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16 SHEVAT 5778 • FEBRUARY 1, 2018 • VOLUME XXXIX, NUMBER 3 • PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID, SYRACUSE, NY

Mickey Lebowitz appointed Jewish community ambassador BY BETTE SIEGEL At its January 11 meeting, the board of the Jewish Federation of Central New York created the position of Jewish community ambassador. President/CEO of the Federation Michael Balanoff said, “Mickey Lebowitz will be the community ambassador. He will accentuate all that is good about the Central New York Jewish community.” As the Jewish community ambassador, Lebowitz said he sees the position as that of a “point person for all things Jewish in CNY.” In collaboration with existing Jewish agencies and leaders, he will welcome new Jewish singles and families into the community, as well as “develop relationships and educate our new friends” about which organizations and services (Jewish as well as non-Jewish) are available to them so they can fully integrate into the local community. Lebowitz is an endocrinologist by training and has served in many positions, including volunteer positions within the local Jewish community. He is a past president of Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas, as well as a member and vice president of the congregation’s Ritual Committee. He has served in various positions on the Syracuse Hebrew Day School board since 1996, including as board president and vice president. In what turns out to

be a pattern, he has been called he hopes to “develop a founinstrumental in various stratedation for a thriving, growing, prospering Jewish community gic planning initiatives in the for the future.” Syracuse Jewish community: Part of his job will be to help as chairman of the SHDS Long develop networks and strategies Range Planning Committee; with community business leadfounder and organizer of Federation’s Council of Jewish ers to offer and advertise jobs to Organizations since 2015; bring in people. As the Central and vice chair of Federation’s New York community grows, Strategic Planning Committee the hope is that the number of since 2017. Mickey Lebowitz Jewish people coming to the When the current position area will also grow. was developed, it was assumed that the The overall objectives of the position chosen candidate would have an “ex- include working on two tracks to enhance cellent understanding and knowledge” affiliations with local organizations. He of local Jewish organizations, as well will seek to engage and integrate current as “broad local Jewish community ser- Jewish residents who have no affiliation vice experiences with organizations and with the Jewish community and attract, people.” A primary trait sought was that welcome and integrate new people to the the ambassador be “a mature individual community. The ambassador’s ultimate with a track record of getting things goal is to strengthen the future of the done in their professional life and as a Jewish community. Lebowitz may work with CenterState community volunteer.” Lebowitz said he views the position CEO, other Central New York business as a way to try to “reverse the negative and political leaders, or Central New demographic trends in the area” and “looks York job recruiters; or he may develop forward to fostering relationships” with and manage internal and external plans Jews already in the community, as well for marketing, communication, public as newcomers, to help engage and edu- and community relations; research case cate them about all that the local Jewish study examples from other Jewish comcommunity has to offer. Additionally, by munities in similar circumstances; be working with existing agencies and lead- an advocate for and extol the virtues of ers, and acting on existing and new ideas, the community institutions; and engage

or work with various constituencies of the local Jewish community (e.g. young leadership, Hazak, Syracuse University or State University of New York Upstate Medical University) to achieve the strategic goals of the Jewish community. Lebowitz’s position will be approximately eight hours a week working as an independent contractor for the Jewish Federation of Central New York. He will regularly and routinely report, coordinate, collaborate and be under the overall supervision and direction of Federation’s president/CEO. He will work in collaboration with the Jewish Federation of Central New York board and its subcommittees, including the Long-Range Planning Committee and CoJO (Council of Jewish Organizations), which may function as an informal advisory body. The position differs from that of Federation’s community concierge, a position held by Jacki Goldberg since spring 2015. Goldberg welcomes Jewish people new to Syracuse and the surrounding area with local information and a gift basket. In her official position as community concierge, her first responsibility is to deliver these baskets to newcomers as part of the “Shalom Syracuse” program. In addition, she often gets to know them socially, guiding them through the dayto-day problems that any newcomer to a community may encounter.

Annual pro-Israel conference makes its latest effort to cut the BDS BY OREN PELEG (JNS) – Israel advocates need to “go to the moral dimension of the issue, not to run away from it” when it comes to the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, said UCLA professor Judea Pearl, father of slain journalist Daniel Pearl, in a plea to students at a recent conference focused on combating BDS. “This is where we are strong. This is our cause and this is where we can win hands down,” Pearl said. “Talk about your emotions. I have emotions, too, and not just as a grieving father, but as a man born in Israel. My friends came back in coffins from many wars, wars we did not start.” More than 500 people representing a multitude of Jewish and pro-Israel groups gathered in Los Angeles from January 19-22 to take part in the fourth annual “Israel in Focus” conference, hosted by StandWithUs. The conference nearly doubled in size from last year and included some 350 high school and college students from all across the U.S., Canada, Mexico and the U.K. StandWithUs, an Israel education and

advocacy organization founded in 2001, hosts the conference each year to give the pro-Israel community a platform to share best practices on countering BDS. “It’s very interesting to see how what we do on campuses is now materializing in further action,” Adah Forer, a 20-yearold senior at University of California, Berkeley, told JNS. “And it’s not just on campus, but in state government and beyond. It’s very heartening.” Forer, whose campus is conisdered a hotbed for BDS activity, also spoke on a panel dubbed “Anti-Zionism: the New Face of Anti-Semitism,” in which she detailed her efforts to work with university administrators to address antisemitic incidents. She said that many high school students sought her out after her panel. “It’s cool to talk to high school students who are interested in continuing their passion and joining pro-Israel groups when they come to campus. It’s what we need,” Forer said. Chairman of the Spirit Music Group David Renzer spoke to a packed ballroom about BDS proponents’ war on culture.

He cited Lorde’s recent cancellation of a Tel Aviv concert following BDS pressure. Renzer, who co-founded Creative Community for Peace, an initiative involving power players in the arts, has been considered instrumental in bringing artists like

Elton John, Boy George, Cyndi Lauper and Alicia Keyes to Israel for shows as well as meetings with Israeli politicians, and to learn about causes like LGBT rights in the Holy Land. See “BDS” on page 2

C A N D L E L I G H T I N G A N D P A R AS H A

February 2............................ 5 pm........................................................ Parasha-Yitro February 9....................... 5:10 pm.............................................. Parasha-Mishpatim February 16..................... 5:19 pm..................................................Parasha-Terumah

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Comedy cabaret

Federation at 100

Israel Experience

The Auxiliary at Menorah Park will A look back at the Jewish Teens planning a trip to Israel this present comedian Joel Chasnoff Federation’s 100-year history, summer can apply for assistance highlighing 1948-58. on April 22. from the Jewish Federation. Story on page 3 Story on page 2 Story on page 5

PLUS Calendar Highlights............... 6 D’var Torah............................... 6 Obituaries................................. 7 Simcha Party Planning......... 8


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JEWISH OBSERVER ■ FEBRUARY 1, 2018/16 SHEVAT 5778

Auxiliary at Menorah Park presents a “Comedy Cabaret” starring Joel Chasnoff on April 22

On Sunday, April 22, at 5:30 pm, the Syracuse community will have the opportunity to attend a comedy cabaret at Menorah Park featuring Joel Chasnoff, who, as the executive director of the Jacksonville Jewish Center said, is “without question, the greatest Jewish comedian touring today.” The fund-raising event is sponsored by the Auxiliary at Menorah Park and will begin at 5:30 pm with a cash bar and casual dining that’s included in the cost of admission. Chasnoff’s show will start at 7 pm. Event Chair Victoria Kohl said, “Joel is hilarious. He’s appeared in Syracuse

On April 22, Joel Chasnoff (at left) will be the featured act in a comedy c a b a re t e v e n t is sponsored by the Auxiliary at Menorah Park to raise funds for Menorah Park’s p ro g r a m s a n d facilities. before, and, if you’ve seen him, no doubt you’ll want to see him again. If

you haven’t, you will not want to miss it. The Auxiliary’s goal was to find a fun way to raise funds for Menorah Park’s programs and facilities, and it doesn’t get better than this.” Born in Chicago, Chasnoff is an IDF combat veteran. He has performed around the world, including in two off-Broadway shows, a USO comedy tour of Japan and Korea, more than 1,000 Jewish events and on Israeli latenight TV. Chasnoff donates a portion of his fees to his foundation, Project Elijah, which does hands-on projects with underprivileged children in the U.S., and he also donates to organiza-

tions such as American Jewish World Service, Doctors Without Borders and American Harvest. The evening will take place in the new Abraham Shankman Wellness Pavilion at Menorah Park, which houses the Jim and Arlene Gerber Bistro, the Fox’s Den Sports Bar and more. “This will be an intimate setting, with excellent food and drink, perfect to enjoy Chasnoff, America’s premier Jewish comedian,” Kohl said. Seating is limited, so early ticket purchase is advised. For tickets, call Windy Van Riper at 315-446-9111, ext. 118, or visit www.menorahparkofcny.com.

Menorah Park – The Auxiliary at Menorah Park, a history of helping BY RUTH STEIN In Syracuse, the first Jewish Home of Central New York, as it was first named, was purchased in 1912. It was a 17-room house on Irving Avenue, and the Women’s Auxiliary helped furnish it and arranged for caregivers, both day and night. In 1925, the Home was moved to Genesee Street; various additions were added over the years, such as individual apartments, The Inn, The Oaks and, most recently, the Abraham Shankman Pavilion that contains the Bistro, among other features. In 2002, the Jewish Home of Central New York officially had its name changed to Menorah Park. The Auxiliary at Menorah Park parallels the history of Menorah Park. It was first established more than 50 years ago, and its primary purpose has been fund-raising to enhance the plans and programs of Menorah Park and to give support to the

BDS

“Clearly this movement (BDS) is not going away and it absolutely targets artists and culture,” Renzer said. “It’s doing so with great strategy, a laser focus and apparently some serious funding. Our goal is to continue what we’re doing and expand on what we’re doing.” Renzer announced his group’s plans to add a New York office to deal with BDS issues in the theater world, like a recent boycott campaign to shut down the production of a Lincoln Center Festival play funded by the Israeli Culture and Sport Ministry. Many conference sessions focused on forming coalitions outside of the Jewish community. Chelsea Andrews, director of campus relations for Passages, a Christian pro-Israel advocacy group that nicknames itself the “Christian Birthright,” leads trips to Israel for Christian college students. She brought nearly 30 of her students to the conference to encourage more dialogue with Jewish students. “If we’re not coming together and hearing other perspectives, then we’re not seeing a more inclusive area and I don’t think Israel should be just the root of Christianity or just a Jewish thing. It needs to be more pluralistic or we can get into a dangerous space,” Andrews said. Evon Sworesho, a Middle East affairs analyst, drew parallels between BDS and historical persecution in the region against Jews and Christians. Several pastors also spoke on a panel about the presence of BDS and anti-Israel views in churches. State lawmakers from both sides of the political spectrum, including Republican Texas Rep. Phil King and Democratic Rhode Island Rep. Mia Ackerman, discussed how their states have passed an-

residents. Fund-raising has been a major function of the Auxiliary. Over the years, fund-raising has included a formal dinner dance held annually at the Persian Terrace of the Hotel Syracuse. It was always sold out. When Temple Adath Yeshurun built its new synagogue on Kimber Road, the dance was moved there. The money from this fund-raiser was used for Bingo prize money, furnishings, and to pay for haircuts and shampoos for the residents. Another major fund-raiser has been the Menorah Park Open golf tournament, which in 2018 will celebrate its 36th year. In the 1950s, it was held at the Lafayette Country Club, followed by a big dinner. When Lafayette Country Club closed, the Open was moved to Drumlins. For many years, only men played in the tournament; while women volunteered to help organize the event

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ti-boycott laws. King, whose state relies on Israel as its fourth-largest trade partner and a “vital contributor” of agricultural technology, said that anti-boycott legislation was a no-brainer for Texas. “BDS at its core is economic warfare,” he said. “Most Texans recognize that regardless of it being a national issue, one that affects our homeland security as Israel is our only friend in the Middle East, there are a lot of state hooks, like our long trade history.” Both state lawmakers agreed that the economic impact of BDS in the West Bank inflicts the most harm on Palestinians working for Israeli companies, referencing the 500 Palestinians who lost their jobs at SodaStream in 2016 due to BDS pressure. Ahava Helfenbaum, a 16-year-old high school student from Toronto and a StandWithUs intern, told JNS she was returning home from the conference with renewed purpose. “All these success stories on fighting BDS I’ve been hearing all weekend are so inspirational and are giving me the confidence to keep going. It’s really a propeller forward for me,” she said. Roz Rothstein, co-founder and CEO of StandWithUs, said her organization added some new wrinkles to the conference schedule this year to encourage more student interaction and engagement. “We did a bit of an experiment and combined the high school and campus students in one community all at once to see if everyone was able to take from the conference what we wanted to give them; namely information, inspiration and the resources to build a network,” she said. “It was very effective this year. I’m receiving unsolicited compliments everywhere I go, even in the elevator.”

and the dinner at night to award prizes. Today anyone is welcome to play and Menorah Park staff and volunteers run the annual event. Five years ago, past Auxiliary President Gwen Kay and current President Janis Martin started working together to reinvigorate the ranks of Auxiliary members. As a result of their efforts, the membership grew to the current membership of 43 and there was an outreach to hundreds of others. Its events are well attended, especially its annual brunch that packed the new Bistro at Menorah Park. The Auxiliary also sponsors a gift shop and has a cart to go around to the different floors so that the residents can do their shopping. Additionally, the Auxiliary had a successful jewelry show in the Veranda at Menorah Park. Organizers said, “Everyone enjoyed it so much, that another one is scheduled for February 7 in the Veranda from 11-4 pm.” The Auxiliary is also sponsoring a Comedy Cabaret with nationally-known comedian Joel Chasnoff on April 22. The Auxiliary members feel that volunteerism in the form of people’s time “means so much” to the residents of

of Central New York

Syracuse Office

Bette Siegel Syracuse Editor Publisher Jewish Federation of Central New York Inc. Ellen Weinstein Chair of the Board Michael Balanoff Federation President/CEO Alan Goldberg Vice President for Communications Editorial 5655 Thompson Rd. DeWitt, NY 13214

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Many people attended a 2017 Auxiliary gathering. Menorah Park and is recognized by the board and executives as an important facet in the quality of life and care on campus. New members are always welcome: men, women, young people and families. For more information, contact Martin at jmmartin@twcny.rr.com, to see how to become an Auxiliary member. All articles, announcements and photographs must be received by noon Wednesday, 15 days prior to publication date. Articles must be typed, double spaced and include the name of a contact person and a daytime telephone number. E-mail submissions are encouraged and may be sent to JewishObserverCNY@gmail.com. The Jewish Observer reserves the right to edit any copy. Signed letters to the editor are welcomed: they should not exceed 250 words. Names will be withheld at the discretion of the editor. All material in this newspaper has been copyrighted and is exclusive property of the Jewish Observer and cannot be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. Views and opinions expressed by our writers, columnists, advertisers and by our readers do not necessarily reflect the publisher’s and editors’ points of view, nor that of the Jewish Federation of Central New York. The newspaper reserves the right to cancel any advertisements at any time. This newspaper is not liable for the content of any errors appearing in the advertisements beyond the cost of the space occupied. The advertiser assumes responsibility for errors in telephone orders. The Jewish Observer does not assume responsibility for the kashrut of any product or service advertised in this paper. THE JEWISH OBSERVER OF CENTRAL NEW YORK (USPS 000939) (ISSN 1079-9842) Publications Periodical postage paid at Syracuse, NY and other offices. Published 24 times per year by the Jewish Federation of Central New York Inc., a non-profit corporation, 5655 Thompson Road, DeWitt, NY 13214. Subscriptions: $36/year; student $10/ year. POST MASTER: Send address change to JEWISH OBSERVER OF CENTRAL NEW YORK, 5655 Thompson Road, DeWitt, NY 13214.

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JEWISH OBSERVER

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AROUND CENTRAL NEW YORK Federation and the state of Israel – 1948-1958

In 1959, the Federation launched a special fund drive BY BARBARA SHEKLIN DAVIS to address what was called “the greatest immigration Editor’s note: To mark this milestone, crisis in a decade,” to provide for transportation, initial we are printing a series of 10 articles absorption and settlement of immigrants to Israel. Fedhighlighting each decade of the Federation’s eration’s Women’s Division worked particularly hard on work with and for the community. We hope the project, believing that “only the swiftest and most you enjoy this look backward as we continue substantial response on the part of all the Jewish women to work to ensure a thriving future. in the community will make it possible for Israel to meet When the state of Israel was born in 1948, the new demands.” “Answer the challenge, women of Syracuse Jewry reacted with the same exhilSyracuse!” they exhorted. To emphasize their determiaration as did Jews everywhere. The 1948 nation to succeed, they announced a citywide house-toFederation campaign proclaimed, “This is the house solicitation to reach every Jewish woman in the year of destiny for the Jews.” The campaign community for her individual contribution. raised more than $1 million for the UJA. Barbara Sheklin Davis is co-author, with Susan But Israel was not an easy sell. A major B. Rabin, of “A History of the Jewish Community of challenge was laid out at the inaugural rally Syracuse,” published by Arcadia Press.” This series of of the 1948 Syracuse Jewish Welfare Appeal. Syracuse Jewish Federation articles is sponsored by Helen Marcum. One of the speakers told the Syracuse audion a successful 2017! ence of 1,500 of the indomitable will of the Jews of that nation to fight to the death, if BRETT KUPPERMANN necessary, for their liberty and freedom. “I want to allay some misunderstandings,” he In a nod to Syracuse Jewry’s ties to Israel, Federation’s 1976 annual told his audience. “I don’t want the people campaign theme was “We are One!”(315)727-2888 brett.kuppermann@nm.com of Syracuse and of America to think for a minute that, 100,000 people who have reached the Promised Land Deadlines for all articles and photos for the because of some diplomatic expediencies, we Jews of are still spending long and weary days. For a few dollars Jewish Observer are as follows. No exceptions will Palestine are ever going to give up our fight. Our peo- they could be happily resettled.” be made. ple have been let down many times in their history,” he Another speaker asked, “In this tragic hour, in this year DEADLINE ISSUE stated, “but we will survive now and, we will win this of our need, what are you prepared to do?” He continued, Friday, January 26, early............. February 15 war. There is not a single Jew in Palestine who believes “We have made two mistakes. At first, we feared too Monday, February 12, early.............. March 1 we will lose.” little and hoped too much. Then we overestimated our At a campaign rally two years later, a Syracuse busi- supposed friends. Don’t let us make the third mistake of Wednesday, February 28................. March 15 Community Hebrew School nessman, just returned from Israel to provide a first-hand caring too little. We Jews Jewish must do our share. We must do Wednesday, March 14..................... March 29 account of conditions there, called the people of Israel it soon enough and in a big enoughon way to answer the 2017! a successful “miraculous.” He described the present generation as call of our people in Europe and in Palestine. We must “fertilizer working to plow itself under so that its chil- emulate in spirit those Jews of theBRETT Holy LandKUPPERMANN who would dren may grow.” He named immigration and housing as rather die on their feet rather than live on their knees. the major problems of Israel, saying that “thousands of Their destiny – and the destiny of those haggard souls DONATE YOUR CAR TO BETH SHOLOM, CONCORD, OR THE JCC, THRU C*A*R*S (a locally owned Manlius company) brett.kuppermann@nm.com persons in rags have poured into Israel from 40 coun- in the DP camps – is our(315)727-2888 challenge.” tries. It’s anticipated that 150,000 will come this year. With those ringing messages before them, the Jewish “giving to your own” But immigration really depends upon how many Jews community of the city promptly made plans to set a record are driven out of Arab-controlled countries,” adding that goal for the annual Federation fund-raising campaign. MIKE LESSEN 315-256-6167 Calls returned ASAP Charitable Auto Resource Service in our 18th year of enriching the religious sector “the Arabs are forcing Jews to go to Israel to put greater Throughout the decade, Federation emphasized the burden on the new state and break her by economic war.” urgent need for funds for the young state. In 1955, it Former Assistant Secretary of State Major John Hilldring, informed contributors that “the people of Israel, with whose United Nations work helped produce the free all their resourcefulness, their energies and their dedJewish state, also addressed the capacity audience, “I ication, are racing against time. Their economy must don’t understand this worry about another war in Israel. be stabilized, their irrigation projects completed, their Don’t worry about the people of Israel on the battlefields. Jewish immigrantsCommunity of various cultural backgrounds Center integrated Menorah Park They can take care of themselves. Instead of tackling as quickly as possible. In a critical hour when the Arab on a successful 2017! on a successful 2017! phantoms, friends of Israel should do something about nations refuse to lessen their hostility toward Israel, the immigration problem. Most of all they should send Israel’s peopleKUPPERMANN know that tomorrow’s tasks must be BRETT BRETT KUPPERMANN money. Only because of the shortage of a few dollars, accomplished today.”

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S

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Donations of gently-used books sought for fund-raiser Now is the perfect time to give gently-used books a new lease on life so that someone else can enjoy them. The Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center of Syracuse is seeking donations of gently-used books for its upcoming book sale fund-raiser. Books suitable for all ages and in generally good condition may be dropped off during regular business hours through Friday, March 2, at the JCC of Syracuse, 5655 Thompson Rd., DeWitt.

Congratulations

The JCC’s used book sale will kick off during the Center’s upcoming Purim Carnival on Sunday, March 4, Syracuse Hebrew Day School from noon-4 pm. The sale will continue Monday, March 5, through Friday, March 16, during the JCC’s regular on a successful 2017! business hours. Proceeds from the sale will benefit the JCC’s childrens’ and seniors’ programs. BRETT KUPPERMANN For more information, contact the JCC at 315-4452360 or info@jccsyr.org.

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Jewish Community Foundation on a successful 2017! BRETT KUPPERMANN (315)727-2888

Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center senior dining menu FEBRUARY 5-9 Monday – vegetable soup and spinach cheese quiche Tuesday – spaghetti and meatballs Wednesday – imitation crab cakes Thursday – chicken fried rice Friday – birthday celebration – fresh salmon with dill FEBRUARY 12-16 Monday – chicken noodle soup and tuna salad on rye Tuesday – baked ziti Wednesday – chicken rollatini Thursday – meatloaf Friday – turkey with stuffing The Bobbi Epstein Lewis JCC Senior Adult Dining Program at the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center offers Va’ad Ha’ir-supervised kosher lunches served Monday through Friday at noon. Lunch reser-

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brett.kuppermann@nm.com

vations are required by noon on the previous business day. There is a suggested contribution per meal. The menu is subject to change. The program is funded by a grant from the Onondaga County Department of Aging and Youth and the New York State Office for the Aging, with additional funds provided by the JCC. To attend, one need not be Jewish or a member of the JCC. For further information or to make a reservation, contact Cindy Stein at 445-2360, ext. 104, or cstein@jccsyr.org.

Visit the JO online at jewishfederationcny.org and click on Jewish Observer

Visit the JO online at jewishfederationcny.org and click on Jewish Observer

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JEWISH OBSERVER ■ FEBRUARY 1, 2018/16 SHEVAT 5778

CONGREGATIONAL NOTES Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas VOICES OF THE SHOAHCONCERT IN FEBRUARY The first concert of a new recital series, Voices of the Shoah, will take place at Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas on Monday, February 19, at 7:30 pm. It is made possible in part by a grant from the Jewish Federation of Central New York’s Philip L. Holstein Community Program Fund. The performance will include “A World Turned Upside Down” and “I Never Saw Another Butterfly,” settings by American composers Juliana Hall and Lori Laitman, of the words of Anne Frank and the children of Theresienstadt, as well as a clarinet sonata by Holocaust composer Mieczyslaw Weinberg. A highlight of the concert will be a reading of the poems of award-winning poet and Syracuse University professor emerita Joan Burstyn, read by the poet herself. The performers include musicians from Syracuse and Sweden: Kathleen Roland-Silverstein, soprano on the faculty of the SU Setnor School of Music; Cantor Paula Pepperstone, cantorial soloist; pianists Dan Sato and Katarina Ström-Harg; and clarinetist

Stefan Harg. The next two concerts of the series will take place on March 4 at Hendricks Chapel, a choral concert on the Malmgren series, and on April 22, as part of the Civic Morning Musicals Live! concerts. There is a suggested donation at the door. For more information, go to https:// kathleen-rolandsilverstein.squarespace. com, and click on “Upcoming Events.” SHABBAT HADOROT POTLUCK DINNER On Friday, February 9, at 6 pm, Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas will hold a Shabbat HaDorot, a service led by the CBS-CS pre-b’nai mitzvah students. It gives them an opportunity to practice leading services. Students are assigned a prayer by grade.All CBS-CS religious school students and Syracuse Hebrew Day School students are invited to participate. The program will begin with a Shabbat dinner at 6 pm. The Shabbat HaDorot service will start at 7:15 pm, followed by dessert. The entire congregation is invited to attend. For more information, or to make a reservation for the dinner, contact Melissa Harkavy at director@cbscs.org. See “CBS-CS” on page 6

Temple Adath Yeshurun CASUAL SHABBAT WITH PAUSE BUTTON AND MISHPACHA SHABBAT SERVICES On Saturday, February 3, Temple Adath Yeshurun will hold a Pause Button and Mishpacha Shabbat. There will be services for every age. Shabbat morning services start at 9:15 am. Pause Button will begin at 9:45 am and offer snacks, study, and singing, and then participants will go back to complete the service. The topic for February Pause Button is “Is that Canonized?” Services for tots and school-age will begin at 10:30 am. Tots (ages birth to 5 years) will meet in the Muriel and Avron Spector Library, and junior congregation (for first-fifth-graders) will meet in the room 15 youth lounge. February 3 will also be a “Casual Shabbat,” when those attending Shabbat morning services are encouraged to come dressed in their favorite sweater or sweatshirt. There will be a kiddush lunch following services. For more information about the tots or junior congregation services, contact Alicia Gross at alicia@ adath.org. For more information about Pause Button, contact Rabbi Paul Drazen at rabbidrazen@adath.org. TAY SISTERHOOD BOOK DISCUSSION BY SONALI MCINTYRE On Sunday, February 11, at 10:45 am, the Temple Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood will host its monthly book group to discuss the novel, “The Weight of Ink” by Rachel Kadish, a National Jewish Book Award winner, an Amazon Best Book of the Year, and one of the Jewish Exponent’s 2017 Top Reads. The novel takes place in London both in the 1660s and the early 21st century, and

On January 13, the Temple Adath Yeshurun Rothschild Early Childhood Center held family movie night, sponsored by the Parent Advisory Council. Nearly 30 families attended the event to watch Disney’s “Moana.” Families brought camping chairs, blankets and pillows, and children dressed in pajamas, to complete the “drive-in setting.” L-r: the Pace-Lamit family, (in front) Juniper and Aspen, (back) Cinnamon and Jamie. intertwines the stories of Ester Velasquez, an emigrant from Amsterdam scribing for a blind rabbi, and Helen Watt, an ill historian with a passion for Jewish history. At the beginning of the book, Watt has been given the task of reviewing 17th century Jewish documents found during See “TAY” on page 8

Temple Concord More than 25 members of CBS-CS had an afternoon of ice-skating at Shove Park in Camillus on January 7. L-r: AJ Sikora, Shaynah Sikora, Kiru Morrissette, Rachel Pettiford, Tom Sikora, Sam Young, Ariella Shever and Myah Pettiford.

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OHA DIRECTOR TO SPEAK ABOUT SHUBERT ORGANIZATION On Sunday, February 4, at 9:30 am, Temple Concord will hold a joint Sisterhood and Brotherhood meeting featuring Greg Tripoli, executive director of the Onondaga Historical Association, who will talk about the Shubert Organization, America’s oldest professional theatre company and largest owner of Broadway theaters. At the end of the 19th century, three brothers, Sam, Lee and Jacob J. Shubert, from Syracuse, founded the Shubert Organization. They eventually moved to New York City and rapidly started acquiring theatres and produced shows. The meeting is open to the presentation. GAN PROGRAM ABOUT PURIM ON FEB. 11 A program about Purim will be held for toddlers ages 2-5 at Temple Concord on Sunday, February 11, at 10:30 am. The program will be filled with art, stories and movement and is open to the public. For more information, contact the synagogue at 315-475-9952. SCHOLAR SERIES PRESENTS ABIGAIL POGREBIN The next Temple Concord Scholar Series speaker, Abigail Pogrebin, will talk about an eclectic life as an author, actress and broadcast producer on Sunday, February 11, at 11 am. She is the author of “My Jewish Year: One Wondering Jew,” an expanded chronicle of her popular column in The Forward, where she spent a year researching and observing every Jewish holiday. She also wrote “Stars of David: Prominent Jews Talk about Being Jewish,” which was adapted for Off-Broadway theater; “One and the Same,” about growing up as an identical twin; and “Showstopper,” about being a teenager in the original Broadway cast of the Sondheim flop “Merrily We Roll Along.”

She was also a broadcast producer for Fred Friendly, Charlie Rose, Bill Moyers, Ed Bradley and Mike Wallace. The event is free and open to the public. Donations are welcome. For more information, contact the TC office at 315475-9952 or office@templeconcord.org. “DOUGH” NEXT UP AT TEMPLE CONCORD CINEMAGOGUE BY CHANA MEIR On Saturday, February 17, at 7:30 pm, Temple Concord will present, the comedy, “Dough,” as the next selection in its Cinemagogue series. When an old Jewish baker (Jonathan Pryce) takes on a young Muslim apprentice (Jerome Holder) to save his failing London kosher bakery, challah sales begin to skyrocket for an unexpected reason – the teenager’s marijuana stash has accidentally fallen into the mixing bowl. Critics have called the movie a “warmhearted” and “humorous” tale about overcoming prejudices under unlikely circumstances, and praised Pryce’s and Holder’s performances. The movie was directed by John Goldschmidt. Cinemagogue events are free and open to the public, and candy and snacks are available. Donations are welcome. For more information, call the TC office at 315475-9952, or office@templeconcord.org. ROBIN SELETSKY AND BIG GALUT(E) ON FEBRUARY 20 BY CHANA MEIR Robin Seletsky and Big Galut(e) will bring their brand of joy, humor and a bit of klezmer to Temple Concord’s Regina F. Goldenberg Series on Tuesday, February 20, at 7 pm. Seletsky, on clarinet, will be joined by Alexander Margolis on violin, Michael Leopold on the theorbo (in the lute family) and guitar, Mark Rubinstein on accordion and Richard Sosinsky on bass. Winner of the Simcha Prize at the See “TC” on page 7


FEBRUARY 1, 2018/16 SHEVAT 5778 ■

JEWISH OBSERVER

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about last summer’s experience. BY JACKIE MIRON Among the comments were: Application forms for fi“The relief I felt when strangers nancial assistance for teens quickly became friends, [and planning a trip to Israel this those] friends turned into family. summer are now available I have been in touch regularly from the Jewish Federation of since last summer and can’t wait Central New York. They may be to see them again.” obtained by contacting Judith “It was so cool that Israel opStander at 315-445-2040, ext. erates around Shabbat – instead 114, or jstander@jewishfederaJackie Miron of me feeling like the only one tioncny.org. There are multiple programs and scholarship funds for teens at home observing Shabbat.” “Since Syracuse has a small Jewish and families to explore. The local Israel Experience Grant population, it was a new and exciting Program was established by the late Helen feeling to be around almost all Jewish Millstein and is administered by Feder- people. Shabbat was my favorite.” “Everyone at home tells kids to disation. Students may apply for funds to defray the cost of a trip to Israel. Current connect from our devices and look up to high school students who will finish the see things. This was easy to do in Israel tenth grade of a Jewish education program as there was so much to see and I forgot about my phone. It felt so peaceful during are welcome to apply. The Isaiah and Rosalind Wolfson Shabbat as I could relax and slow down.” The Jewish Federation of Central New Scholarship Fund helps send area youth to Israel in a program administered by York encourages teens to travel to Israel the Jewish Federation of Central New and is prepared to help when possible. The York. As part of the application process, deadline for submission of all paperwork is a representative from the Wolfson family Tuesday, April 10. Summer camp incentive and scholarand the Federation will interview teens to ship applications for summer 2018 are support need-based trips. The goal of the Jewish Federation also now available. Applications may be of Central New York is to “enrich obtained by contacting Judith Stander and transform” the lives of youths by at 315-445-4020, ext. 114, or jstander@ strengthening their Jewish identity and jewishfederationcny.org. Summer paperwork has also been knowledge and values, and, hopefully, forwarded to each synagogue and to the cultivating lifelong friendships. Many teens from the area have attended Rabbi Jacob Epstein School of Jewish programs through the years. Recent travelers Studies and to the Syracuse Community made the following comments when asked Hebrew School.

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JEWISH OBSERVER ■ FEBRUARY 1, 2018/16 SHEVAT 5778

D’VAR TORAH

Pay to play – my two cents’ worth BY RABBI PAUL DRAZEN “Gotta pay your dues if you want to sing the blues, and you know it don’t come easy.” So sang Ringo Starr. Now that you’re done singing, let’s consider the meaning

Calendar Highlights

To see a full calendar of community events, visit the Federation's community calendar online at www.jewishfederationcny.org. Please notify jstander@jewishfederationcny.org of any calendar changes.

Monday, February 12 EARLY Deadline for the March 1 Jewish Observer Saturday, February 3 Temple Adath Yeshurun Pause Button and Mishpacha Shabbat at 9:15 am Sunday, February 4 Temple Concord Brotherhood meeting at 9:30 am TC Sisterhood program on Jewish history in CNY at 9:30 am Syracuse Hebrew Day School BUDS Super Sledding Sunday at 12:30 pm Shaarei Torah Orthodox Congregation of Syracuse “Tea and Torah” at 3:30 pm Tuesday, February 6 Epstein School at Temple Adath Yeshurun from 6:30-8:30 pm Wednesday, February 7 TC Board of Trustees meeting at 7 pm Friday, February 9 TAY Shabbat in Round at 5:30 pm Sunday, February 11 PJ Library Event TC Scholar Series presents Abigail Pogrebin at 11 am TC GAN program at 10:30 am TAY book discussion at 10:45 am TAY family Fun Day at noon Congregation Beth Sholom-Chevra Shas Hazak presents the Jezers speaking on “From Glacier to Gorillas” at 2 pm Tuesday, February 13 Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center Executive Committee at 6 pm, followed by Board of Directors at 7 pm Epstein School at Temple Adath Yeshurun from 6:30-8:30 pm Wednesday, February 14 TAY discussion on Jewish values at 7:30 pm CBS-CS Board meeting at 7:30 pm Saturday, February 17 TC Cinemagogue presents “Dough” at 7:30 pm STOCS game night at 7:15 pm Tuesday, February 20 TC - Regina F. Goldenberg Series presents Robin Seletsky and Big Galut(e) on Tuesday, February 20, at 7 pm

of the words: the only way you can be part of something is to be part of it. That’s a rather different understanding than many people have these days. In many areas, politics especially, “participating” means “funding.” If you’re looking for attention and consideration, contributions can turn heads. What’s more, as Tevye sang in “Fiddler on the Roof,” “When you’re rich, they think you really know.” That kind of attention feels good. But listening only to contributors’ ideas, to the exclusion of others’ ideas, is not the way the world should work. Of course, activity is vitally important in making a community work. But we cannot survive without funding. There is nothing inherently wrong with money. Organizations could not continue without funding. Doing good work takes financial backing. Most importantly, there is a universal obligation to provide money to keep institutions alive. That obligation is outlined in the maftir reading for Shabbat Shekalim (the Shabbat before the beginning of Adar and the first in a series of special spring Shabbatot). The Torah obligates everyone to bring a donation

Profiles of SHDS alumni – Rebecca Goldberg Cantor support of my family and friends, as well as BY BARBRA DAVIS a constant drive to push forward, eventually Rebecca Goldberg Cantor, a 2001 graduate brought me to the finish line. And that was when of the Syracuse Hebrew Day School, is a phythe real challenge of life began!” sician assistant in primary care and women’s She credits her years at SHDS for “setting health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in a strong foundation, upon which I continue to Boston. She has a bachelor of science degree flourish. Not only did the teachers at SHDS in biology from George Washington University provide me with the basic skills of critical thinkand a master of science degree from the George ing and intellectual confidence, but they also Washington University School of Medicine. promoted creativity and openness to exploring She said, “Working in a women’s healthcare new passions. I continue to pull on these core center with 11 other female clinicians” is the fulfillment of a lifelong ambition. “When Mrs. Rebecca Goldberg values as I grow in both my professional and personal life.” She also cites her relationship Millstein, my day school kindergarten teacher, Cantor with fellow day school classmates as “a forever asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, I immediately responded ‘pediatrician!’ From that day bond,” and says that “although we may not talk for months forward, I always knew that I wanted to go into medicine. or years at a time, I love catching up with them and hearing Throughout high school and college, I spent time shad- about their journeys and life successes.” Cantor said, “The SHDS provides a welcoming enowing a wide range of healthcare professionals, including doctors, physician assistants and nurse practitioners. My vironment to educate, inspire and empower children. passion for helping others, combined with my interest in The teachers engage students in an unparalleled dual the complex human body, pushed me to become a P.A.” curriculum in Judaic and general studies to promote She said that she and her colleagues “are committed to growth and success. The SHDS set me up for a future as improving the health of our patients by integrating evidence a confident, passionate career woman in medicine with based medicine with gender-specific care. I feel fortunate a strong foundation of core values. I think about my to be able to provide the highest level of care to patients memories from the SHDS often and I would not trade of all socioeconomic backgrounds in such an empowering my experience there for the world.” environment.” She says that the many years of training that it took for her to receive her degree were “grueling, pushing me further than I ever thought possible,” but “the Continued from page 4

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to maintain the worship service. Every person’s gift was set at the same, identical level: one-half shekel was mandated to support the community’s worship activity. The well-off were to bring no more; the poor no less. Everyone had an equal obligation to be part of the core support of community institutions. Those who could afford it were allowed to bring other gifts and sacrifices; but everyone, no matter personal financial circumstances, had to give. No one was allowed to let others take communal responsibility from the community. In later years, Rambam noted that even a person who lives on community funds has the obligation to contribute to the community. We today must remember that mandate from the Torah to support the community. We cannot be content to let others carry the burden of the community. Each of us must help fund the cost of the Jewish community doing business. We are not permitted to pass the obligation totally onto others. Or, to paraphrase the opening paragraph, everyone has to pay their dues. Rabbi Paul Drazen is the rabbi at Temple Adath Yeshurun.

Continued from page 5 interfaith dialogue help foster a culture of peace.” The assembly provides an opportunity for the community to “appreciate the beauty and diversity of local varied faith traditions, and to discover the many commonalities present among different faiths.” There is no fee to attend the event, and a reception will follow. The synagogue’s upper parking lot is for handicap parking, and the lower two lots are for general parking. Overflow parking is available at Pebble Hill Presbyterian Church with a shuttle to the synagogue that will start at 5:30 pm. Further information can be found on the InterFaith Works website, https://www. interfaithworkscny.org. InterFaith Works of Central New York, through education, service and dialogue, affirms the dignity of each person and every faith community and works to create relationships and understanding. Founded in 1976, InterFaith Works addresses deeply-embedded social divisions leading to community action and policy change. InterFaith Works’ social service programs address the needs of, and empower, people who are vulnerable, with low income and are targets of oppression, including refugees, the elderly and the institutionalized, through direct service and educational programs. InterFaith Works is committed to the belief that all people are deserving of dignity and respect regardless of ethnicity, faith tradition, social circumstances or age. Key programs include the Ahmad and Elizabeth El-Hindi Center for Dialogue, Center for New Americans, Interfaith Initiatives and Senior Services.

CBS-CS HAZAK: FROM GLACIER TO GORILLAS On Sunday, February 11, at 2 pm, Rabbi Emeritus Daniel and Rhea Jezer will share their experiences and pictures of Africa and Iceland. This event is open to the community and refreshments will be served. The Jezers met while students traveling to Israel. They have been traveling ever since, and now sometimes take their grandchildren. They have toured every continent, more than 50 countries and 48 of the 50 U.S. states. The Jezers just returned from Africa, where they tracked gorillas, trekking up mountains in the Volcano National Park in Rwanda to visit two gorilla families. In the Serengeti Plains of Tanzania, they also witnessed a lion attack and many animals very close up. They will speak about the Rwandan genocide of 1994 and how the country is attempting to rebuild itself into a modern state. Included in the presentation will be their trip last summer to Iceland, where they went to the bottom of a volcano and walked over a city completely buried in volcanic rock. The program is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the CBS-CS office at 315-446-9570.

L-r: Rachel Pettiford, Shaynah Sikora, Myah Pettiford and Kiru Morrissette.


FEBRUARY 1, 2018/16 SHEVAT 5778 ■

JCC gymnastics places first and third in local meet

Two school-age gymnastics teams from the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center of Syracuse took home honors at the Frozen Magic Invitational gymnastics meet on January 13 hosted by Cortland YMCA Gymnastics. The JCC competed with teams from Watertown, Fulton, Central Square and Syracuse.

JEWISH OBSERVER

7

OBITUARIES GERTRUDE GREENE

Gertrude Greene, 92, the last surviving of seven children, died on January 19 in Danbury, CT. She spent her childhood in Scranton, PA, and, when she and her husband Hersch married in 1953, they made their home in Syracuse. They enjoyed traveling to Japan, Africa, Israel, China and beyond, and playing golf, tennis and skiing. She was predeceased by her husband, Hersch (Hilbert) in 2005. She is survived by her children, Debbie (Regis) Quinn, Lauren (Gary) Cohen, Andrew (Sondra) Greene, Lisa Greene; and five grandchildren. Burial was in the Adath Yeshurun Cemetery. Sisskind Funeral Service had arrangements. Contributions may be made to Regional Hospice, 30 Milestone Rd., Danbury, CT 06810, or the American Cancer Society, 250 Williams St. NW, Atlanta, GA 30303. 

MARY SCHNEIDER RUBENSTEIN

The JCC Bronze Team, which won third place at the Cortland Meet. The JCC’s school-age gymnastics program offers a comprehensive regimen of gymnastics instruction where placement on a team is based on skill, not age. For more information about the JCC gymnastics school, contact Sherri Lamanna at 315445-2040, ext. 126, or slamanna@jccsyr.org.

L-r: The JCC’s first place Silver Team members Meryl Murphy, Emily Greenblatt, Abby Gorczynski, Nithya Suryadevara and Merin Murphy.

TC

Continued from page 4

2017 International Jewish Music Festival in Amsterdam, Big Galut(e) has been described as “soulful and unselfconsciously poignant,” “jubilant” and, by Israeli radio personality Dubi Lenz, as “a serious band with lousy American humor.” Noted by critics for “the virtuosity of its members,” the ensemble has been heard on PRI’s The World and WYNC’s New Sounds. Among other venues, members have played as soloists with the Catskill Symphony, in concert at Stanford University and Oberlin College, and at myriad synagogues, temples and JCCs nationwide. For the Goldenberg Cultural Series, Big Galut(e) has prepared a program of music between Klezmer and classical traditions. Featured composers will include Gershwin, Mahler, Shostakovich, Musorgsky, Brahms and Rodgers and Hammerstein. Goldenberg events are free and open to the public. Donations are welcome. For more information, contact Temple Concord at 315-475-9952; consult the online event calendar at templeconcord.org; or e-mail office@ templeconcord.org. EXPLORING CONTEMPORARY JEWISH MUSIC AT TEMPLE CONCORD BY CHANA MEIR Joe Eglash posed the question, “What makes music Jewish?” to Temple Concord’s Brotherhood in a talk on January 7 titled “The State of Jewish Music Today,” which focused on the evolution of contemporary music in the progressive/liberal Jewish movements. Eglash is the director of Transcontinental Music, the world’s largest publisher of Jewish music; Joe Eglash spoke to the creator of oySongs.com, the Temple Concord’s leading online source for Jewish Brotherhood about audio and sheet music downloads Jewish music. (which he sold in 2012); and the owner and operator of Eglash Creative, a small music publishing boutique and design house. He is also an accomplished musician who plays guitar and other stringed instruments, and a bandleader, arranger and composer. He moved to Syracuse in 2014 with his wife, Temple Concord’s Cantor Kari Siegel Eglash, and family in 2014. Eglash said, “The early American Reform Movement embraced music based on the German classical tradition that sounded much like Protestant choral music, in an attempt to assimilate into American society and to differentiate itself from Orthodox traditions. Temple music at the time was largely ‘performed’ by the cantor and a choir.” He said, “a turning point occurred in the 1960s and ‘70s, when secular folk and rock music inspired by the civil rights movement began to influence songs sung at Jewish summer camps and in youth groups.” Eglash called the camps “laboratories” for looking at new ways to sing and pray. Guitars and bands were introduced, and Hebrew was used more frequently, largely in support of the state of Israel. The trend was accelerated by the emergence of stars such as Debbie

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Robin Seletsky and Big Galut(e) will perform at TC on February 20. Friedman, who Eglash said he equates to “being a prophetess in this movement,” and Jeff Klepper. He noted that new arrangements of traditional texts keep them from becoming stale, and can open up new ways of experiencing prayers that might have fallen into the habit of doing by rote. “Jewish music is as integral as anything else in Judaism that makes us Jewish,” Eglash said.

Mary Schneider Rubenstein, 61, died on January 24 at Crouse Hospital after a long illness. Born and raised in Oneida, she graduated from Oneida High School and Syracuse University. She worked at SUNY Upstate as a medical technologist. She met her future husband through a mutual friend and they were married a few years later. They lived in Syracuse, raised their family and, together, established Middle Ages Brewery, where she was president. She was a charitable person, but her greatest passion was designing, sewing and fitting costumes for theatrical productions at Jamesville-DeWitt Middle and High School, and the Syracuse Children’s Theater. She was predeceased by parents, Edwin and Barbara Schneider. She is survived by her husband, Marc; their children, Babs and Isaac (fiancée Rachel); her sister, Carol Schneider; her brother, Tom Schneider; and her niece, Amy Jones. Sisskind Funeral Service had arrangements. Contributions may be made to the Foundation of Menorah Park, 4101 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, NY 13214. 

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JEWISH OBSERVER ■ FEBRUARY 1, 2018/16 SHEVAT 5778

Churches and Graveyards from Marcellus win JCC Battle of the Bands

BY ANKUR DANG Coldplay’s “Viva La Vida” echoed through the Neulander Family Sports and Fitness Center at the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center just after 7 pm on January 13. It was a bit unusual. Normally, the Fitness Center is closed at that hour. Then again, on most days, musicians aren’t going head to head with each other as part of a concert in the Schayes Family gymnasium. But this night was different. It was the JCC’s Battle of the Bands, an event where five high school bands faced each other in a “truly impressive” musical showdown; and “Viva La Vida” performed by Sydney Irving of Marcellus was only the first act of the competition, which was ultimately won by Churches and Graveyards, a fellow Marcellus band whose name describes their town, which has four churches and three graveyards all within a mile of each other. “But we have never practiced in a graveyard,” said Dan Balman, 17, the bass guitarist of this classic rock sextet. “There’s no power in graveyards. Still, I guess we can get a generator.”

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The 2018 JCC Battle of the Bands winner, Churches and Graveyards, from Marcellus High School. Pictured are the band’s members (l-r): Jackson Masters, lead guitar; Ben Carranti, vocals; Colin Arnett, piano/ saxophone; Dan Balman, bass; Christian Malone, drums; and Tyler Wetherell, vocals. Organizers found this “light-hearted exuberance” expected after winning the competition. The celebration was made “even sweeter” because the band is only 3 months old. “We’re the new kid on the block,” said Christian Malone, 14, the drummer and youngest member of the group. And

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while the band is new, some of the members have played with each other before. Their ability to work so well with each other is what led them to form this band so that they could create original music and play local events regularly.” One of Churches and Graveyards’ original Jackson Masters, lead guitarist numbers that they played of Churches and Graveyards. was “Avalanche,” which according to Balman, was written after he was called a “natural disaster” by his chemistry teacher when she caught him zoning out in class. “I always get nice, little nicknames from my teachers when I do stuff like that,” he said, while insisting that it isn’t something that happens too often. The rest of the band includes Tyler Wetherell, vocals; Colin Arnett, piano/saxophone; Ben Carranti, vocals; and Jackson Masters, lead guitar. They were awarded a $200 cash prize, eight hours of studio time at More Sound Recording Studio in Syracuse, the headline slot at this year’s Contact Community Services’ TeenFest event, and the opportunity to play in a special JCC 2018 Spring Showcase concert. Vivid Recall, from Liverpool High School and Baker High School (Baldwinsville) was the first runner-up in the competition. Singer-songwriter Sidney Irving from Marcellus High School finished in the third place. “It happens,” Irving said with a smile on her face. “But performing in itself is such a rewarding experience. I live for the music. That’s what’s most important. Viva la musica.” With that, she patted her younger sister, Kalissa, softly on the shoulder and they walked out of the venue with their parents. The other Battle of the Bands entrants this year were Fayetteville-Manlius from Fayetteville-Manlius High School/Nottingham High School and Decent from Lafayette Junior-Senior High School. Judges for the 2018 Battle of the Bands were Jose Varona, More Sound Recording Studio; Bob Staffa (B.O.B), 95X radio personality; Katrina Tulloch, life and culture reporter for The Post-Standard; Greg Minix, Syracuse New Times; and Nate Murphy, Josh Winoski and Dan Wrona from last year’s winning band Posted. This year’s Battle of the Bands was sponsored by More Sound Recording Studio, 95X, Contact Community Services and Pepsi.

TAY

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renovations in the home of a former student. With the help of American graduate student, Aaron Levy, she embarks on one last project to determine the identity of “Aleph,” the mysterious scribe of the documents. “The Weight of Ink” has been described as “an intellectual and emotional jigsaw puzzle,” and “a sophisticated work of historical fiction about women separated by centuries, and the choices and sacrifices they must make in order to reconcile the life of the heart and mind.” TAY Sisterhood book discussions are open to the community. For more information, email info@adath.org. “THE ETHICAL LIFE: JEWISH VALUES IN AN AGE OF CHOICE” BY SONALI MCINTYRE Since October, TAY Rabbi Paul Drazen has been conducting the monthly course, “The Ethical Life: Jewish Values in an Age of Choice.” The course includes videos featuring Jewish Theological Seminary faculty, other expert scholars and practitioners in the field, along with classical and contemporary texts. Rabbi Drazen said, “From political and financial scandals, to rapid progress in biomedical science and technology, the complex issues of modern society are, at their core, issues of ethical and moral concern. Now, more than ever, we require a solid understanding of how Jewish ethics can inform our discussions and decisions about the critical questions of the day. Judaism has a long history of wrestling with moral questions, responding to them in a way that considers all sides of an issue. ‘The Ethical Life,’ a study program of the Jewish Theological Seminary, gives us the opportunity to consider modern ethical issues through the lens of Jewish sources. Seminary faculty presentations and discussion make for a fascinating evening.” The remaining courses will be on Wednesdays at 7:30 pm: February 14, March 14, April 11, and May 9. This course is open to the community, and there is a fee for study materials. For more information, contact Rabbi Drazen at rabbidrazen@adath.org.

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Jewish Observer Issue of February 1, 2018

Syr0130  

Jewish Observer Issue of February 1, 2018

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