,000 15,000

2013–14 Proposed Total 2012–2013 Distribution

Restricted program grant funds

Total Distribution

9,000 9,000 52,500 20,000 20,000 12,000 10,000 10,000 15,000 10,000 7,000 15,000 287,680 15,000 16,340 - 508,520

9,000 9,000 57,000 20,000 20,000 12,000 12,000 10,000 15,000 12,000 7,500 20,000 288,280 20,000 20,709 532,489

9,000 9,000 57,000 20,000 20,000 12,000 12,000 10,000 15,000 12,000 7,500 20,000 288,280 20,000 20,709 532,489

Total % Change 0.0% 0.0% 8.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 20.0% 0.0% 0.0% 20.0% 7.1% 33.3% 0.2% -100.0% 26.7% 4.7%

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ENSURING THE JEWISH FUTURE SUBCOMMITTEE

Agency/Program CAJE/Passport to Israel CAJE/Israel Experience Center CAJE/Teacher Certification JCRC/Karen Solomon Young Adult Service Initiative Birthright Israel Congregations/Jewish Family Education Grants Torah MiTzion Kollel/Sherut Leumi CAJE/PJ Library CAJE/Concierge Jewish Federation/Israel Engagement Worker CAJE/One Happy Camper Jewish Student Union Next Dor Yokneam-Megiddo Partnership 2Gether Partnership 2Gether Kesher B'Kitah Jewish Agency for Israel Summer Camps–FSU Progressive Community in Israel Ruach Hadasha St. Louis–Yokneam-Megiddo Professional Exchange Innovation Fund Jewish Community Center/Israel Family Experience Chabad on Campus/J Grads Reserve-Ensuring the Jewish Future Subtotal 1 Donor gift 2 Income from endowment fund

2012–13 Actual Restricted Restricted program program grant funds grant funds July 2012– Other June 2012 * March 2013 Funds * 12,000 5 159,600 2 27,600 2 108,297

-

25,000 -

-

10,000 -

-

48,541

-

55,000 30,000

2013–14 Proposed Total 2012–2013 Distribution 12,000 159,600 27,600

Restricted program Other grant funds * Funds 12,000 160,000 2 2 27,600 -

25,000 108,297

108,297

80,000 20,000 85,000 45,000

78,099 30,000 75,000 39,249

1

48,541

-

41,000 5,000 5,000

4

126,000 30,000 15,000

71,250 30,000 10,000

-

49,600 -

3

104,600 30,000

50,000 20,000 10,000

-

-

28,900 30,000

-

-

34,226 893,623

10,000 30,850 40,850

196,141

80,000 20,000 75,000 45,000

2 1,2 2

85,000 25,000 10,000

2

3 Supporting foundation 4 Third party grant

1

3

3 3

25,000 -

2

10,000 8,001

1,2 2

3

25,000 108,297

0.0% 0.0%

78,099 30,000 85,000 47,250

-2.4% 50.0% 0.0% 5.0%

1

47,593

-2.0%

18,750 5,000 5,000

4

90,000 35,000 15,000

-28.6% 16.7% 0.0%

55,000 40,000

49,600 -

3

104,600 40,000

0.0% 33.3%

50,000 20,000 10,000

50,000 20,000 10,000

-

50,000 20,000 10,000

0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

28,900 30,000

40,000 45,000

-

40,000 45,000

38.4% 50.0%

210,194 1,099,689

2

6 6

180,944

5 Unexpended prior year funds 6 Will be considered for CY2014 funding

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1

47,593

10,000 30,850 34,226 1,130,614

BUILDING JEWISH IDENTITY

Total % Total * Distribution Change 5 12,000 0.0% 160,000 0.3% 27,600 0.0%

3 3

- -100.0% - -100.0% 210,194 514.1% 1,280,633 13.3%


ISRAEL EXPERIENCE CENTER The Israel Experience Center focuses on three core areas: • Israel education for those traveling to Israel and those involved in the Passport to Israel savings program • Trip marketing and consultation • Scholarships Highlights this year included the creation of a St. Louisonly three-week Israel Bound summer trip for 28 teens, the distribution of 57 meaningful travel grants for teens and young adults, creation of 12 Israel-related courses for teens through a collaboration with Central Agency for Jewish Education’s high school program, and travel education workshops for students in grades four through 12. A cutting-edge Israel travel marketing campaign will be launched in summer 2013 to jumpstart interest in Israel travel for the summer of 2014.

FUNDING TRIPS TO ISRAEL

TEACHER XCHANGE The Ensuring the Jewish Future Subcommittee funded a teacher exchange program, the first in a series of Jewish professional exchanges with our partnership region in Israel, Yokneam-Megiddo. Religious school teachers were chosen as the first cohort to participate in these exchanges, with the goal of strengthening the work that has already been done with the school-to-school Kesher B’Kitah program between St. Louis congregational and day schools and schools in Yokneam-Megiddo for the past six years. Four Israeli educators visited St. Louis in December. During their visit, the delegation members went to synagogues and schools in St. Louis, learned about the American secular and Jewish educational systems, met with community leaders, spent time in planning meetings with our teachers, and made presentations in our Jewish schools. In March, a delegation of five educators from St. Louis who had never visited Israel before traveled to meet their counterparts in Israel. This group spent much of its time visiting the schools currently participating in the Kesher B’Kitah program, learning about the Yokneam-Megiddo region and gaining a more nuanced understanding of Israel.

FACILITATING TEACHER VISITS TO ISRAEL

A primary objective of these visits was to engage the teachers in the design of an in-depth operational program for Kesher B’Kitah that will move the program forward in a meaningful and impactful way. Both sets of teachers returned to their schools with clearly delineated goals and a work plan enhanced by a new understanding of their partners’ communities and the work they do in their schools.

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TOTAL ALLOCATIONS TO BENEFICIARY AGENCIES Under the Federation’s Strategic Plan, beneficiary agencies receive an unrestricted allocation and are also eligible for strategic programming grants.

Agency/Program

Central Agency for Jewish Education Passport to Israel Israel Experience Center Teacher Certification PJ Library1 Concierge for Families with Young Children1 One Happy Camper1 Total Community Aging Corp. (Covenant/CHAI) Day School Pool Hillel-University of Missouri Columbia Holocaust Museum & Learning Center Jewish Community Center Social Nutrition Adult Day Center Scholarships2 Israel Family Experience2 Total Jewish Community Relations Council Israel Business & Technology Committee Total Jewish Family & Children's Service Homemaker Services Waiting List3 Food Pantry Kosher Meat2 Lifeline2 Total St. Louis Jewish Light Saul Brodsky Jewish Community Library St. Louis Hillel at Washington University Israel Campus Fellows Total MERS/Goodwill JF&CS/Covenant House Homemaker Services TOTAL ALLOCATIONS TO BENEFICIARY AGENCIES

Unrestricted

2012-13 Actual Restricted

Total

2013-14 Proposed Unrestricted Restricted

Total

699,403 -

159,600 27,600 75,000

699,403 159,600 27,600 75,000

653,942 -

160,000 27,600 75,000

653,942 160,000 27,600 75,000

699,403

45,000 45,000 85,000 85,000 392,200 1,091,603

653,942

39,249 39,249 71,250 71,250 373,099 1,027,041

69,887 495,989

-

69,887 495,989

69,887 495,989

-

69,887 495,989

59,597

-

59,597

59,597

-

59,597

- 212,068 - 1,083,503 143,950 143,950 20,000 20,000 10,000 10,000 173,950 1,257,453

205,706 991,405 991,405

212,068 1,083,503 1,083,503

205,706 991,405 143,950 143,950 143,950 1,135,355

296,932

-

296,932

285,055

-

285,055

296,932 360,222 360,222 80,385

12,125 12,125 49,920 28,500 68,750 147,170 -

12,125 309,057 360,222 49,920 28,500 68,750 507,392 80,385

285,055 329,603 329,603 77,170

12,125 12,125 -

12,125 297,180 329,603 329,603 77,170

147,676

-

147,676

144,722

-

144,722

111,922 111,922 43,650

26,200 26,200 -

111,922 26,200 138,122 43,650

107,445 107,445 41,904

-

107,445 107,445 41,904

-

25,000

25,000

-

25,000

25,000

776,645 4,437,877

3,462,425

3,661,233

1 Programs transferred from Federation to CAJE 9/1/12 2 Will be considered for CY2014 funding 3 2013-14 need was met by other funding source

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554,174 4,016,599


NATIONAL AGENCY ALLOCATIONS Funding continues to a limited number of national agencies that benefit our community and are linked to advancing Federation’s Strategic Plan. NATIONAL AGENCY ALLOCATIONS Ensuring the Jewish Future B'nai B'rith Youth Organization Jewish Community Centers Association Jewish Education Service of North America Hillel: Foundation for Jewish Campus Life Moishe House Subtotal Ensuring the Jewish Future

2012-13 Actual

2012-13 Proposed

4,000 20,000 15,000 25,000 2,500 66,500

3,800 19,000 23,750 2,375 48,925

-5.0% -5.0% -100.0% -5.0% -5.0% -26.4%

11,926 10,000 10,000 20,000 18,000 69,926

11,926 9,500 9,500 19,000 17,100 67,026

0.0% -5.0% -5.0% -5.0% -5.0% -4.1%

TOTAL NATIONAL AGENCY ALLOCATIONS

136,426

115,951

-15.0%

Dues to National Agencies Jewish Federations of North America Jewish Communal Service Association of North America World Council of Jewish Communal Service Subtotal Dues to National Agencies

364,676 500 500 365,676

358,534 500 500 359,534

-1.7% 0.0% 0.0% -1.7%

TOTAL PAYMENTS TO NATIONAL AGENCIES

502,102

475,485

-5.3%

Community Engagement Israel Action Network Jewish Telegraphic Agency Jewish Council for Public Affairs American Jewish Committee Anti-Defamation League Subtotal Community Engagement

SUPPORTING SENIORS AT COVENANT/CHAI

15


ISRAEL MULTIYEAR PROJECT 2013-14 For 9 years as part of Federation’s concern for vulnerable Jews in need overseas, we have funded together with the Atlanta Jewish Federation a multiyear project in Yokneam and Megiddo. This project serves families in distress with children and youth in need through multiple interventions that have demonstrated much success.

ISRAELI YOUTH

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Program

Description

Megiddo–Family Mentoring & Empowerment and Community Building

Family empowerment and employment assistance. Also, building community capacity in Ein Haemek and Elyakim (two moshavim comprised of many families of low socioeconomic status) Preschool prep program After-school enrichment for the most at-risk children in Megiddo; also parent groups and other therapies and services. School-based intervention for high school students at risk of dropping out. Girls support and therapy group.

Megiddo–Youth at Risk Megiddo–Otzma Enrichment Center Megiddo–MALEH Megiddo–Support Yokneam–Family Empowerment

Yokneam–Etrog Kindergarten Yokneam–Elementary School Yokneam–High School Yokneam–Hapoel Soccer Yokneam–Bayit Cham Yokneam–Youth Department Yokneam–Kfar Hassidim Youth Futures

Total Programs Additional–Evaluation (Do-Et) Additional–Program Staffing TOTAL MULTIYEAR PROJECT

Caters to the Ethiopian community as a whole, aiming to integrate them into Israeli society while sensitive to needs and culture. Assigns coordinators to 50 Ethiopian families, who are coached on employment, self-sufficiency, parent skills, subsidies for children. Extended school day at integrated kindergarten. Scholastic assistance and therapies within the school framework after school hours. Scholastic assistance for 100 Ethiopian and at-risk students in ORT high school. Subsidizing Ethiopian children and junior high teens to participate year-long in a high-quality soccer program. An after-school warm home for the most at-risk children. After-school enrichment programs and counseling for children at-risk at two local youth centers. After-school scholastic assistance for all the Ethiopian youth learning outside Yokneam. Each child is assigned an adult role model (trustee) who serves as a liaison between the child, the parents and the school.

FY14 Request

ATL FY14 Rec Portion

ST LOUIS FY14 Portion

$44,680

$29,330

$15,350

$13,000 $80,990

$13,000 $60,990

$0 $20,000

$21,000

$15,000

$6,000

$5,000

$5,000

$0

$140,356

$101,572

$38,784

$10,555 $75,864

$7,872 $52,430

$2,683 $23,434

$54,289

$38,948

$15,341

$26,700

$20,000

$6,700

$27,237 $147,033

$16,810 $101,622

$10,427 $45,411

$30,000

$17,000

$13,000

$80,000

$52,000

$28,000

$756,704 $23,130 $103,170 $883,004

$531,574 $11,565 $51,585 $594,724

$225,130 $11,565 $51,585 $288,280

TEACHER WITH ETHIOPIAN BOY

17


CAMEL RIDE IN ISRAEL

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ISRAEL ENGAGEMENT PROFESSIONAL The Israel Engagement Professional (IEP) conducts one-to-one and one-to-small-group outreach with alumni of Birthright Israel and other young adult trips to Israel to help identify and connect them to appropriate next steps in their Jewish journey. Federation’s goal is to build a network of Birthright alumni in, around and from St. Louis while also making Israel engagement (both pre- and post-trip) a sustainably viable entry point for young adults into the rest of the greater St. Louis Jewish community. The IEP also oversaw the allocation of Israel engagement grants to Washington University Jewish student organizations Hillel and Chabad on Campus to “collaboratively intensify post-trip follow-up for Birthright alumni and others, with a particular mandate to reach out to students who participate in Birthright with a provider other than those organizations.” The IEP also facilitates the St. Louis Community Birthright Trip, a Birthright trip specifically reserved for and tailored to St. Louisans, made possible by local St. Louis donors. Since August 2011, the IEP has made connections with more than 550 young adults in and from St. Louis, resulting in more than 2500 touch points, by working toward key goals: • Engage and meet young adults to understand their interests and make referrals and connections to existing Israel engagement opportunities in St. Louis and Israel to encourage next-step experiences; • Recruit young adults and organize pre- and post-trip activities for two annual St. Louis Community Birthright Trips; • Develop relationships with St. Louis Jewish organizations offering Israel-related activities and maintain a database of activities; and • Build relationships, work cooperatively with and serve as a resource to other St. Louis young adult-oriented professionals within organizations such as Federation, Jewish Community Center, Hillel, Next Dor, etc.

STL BIRTHRIGHT PARTICIPANTS FLOATING IN THE DEAD SEA

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ST. LOUIS NATURALLY OCCURRING RETIREMENT COMMUNITY The St. Louis Naturally Occurring Retirement Community (NORC), which has operated for nine years, continues to provide socialization and support services to enhance the lives of older adults and help them maintain their independence within a three-mile service area. The membership-based program has grown annually, from 565 in 2008 to 650 in 2012. The program reaches almost 1,600 individuals via a quarterly newsletter. Dues account for approximately 6% of the program’s budget. NORC services for 2012 include: • Transportation—In late January 2012, the JCA Charitable Trust awarded a grant for transportation service to programs for members who do not drive. • Home Modification—Collaborations with Washington University School of Medicine, Medical West, and a local contractor provide occupational therapy home safety assessments and adapt residences to enable continued independence (e.g., wheelchair ramps, grab bars, shower seats). • Home Repair—Volunteers from the community provide home assistance, such as mattress flipping, changing light bulbs and smoke detector batteries, cleaning furnace/AC filters, leaf raking, and computer troubleshooting. • Socialization Opportunities—The Gathering Place, a rented space at the Jewish Community Center, provides space for cultural, health, educational and social programs. • Neighborhood Outreach—The quarterly NORC newsletter, mailed to more than 1,000 households, provides news, information, and resources for older adults.

FINDING UNCLAIMED PROPERTY

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Materials distributed throughout complexes publicize activities, programs and services available to residents. Members receive bi-monthly mailings and monthly informational emails of the calendar of activities, special programs, and significant information. A membership directory is published once a year. A NORC Advantage Card offers discounts at 35 Creve Coeur- and Olivette-area merchants. • Health and Wellness—A variety of programs are offered each month to educate and promote healthy aging, including weekly chair yoga, monthly blood pressure checks through BJC Home Health, and a 90-day walking program called Step into Spring, underwritten by AARP. • Volunteers—A volunteer coordinator has developed a formal volunteer program, focusing on community volunteers and recruiting residents to take on greater leadership roles. Currently there are 80 resident volunteers and 28 community volunteers. • Community Collaborations— NORC seeks partnerships with service providers and religious institutions and has developed a strong collaboration with a multinational corporation. NORC continues its relationship with the Friedman Center for Aging at Washington University, and several graduate programs at area universities provide student interns and volunteers. • Funding—$2,700 has been secured from the Women’s Auxiliary for the Jewish Aged (formerly JCA Women’s Auxiliary) to underwrite a community-wide musical performance, the annual Summer Celebration; and the annual 90s Celebration of Life. The Leader/Persons Foundation provided $2,500 in operating support in 2012, and NORC receives a United Way allocation. In 2013, St. Louis University Hospital provided $1,200 for a new series on self-management, and the Boeing Employees Charitable Trust provided $739 for ongoing operations.

CELEBRATING WITH NORC

21


GOVERNMENT RELATIONS OFFICE OF THE MISSOURI JEWISH FEDERATIONS The Government Relations Office of the Missouri Jewish Federations (GROMJF) is concentrated in St. Louis and operates out of Jewish Federation. GROMJF acts on behalf of the Jewish communities of Missouri by taking a leadership role in supporting or opposing legislation and accessing funding for Jewish communal organizations. With a shifting landscape in the state legislature, GROMJF worked to help newer members understand the role of Federation in human service policy. With an eye toward fiscal conservatism, many members of the majority party continued to struggle with the current role of government and the slow economic growth of the state. State spending in a number of areas was cut for the sixth straight year, and tax credit programs continued to be a source of considerable discussion. GROMJF was actively involved in a number of policy discussions throughout the session, including an emphasis on human services funding, tax credit promotion for the non-profit sector and other specialty areas. Substantial efforts of GROMJF were expended on: • NORC Appropriations–Missouri State—With the support of legislators on both sides of the aisle, ongoing general revenue funding of $100,000 within the Department of Health and Senior Services was approved for the St. Louis Naturally Occurring Retirement Community (NORC) project. In the past several years, funding for NORC has been an increasingly contentious issue among members of the House and Senate. Because NORC is isolated to one area in the state and largely identified with the Jewish community, a number of members in both the House and Senate chose to target this program for criticism. This year, we were able to work with senators to include an additional $100,000 in the budget. (Note: this funding is subject to conference committee approval.) The additional funds would be used to identify and establish a second NORC project, likely in an AfricanAmerican community in Kansas City. • Tax Credit Reform—Once again, the legislature deadlocked over tax credit reform. However, key members of the Senate continue to make tax credit reform a central theme in discussions around fiscal health. This session, lawmakers seemed to understand that tax credit policy would be a stalemate. However, that did not stop many from delaying the budget and other bills while insisting on major tax credit reductions. With a number of the more extreme elements facing term limits, tax credit reform will likely be a serious discussion in the next session, as members look to correct structural imbalances in the state budget. GROMJF continued to educate and lobby members on the important role the smaller programs that benefit the non-profit sector play in supporting this important infrastructure.

VISITING A LAB IN ISRAEL

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BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS ON THE MOBIO TRIP

• Social Innovation Fund—This year, the House and Senate Appropriations committees approved $1 million in general revenue to fund three competitively bid pilots to address the issue of families caught in the state child welfare system that have shown a number of key characteristics that make them susceptible to generational abuse. This project is a direct outgrowth of the Missouri Biotechnology Association (MOBIO) trip to Israel, in which the House Budget chair and the ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Committee both participated. • Community Agencies—GROMJF worked with community-relations organizations throughout the Jewish community, providing consulting, information and assistance whenever possible. This year, GROMJF worked with the Jewish Community Center (JCC), the Jewish Community Relations Council, Crown Center and Covenant/CHAI on a variety of issues, including: – Increasing resources and rates for the in-home services program, which is slated for a 3% increase as reported by the Senate; – Facilitating discussions on Medicaid expansion and the connection to the efforts of Jewish Federation agencies; – Working with legislators to expand on the recent MOBIO trip to Israel and their experience; – Identifying and quelling efforts to partially eliminate the JCC’s exemption from tax on memberships; and – Providing basic consultation to agencies on working with government agencies. As in previous years, GROMJF served as a conduit of information to community defense agencies and service organizations on issues from religious freedom to child care. The Jefferson City office makes sure agencies are aware of proposals that may affect their work and operations. Agencies have the opportunity to use GROMJF’s lobbying services to mitigate any potential negative outcomes and look for opportunities to enhance operations or funding.

23


PROGRAMMATIC FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES The dollars distributed through the following funds and programs provide a further source of program revenue for some of the agencies and have been primary vehicles through which the Federation distributes monies for programmatic purposes to local area congregations. The recommendations for these funds are shared annually with the Planning and Allocations Committee and require the approval of the Federation’s Board of Directors.

JEWISH FAMILY EDUCATION GRANTS The Jewish Family Education Grants program began in 1995 with a three-year grant from the Henry and Gladys Crown Charitable Income Trust, honoring the memory of Shirlee Green. The grant provided $50,000 for each of the first two years, and in each of the ensuing years the Crown funds have been matched by a grant from the Federation’s Rich Education Fund. Annually, as much as $80,000 is available for grants. A committee comprising community and educational leadership makes recommendations on the distribution of these funds.

Congregation/Grant Bais Abraham–Families Doing Chesed

Description

Recommend

Year-long family study about Jewish ideas of charity, justice, loving kindness and obligation to one another, including family community-service projects

$8,700

B'nai Amoona–Family Camp

Family camp weekend with intergenerational learning for families with children in grades 2 to 8

$8,500

Jewish Family Educator's Network (JFEN) Back by Popular Demand

Community-wide program, focus to be determined via family surveys

$11,000

Kol Rinah–Shabbat Rinah Family Retreat

Shabbat retreat to build relationships among members in new synagogue, with three intergenerational programs leading up to event

$12,250

Kol Rinah–Ma Ha'Kesher (What's the Connection?)

Connect families through interactive Jewish and Israeli cultural arts programming

Shaare Emeth–Tzibur Echad: One Community

Creation of smaller, more meaningful communities within the larger congregation. Families will gather together to learn, worship and perform acts of loving kindness

$19,916

United Hebrew–Family Days (Yamei Ha'Mischpacha)

Establishment of informal family education programs for families with children in grades K–3, initially focusing on family holidays

$13,600

Jewish Family Education Crown Grants Committee–Doorposts/Program Bank

Maintenance of local program bank at CAJE as a resource for area educators

GRAND TOTAL

$3,883

$250 $78,099

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BOHM FUND FOR JEWISH EDUCATION The Bohm Fund was established in 1983 by Lee and the late Milford Bohm to provide seed money for new projects in Reform Jewish religious school settings. The income from the fund may only be used to directly benefit children, rather than for general administrative costs of the temple or religious school. A committee comprising leadership from the Reform congregations makes recommendations on distribution of these funds. Funds may not be distributed every year if the fund balance goes below corpus. Approximately $5,000 to $7,000 is allocated when funding is available.

RICH EDUCATION FUND The Sam, Charles and Mamie Rich Education Fund was created in 1995 to provide support for Jewish educational and identity purposes of all kinds, as defined by Jewish Federation of St. Louis. Recommendations for distribution of the fund come primarily through the P&A Committee to the Federation’s Board of Directors.

Total = $418,054 Jewish Student Union $25,000 Sherut Leumi $20,000

CAJE Israel Experience Center $78,000

Community Services $45,000

Jewish Family Education Grants $39,050

Day School Pool $92,760

CAJE Teacher Certification $78,000

Birthright Israel $90,644

25


OVERSIGHT OF FUNDS The following funds are overseen by the staff of the Planning and Allocations Department. The funds are held by Jewish Federation of St. Louis; however, many of these funds are directly administered by one of the constituent agencies. CHILDREN & FAMILY EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND Helps families with limited resources through emergencies, particularly to supplement medical, food, housing or other needs when other resources are not available or are insufficient. Recommendations for the use of these funds come from Jewish Family and Children's Service (JF&CS). Distribution Y2012: $1,157 EPHRAIM BLOCK FAMILY CHARITABLE TRUST Aids indigent and destitute persons of the Jewish faith, wherever such assistance may be needed. The trust was established by Ephraim Block in loving memory of his parents, Louis and Sarah Block, and his sisters and brothers, Flora B. Block, Frances Block, Dena Block Greengard and Jacob Block. Funds are distributed to JF&CS for financial assistance for rent and utilities and to the Jewish Community Center (JCC) for day care scholarships. Distribution Y2012: $60,392 total; $51,464 JF&CS; $8,928 JCC ROSE GROSS EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND Provides emergency relief and aid to individuals and families in distress. Distribution Y2012: $0 JEWISH LOAN ASSOCIATION Provides interest-free loans to Jewish individuals who have exhausted personal and/or family resources and demonstrated a need. Loans are for a very limited period or occurrence only; applicants in need of ongoing support will be referred to appropriate agencies. Recommendations for the use of these funds come from JF&CS. Distribution Y2012: $60,525 JULIUS, ANNA AND LILIAN JOSSEM MEMORIAL FUND Assists the needy Jewish elderly (60+ years) by providing extras to make their lives less lonely and more comfortable, both physically and emotionally. The fund, created by Lilian Jossem in her name and the names of her parents, also can be used to meet personal and medical needs supplementary to those ordinarily supplied by Federation’s agencies. The fund responds to requests from agency professionals and rabbis on behalf of the needy elderly. Distribution Y2012: $8,313

EMERGENCY RELIEF

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HELPING TEENS IN ISRAEL

LOUISE & BENJAMIN, MAJORIE & HARRY LOEB ENDOWMENT FOR INDIGENT JEWS Provides direct cash assistance to Jewish and other indigent clients. Recommendations for the use of these funds come from JF&CS. Distribution Y2012: $14,999 STUART I. PESSIN RESTRICTED SCHOLARSHIP FUND Provides scholarships to support student travel to Israel for the programs operated by the Central Agency for Jewish Education or St. Louis Hillel at Washington University. The funds are distributed through Jewish Federation of St. Louis. Distribution Y2012: $2,500 YOUTH IN ISRAEL FUND Non-interest loan fund that enables Jewish youth (grades 9–12) who are able to demonstrate a need for financial assistance, to participate in an educational program in Israel. Distribution Y2012: $0 TERRY AND HARVEY HIEKEN ST. LOUIS CHESED FUND Provides direct cash assistance to meet the special or emergency health and social welfare needs of Jewish individuals. Recommendations for the use of these funds are made by JF&CS. Distribution Y2012: $5,987 LIFELINE FUNDS Direct financial assistance and interest-free loans help Jewish clients who have recently experienced job loss or business reverses, home foreclosure or the prospect of foreclosure, and have urgent financial needs because of the current economic situation. Assistance can be in the form of direct cash assistance, a loan from the Jewish Aid Association, or a combination of both. The distribution of these funds is processed through JF&CS. Distribution through December 31, 2012: $770,163

27


PLANNING AND ALLOCATIONS COMMITTEE Michael Oberlander, Chair Jon Baris, At-Large Gina Bernstein, At-Large Randall Green, At-Large Diane Katzman, Chair, Caring for Jews in Need–Overseas Subcommittee Lauren Weissman Kerner, At-Large Sarah Kovenock, At-Large Mark Levin, Chair, Caring for Jews in Need–Domestic Subcommittee Ruth Raskas, Chair, Ensuring the Jewish Future Subcommittee Craig Rosenthal, Chair, Standards and Capacity Building Subcommittee Todd Siwak, Chair, Budget, Finance and Administration Committee Leslie Sterman, Chair, GROMJF Committee Jane Roodman Weiss, Chair, Community Engagement Subcommittee

PLANNING AND ALLOCATIONS DEPARTMENT STAFF Dr. Stephen Cohen, Vice President Karen Berry-Elbert, St. Louis NORC Manager Sonia Dobinsky, Senior Planning and Allocations Associate Joel Frankel, Israel Engagement Professional Roberta Gartenberg, St. Louis NORC Volunteer Coordinator Joan Hirst, St. Louis NORC, Community Liaison Lori Kabrun-Berry, Interim Senior Planning and Allocations Associate Susan Scribner, Senior Planning and Allocations Associate Terri Sever, Resource Assistant

JEWISH FEDERATION OF ST. LOUIS Robert Millstone, Chair Andrew Rehfeld, President and Chief Executive Officer

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We express our appreciation to these individuals who have served on our committees for the past year.

LOCAL AGENCY PERFORMANCE STANDARDS & CAPACITY BUILDING SUBCOMMITTEE Craig Rosenthal, Chair Zach Abeles Michael Abrams Daniel Bindler Jim Deutsch James Hirschfield

Audrey Katcher Anna Reby Bertman Naomi Shanker Elizabeth Wallace

ENSURING THE JEWISH FUTURE SUBCOMMITTEE Ruth Raskas, Chair Douglas Baron Jennifer Deutsch Lisa Graivier Barnes Geoffrey Gross Rick Recht

Devorah Soroka Melanie Winograd Greg Yawitz Susie Zimmerman

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SUBCOMMITTEE Jane Roodman Weiss, Chair Burt Garland Richard Gilbert Charles Bradley Gross Kenneth Kranzberg Karen Smoller

CARING FOR JEWS IN NEED–DOMESTIC SUBCOMMITTEE Mark Levin, Chair Rabbi James Bennett Laurie Chod Keith Cohen Gary Godwin Richard Goldberg

Kim Goldenberg Dr. Aviva Raskas-Adler Bradley Snitzer Timothy Stern Dr. Lisa Suffian

CARING FOR JEWS IN NEED–OVERSEAS SUBCOMMITTEE Diane Katzman, Chair Marcy Cornfeld Patricia Croughan Michelle Hoberman Jen Kaslow Lisa Kraner

Leslie Litwack Cheryl Maayan Rachel Pepe Susan Schlichter Rabbi Susan Talve Stuart Zimmerman

ENSURING THE JEWISH FUTURE PROFESSIONAL ADVISORY GROUP Liessa Alperin Jennifer Baer Lotsoff Cantor Joanna Dulkin Joel Frankel Rabbi Brad Horwitz Rabbi Andy Kastner

Jayne Langsam Cheryl Maayan Rabbi Brigitte Rosenberg Rabbi Michael Rovinsky

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROFESSIONAL ADVISORY GROUP Batya Abramson-Goldstein Karen Aroesty Rabbi Andrea Goldstein Larry Levin Nancy Lisker Rabbi Moshe Shulman

CARING FOR JEWS IN NEED–DOMESTIC PROFESSIONAL ADVISORY GROUP Joan Denison Kathy Gardner Lori Goldberg Nikki Goldstein Rachel Goltzman Rabbi James Goodman

Sally Lang Lesley Levin Marilyn Ratkin Johni Siegel

29


JFedSTL.org 12 Millstone Campus Drive St. Louis, MO 63146 • 314-432-0020

OUR MISSION Jewish Federation mobilizes the Jewish community and its human and financial resources to preserve and enhance Jewish life in St. Louis, Israel and around the world.

Learn more about our Jewish community at www.JewishinStLouis.org

Planning & Allocations Report, 2013  

The success of the 2012 Annual Community Campaign of Jewish Federation of St. Louis resulted in a 1.3 percent increase in new allocable doll...

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