JEZ Magazine - The Legendary Issue

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MAGAZINE

Fashion. Culture. Philanthropy.

THE LEGENDARY ISSUE / 2019

THE LEGENDARY ISSUE WE STILL LOVE OLD HOLLYWOOD

QUENTIN JEZMAGAZINE.COM

TARANTINO’S MUSE

NICHOLE GALICIA GOES RETRO

S

Dorinda o

nice to be

VOLUME 3


EZSTUDIOS.COM • INFO@EZSTUDIOS.COM • TEL 646 329 6076


editor’s I am so thrilled to present

our new LEGENDARY Issue. This one truly has my heart, because it was inspired by all of my favorite people. The word Legend can mean a variety of things, but a true legend is someone who isn’t afraid to be his/herself and shine with his/her own personal sparkle. A legend creates an environment in which others feel free to shine as their authentic selves too. So many of the legends who inspired me growing up were artists of long ago who used their stardom and creativity to speak out against injustice.

letter Another legend who comes to mind is the gorgeous Josephine Baker, the first African-American to star in a motion picture in the 1920’s. Although renowned for her sensuality and stage presence, she was revered by intellectual, and became a spokesperson for civil rights. Josephine refused to perform for segregated audiences, and fought hard against the racism of her era.

As you can see, legends come in all different shapes, sizes, complexions, and nationalities. Although our issue features many beautiful people, and luxurious items, we never forget the philanthropic soul that is at the heart of everything we do here at JEZ. If you remain true to yourself, celebrate the beauty Hollywood Glam has been a theme of many of my shoots, in you and in others, and act with kindness and gratitude, then and when I think of quintessential hollywood glam, I think you, my darling reader, are already a legend in the making. of none other than the exquisite Marlene Dietrich. Growing up watching old movies, I was drawn to her voice, her Thank you to all the amazing people that have contributed sophistication, her confidence, and that badass androgynous to make this issue possible. tuxedo-look. Marlene, although German-American, refused to perform in Germany when it was taken over by the Nazi’s, God Bless, Ezequiel De La Rosa, Editor –in- Chief even bravely ridiculing Hitler in the press.

ON THE FRONT COVER: PHOTOGRAPHER EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA @EZEQUIELDELAROSA WITH DORINDA MEDLEY MAKE-UP TY-RON MAYES HAIR ARTIST MARC ANTHONY LOCATION THE LOTTE NEW YORK PALACE Gown by Cyril Verdavainne. Dyed silver fox stole in blue, Dennis Basso available at Saks Fifth Avenue Fur Depot.

ON BACK COVER: PHOTOGRAPHER EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA @EZEQUIELDELAROSA WITH FREDERIQUE VAN DER WAL STYLIST GRAZIELLA FERRARO STYLIST ASSISTANT VINCENT MORIN MAKE-UP/HAIR ARTIST BOBBY RENOOIJ LOCATION CONSERVATORIUM HOTEL AMSTERDAM

Covered suede and black lace heels: Christia Dior provided by Albright Fashion Library. Jewels By Hammerman Jewelers.

JEZ MAGAZINE © 2019, All Rights Reserved. The Authors and Photographers reproduction without permission prohibited. Follow JEZ MAGAZINE on instagram @jezmagazine. 3


contributors

Fashion Editor At Large

Creative Director

Design Director

Stylist

Stylist

Photographer

Contributing Writer

Beauty Editor

Fashion Editor

Creative Marketing Director

Contributing Writer

Stylist

Prepress Consultant

Stylist

IT Director

Production Director

Publisher Video Editor NEW YORK LOCATION: EZ Studios | 325 W. 37th Street | Ground Floor | New York, NY 10018


DR.SUE VARMA IT IS SO NICE TO BE

QUENTIN

TARANTINO’S MUSE

contents

THE BEAUTIFUL SIDE OF MENTAL HEALTH

NICHOLE

GALICIA GOES RETRO

DORINDA

MODA ITALIANA WITH THE LEGENDARY

GIANLUCA

DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOU’RE GOING TO?

MAHOGANY

ELVIS LIVES IN NYC

ALEX

LUNQVIST SHOWS US HIS SWEDEN

IN AMSTERDAM WITH

FREDERIQUE

VAN DER WAL


Do you remember what you were thinking when you made this painting? Is painting more a mental or emotional exercise? Do you generally think about something specific or rather try to capture a feeling? There are for me several ways to approach my creation. Most of the time I don’t have a particular concept or a storyboard in my head; I just go with the flow and the inspiration of the moment, leaving the feelings and the emotions to guide my hand. The painting reveals itself to my eyes as it would to an audience and it makes me discover sometimes some aspect of my personality and my sensitivity that were till then unknown to me. Sometimes, it also happens that I work on the series of paintings that are telling a story relating to a particular psychological aspect. In that case, I work first on a mini-storyboard that I have made during my daily breaks, sittting at the cafe, in a cab, or waiting for a meeting... during any window of my schedule. When I start to paint on the canvas, then the feeling and the emotions will still be the main guidance to my creation.

BEAUTIFUL

PEOPLE make BEAUTIFUL

This painting seems to strike a common theme you have returned to in a number of paintings. Among followers of your work, is this a popular style? What kind of reactions or comments do you receive on it? What is your favorite comment or reaction to it? This painting is one of a series that is actually the last period of my work, a period still in progress through many variations. My followers and collectors are actually very enthusiastic about it, and it seems that it talks to everyone about something very personal, digging deep in our core and often awakening some of our strongest emotions.

Things PHOTOGRAPHY: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA MAKE-UP: CHRISTOPHER MICHAEL HAIR: ARMANDO STYLED BY: JASON LYON FROM MORPHEW MODEL: SNOW DOLLKINSON THANK YOU: @SHOPMORPHEW

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THIS PAGE:THE BATHING SUIT AND PARACHUTE SKIRT, 1970S NORMA KAMALI WITH MANOLO BLAHNIK PUMPS. OPPOSITE PAGE:THE SILK GINGHAM BLOUSE, GIANFRANCO FERRÉ FOR DIOR HAUTE COUTURE WITH RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION TROUSERS AND MANOLO BLAHNIK PUMPS


My first impression in seeing this painting was of the story, Alice in Wonderland, and that the painting captured how it might look to see the sky from inside the rabbit hole that Alice fell down. It was dizzying for a moment! That impression was reinforced for me when I read that you were scouted at the age of 15 to become an international model. That must have been a dizzying moment for you. Did it feel something like falling down the rabbit hole? The paintings of this particular series are offering to our eyes the contrast of a giant white hole just in the middle of a dense and dark forest. It gives us the impression that we are lying in the grass looking through the hypnotic sky to the infinite of the universe. As with the allegory of Alice in Wonderland, those metaphoric images speak about the notion of passage. It is not so much about falling but more about crossing and evolving to the unknown; the interpretation of this white can also bring the notion of the “white page”: you write on it the story that you want, all your desires and all your dreams are just about to be true. There is of course, also, a very spiritual point of view, how to ignore, for the believers, the white light at the end of the tunnel, the passage to the other life. In my modeling career I have experienced this moment of transition several times, in particular at the moment I just started on the catwalks [podiums], alone, far from my country, far from my family, when I was suddenly projected, like a bullet from an unfinished childhood, to the toughness of the adult world.

How do you give back, as a model, an artist, a woman and a human being? Voltaire’s Candide spoke of “Tending one’s own garden;” well, I try to make my garden as large as possible and then to be the best host. You have spoken about your desire as an artist to express your optimism. This seems to be a quality in relatively short supply these days, especially in the political and social arenas. What can we all do to inject more optimism into our engagement with each other, and into our day-to-day lives? We have first to be in peace with ourselves before beginning to expand our energy and being efficiently able to help others. When this is done, we have in our hands the best tool to go forward in life and to assert positively ourselves in the social world. - Written By Jennifer Schense, founder, House of Nuremberg (houseofnuremberg.org)

At what moment did you feel that modeling was a career you chose for yourself rather than one that was chosen for you? Modeling was not chosen for me, even if I was very young when I started this career. It was proposed to me and for some reason that I still try to figure out, being at that time still very naive, I woke up and understood very fast the reality of this adult world, the twist of it and the traps that I should avoid. Where did you learn to draw and paint? You have spoken about the influence of your early years, your family home, and your father on your desire to create art and on your style. Did you engage in formal training as well? How important do you find such formal training to be? Or is it less important than some people might think? Beside the non-formal education that I had through the inspiration and the advice given by my father, I took some private lessons in my home town to learn different styles. When I was modeling in Paris, I had the chance to work by the side of the French artist Paul Marsignac, who is known for his paintings and his illustrations, and he became a mentor to me. Of course education about the different techniques and different mediums is important to give you the necessary basis necessary for artistry, but it can also very fast become a trap and thereafter bring limits to your wildness and to your freedom of creation. Have you ever considered figurative portraiture as an artist? What is your favorite photograph of yourself taken? Would you ever consider attempting a self-portrait? I often draw figurative sketches but those characters are always coming from my imagination. I love to contemplate the portraits made by the masters through the centuries but it is not an exercise that I am into. In general I do not work on a subject that is standing right in front of my eyes. I prefer when it leaves a trace in my memory and when its character and physical appearance starts to morph with the emotional and psychological impression that it has left to me.

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WARNER WADA Warner Wada is a New York based photographer, painter, documentary filmmaker and professor. As a graduate of Yale his passion for art and architecture, has in turn, fueled his love for photography. Along with heading the visual arts department at Ramapo College of New Jersey, Wada also founded design partnership Burning Relic, where he worked alongside many influential figures in the fashion, art and music world, including Donna Karan, Yohji Yamamoto, Lou Reed and more. He began by uniquely experimenting with pinhole photography, through his photographs of the Mayan ruins or “ruinas” in Quintana Roo, Mexico, followed by a photo series of the famous ruins of Angkor Wat in Cambodia. Wada describes how he chooses his subjects. One of his exhibitions, “Works in Progress: MeadowlandsA Post Industrial Resurrection was inspired by his daily commute from New York City to New Jersey’s Meadowlands area, just beyond the Lincoln Tunnel.

Wada emphatically describes the photo series as a tribute to the “beautifully rebounding natural richness and post industrial complexity of the Meadowlands.” He is deeply interested in the contradictory nature of environments. This isn’t the first time Warner has created art based on the Meadowlands. His documentary film Muskrat John, is a touching tribute to the area, featuring New Jersey fisherman Johnny Rohweder who, even in his late 80’s, carries on fishing in the shadow of the New York City Skyscrapers. His most recent work, is a one-person exhibit of his black and white photography, showcasing Pittsburgh in the 1970’s all the way up to modern-day New York City. Warner reveals, what makes this particular exhibition so special, is the reward of comparing and contrasting his earlier photographs to his more recent ones of New York City. We look forward to discovering which subject and medium Warner will utilize next. - Written By Victoria DeBlauss

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Ben Fronckowiak A RENAISSANCE MAN

You paint, you make films, you model. Would you consider yourself a Renaissance man? Is there truly such a thing? What makes for a legend in the painting world? I feel the need to express myself through making art and enjoy varying forms of expression—if that makes me a Renaissance man, then yes I would consider myself a Renaissance man. I don’t see myself as any one thing—I don’t like to limit myself. If I feel sad, then I might want to paint a funny caricature, whereas if I’m happy, then I might want to paint something more realistic in order to ground me—I let my feelings dictate what and how I approach art. I studied film production at UCLA and I was trained in running a production—this includes all aspects of a production: filming, directing, set designing, casting, acting, and editing. I don’t like to limit myself artistically and want to learn as much as I can. “Legend” is relative. There are so many remarkable talents who are overlooked while others gain attention but who (in my opinion) aren’t very talented. A legend is someone who fights for truth despite what the status quo deems acceptable.

and to encourage them to keep to what can seem like a very uncertain life track? (Pablo Picasso was quoted as saying: “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.”) There are no guarantees in life, but can more be done to build communities that keep artists on track for the long-term? I found inspiration in my teachers as they made me feel accepted by providing stability, encouragement and love. However, in terms of the inevitably difficult and uncertain path, I choose to embrace this. This uncertainty is what makes the career exciting and unpredictable. There are hurdles, but just like in anything, these hurdles teach us patience, discipline, determination and how to jump even higher. If everything was easy, it wouldn’t be worth it; however, overcoming adversity makes the thrill and foster empathy. You work across a number of artistic platforms. How do you balance your time in the midst of professional uncertainty, and how do you maintain a cohesive artistic platform and professional identity across your different areas of expression and work? This is something that I let evolve. I don’t typically anticipate my steps—I usually listen to my intuition. I also try not to take a judgmental stance with opportunities; instead of viewing something as right or wrong, I try to train myself to find the pros and cons of a situation—if it’s something that I haven’t done before, I try to train myself how to do it. Hence, my journey has been serendipitous—it all falls under the umbrella of art making, and there’s no right or wrong way to do something. Uncertainty is inevitable, so why not have fun with it?

You paint murals in public spaces, which adds a performative element to painting. Do you see a parallel between this form of art and modeling, which is also intended for the public gaze? Yes; I absolutely see a parallel. Modeling has helped me to be more confident with myself and my choices. I was initially extremely timid and only comfortable behind the camera; however, modeling helped me feel confident in myself and in being seen by an audience. Mural/live painting is similar, but whereas modeling is more superficial, live painting is a more vulnerable experience—not only are you watched superficially, but your painting is being judged as well. I open myself up entirely when I paint live. You have spoken about the importance of volunteering, and of the importance of helping others to find their strengths and talents. Do you feel the art world does enough of this? Or do the ideas of the “struggling artist” and the “lucky break” still largely hold? What more can be done to foster artists from a younger age,

If you could paint anyone’s portrait 50 feet high in Times Square, whose would it be? I would create a character—she would be inspired by Botero and Picasso.

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- Written By Jennifer Schense, founder, House of Nuremberg (houseofnuremberg.org)


JACKET, ECIECTIC PINS, FLEURD PINS SHIRT, PRADA

Stylish ON

PHOTOGRAPHER: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA STYLIST: ALEXANDER GARCIA GROOMING: FRANCISCO CATEDRAL MODEL: SIMON WHEELDON

DEMAND 11


JACKET, ECIECTIC SHIRT, PRADA TIE, PRADA PANTS, STEPHEN F

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THIS PAGE: SUIT, DAVID HART SHIRT, PRADA BOWTIE, STEPHEN F OPPOSITE PAGE: JACKET, DAVID HART BOWTIE, STEVEN F SHIRT, PRADA

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SUIT, DAVID HART SHOES, FLORSHEIM

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BILLIONAIRES @BILLIONAIREINTERNATIONAL

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MODA italiana

With

Gianluca

THE LEGENDARY PHOTOGRAPHER: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA @EZEQUIELDELAROSA_PHOTOGRAPHY ART DIRECTION: ROSIO DE LA ROSA MODEL: GIANLUCA DISOTTO @GIALUCADISOTTO

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BOTH PAGES: BILLIONAIRES @BILLIONAIREINTERNATIONAL

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BILLIONAIRES @BILLIONAIREINTERNATIONAL

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PETRELLI AMAME @PETRELLIUOMO_OFFICIAL

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BOTH PGES: BILLIONAIRES @BILLIONAIREINTERNATIONAL

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o

S

nice to be DorindaMedley

is best known for starring in Bravo’s hit reality show, “The Real Housewives of New York.” She is an entrepreneur, philanthropist and socialite who caught the eye of Bravo’s Andy Cohen. Medley has since become one of the fan favorites. In fact, the self-proclaimed hostess has become the heart of the show. With her no nonsense approach to life, the moxy maven continues to captivate her audience with saucy taglines and quick, witty comebacks like, “Clip Bitch!” And her unforgettable, “... I made it nice!” Dorinda walks the walk and now talks the talk with her very own talk show on Radio Andy SiriusXM. Medley’s gabfest is an intimate chat, in which, Dorinda uses her own life experience to help others. In her life, Dorinda took tragedies

and turned them into triumphs and heartbreaks into love. And without the distraction of the other housewives, Dorinda gives heartfelt advice to her millions of listeners and truly “Makes It Nice.” For our Issue, “The Queen of Blue Stone Manor”, takes center stage and channels Germany’s, “Teutonic Blonde”, Marlene Dietrich at the exclusive Lotte New York Palace. Friend and Fashion Editor at Large, Ty-Ron Mayes, cracked open the vaults of Hammerman Jewelers, as well as, the iconic Fur Salon Saks Fifth Avenue and styled a luxurious layout that shows the glamorous side of being one of the world’s most famous Housewives....

Words by Ty-Ron Mayes

PHOTOGRAPHY: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA FASHION EDITOR AT LARGE AND TEXT: TY-RON MAYES MAKE-UP: TY-RON MAYES FOR PAPER FACES HAIR: MARC ANTHONY ASSISTANT STYLIST: COCO JOHNSEN AND COUMBA DIAO PHOTO ASSISTANT: JULIO RAMÓN VIDEOGRAPHER: NANO LEON SPECIAL THANK YOU TO: THE LOTTE NEW YORK PALACE

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Dorinda!!

t’s Dooorrrrinda! Dorinda wears a black and white beaded blazer and fringe necklace, Naeem Khan. French beret, Flame Keeper Hat Club. On her right hand, Dorinda wears 18 karat white gold Bombe Crystal and Diamond Ring and on her left hand, 18k White Gold and Diamond Black Onyx Cocktail Ring, Hammerman Jewelers.


Dorinda Medley loves a suit! Inspired by a dark hair Marlene Dietrich who once said, “I am at heart a gentleman.” Dorinda challenges gender roles in this crisp pale blue dress shirt, silk tie and wool blazer, Hatem Sayki. Black slacks, Victoria Beckham. Fedora, Keeper of The Flame Hat Club. Patent leather loafers, Pierre Hardy. Gold brooch, Object D’Art Pin Flower Collection 18 Karat Flower Vase Pin with Diamonds, Rubies, and Opal, Hammerman Jewelers.


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Dorinda enjoys drinks after 5 in the Lotte Hotel’s posh, French style Wood Panel Bar. “Martini’s are like breast: two are great ... three are too many.” Black tuxedo blazer, Yves Saint Laurent. Black tuxedo pants, Victoria Beckham, both courtesy of Albright Fashion Library. White tuxedo shirt and bow tie, Hatem Sayki. Top hat, Keeper of The Flame Hat Club. Black and red patent leather peep-toe pumps, Christian Louboutin (Paris). Gold brooch, Object D’Art Pin Collection: 18 Karat Vase Pin with Diamonds, Rubies, and Amethyst and 18 Karat White and Yellow Gold Cocktail Ring with Amethyst, Emeralds, and Diamonds. 40 carats of amethyst and emerald, 1.6 carats of diamonds, Hammerman Jewelers.

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The scene stealer! Dorinda captures our attention in this beautiful Fortuny pleated gown with Art Deco style crystal embellishments, Coco Johnsen. Nude peep toe pumps, Christian Louboutin (Paris). Short black feather coat: Julia & Stella available at Fur Salon at Saks Fifth Avenue Fur Depot. 18 Karat Vintage Cut Champagne Cushion Crystal Earrings with Diamonds. 18 Karat Royal Pave Diamond Bracelet. 8.81 carats of diamonds. 18 karat diamond bracelet with diamonds. 13 carats of diamonds, Hammerman Jewelers.

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On with the show! Dorinda Medley is the ultimate hostess. What do you do after lighting the Lotte New York Palace’s Christmas Tree? You celebrate in this black sheer tulle coat with bell sleeves trimmed in ostrich feathers, Osman. Black beaded dress, Long sleeve, black beaded sheer gown, Alberta Ferretti. Beaded “showgirl” headband with plumes, Eric Javis. Open toe, 2 buckle suede heels with ankle straps, Sergio Rossi. All provided by Albright Fashion Library. Platinum and Diamond Kunzite Crown Ring with Pink Sapphires. .13 carats of diamonds, 24 carats of kunzite and pink sapphire. 18 karats amethyst ring. 6.75 carats of diamonds, 29 carat amethyst. 18 Karat diamond tassel earring with baguettes. 8 carats of diamonds. 18 Karat black spinel and Akoya Pearl Necklaces, Hammerman Jewelers.


The party’s over when Dorinda says, “I love you for coming and I love you for leaving!” Open back black evening gown with dramatic floor length long sleeves, Alex Perry. Open toe, sling back D’Orsay style stiletto heels, Alexandre Vauthier. Both provided by Albright Fashion Library. 18 Karat Flexible Necklace with Diamonds, Emeralds, Rubies, and Sapphires. 18 karats 9 row flexible bracelet with diamonds, emeralds, rubies and sapphires. 22 carats diamonds, 36 carats of color stones. 18 karats Cabochon ruby and diamond bracelet. 22 carats of diamonds, 21 carats of rubies. 18 Karat flexible earring with diamonds, emeralds, rubies, and sapphires. 13 carats of diamonds, 8 karats of color stones, Hammerman Jewelers.

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Beautiful f

o MENTAL HEALTH

PHOTOGRAPHER: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA STYLIST: ALEXANDER GARCIA MAKE-UP: FRANCISCO CATEDRAL TALENT: DR. SUE VARMA HAIR : JACQUELINE MORGAN FASHION ASSISTANT: VINCE MELENDEZ GOWN PROVIDED BY: MORPHEW SPECIAL THANKS TO: WATER SIDE FOR THE BEAUTIFUL LOCATION THANK YOU: KEYTT LUNDQVIST DRAMA TO THE PHOTO

It strikes me that we have become a more fearful society, fearful and distrustful both of our fellow citizens and of foreigners. Why do you think that is, and in the largest sense, what can we do about it? We are still a new nation, and more heterogenous. When you are contrasting the US to European nations—we don’t all speak the same language, even though we are neighbors—our food, religious practices, our street smarts and savvy all vary greatly. I think our beauty is that we are relatively new and fresh, we can invent and adopt what works and discard what doesn’t; we aren’t weighed down by tradition. But I wonder if at the same time we are also not grounded by it the way other countries may be.

2021 will mark twenty years since the September 11 (2001) attacks. As the founding medical director and attending psychiatrist to the World Trade Center mental health program at NYU Langone/Bellevue Hospital, named one of the 3 centers of excellence for treatment after 9/11, what do you foresee will by the lasting legacy of 9/11 in terms of mental health? We will have a profound understanding of the long-term consequences of trauma. There were a lot of losses, for a lot of people. These types of large-scale attacks chip away at the morale of our society- but they also show that communities have the chance to bounce back. We have learned about factors involved in resilience—with altruism and support being key—both of which were palpable after 9/11 here. In my mind, New York and much of the country will be divided into two eras—pre and post 9/11—from everything from the sense of care-free attitude we have lost to all the extra security measures we have in place to protect us as a result of these events. “If you see something, say something”- signs on subways everywhere still 18 years later; there is heightened anxiety, but understandably so. These were things that could only happen in movies, we thought. As a physician, I want to see the people whose health was impacted by 9/11—the cancers, asthma, allergies—I want to see them get the medical treatment and support they deserve. We can’t turn our backs to them. More first responders have died of illness linked to the attack than had perished in it.

Your practice seems to be a quite modern one, balanced between traditional private sessions with patients and public outreach and discussion, via television, radio and the Internet. How effective do you find the public outreach side of your practice? Does the increasing distrust many people have expressed in the media lately affect this? Is there a way to reach across this divide to foster greater public trust in this essential discussion about how to address issues of mental health? Trust is important when it comes to healthcare. We need to also feel that our doctor is invested in getting to know us, is relatable and accessible. Because of constraints and challenges with our healthcare system, financial and time pressures, not being able to practice medicine the way they want, doctors are experiencing burn-out and even higher rates of suicide than ever before. This will impact patient care and as a whole I think there are feelings of disappointment.

For myself, I was living in New York at the time of 9/11, but was in the Netherlands on the day it happened. I moved to the Netherlands the following April, and I don’t think that is entirely coincidental. New York didn’t feel like home anymore. I have the feeling that this sense of disconnection cannot have been something that only I experienced. How did you find that New Yorkers recovered a sense of home after 9/11? A sense of home was lost. New Yorkers are some of the toughest people I’ve ever met; I’m born and raised here. They are also some of the most genuine people you will meet. People don’t necessarily realize that—we have a “rough around the edges” stereotype —but I like the “what you see is what you get” attitude. If they say they will help you they will. There were a lot of incentives for businesses and residential areas to re-invest in the downtown area, and it is thriving. More first responders have died since 9/11 due to health-related complications than in the attacks. This is a tragedy and breaks my heart. We need to support those who saved our lives.

Your private practice includes addressing work-life balance issues. What are your three top suggestions for how to achieve work-life balance? On a related note, your practice is based in New York City. I lived myself in New York for eight years, and while I loved it, I felt the demands of living in a big and expensive city could drain me of my energy. What tactics do you recommend to city dwellers for maintaining some reserve of energy in the face of the demands of working, commuting and getting things done in the big city? It’s been ingrained in many of us that US is considered the “land of opportunity” and “if you believe, you can achieve.” So most people “forget” to relax or don’t even take their complete vacations. One study shows that if they are given two weeks, they often leave a week on the table. This is in contrast to some other countries where

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DRESS, FRED HAYMAN GIORGIO BEVERLY HILLS JEWELRY, MODELS OWN


How important is it to keep believing in legends, in myths, in something bigger than our everyday lives? Which legends or myths are important to your own philosophy or outlook, if any? The people who fought against all odds, in enlightening and creating mass change, and who gave their lives/well-being for it, come to mind, such as Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and the Queen of Jhansi (Rajasthan). The Hindu godddess Durga is an amazing female role model, and the Greek gods and characters like Sisyphus never go out of style.

the month of August is frequently taken as a holiday. As for my tips, I would offer the following: 1. Make your life outside of work a priority, particularly social life, and schedule dinner w friends. 2. Have a sense of self-worth and mastery that comes from something outside of your work. A class-patients of mine love exercise-spinning, group sports, volunteering and mentoring students, and have other properties and interests from where they draw their self-esteem. 3. Schedule downtime. Cut off from work at a specific time, let people know you aren’t available, wrap up projects, or ask for coverage. 4. Plan vacations in advance. 5. Ask to work from home, have flexible work schedules where as long as work gets done that is what should count.

You have talked about the impact of losing a sense of purpose, in particular through losing a job or career, referencing the work of Victor Frankl, the Holocaust survivor, who spoke about the importance of having a sense of purpose to survive and thrive, to connect to something outside and beyond yourself..To what degree is it important to account for what has happened in order to have closure and move on? Acceptance is a necessary part of grieving, which is the hardest part. When experiencing loss, trying to understand it intellectually helps, but also having a philosophy in life is important. I like he serenity prayer, which says there are some things we need to accept and that we need courage, wisdom and serenity, to do what we can always, but let go when we can’t do any more.

I wonder what role you might see for philosophy in maintaining mental health? I’m very grateful to you for bringing this up. I’ve been touched by world religions and philosophies; all of the major religions have taught me something and have been a part of my education, either formally or informally. I’ve spent most time growing up with eastern wisdom, and although was born and raised in the US, I lived in India for two years and then visited there in summers thereafter, and worked there while in medical school. Mindfulness-based stress reduction, now very much integrated into western medicine, comes from the east. I also appreciate existential, stoic philosophies, Greek thinkers and their contribution to science, etc. When I have experienced losses, the eastern tradition has been helpful, as it has been in understanding pain, sickness, tragedy, and loss as part of the cycle of life, and embracing non-attachment—seeing happiness and sorrow as the same in their transience—and that we are bigger than either. But having a faith, a philosophy, has been thought to be very protective of mental health.

In this current political and social climate, many people are looking for reasons to be optimistic. Can you name three? We need to remain optimistic because our mood predicts our success. Studies show that doctors do better when in a good mood, and students perform better when teachers have high expectations of them. They do better; it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. Optimism is correlated with resilience after trauma. We see this after natural disasters, terrorism attacks. And is the only way to get through ups and downs of life-because there will be many. We are also making advancements in technology that are giving us access to people, conversations, opportunities in a way we haven’t seen before. This is cause for optimism. I feel that the inclusion of mental health as part of the global dialogue is a cause for optimism. The UK has appointed a loneliness minister and a suicide prevention minister, showing at least acknowledgement of these issues. NY State is making prenatal depression screening mandatory. We still need to make care accessible to all-and we need to start early in the life cycle to prevent. But we are taking positive steps forward. - Written By Jennifer Schense, founder, House of Nuremberg (houseofnuremberg.org)

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THIS PAGE: DRESS, FRED HAYMAN GIORGIO BEVERLY HILLS SHOES, NINE WEST JEWELRY, MODELS OWN THE OPPOSITE PAGE: DRESS, BADGLEY MISCHKA SHOES, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

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THIS PAGE: THE ERA OF THE ORIENT IS REVISITED WITH THIS CRIMSON KIMONO AND SEQUIN HIGH-WAIST SHORT, CHENG-HUAI CHUANG. BLACK SILK WRAPPED BRA, DOLCE & GABBANA (VINTAGE). GRAPHIC PRINT PEEP-TOE PUMP WITH STRAP, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN.

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Chez

N ! NICHOLE Welcome to the “Roaring 2020’s” where Hollywood is set to change its perspective as we know it! Being Black is hot! And one woman has positioned herself to stand out and to be seen. Enter Nichole Galicia! The American actress who set her sights on Hollywood. This acting assassin has starred in compelling television series, sci-fi hits and is the muse of Quentin Tarantino! He casted her in his Oscar Award Winning film, “D’Jango Unchained”! This sassy starlet even inspired the atmospheric energy at his, “Once Upon A Time In... Hollywood”, premiere. In fact, she was the original cigarette girl who, “...Took A bite out of a Red Apple Cigarette.” After starring opposite Jaime Fox in two films, kissing Leonardo Di Caprio and devouring the entire cast of “Defiance”, our cover girl is on her way to becoming a leading lady!

PHOTOGRAPHER: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA FASHION EDITOR AT LARGE: TY-RON MAYES BEAUTY EDITOR: RENEE GARNES HAIR: ANDREA WILSON


INSPIRED BY THE PIN-UP GIRLS OF VARGAS, NICHOLE IN THIS RED SEQUIN FLAPPER DRESS, EMILIO PUCCI. GRAPHIC PRINT PEEP-TOE PUMP WITH STRAP, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN.

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THE HOODED EYES OF A SEASONED ACTRESS EVOKES A SULTRY ALLURE AND THE SWEETEST PAIN. NICHOLE’S PENSIVE BEAUTY CREATES A WOMAN OF MYSTERY IN THIS BLACK VEIL EMBELLISHED WITH CRYSTALS, VICTORIA HAYES. BEAUTY NOTE: DANESSA MYRICKS COSMETICS GETS YOU READY FOR AN AWARD-WINNING SCENE WITH COLOR FIX IN FRUIT PUNCH FOR YOUR LIPS. VISION CREAM FOUNDATION AND SHIMMER-ILLUMINATING VEIL IN DESIRE. ENLIGHT ILLUMINATOR IN CONFIDENCE. AVAILABLE AT DANESSAMYRICKSBEAUTY.COM


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Nichole Galicia

INSPIRED BY JOSEPHINE BAKER, SHIMMIES IN THIS SILVER SEQUIN FRINGE BODYSUIT, CHENG-HUAI CHUANG. PATENT LEATHER HEELS, YSL.

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NicholeIS NOGalicia DANCES LIKE THERE TOMORROW IN THIS SEQUIN

FRINGE DRESS IN PEWTER TRIMMED N BLACK LACE, NAEEM KHAN. BLACK, PINK, SILVER METALLIC AND GRAPHIC STRAP HEELS, JIMMY CHOO.

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Nichole

CHANNELS THE SWAN-LIKE MOVEMENT OF THE SUBJECTS OF ERTE’. BLACK BEADED GOWN WITH HORSE HAIR PANELS, CARMEN MARC VALVO VINTAGE. PATENT LEATHER OPEN TOE SHOES, YSL.

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Nichole Galicia

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LIKE JOSEPHINE BAKER, IS A PHILANTHROPIST WHO IS THE FOUNDER OF THE ORCHID FOUNDATION; A MENTORSHIP PROGRAM DESIGNED TO HELP UNDERSERVED GIRLS IN NEW YORK CITY. NICHOLE GIVES HER BEST PIN-UP POSE IN THIS PYTHON CORSET WITH BLACK AND WHITE PEARLS, WORN WITH, BLACK PEARL BEADED SHORTS, THE BLONDS. NUDE PEEP-TOE PUMPS, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN.


PEOPLE TO FOLLOW

Alejandro Garcia @alexandergarstyle

Amara La Ngra @amaralanegraaln

Sue Varma @doctorsuevarma

Ben Fronckowiak @benfronckowiak

Carlton Jones @carltonjones212

Waterside Restaurant @watersidenj

Amit Neuman @amit_neuman

Dorinda Medley @dorindamedley

Frederique van der Wal @frederiquevdwal

Ovo Drenth @itsovodrenth

Jacob M Lewandowski @jacobmlewandowski

Jennifer Schense @jschense

Kinga Trojan @kin_derka

Nichole Galicia @officialnicholegalicia

Robert Lee @sir.robert.lee

Julien Farel @julienfarel

Snow Dolkinson @snowdolkinson

NY Model Management @Alexanderallenstyle

D. Smith @truedsmith

@Winonah De Jong @winonahdejong

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PEOPLE TO FOLLOW

The Fur Salon Nyc @thefursalonnyc

Renee Garnes @reneegarnes

Ty-Ron Mayes @stylisttyronmayes

Ezequiel De La Rosa @ezequieldelarosa

Francisco Catedral @franciscocatedral

Iconic Focus @iconicfocus

Victoria DeBlauss @victoriadeblauss

Rui Araujo @ruizao_king

Arnold Milfort @arnoldmilfort

Gianluca Disotto @gianluca.disotto

Conservatorium Hotel @Conservatorium Hotel

jacqueline Leighh @jacqueline.leighh

Lotte New York Palace @ @newyorkpalace

Click Models @clickmodelny

Christopher Michael @therealcmichael

EZ Studios @ezstudios

The Bank Hotel @bankhotelstockhom

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Alex Lundqvist @therealalexlundqvist

Simon Wheeldon @skwheeldon

Andrea E Wilson @andreawilson_hair


OUTFIT, WINONAH SWIMSUIT, MARLIES DEKKERS SANDALS, UNISA JEWELLERY, MR O GLASSES, CELINE

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A day in Amsterdam

Frederique With

PHOTOGRAPHER: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA MODEL: FREDERIQUE VAN DER WAL STYLIST: GRAZIELLA FERRARO STYLIST ASSISTANT: VINCENT MORIN MAKE-UP/HAIR ARTIST: BOBBY RENOOIJ LOCATION: CONSERVATORIUM HOTEL - AMSTERDAM

INTERVIEW WITH FREDERIQUE VAN DER WAL BY JENNIFER SCHENSE, FOUNDER, HOUSE OF NUREMBERG

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INTERVIEW WITH FREDERIQUE VAN DER WAL

The Netherlands is celebrating Rembrandt this year as a legend of Dutch culture. What does it mean to you to be a legend? Can someone achieve this status in their own lifetime? Why do legends matter?

by Jennifer Schense, founder, House of Nuremberg

I understand you live in New York but spend a lot of time in Amsterdam. What is your favorite place to spend time? I love both New York and Amsterdam, in Amsterdam what I love is the coziness, the gezelligheid of the city and the closeness of my friends there. Amsterdam is a village more than a big city, which makes it very easy to be in yet it can also make it stifling. The Dutch are a bit more careful. By contrast, in New York, anything is possible. New York inspires me, both in its variety of people, and in what people do and achieve all around me. At the same time, the anonymity the city provides can be nice at times. A great combi, these two worlds. In Amsterdam, I was just at the Noordermarkt the other day, and it was fabulous to be surrounded by all these beautiful flowers, organic cheeses and foods, to run into people and chat, and just sit and have a slice of appeltaart and coffee. Life is good in Amsterdam; the pace of life is much slower, which is a nice contrast to New York. In New York I love the Nolita area to wander around in. How has your experience as a model affected your view of the importance of portraits and visual representations of ordinary life? Today, I think more than ever, we have an inside look into people’s lives, everyone is accessible, everyone shares everything. It’s maybe almost too much, from my point of view. I would like to see a bit of mystery again. My life as a model has brought me a lot and still does, especially due to my travels and seeing so many cultures. Life in New York has the same effect; it exposes you to so much. I love the arts, and often go to museums and galleries. I think the overexposure we see in everyday lives, we see in fashion as well. I think at the moment we are exposed to too much, and that people edit or fine-tune everything so much, we don’t even know what’s real anymore. In this way, fashion I feel has become a bit flat. I do hope that will change again, and that it will become a bit more interesting.

Who to you are the most important legends who guide you through their actions in the past? Who do you feel most connected to you? In turn, what do you want people to remember about you, looking back on your life? I get inspired all the time in New York by people and events that suddenly touch me. The artist Beatrix Ost is one such person, a dear friend and someone I admire for her look on life. Fantastic! But in the end, family has influenced me the most. My mom passed away very young, but made a huge impact on my life, both in the way she was and also in her passing. My daughter has also taught me a lot. She is such a gift, and has helped me grow enormously. My friends will remember me as someone who was kind, caring, and lived life to the fullest. You have participated in many charitable endeavors, from saving the native forest to Solving Kids Cancer and have spoken about how your flower business is designed to improve people’s lives. Along those lines, I very much enjoyed watching Homegrown Makeover. What is your current focus in terms of charitable activity? How do you like to give back?

Do you think the Netherlands had a hand in presenting a greater variety of models and more realistic portrayals of them than elsewhere in the industry? Where do you think the industry is going in this respect, where does it deserve kudos, and how can it do better? I think the Dutch are very real as people and very grounded, and that’s what you feel. I think in terms of variety they could still do better. I do feel the fashion industry has gotten much better, using a variety of women, men, guys and girls. It is more interesting too, as beauty finally comes in every shape and color. The trend of that really fake look is still there too, but I think it’s leaving, thank God! You also see the mix of ages, which I think is wonderful. As for myself, I actually enjoy it more now, to stand in front of a camera and play, than when I was a young girl. I like where I am. You live in New York as well, formerly New Amsterdam. What elements of Dutch culture do you perceive in the city? Do you feel still some connections between the two places? One of the Dutch things is a mengelmoes van mensen, or a mixture of people. I think New York has that, and got that from the Dutch. The first renowned couple was a mixed couple. In certain areas, I really feel the Dutchness: downtown for sure, with its smaller scale and smaller streets. I’m doing a series now called Lifecycles on Newswire.fm, where I jump on my bike and interview some of my unique friends, and talk about the cycles of life, and what keeps them in New York. I was interviewing an actor the other day, and walked by the house of former Dutch governor of New Amsterdam, Peter Stuyvesant. The Dutch are very present!

I’m Dutch and we are humble and grounded, so no, I don’t see myself as a legend! We didn’t really grow up with the concept of legends, but I do admire certain people. Also, a legend is someone who did indeed pass on; there are few legends who are still alive. I do feel that we mix up celebrities with legends today; we have so many ridiculous celebrities and they will be well forgotten after they have died. I think a true legend gives something lasting to society, something meaningful and impactful, like poetry, painting, music, writing, architecture, and so forth. They are the thinkers and these people I admire. These legends are a beautiful thing.

I think it is very important to give back in any way possible, to share, whether it is time, money, or connections. We can all bring awareness to certain issues. I do try to give back through charities such as STNF.org (save the Native Forest) and Solving kids Cancer (solvingkidscancer.org). Homegrown Makeover had a bit of that too by introducing plants and flowers into people’s lives, as a way to start understanding that we have to respect nature, and the cycles of life. I’m working now on a documentary which I will be doing with my daughter, heading into the Amazon in Ecuador next year. What lessons would you share from your own career as a model for young people interested in modeling? Would you advise a young model to begin in New York or elsewhere? Are you involved in the modeling world in Amsterdam? What would you advise young girls and parents of young girls or boys who are interested in modeling? Modeling is a great opportunity to discover the world. As a business it has changed a lot. For a model starting out, where you start depends on your strengths. In the old days, you started with magazines and built up a book and recognition. Often that was done in Europe, in particular between Paris and Milan. These days of course, through social media you need to create a presence that way, you need followers. So, depending on an agent and where you want to be, you can start anywhere. New York, Paris and London are still big starting points. I have seen girls get their start in Amsterdam or anywhere really.

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I do feel that modeling can still be a great spring board and jumping-off point, but I firmly believe that young women and men need to develop further, and study and find different interests, not just enter modeling and think, that’s it, there isn’t anything else to do. These days, a career in modeling doesn’t last that long. It is good to have options.


FLOWERS DRESS, MARCIANO SANDALS, UNISA JEWELRY, MR O

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SILVER DRESS, MARCIANO SANDALS, UNISA WATCH BALLON BLEU, CARTIER RING, MR O

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GREEN DRESS, WINONAH BLUE HEELS, STEVE MADDEN RING, GRAZIELLA FERRARO

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THIS PAGE: DRESS, WINONAH SANDALS, UNISA BRACELET, BODES & BODE RING, MR O COUTURE HAT, DEMURE OPPOSITE PAGE: JEWELLERY, MR O BLUE DRESS, WINONAH

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space Audrey

PHOTOGRAPHER: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA STYLIST: ALEXANDER GARCIA HAIR & MAKE-UP: JACQUELINE MORGAN MODEL: KINGA TROJAN WITH NEW YORK MODELS CHANEL & VIVIAN DELLA CHIESA PROVIDED BY MORPHEW ALL VINTAGE JEWELRY COURTESY OF VANESSA’S VINTAGE

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THIS PAGE: JACKET & TROUSERS, HOGAN MCLAUGHLIN GLOVES, CAROLINA AMATO SHOES, GUESS EARRINGS, 1980s GIVENCHY OPPOSITE PAGE: DRESS, THE BLONDS SHOES, NINE WEST BRACELET, 1950s VARGAS

Age

Hepburn

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DRESS, VIVIENNE TAM SHOES, SERGIO ROSSI EARRINGS, 1930s MIRIAM HASKELL COCKTAIL RING, 1990s 14K GOLD & CITRINE

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JACKET, GREY-DYED PYTHON JACKET WITH SILVER FOX TRIM EXCLUSIVELY FOR THE FUR SALON AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. SAKS.COM/THEFURSALON NECKLACE & BRACELETS, MINDI MOND

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THIS PAGE: JACKET, MONIQUE LHUILLIER SAPPHIRE MINK JACKET WITH APPLIQUES FOR THE FUR SALON AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE, SAKS.COM/THEFURSALON TROUSERS, HOGAN MCLAUGHLIN SHOES, SERGIO ROSSI EARRINGS, 1960s VENDOME OPPOSITE PAGE: DRESS, CHANEL EARRINGS, DIOR NECKLACES, 1950s SCHIAPARELLI & MIRIAM HASKELL HOSIERY, FOGAL GLOVES, CAROLINA AMATO SHOES, KENNETH COLE


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DRESS, NAEEM KHAN EARRINGS, 1960S VENDOME COCKTAIL RING, 1990s 14K GOLD & TOPAZ NECKLACE, 1970s SARAH COVENTRY (WORN AS DIADEM)

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LUNDQVIST shares

his

SWEDEN PHOTOGRAPHER: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA MODEL: ALEX LUNDQVIST LOCATION: STOCKHOLM, SEWDEN THANKS TO: THE BANK HOTEL & ALMA

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THIS PAGE: OUTFIT BY STEPHEN F OPPOSITE PAGE: OUTFIT BY ROSE & BORN

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THIS PAGE: OUTFIT BY ROSE & BORN SUNGLASSES, OVAN EYEWEAR OPPOSITE PAGE: TUX LOOK BY ROSE & BORN

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BOTH PAGES: OUTFIT BY ROSE & BORN

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THIS PAGE: OUTFIT BY ROSE & BORN OPPOSITE PAGE: OUTFIT BY STEPHEN F

Brandi Quinones turns up the heat in a red crystal chainmail bandeau top with matching lace up skirt, The Blonds. Shoes, Christian Louboutin, provided by Albright Fashion Library.

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Red Alert! Brandi Quinones is wearing a red and leopard sequin bustier maxi dress, The Blonds. Silver gloves, Carolina Amati. Shoes, Christian Louboutin. Gloves and shoes provided by Albright Fashion Library. Kenny is wearing a necklace .......

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Amara is wearing a WHITE MONTANA LYNX HOODED CAPE available at THE FUR SALON AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE stores nationwide or saks.com/thefursalon

Amara La Negra AIN’T NO MOUNTAIN HIGH ENOUGH FOR THE FIERCE Amara!

I was immediately intrigued by Amara with her charismatic demeanor and strong character. Amara is a driven force of nature who has overcome so many obstacles including racism in her own Latin community. Though most may not think, racism exists amongst latin communities. I myself, being Latino and biracial, have experienced it. I admire Amara for overcoming these obstacles and becoming one of the few Latina Afro latinas to make a name for herself in such a large and difficult market. Amara was born to perform and those that have the honor of being in her presence can easily captivate her exuberant energy and thrive! I admire her for all she has overcome and wish her nothing but continued success in her future.

PHOTO: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA /// MAKE-UP: JACQUELINE CICALA /// HAIR: HADIIYA BARBEL /// STYLIST : STEVEN LASSALLE

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KIMONO, YUMI KATSURA SHOES, KATE SPADE

Mahogany PHOTOGRAPHY: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA STYLIST: CARLTON JONES @CARLTONJONESCOLLECTION MAKE-UP: JACQUELINE MORGAN MODEL: OVO DRENTH @ITSOVODRENTH WITH @MAJORMODELSNY MALE MODEL: AMIT NEUMAN


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HER: DRESS, LAURENCE & CHICO EARRING, VINTAGE CHANEL SHOES, BALENCIAGA RING, LARUICCI HIM: JACKET, RALPH LAUREN SHIRT, DIOR HOMME PANTS, DEVEREUX

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HER: JUMPSUIT, CARLTON JONES SHOES, DIANE VON FURSTENBERG EARRINGS, VINTAGE DIOR RING, LARUICCI HIM: JACKET, CASPAR SALDANHA SHIRT, HUGO BOSS PANTS, DEVEREUX SHOES, FLORSHEIM

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DRESS, MORPHEUS


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THIS PAGE: DRESS, CARLTON JONES SCARVES,KAZUMI YOSHIDA OPPOSITE PAGE: HAT, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN KIMONO, MORPHEUS SKIRT, CARLTON JONES

SHOES AND DRESS BY KATTY XIOMARA

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ELVIS LIVES IN NYC

PHOTOGRAPHER: EZEQUIEL DE LA ROSA STYLIST: ALEXANDER GARCIA MAKE-UP: JACQUELINE MORGAN MODEL: JACOB M. LEWANDOWSKI

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THIS PAGE: BLAZER, ROBERT GRAHAM SHIRT, ROBERT GRAHAM TROUSERS, MORSE TIE, PRADA SHOES, FLORSHEIM OPPOSITE PAGE: TROUSERS, MORSE SHIRT, ROBERT GRAHAM SHOES, FLORSHEIM

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THIS PAGE: JACKET, MORPHEW T-SHIRT, CALVIN KLEIN JEANS, RAG & BONE OPPOSITE PAGE: SHIRT & TROUSERS, ARKUN

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THIS PAGE: SHIRT, PRADA BELT, GUCCI JEANS, TRUE RELIGION SHOES, ECLECTIC JACKET, ECLECTIC OPPOSITE PAGE: JACKET, ROBERT GRAHAM SHIRT, TOKYO JAMES JEANS, TRUE RELIGION

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THIS PAGE: SUIT, DAVID HART SHIRT, O.N.S. SHOES, FLORSHEIM OPPOSITE PAGE: JACKET, MORSE SHIRT, DAVID HART TROUSERS, MORSE


aRehash? aRefresh When No, I’d Say

the velvet ropes parted, allowing you past the throngs waiting on the sid walks of East 14th Street, hoping to gain entrance into the inner sanctum of New York’s holy grail of nightlife opulence, the rush of Adrenaline was palpable. You had been chosen, once again (was there a doubt…?). You walked through a long gray, non-descript entry hall, past the coat check, around to the left and a quick right and the visual splendor began. The iconic polka-dot lit double staircase, was like ascending on giant strips of black & white dot candy. A hint of the sweet splendor to come. The thud, thump, thud of the subs on the dance floor became audible. At the top of the stairs, a quick right or left, through the double doors and night-life paradise lay before you. You had arrived at the dance floor of the Palladium.

New York’s Downtown elite could be seen bouncing about to the beats of the latest underground band, being live-mixed off vinyl from London that was so new, it was still warm from the factory, were the dulcet ennui of the Pet Shop Boys, the shrill melodies of the Cocteau Twins, or the atmospheric rhythms of Tears for Fears all seamlessly blended together into a melodic soup that provided the perfect backdrop to the “show”. The show in this case was the fashion. Every conceivable method of textile self-expression was on clear display with not a judgement being made (by those in the “show” of course). From the legendary club kids, pushing their glittery androgyny, to the thrift shop “mods” from Alphabet City, piecing together wildly proportioned, layered ensembles for literal pennies, to the jet-setters wearing the latest, slick, polished looks from the runways of Europe, it didn’t matter… all were welcome, and all were celebrated. As I observed the offerings for the Fall/Winter 2019 Men’s Collections, it became evident to me… my countless nights (and mornings!) spent on the dancefloors of the clubs in the mid to late 80’s in New York was preparing me for this aesthetic moment some 30+ years later. Literally, collection by collection, Fall 2019 Men’s seemed to be castfrom another era, yet, I would be loath to call it a simple rehash. That would not be giving the designers proper credit, as these collections seemed genuinely inspired, not a common word used lately in fashion… inspired! Yes, some collections played to the extremes, like Amsterdam’s Maison the Faux or New York’s Alessandro Trincone, NoSesso, ThreeASFOUR and Vasilis Loizides, but each had points to make, especially Maison the Faux, which cast several models that were well into their 70’s & lived the aesthetic both times it walked the runways! Extremes aside, the bulk of the collections made strong statements that will resonate well with fashion fanatics for certain.

The trends that resounded the strongest in color were head to toe Black or White as well as bold, graphic color blocking. Nearly every collection showed a version of each of these three color plays, with Todd Snyder, David Hart, Versace, N. Hoolywood and NPC being the strongest statements.

The giant overcoat or enormous knit sweater are the pieces to purchase for certain for a silhouette statement. Every collection presented its own version of the proportion with each one being nearly more covetable than the next. How is one to decide? True standouts were versions by a range of design aesthetics like N. Hoolywood, David Hart, Todd Snyder, Emenegildo Zegna, NPC and Keenkee. While Black & White monochrome was a major force, rest assured, prints and patterns were still seen in major ways, especially Leopard prints and, shockingly still, Camouflage. Both prints emerged in a variety of ways, but looked best when the scale had been altered, or when the traditional color combinations were altered. The best amongst these were done by Descendants of Thieves which mastered both plays on prints, Ackermann Paris’ slick silver Leopard suit, Peacebird’s street take on the pattern and Versace which won the Leopard race hands down with an oversized version on a coat that was strikingly procured by the model who dyed his hair in the exact same pattern. It’s the image of the season in my mind. In fact, Versace won the print game across the board, freshly reprising the house’s signature prints upon which the empire was founded. They even brought back the oversized gold safety pins a al Elizabeth Hurley for good measure. Could Versace be back??? So often in fashion, we criticize designers for borrowing too heavily from one another, or from an era, as we seem to place “original” design on a wrung of the creative ladder above referenced design. This is sad, in ways, as if we sit and wait for true original design, it would be like waiting for fashion’s equivalent of Godot. True original design is so rare and so fleeting, that if we only honor the true originals, the glorious pieces like these for Fall 2019 would be missed. That would be sad indeed. I, for one, cannot wait for Fall 2019! I’m going to pull out a few pieces from the past, add in a healthy dose from the present and I may even go down to East 14th Street at midnight and listen for a few beats of music that may still be reverberating from the days of old or being reprised by the NYU students who now live in the dorm that is built on the site. Likely, they will be playing the tunes once again… on vinyl.

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- R. Scott French


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Keep Smiling Porcelain veneers Dental Implants & more. Address: 595 Madison Ave suite 2500 New York, NY 10022, United States Phone: 212.447.7273 Cell: 917.449.3331 Fax: 212.447.7275 Emergency line: 347.859.0137 Address: 1075 Central Park Ave. Suite 410 Scarsdale, NY 10583 Phone: 914.725.1822 Email: sherifradwandds@gmail.com



MAGAZINE

Fashion. Culture. Philanthropy. Fashion. Culture. Philanthropy.

THE LEGENDARY ISSUE / 2019

THE LEGENDARY ISSUE

WE STILL ALEX LOVE OLD HOLLYWOOD LUND QVIST SHOWS US

HIS SWEDEN

D.SMITH TRANS - FORMS MUSIC

FASHION QUENTIN TRENDS TARANTINO’S FOR THE JEZ MAN JEZMAGAZINE.COM

MUSE

NICHOLE GALICIA GOES RETRO

IN AMSTERDAM WITH

S

Dorinda o

nice to be

VOLUME 3