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Serving the Local New Orleans, Northshore, and Baton Rouge Jewish Communities

10 Ways American Jewish Life Changed In The 2010s By JTA Staff

Rabbanit Jenna Englender dances with the Torah during her graduation ceremony from Yeshivat Maharat in New York, June 17, 2019. (Shulamit Seidler-Feller/Maharat; photo illustration by Grace Yagel)

NEW YORK (JTA) — All of the gloom and doom that many in the Jewish community have felt toward the end of this decade should not obscure the fact that the 2010s were full of innovation. Yes, there was an alarming rise in anti-Semitism across the U.S. and the world, which culminated in several violent attacks on Jews and Jewish institutions. But that didn’t stop the community from growing, evolving and adapting to modern life. Here’s a look back at 10 huge developments from the past 10 years that have changed the makeup and lifestyles of Jewish Americans. Technology Puts Judaism In Everyone’s Pocket

(Stevica Mrdja/EyeEm/Getty Images)

With the advent of the smartphone, we modern folks have grown accustomed to having any piece of information available anywhere, anytime, at the push of a button. But it wasn’t until the launch of Sefaria in 2011 that this was true of Jewish texts. In a stroke, Sefaria put thousands of years of Jewish literature in everybody’s pocket. The Bible, the Talmud, medieval Jewish philosophers and commentators, the classic Jewish legal codes — all of it available in Hebrew (and often English, too) and completely searchable. Seemingly overnight, the site became an invaluable resource for Jewish learning. And

much like Google and Facebook before it, Sefaria made many people wonder how they had ever lived without it. The site also helped democratize Jewish study — not only by making English translations of canonical texts instantly available anywhere, but by making it possible for anyone to create source sheets that gathered sacred texts on a given topic and share them with the world. The site currently hosts thousands of such sheets on topics as diverse as Jewish business ethics, discrimination, civil rights, hunger and environmentalism. Sefaria is not the only example of technology being harnessed to broaden the Jewish tent. Synagogues now stream services for free online and Jewish educational websites bring a bottomless wealth of Jewish information to the far-flung masses. But it may be the most ambitious of the lot. — Ben Harris

percent kosher cheeseburger. At Dunkin’ Donuts, patrons can have an egg with Beyond Bacon. For kosher-keeping Jews, trying to imitate forbidden foods is a tradition as old as time. Meatless burgers have ushered in a new era of that struggle. For while the rabbis of the Talmud outlawed the eating of milk and meat together, they said nothing about milk and heme. — Ben Sales Female Orthodox Clergy Make Their Mark

Yeshivat Maharat students attend a graduation ceremony in New York, June 17, 2019. (Shulamit Seidler-Feller/ Yeshivat Maharat)

When the decade began, there were almost no American Orthodox A New Kosher Cheeseburger clergywomen. When it ended, there Becomes Possible were 33. The 2010s saw a revolution in the Modern Orthodox world, as a seminary for Orthodox women, Yeshivat Maharat, turned out ordained graduates year after year starting in 2013. The last graduating class was the largest with eight members. Impossible burgers shown at a medida event in Las Vegas, Jan. 7, 2019. (Robyn The graduates — some of whom Beck/AFP via Getty Images) take on variations of the title “rabbi” The 2010s have seen the emer- — have made a splash. Nine work gence of plant-based products that in synagogues, many in pulpit positaste eerily like burgers but do not tions. The others work in leadership contain an iota of meat. Their pur- roles throughout the Jewish world. veyors — Impossible Foods and They’ve also sparked a backlash, Beyond Meat chief among them with two umbrella Orthodox groups — hope to launch a vegetarian — the Orthodox Union and the revolution that will take down Rabbinical Council of America — America’s massive factory farming issuing bans on female clergy. industry. Impossible says that the But the bans have not stopped protein heme gives their offerings the growing ranks of American the juicy, meaty quality missing Orthodox women receiving ordinafrom previous veggie burger tion, joining the ranks of Conservaattempts. tive and Reform women who have For Jews, the new meatless burg- been rabbis for decades. Just months ers have meant that dishes once before the decade ended, a graduate Jewishly verboten have finally of Yeshivat Maharat founded the become accessible. Observant Jews first-ever American Orthodox synacan slap a slice of cheddar on an gogue led by a woman. Impossible burger and enjoy a 100 — Ben Sales

Domestic Anti-Semitism Is Back

People gather in front of the Monsey house of Rabbi Chaim Rottenberg, the site of an attack at a Hanukkah party by a machete-wielding man, Dec. 29, 2019. (Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)

In 2013, the Anti-Defamation League reported the lowest levels of anti-Semitism since it started tracking the phenomenon in 1979. By 2018, the trend had fully reversed: There were 1,879 antiSemitic incidents, the third-highest total ever recorded by the ADL. The incidents included the killing by a white nationalist of 11 worshippers at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh — the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history. Not even a year later, on April 27, 2019, a woman was killed and three others were injured at a Chabad synagogue in Poway, California. And on Dec. 10, four people were killed in an attack that ended at a kosher supermarket in Jersey City, New Jersey. On Dec. 29, a man entered a rabbi’s house in Monsey, New York, with a machete and stabbed five people. The spike included a dramatic increase in attacks on predominantly Hasidic men in Brooklyn, who are more easily targeted by would-be assailants than other Jews because of their distinctive dress. Jewish Americans are afraid of this becoming the new normal: Some 31 percent of respondents to a recent survey by the American Jewish Committee agreed that they “avoided publicly wearing, carrying, or displaying things that might help people identify you as a Jew,” and 25 percent “avoid certain places, events, or situations out of concern for your safety or comfort as a Jew.” — Laura E. Adkins See 10 WAYS on Page

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EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN! Registration is officially open for LimmudFest 2020. Between now and the end of January, all ticket prices are reduced. Be an early bird and register today! Or, for those who want to support LimmudFest's sustainability and growth, we have a new ticket option this year that is LimmudFest Mensch. Support LimmudFest and help us sustain and grow by paying $180 for your ticket to cover the true costs. This year, LimmudFest’s celebration of arts, culture, community and learning includes a Shabbaton at Congregation Gates of Prayer on Friday and Saturday, with more learning and cultural programs at the Uptown JCC on Sunday.

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and oversees the development and curriculum for these dynamic lay leaders throughout North America who take part in the program. Yaffa also has served as a faculty member for the Wexner Heritage Program since 2015. Yaffa most recently served as the Director of Education, North America for the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies where she implemented a comprehensive educational vision for advancement of the institute in North America. A member of the faculty for Pardes since 2004, Yaffa also has taught at Yeshivat Maharat, the Drisha Institute, the Dorot Fellowship, and Young Judaea on Talmud, Jewish liturgy, Jewish law, constructive disagreement, leadership and women in Judaism. She also has served as a Scholar in Residence for organizations such as Moishe House, JFNA, The Covenant Foundation, Nahum Goldmann Fellowship, Repair the World, Meorot Fellowship, KADIMA Fellowship, and the Jewish Education Project. Yaffa received Rabbinic Ordination from Yeshivat Maharat and holds a Law Degree from Bar-Ilan University. She has lectured at Limmud Events around the world, has written curriculum for the Global Day of Jewish Learning and has created innovative educational programming for Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life. We are recruiting for volunteers!

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New Orleans JCC Film: Tel Aviv On Fire

Tel Aviv on Fire sounds like it could be a disaster film, or perhaps an adventure, or maybe some sort of issue-oriented documentary. The one thing you don’t expect it to be is a laugh-out-loud comedy. ArabIsraeli director Sameh Zoabi has found a way to bring a chuckle and sigh to a story about checkpoints, occupation and unhappy neighbors. Salam, an inexperienced young Palestinian man, becomes a writer on a popular soap opera after a chance meeting with an Israeli soldier. Tel Aviv on Fire is the name of the pro-

Arab soap opera set in the build up to the 1967 war, a TV show that both Israelis and Palestinians watch and anticipate the ending. The film has been able to show comedy in the lives of regular people living in a bizarre situation. Sponsored by Cathy and Morris Bart, this event is free and open to the community. Date: January 21, 2020 Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Location: New Orleans JCC Uptown 5342 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70115 Contact: Judy Yaillen Phone: 504-897-0143 Email: judy@nojcc.org 

The Sydney And Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden At NOMA

Join us for a docent led tour of the beautiful Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden at NOMA. Particularly, we will spend SPOTLIGHTING ONE OF time visiting the new addition LIMMUDFEST'S 2020 SPEAKERS: which features 27 new works by artists working primarily in the 21st century. We will meet for lunch at Cafe' NOMA in the museum at noon, then walk over to the sculpture garden for our tour. In case of rain, we will visit exhibits inside the museEmail info@limmudnola.org to um. The sculpture garden is free find out about volunteering by planning LimmudFest or being a weekend-of-volunteer. LimmudFest volunteers are doing logistics, marketing, fundraising, programming, and more! Rabba Yaffa Epstein Follow and like LimmudFest on The block-busting Israeli series Director, Wexner Heritage Program Facebook to stay in touch and check Shtisel tells the story of a Haredi Rabba Yaffa Epstein is the Direc- out limmudnola.org for even more family living in an ultra-Orthodox tor of the Wexner Heritage Program information.  neighborhood of Jerusalem as they reckon with love, loss and the doldrums of daily life. Join us at the Uptown JCC for an ongoing conversation with Rabbi Josh Pernick of Congregation Beth Israel as we watch the first season of this bingeworth series and learn more about the lifestyle it portrays. All are welcome. There is no cost to attend but 985-445-1270 an RSVP is required. Contact judy@nojcc.org for additional

and museum entrance is free for Louisiana residents on Wednesday. Lunch is on you. RSVP by Monday, January 20 to Rachel Ruth at 8970143 x161 or rachel@nojcc.org. No charge members and nonmembers New Orleans JCC - Uptown Date: January 22, 2020 Time: 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm Location: NOMA Contact: Rachel Ruth Phone: 504-897-0143 Email: rachel@nojcc.org 

Shtisel 101: Everything You Always Wanted To Know But Were Afraid To Ask

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details and to RSVP. Wednesdays, 7:00 - 9:00 PM Instructor: Rabbi Josh Pernick No charge members and nonmembers (RSVP is required) New Orleans JCC - Uptown Date: January 22, 2020 Time: 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Location: New Orleans JCC Uptown 5342 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70115 Contact: Judy Yaillen Phone: 504-897-0143 Email: judy@nojcc.org  THE

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Kicking For Kids Footgolf Tournament

If your group has an event that you would like for us to include on the Community Calendar please e-mail the information to jewishnews@bellsouth.net. All submissions are subject to acceptance by the Editor. 

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The New Orleans JCC presents the second annual Kicking for Kids Footgolf tournament Sunday, January 26, 2020, at Timberlane Country Club. This year's event will feature an 18-hole adult tournament and a 9-hole family tournament. Proceeds will go towards scholarships for the New Orleans JCC’s Maccabi team. Adult Tournament (21+): $200/ team 9:00 AM Check-in/Registration 10:00 AM Start Family Tournament: $100/team 1:00 PM Check-in/Registration 2:00 PM Start Registration includes participation in the tournament, lunch, and beverages. Purchase a cart for your team for an additional $20.

Each team must include four players. A team captain must register and pay for the team in full. If you do not have a team but would like to play, email Neal Alsop to be paired with other individual participants. Family teams must include at least one adult over 18 years old, either as a participant or chaperone for four youth, and may not have more than two adults as participants. No experience is required to play. 1. Pay for your team with our online class registration under "Uptown Sports & Fitness." 2. Once you have paid, you will receive a confirmation email with a link to complete your team registration. Date: January 26, 2020 Time: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Location: Timberlane Country Club 1 Timberlane Drive Gretna, LA 70056 Contact: Neal Alsop Phone: 504-897-0143 Email: neal@nojcc.org 

Harriet W. Kugler Memorial Mah Jongg Tournament $40, $60 or $75 members and non-members New Orleans JCC - Uptown Date: January 26, 2020 Time: 11:00 am - 3:30 pm Location: New Orleans JCC Enjoy a delicious catered lunch Uptown and an afternoon of Mah Jongg 5342 St. Charles Avenue with your friends at the 10th annual New Orleans, LA 70115 Harriet W. Kugler Mah Jongg TourContact: Judy Yaillen nament. Cash and door prizes will Phone: 504-897-0143 be awarded. Email: judy@nojcc.org 

Movie Day: Queen Of The Desert Helmed by Werner Herzog, this members historical drama charts the life of the New Orleans JCC - Uptown remarkable Gertrude Bell, a British Date: January 30, 2020 adventurer, archaeologist, spy and Time: 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm political attaché who played a key Location: New Orleans JCC role in reshaping the Middle East Uptown after World War I. Movie snacks 5342 St. Charles Avenue will be served. RSVP by Monday, New Orleans, LA 70115 January 27 to Rachel Ruth at 897Contact: Rachel Ruth 0143 x161 or rachel@nojcc.org. Phone: 504-897-0143 No charge members and nonEmail: rachel@nojcc.org 

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CARNIVAL 2020 Reserved Tables Are Now Available!

A Variety of Live New Orleans Style Music ZAGAT RATED

The Jewish Holidays provide a spiritual template for the year, guiding our community through seasons of joy, introspection, remembrance, and celebration. This class will explore the most essential holidays with goals of building familiarity along with spiritual awareness and depth. JEWISH LIFE CYCLES WEDNESDAYS FROM 7-8PM, RABBI BAUMAN BEGINNING IN JANUARY! 1/29, 2/5, 2/12

WINTER 2020

Jewish theology and spirituality manifest powerfully through life cycle observances. Our sessions will explore the sacred moments of birth, marriage, conversion, and death through the lens of liturgy and ritual, focusing on the ways that these elements convey the soul of the Jewish faith family. JEWISH HISTORY WEDNESDAYS FROM 7-8PM, DR. JASON GAINES 3/4, 3/11, 3/18, 3/25

SPRING 2020

Where does Judaism come from? What is the relationship between Judaism and the Hebrew Bible (also called the Tanakh or Old Testament)? Who holds power in Judaism, and where does this authority originate? This course explores the origins of Judaism, from the earliest traditions 3,500 years ago up to the dawn of the rabbinic age. Through the study of religious literature and historical evidence, we will seek to understand the foundations of Judaism. CHANTING THE TORAH TUESDAYS FROM 7-8PM, CANTOR MARGOLIUS BEGINNING IN JANUARY! 1/7, 1/14, 1/21, 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 3/3, 3/10, 3/17, 3/24, 3/31, 4/7

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WINTER 2020

WINTER 2020

Experiencing the Torah is one of the most profound spiritual gifts in Jewish life. We hold the Torah, parade it, hear it chanted, and study it. But chanting from a handwritten scroll is an unparalleled experience. In this class you will learn how to understand ta’amei hamikra— the trope symbols — and chant the Torah. This class is an essential starting point for those interested in adult bar/bat mitzvah. Prerequisite: ability to sound out Hebrew consonants and vowels. EXPLORATION OF THE MEGILLOT TUESDAYS FROM 7-8PM, RABBI SILVERMAN SPRING 5/5, 5/12, 5/19 2020 What do you think of when you hear the word “megillah”? Queen Esther? Hamentashen? A cartoon gorilla? All of those answers are correct — but that’s not the whole megillah! Join us for a deep dive into the five (yes, five!) megillot, all of which correspond to a holiday on the Jewish calendar, and all of which encapsulate a small part of the Jewish experience throughout history. We will survey each megillah (scroll) and examine the historical, theological, and philosophical implications that each provides us. SHORT STORIES BY SHOLOM ALEICHEM, PERETZ, AND MALAMUD THURSDAYS FROM 7-8PM, CANTOR MARGOLIUS 5/7, 5/14, 5/21

SPRING 2020

The masters of Jewish Literature give deep insight into the Jewish experience of their times. The motifs and tropes they draw upon have been deeply woven into the tapestry of modern Jewish life. In this class, we will examine short stories by Sholem Aleichem, I. L. Peretz, and Bernard Malamud. 6

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JEWISH MEDICAL ETHICS* SELECT WEDNESDAYS AT 6PM, RABBI BAUMAN ALL 1/22, 4/1 YEAR! Our ongoing series exploring some of the most pressing scientific, social, and health related concerns of our time, through a Jewish lens. Previous topics have included explorations of pain management and the opioid epidemic; political agendas that affect policy in medical care; palliative and supportive care in religious traditions, and the nature of suffering. *This series is designed for but not limited to medical professionals. Reservations are required for dinner. LAY-LED TORAH STUDY SATURDAYS FROM 9-10:30AM Community members gather in our Mautner Learning Center to study the weekly Parashah (Torah Portion). The discussions are led by congregants who extend an open invitation regardless of experience with Hebrew or the Torah. Bagels and coffee are served to accompany the lively and informative discussion on what our ancestors had to say about the stories of the Bible.

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TOURO CHAI SCHOLARS CELEBRATING A COMMITMENT TO LEARNING TOURO CHAI SCHOLAR CEREMONY - FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2020 - 6 PM The ancient rabbis teach that Talmud Torah, the deep study of our sacred texts and traditions, is such a high mitzvah that there is no fitting reward. Touro Synagogue is enriched and moved by the commitment of those for whom Jewish learning is a passion. There will be a ceremony to honor those community members who participate in 18 hours of Jewish learning or more throughout the year, our Touro Chai Scholars, held on Friday, May 29, 2020.

LEARNING AND LIFECYCLE EMBRACING JUDAISM: A PATH TO PURSUING CONVERSION Conversion to Judaism (gerut in Hebrew) is a sacred pathway that many have traveled over thousands of years. The process of embracing Judaism is one that involves cognitive learning, deep self-reflection, community service, congregational participation, and the intentional building of relationship with fellow Jews. Touro Synagogue clergy welcome inquiries about the process of conversion and will consider it an honor to be guides for those who seek to engage in it.

ADULT B’NEI MITZVAH While many participate in a Bar/Bat Mitzvah service near their thirteenth birthday, standing on the bimah to read Torah for the first time is a profound experience at any age. What a blessing it is for the entire community to join in celebration of this achievement! Those interested should contact Cantor Margolius, and participate in the Hebrew Reading (Foundations) and Chanting the Torah (Elevations) classes.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 FOLLOWING SHABBAT SERVICES

FROM OUR PRESIDENT

ALL OF A SUDDEN MY HEART SINGS

THE LIFE & MUSIC OF HAROLD ROME

Just when you were getting used to it being 5780, the year had to go and change itself to 2020! Now how am I going to remember what date to write on my checks? Okay, so maybe I’m one of the few of you reading this who still writes checks. But we all know that 5780 and 2020 can peacefully coexist—even joyfully coexist—at least for the next eight months. And this bulletin is your guide to the next three months of 2020/5780. Peruse, enjoy and keep it handy—there’s a lot going on at Touro Synagogue.

If you haven’t already done so, don’tSERIES wait another minute to BY RSVP for our fabulous January 25th fundraiser, A THE JEWISH COMPOSER LECTURE PRESENTED GEORGE DANSKER

Night at the Copa! An evening of comedy, music, delicious food and cocktails (along with an auction of specially curated experiences!) that will transport you back to the legendary Manhattan nightclub of the ’50s—this is an event that you will not want to miss. Also, mark your calendars and join us on Friday, January 31, for a very special evening—the 12th annual

PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE 12TH INSTALLMENT OF OUR LECTURE SERIES presentation ourFOR Jewish Composer Lecture Series, which will follow Shabbat evening services. Led, as always, PLEASE JOINofUS THE 12TH INSTALLMENT OF OUR LECTURE SERIES SALUTING THE GREAT JEWISH-AMERICAN COMPOSERS OF BROADWAY . Jane by the incomparable George Dansker and featuring Cantor Kevin Margolius, with guest artists Sarah SALUTING THE GREAT JEWISH-AMERICAN COMPOSERS OF BROADWAY.

McMahon, Megan Kukro and Jesse Reeks, this year’s unforgettable program on the life and music of Harold Harold Rome (1908-1993) worked on that 17 lasted Broadway shows a Harold Jacob Jacob Rome (1908-1993) onfor17music Broadway during a career more than three decades. during His songs were Romeworked is a must lovers.shows career that lasted more than three decades. His songs were featured on BillLisa featured onHerman Billboard and the Hit Parade. He helped discover Barbra Streisand and wrote songs for such great singers as Ezio Pinza, What’s the best part of the Mardi Gras season? Shabbati Gras at Touro, of course. Following Shabbat services on Florence Henderson, and Dolores Gray. Rome was a tireless social activist, and was once referredStreisand to as a “Noel Coward with a social board and the Hit Parade. discover and wrote Friday, February 14, and Friday, February 21, plan to He stay forhelped a casual family dinner and anBarbra exciting night of parade watching. It’s always more conscience. ” Harold Rome was also a talented painter. songs such great singers fun when wefor celebrate together as a Touro family. as Ezio Pinza, Florence Henderson, and Dolores Gray. Rome wasthe adeeply tireless and was once referred to as 5001 a Together we will discover melodic musicaway. ofactivist, this andto learn about hisMystery multi-faceted, inspiring life,“Noel and And speaking of celebrating, Purim is only twosocial months Wegreat look man forward seeing you for Megillah Theater and his the Coward with a social conscience.” Harold Rome was also a talented painter. commitment writingon about Jewish culture. reading of the to Megillah Monday, March 9th. We welcome back our superb guest artists Sarah Jane McMahon, Megan Kuckro and Jesse whochecked will be joined by the of our own CantorDesigned Kevin Margolius. Finally,Reeks have you out Touro’s newsplendid Lifelongvoice Learning opportunities? by our wonderful clergy team to address the broadest

Together we will discover the deeply melodic music of this great man and

possible of Jewish these course offerings provide opportunities for allhis of us to add to our own Jewishto journeys through learnspectrum about his interests, multi-faceted, inspiring life, and commitment writing meaningful engagement in Jewish study. No matter where your interests may lie, there is an offering for you. A MESSAGE FROM GEORGE DANSKER

about Jewish culture. We welcome back our superb guest artists Sarah Jane

Looking forward to our time together over the coming months ofReeks 2020/5780!who will be joined by the splendid McMahon, Megan and Jesse OfKuckro all the Broadway composers I have presented these past 11 years no individual has given me more Lisa voice of our own pleasure Cantor Kevin Margolius. during these past few months of research than Mr. Harold Rome - our 2020 Jewish American Broadway Composer. For sure I already knew his music and his hit shows such as “Fanny” and “Wish You Were Here.” But what I didn’t know was the amazing man behind the music and lyrics --- the man of whom no one ever had an unkind word. (And that is saying a lot in the world of Musical Theater.) Harold Rome was a brilliant and caring man (studying both Law and Architecture at Yale) and he was known for his social activism — personally and professionally. He was also a very talented painter.

t h g i A Nt the Copa! a

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 2020

It is important to note that throughout his career Harold Rome was able to create shows that 7PM AT before. TOURO SYNAGOGUE illuminated contemporary Jewish culture as no one had ever done I am deeply honored to present his life story and selections of his most beautiful music. Please join me and our amazing artists on January 31, 2020 for what promises to be an unforgettable evening.

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OF SOUNDS D E H T O T IG BAN DANCE LLIDAY B O H C O D THE

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FABULOUS

Live Auction OF SPECIALLY CURATED EXPERIENCES

A MESSAGE FROM GEORGE DANSKER

Of all the Broadway composers I have presented these past 11 years no individual has given me more pleasure during these past few months of research than Mr. Harold Rome - our 2020 Jewish American Broadway Composer. For sure I already knew his music and his hit shows such as “Fanny” and “Wish You Were Here.” But what I didn’t know was the amazing man behind the music and lyrics --- the man of whom no one ever had an unkind word. (And that is saying a lot in the world of Musical Theater.) Harold Rome was a brilliant and caring man (studying both Law and Architecture at Yale) and he was known for his social activism — personally and professionally. He was also a very talented painter. It is important to note that throughout his career Harold Rome was able to create shows that illuminated contemporary Jewish culture as no one had ever done before. I am deeply honored to present his life story and selections of his most beautiful music. Please join me and our amazing artists on January 31, 2020 for what promises to be an unforgettable evening. Call Our Trained Experts & Experience the Difference

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EDUCATIoN

Jewish Campus Group Hillel Promotes Data Guru To CEO By Ron Kampeas

Adam Lehman succeeds Eric Fingerhut as the CEO of Hillel International. (Courtesy of Hillel International)

WASHINGTON (JTA) — After a six-month search, the Jewish campus group Hillel International is sticking to the path hewn by its previous CEO in choosing a close associate as his successor. Hillel’s board announced Tuesday that Adam Lehman, the group’s former chief operating officer and interim CEO, will succeed Eric Fingerhut, who became head of the Jewish Federations of North America over the summer. In choosing Lehman, the board has issued a vote of confidence in how Fingerhut has shaped the organization, expanding its reach to Jewish students while sticking closely to the establishment line on Israel. “We are so thrilled that Adam will be continuing to lead Hillel to help us build on the tremendous progress we’ve made in our mission of enriching the lives of all Jewish students so that they can

enrich the Jewish people and the world,” Skip Vichness, chairman of Hillel International’s board of directors, said in a statement. In terms of growth metrics, Fingerhut’s tenure was seen as a success. When he took over in 2013, engagement was reaching 68,000 students a year. Last year, the group reached 141,000 students on 550 campuses. The budget has also doubled from $90 million to $180 million. But the organization has also been hammered as the political climate has grown more polarized, particularly on Israel. Fingerhut apologized in 2015 after he pulled out of an appearance at JStreetU, the student affiliate of the liberal Jewish Middle East policy group. In 2018, he apologized again after Princeton Hillel canceled an appearance by Israel’s then foreign minister, Tzipi Hotovely, in the face of protests. Lehman, 52, has a background in data analysis. For eight years, he was a senior vice president at AOL. In an interview with the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, he said he would use data to analyze how best to serve Jewish students so that “they find meaning, they find purpose, they find a way to serve the broader community through Hillel.”

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The data would help shape “spiritual and religious life experiences, Israel engagement experiences, social justice activity and voluntarism,” he said. Lehman tried to dodge a question about which organizations Hillel considered kosher to partner with, saying it would engage with Jewish students as individuals whatever their affiliations. When pressed, he said Hillel would work with groups that “align with our values and our mission,” a rubric that in the past rejected partnership with any group that supports a boycott of Israel. Pressed again, he said Hillel International would continue to work with JStreetU. Reluctance to disengage from the establishment on matters related to Israel has dogged Hillel’s efforts to engage younger Jews. There was internal dissent in 2018 when Hillel endorsed Kenneth Marcus to run the civil rights division in the Trump administration’s Department of Education. Marcus had worked with Hillel to fight anti-Israel activity on campus, but he was reviled by liberals for pledging to roll back federal protections for victims of campus sexual assault. On the programmatic front, Lehman said he wanted to take successful programs initiated at individual chapters and roll them out nationwide, including a mental wellness initiative from California, a free delivered Shabbat dinner party kit from Vermont and a training program to combat anti-Semitism from Illinois. He also wants

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to emphasize wellness and mental health. “That is such a critical set of issues today,” he said. For all of his wonkiness, Lehman — who likes tossing out terms like “Gen Z” — has an artsy side: He’s a founding member of the D.C.-based Jewish a cappella group JewKvox. Praising the pick was Sheila Katz, the CEO of the National Council of Jewish Women who was at the center of a Hillel controversy last year when she went public with her story of being sexually harassed by a major donor, Michael Steinhardt. Hillel cut off relations with Steinhardt. “He’s data and technology-driven and he cares deeply about students and the student voice and believes in new ways to engage students using technology and data,” she said. Emphasizing her approval of the choice, Katz nonetheless noted that yet another national Jewish organization will be helmed by a white man. She said she had heard that plenty of women had applied for the position. “It used to be said there were fewer women because women weren’t putting their names forward,” she said. “They are putting their names forward. It calls on us to do better at creating opportunities for more diversity on the ladders of leadership and to do more training on the unconscious bias on boards and hiring committees.” 

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I Didn’t Need To Marry Jewish, But I Wound Up With a Rabbi By Stephanie Belsky

(Frank Rosenstein/DigitalVision/Getty Images)

This story originally appeared on Alma. I am a product of a Jewish day school education, eight years of Jewish summer camp, and a Conservative Jewish upbringing. Finding a Jewish partner to marry and have Jewish babies with was in my DNA, as was tikkun olam. So it came as a huge shock to me that throughout my 20s and early 30s, not once was I attracted to a Nice Jewish Boy. I had been on dating apps for eight years seeking my bashert. I dated a series of awful Jewish and non-Jewish men. One guy, definitely not Jewish, told me he was “legally” still married — after we had been dating a year. Oy. As I dated more non-Jewish men, I created this narrative in my head: “Well, at least I’ll raise my children Jewish.” But here’s the thing: You can’t guarantee this unless you find a partner who’s spiritually on the same page as you are, and even then there’s no guarantee. I remember sitting at dinner with my Jewish parents when we inevitably ended up talking about my love life. Ugh. But instead of shutting down the conversation and drowning my singledom in dirty martinis, I finally spoke out loud to the universe and my parents exactly what I was looking for in my partner. “No,” I said, “my partner did not need to be Jewish. They needed to keep up with me, be kind, have confidence and hold their own in a room, and be generous with their money and their time.” The list went on but I was clear: No, being Jewish was not a prerequisite; he just needed to be open to the idea of raising our children Jewish. That last part seemed to satisfy my parents’ heartfelt desire for a THE

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future grandchild’s bar/bat mitzvah. Then, a month later, I started talking to somebody on the dating app Hinge. Jeff messaged me four times before I gave him the time of day. The rabbinical school student’s first message was “Shabbat shalom!” and I couldn’t roll my eyes hard enough. So cliché. I finally gave him my phone number and he asked me out. As I walked into the bar to meet him, I remember seeing Jeff and having this strangely comfortable feeling of “Oh, there he is,” as if I recognized him from somewhere else. And not just a recognition of “Phew! He looks like his photos!” but a deep, soul level recognition. My next thought was “That’s not a rabbi!” as I scanned this bald and bearded ginger, with his Chuck Taylors, Ray-Ban sunglasses on the table, jeans and plaid buttoneddown. And wait a minute; was that an earring in his left ear? We perused the menu and then I popped the question: “Do you keep kosher?” I held my breath as I waited for the answer. It wasn’t that I actively sought out pork, but I definitely enjoy good food experiences and sometimes that includes mixing milk with meat. Would this be a new level of guilt and self-consciousness if we dated? And what if one day we ended up getting married and had to register for two sets of dishes? Would I have to change who I was to date a rabbi? “No, I don’t keep kosher,” he told me. “What are your thoughts on chicken wings?” I was embarrassingly giddy as my dream of eating cheeseburgers together remained alive and well. We hit it off and laughed our butts off the entire night. Drinks, dinner, and then I invited him to ice cream. On our second date, breakfast on the morning before Rosh Hashanah, Jeff invited me to the High Holiday services he was leading. Immediately I started to freak out and thought, “I’ve NEVER been attracted to a Jewish man … am I really about to date a rabbi?!” I

ALMA IS FOR LADIES WITH CHUTZPAH Hey! We’re Alma, a new place for women to talk about working, dating, TV-binging, yummy eating, bat mitzvah reminiscing, quasi-adulting, and the world around us. liked this guy, really liked him. But I was definitely not ready to see him “be a rabbi” before our third date. I thanked him for the invite and told him I already had plans. So, instead, I stood miserably at services held at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills with my only Jewish girlfriend who I could convince to go with me. We were less than moved by the sermon and both of us plotzed as we stared at the mechitzah, a floor to ceiling curtain separating the men and women. So when Jeff invited me to Yom Kippur, I accepted his invitation. The night before, I bailed on Kol Nidre services and opted for a completely dramatic and totally unnecessary existential crisis. It was basically the “OMG does he keep kosher?!” conversation on steroids: Where should I sit/stand? What should I wear? Should I look sexy? No, it’s Yom Kippur, idiot. OK, maybe just a little sexy. Should I give him a kiss on the cheek when I see him? No, a hug is probably better. Am I really dating a rabbi? Am I ready to see him be a rabbi?! Am I Jewish enough for a Reform rabbi? Am I too Jewish for a Reform rabbi? Maybe I shouldn’t go. I think I’m coming down with something. I’ll text Jeff. I told him I wasn’t feeling well and didn’t think I’d make it to his service. He seemed disappointed but understood, and then he sent me one of my favorite texts ever: a photo of a ring on a middle finger

that said “‫רובעי הז םג‬,” which in English means, “This too shall pass.” I realized how dumb I was being and how badly I needed to get out of my head. I liked this man, and I would have liked him regardless of the fact that he was a rabbi, or even Jewish for that matter. I went to the service and was very glad I did. He must have really liked me, too. And two years later, he proposed … in Israel. SO cliché. Both Jeff and I being Jewish makes our lives easier, though it completely and unequivocally does not matter. It wasn’t Judaism that brought us together. It’s the connection we have, the values we share, the families we come from, the love we have for each other and the people we have become that will make our marriage work. To quote his Rosh Hashanah sermon this year, “Love isn’t Jewish, love is love.” I know now that I am absolutely “Jewish enough” to marry a rabbi. I’m not great at baking challah, but I’m learning. I sit with our community, where they’ll occasionally witness me sticking my tongue out at my rabbi fiance when we make eye contact during services. I wear whatever I want and at Rosh Hashanah services this year, my friend said I looked “rebbetzin chic.” Looks like I’m on my way to becoming a solid rabbi’s wife, which, as it turns out, means I just get to be me. 

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Judaism 10 WAYS Continued from Page 1 The Pew Study Counts American Jews

The Pew study found new high rates of intermarriage in the Jewish community. (iStock/Getty Images)

The Jewish organizational world was rocked in 2013 by the release of a study by the Pew Research Center on American Jewish demographics. The study counted how

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many of us there were, whether we were marrying other Jews, what denominations we identified with and how we observed Jewish ritual. It found that that the rate of intermarriage was sharply rising, the number of Conservative Jews was falling and nearly a third of Jews were unaffiliated. Since its publication, the study has been used by Jewish journalists, activists and leaders to guide their decisions and justify their opinions. It has also helped push Jewish organizations to shift from trying to prevent intermarriage to trying to engage interfaith families. The study additionally found that many define their Judaism around remembering the Holocaust, leading an ethical life and working toward justice. It showed that most Jewish Americans feel some attachment to Israel. And it found that nearly all Jewish Americans — 94 percent — are proud to be Jewish. — Ben Sales The Rise of Jewy And Israeli TV

chially Jewish shows that still found a mass audience: “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” which won a raft of awards portraying a Jewish 1950s housewife turned comedian; “Broad City,” the comedy about two Jewish millennial women in Brooklyn; “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,” in which protagonist Rebecca Bunch engages in a “JAP Battle”; and “Transparent,” about a Jewish family in Los Angeles struggling with gender identity and which filmed a season mostly in Israel. While “Transparent” went to Israel, a number of Israeli shows came to the U.S. Americans bingewatched “Srugim,” about Modern Orthodox singles in Jerusalem; “Shtisel,” about ultra-Orthodox singles (and marrieds) in Jerusalem; “Our Boys,” about the murders of children in and around Jerusalem; and “Fauda,” about Israeli commandos in the West Bank. There were also a bunch of forgettable movie dramas about Israel, at least three of them starring Ben Kingsley. All of it added up to viewers across America watching and enjoying a range of Jewish characters, foibles and stories. — Ben Sales Haredi Women Have Their Say

Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer at an event for their series “Broad City” at Sony Hall in New York City, March 27, 2019. (Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images for Comedy Central)

Jews have long found success in Hollywood, and for decades television has been fertile ground for Jewish cultural references (see: Seinfeld, Jerry). But the 2010s saw the rise of a number of celebrated television shows and movies that are either explicitly centered on J e w i s h themes or imported directly from the Jewish state. The Golden Age of Streaming brought a deluge of paro10 Business Referral Guide

Judge Rachel Freier offers her business card in the New York City Council chamber. In November 2016, Freier became the first Hasidic woman in U.S. history to be elected to public office. (Andy Katz/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

On Dec. 22, 2016, Rachel “Ruchie” Freier was sworn in as a civil court judge in Kings County, New York: She was the first Hasidic woman ever elected to public office in the United States. Unlike some other segments of the wider Orthodox world, Hasidic Jews largely reject engagement with the secular world unless necessary. Both men and women follow restrictive dress codes, and women in particular are not encouraged to hold public leadership positions. Raised in a Hasidic enclave in Brooklyn, Freier in recent years has become a symbol of female Orthodox women who want to assume more public roles without compromising traditional values or sever-

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ing ties to their cloistered communities. In 2011, Freier founded an all-female volunteer EMT service, Ezras Nashim, after the Jewish EMT service Hatzolah refused to allow women to serve. The group’s fight for an ambulance has become politicized and their full acceptance in the ultra-Orthodox world is a long way off, but there’s little question that Freier and women like her have carved out space for haredi women to take on positions of greater influence and visibility in their communities. — Laura E. Adkins The Passover Kitniyot Revolution Comes To America

(Pixnio)

The year 2016 saw an important if obscure change in American Jewish life: The Conservative movement officially declared kitniyot, or legumes, acceptable for Ashkenazi Jews to eat on Passover. The ruling gave an imprimatur to what already was a quiet revolution taking place in a growing number of liberal observant homes. For centuries, traditional Ashkenazi Jews have abstained from peanuts, beans, rice, lentils, chickpeas and other foods that, according to the rabbis, could be misconstrued as hametz, or leavened food that is anathema on the holiday. According to Sephardic Jewish practice, those foods have always been fine to eat on Passover. In Israel, where most Jews are of Sephardi heritage, kitniyot are widely available on Passover. A significant portion of Israeli Ashkenazim eat them even as they observe the holiday’s other dietary laws. Many Israeli families are mixed Ashkenazi-Sephardi, blurring the lines even further. The past decade has seen the Israeli kitniyot trend cross over to America, as parts of America’s largely Ashkenazic Jewish population adopted the Sephardic custom. With a major Jewish movement approving the practice, the stacks of hummus on kosher-for-Passover grocery store shelves could grow. — Ben Sales See 10 WAYS on Page THE

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What The Fall Of The Berlin Wall Meant For Eastern European Jews By Liam Hoare

The Berlin Wall opens in November 1989. (Patrick PIEL/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

VIENNA (JTA) — “Neither ox nor donkey can block the path to socialism,” the East German leader Erich Honecker boldly declared on Aug. 14, 1989. Less than three months later, on Nov. 9, the Berlin Wall would fall. Newsweek’s then-Berlin bureau chief Michael Meyer called 1989 the year that changed the world. In “We the People,” British historian Timothy Garton Ash described the opening of the Berlin Wall as “a moment of emancipation and liberation.” Ron Zuriel, a Jewish photography enthusiast, went to the wall frequently in the days following Nov. 9 to capture the moment. He told Mark Kurlansky for his 1995 book “A Chosen Few” that East Germans “came into a different world.” Thirty years later, Garton Ash acknowledges that across Central and Eastern Europe, “the reality” of post-Berlin Wall Europe “did not live up to the dream.” Such is the nature of revolution on the one hand, though it is certainly true that the fruits of 1989 were not evenly shared. But if one community can be said to have been entirely transformed by the Velvet Revolutions of that year and the sometimes-bumpy transition from communism to democracy, it would be Eastern European Jewry. After 1945, Holocaust survivors in Western Europe, augmented by immigrants from Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union and North Africa, were able to rebuild Jewish life following the destructive fascist experience. But Judaism under communism became what Kurlansky describes in “A Chosen Few” as a “death cult.” Though community bonds remained, religion and Zionism were anathema to communism. Jewish identity became a secret and Judaism itself withered. Things began to change in the late 1980s when non-Jews in THE

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Poland, for example, took a renewed interest in Judaism, leading to the birth of the Krakow Jewish Culture Festival. Yet it was only post-1989, after the communist monopoly on power had been eradicated, that Jewish life itself could be revived. There were teething problems, particularly in Germany, as Kurlansky captured. Separated for 40 years, the two Germanys had developed two Judaisms. “The biggest event of the year at the [East Berlin] synagogue was the annual memorial to Kristallnacht,” Kurlansky writes, adding that though there was an official East German Jewish Community that put on lectures and cultural events, for most Jews in the GDR, their new religion was socialism. After reunification, East Germans felt that they had been colonized by the West, their institutions dissolved and way of life dismissed. Intracommunal conflict and questions surrounding financial sustainability have not gone away. Still, to survey the past 30 years is to witness Judaism, once buried, being brought back into existence. Anyone who has reported from the region since the fall of the Berlin Wall has heard their own stories of young people whose parents unearthed their Jewishness, bequeathing to their children a secret that they knew need not be hidden any longer. Since 1989, Judaism in Eastern Europe has multiplied. The work of the JDC and Hillel International, Moishe House and the Lauder Foundation has given birth to new Jewish schools, community and cultural centers in Warsaw and Krakow, Budapest and Timisoara, and with it, new avenues and approaches to Judaism. Synagogues like Fraenkelufer in Berlin have been rejuvenated, new communities including Warsaw’s Reform Beit Warszawa established, while the post-’89 generation of Jewish leadership like Alek Oskar, president of Organization of the Jews in Bulgaria, has arisen to take the reins of community institutions. And the freedom to travel and the birth of cheap air travel has strengthened Eastern European Jewry’s connection to Israel, as did programs like the Jewish Agency’s MiNYamin Fellowship.

The fall of the Berlin Wall and the Velvet Revolutions of 1989 made all this possible. It was a victory for Jewish life. Communism could not provide the conditions necessary to live as a minority, be one Jewish, Roma or LGBT. Only liberal democracy offers the basis for stable Jewish life in Europe. This means not only the freedom of speech and thought, assembly and association, but also the right to private and family life and, as important, the rule of law and equal treatment thereunder. Of course, whether in Hungary — an authoritarian state with a democratic facade where neo-Nazis recently demonstrated in front of a Jewish-run community center — or Poland, those conditions are now being deliberately undermined and the gifts of 1989 squandered. “We know you can turn an aquarium into fish soup,” so went the

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joke picked up by Garton Ash in 1989, “but can you turn fish soup back into an aquarium?” The challenge after the fall of the Berlin Wall was, in other words, tremendous. Its anniversary is a reminder not just of the work that has been done in the name of liberty, democracy and rebuilding Jewish life in Central and Eastern Europe but that which is still to come. LIAM HOARE is Europe Editor for Moment. He lives in Vienna where he reports on politics, culture, and Jewish life in Austria and the wider region. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of JTA or its parent company, 70 Faces Media. 

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Bookshelf

The Earliest Known American Jewish Novel Introduces A New Feminist Voice By Penny Schwartz

(JTA) — More than a century after her death, Cora Wilburn is having her moment. With the rediscovery and recent publication of her novel “Cosella Wayne: Or, Will and Destiny,” edited and introduced by Jonathan Sarna, the 19th-century writer nearly lost to history is being given her due as likely the first Jewish author to pen a distinctly American Jewish work of fiction. Originally published in 1860 in serialized form in “The Banner of Light,” a journal of the Spiritualist movement, this is the first time that “Cosella Wayne” has been published in book form. It’s accompanied by excerpts from one volume of Wilburn’s diary that Sarna, a scholar of American Jewish history, unearthed in the course of his research. The revealing novel, which mirrors Wilburn’s often heartbreaking life, pulls back the curtain on subjects unknown in Jewish literature of the time: domestic abuse, women’s rights, religious and spiritual exploration, and class divides within the American Jewish community of the mid-1800s. In the novel and her diary writings, Wilburn (1824-1906) emerges as a fiercely independent and bold Jewish thinker, an abolitionist and a feminist. Her writing also sheds light from the perspective of a Jew-

ish woman on the early years of Spiritualism, the religious movement popular during the Civil War that encouraged communication with spirits of the deceased. The novel, published last month, “redates American Jewish literature,” said Sarna, the Joseph H. and Belle R. Braun professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University. Until now, Sarna said, the first American Jewish novel, “Differences,” published in 1867, was credited to Nathan Mayer. Emma Wolfe, whose novel “Other Things Being Equal” was published in 1892, was believed to be the first Jewish woman novelist. “Cosella Wayne” is a melodramatic, riches-to-rags coming-ofage story of a young Jewess subjected to abuse by an unscrupulous, mean-spirited Jewish merchant, who masquerades as her father through trickery and deception. But the book also is a story of resilience, about a single Jewish woman left in poverty who stood firm in her deeply held religious and moral convictions. While the novel depicts a devastating image of the Orthodox Jewish merchant, Wilburn’s portrayals of Jewish ritual and holiday observances are rendered with warmth and sympathy, Sarna said. Wilburn, who later changed her name, was born Henrietta Pulfermacher, likely in Alsace, France. Her father, a conniving Jewish gem merchant, was an alcoholic and abusive. He would remarry after the death of his first wife, whom he also abused. Adopting various identities, he lived on the run across the globe, dragging his wife and daugh-

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ter with him. The experience provided the multilingual Wilburn with a rare, intimate lens of Jewish communities in Germany and in far-flung locales including India, Australia and Venezuela. Her keen observations, woven into the novel, read like a global Jewish travelogue. Following the death of her father in La Guaira, Venezuela, Wilburn was left without means, her life upturned. Known still as Henrietta, she relocated in 1848 to Philadelphia, where she toiled as a meagerly paid, sometimes cruelly treated seamstress in the homes of the city’s well-off Jewish families, in humiliating scenes that play out in the novel. Her vivid descriptions, both in the novel and her diary, totally changed Sarna’s view of Jewish life in 1800s Philadelphia, he said. “Almost everything we know is from the perspective of these wealthy Jewish families …That has shaped our image,” Sarna said. “Suddenly we have a different and devastating perspective. It’s not to say one is right or one is wrong,” but it’s a reminder that there was another view, from the perspective

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of the seamstress. After four tortuous years, Wilburn ended her domestic work, changed her name to Cora Wilburn and embraced a literary life, producing an “astonishing” body of writing, from poetry to essays and fiction, Sarna found. In 1869, disillusioned with Spiritualism, she publicly reaffirmed her Jewish faith, comfortable with the tenets of Reform Judaism that was open to the liberal causes she supported. During these later years, when she was living in poverty in Massachusetts, Wilburn wrote extensively on Jewish themes and subjects. Her meager income was supported by a few Jewish institutions and rabbis, Sarna learned. She corresponded with Henrietta Szold, the founder of Hadassah, and had visits from the Boston Jewish writer Mary Antin. “There’s something very exciting for a historian about discovering not only a person but a world and a text that nobody has ever known before,” especially when these are primary sources, Sarna said. “Now I hope … over time, people will study it.” 

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Arts & Culture

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Audiences Loved ‘Fiddler On The Roof’ In Yiddish, But Yiddish Itself Still Gets No Love By Rokhl Kafrissen

Chaim Topol in the 1971 "Fiddler on the Roof" movie. (RDB/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

NEW YORK (JTA) — “Fidler afn Dakh,” the Yiddish adaptation of “Fiddler on the Roof,” closed on Jan. 5 after a wildly successful 11-month run off-Broadway and an equally successful seven-month stint at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Shraga Friedman’s Yiddish translation of “Fiddler” is a miracle (of miracles) and it was a joy to see it — and Yiddish — celebrated not just in my little shtetl, but in the mainstream, too. And yet, when I recently stepped onto a stage and spoke Yiddish, I was less appreciated and more iconicized. Let me explain. I didn’t even know it happened until I read about it in the newspaper afterwards. I had done something quite out of the ordinary for my life: I took a gig as a performer at a “Cocktails and Klezmer” evening in Philadelphia. My job was to lead the audience through some Yiddish questions and unpack a few elements of Yiddish grammar. I was the educational content in between the booze and schmooze. The next week, the event was reviewed in the Jewish Exponent. As Jesse Bernstein described it, I “read aloud with the crowd, building the sentence fragment by fragment, filling the room with guttural ‘ch’s’ and other vocal foundations of the language.” It reminded me of the joke in Billy Crystal’s autobiographical book (and then show) 700 Sundays, in which he describes his family as “the kind of people who spoke mostly Yiddish, which is a combination of German and phlegm. This is a language of coughing and spitting; until I was 11, I wore a raincoat.” If one had to locate Yiddish within the popular imagination, it would be found in the primeval Jewish throat. The success of Yiddish “Fiddler” shows that Yiddish, from afar, can attain a certain symbolic stature in the public eye of the theatre class. But the intimate experience of Yiddish, up close and personal, still THE

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speaks to nothing so much as lingering discomfort, and an estrangement between observer and object. Yiddish is often characterized by its guttural “ch’s.” But Hebrew, with just as many guttural sounds, rarely seems to get tagged as such. As late as 1930, Zev Jabotinsky was arguing that the ideal Hebrew pronunciation would “First of all … have to avoid the Yiddish ch, which is like the hoarse cough of someone with a throat disease.” Ouch. Linguistic anthropologists Judith Irvine and Susan Gal describe those linguistic features which were believed to “depict or display a social group’s inherent nature or essence” as “iconic,” hence the process of “iconicization.” When European anthropologists began describing the languages of southern Africa in the mid-19th century, they focused on the phonetically unfamiliar “click” sounds, describing them as similar to the sounds of animals, or rocks striking each other. Clicks were a linguistic feature which “indexed” the peoples who used them. Drawing on the prevailing racial-scientific logic of their day, European linguists concluded that the more clicks a language contained, the more “degraded” or “subhuman” was the speaker. I don’t think Billy Crystal, or Jesse Bernstein for that matter, are expressing a personal hatred or contempt when they index Yiddish speakers by the depth of their gutturals or the volume of their phlegm. In fact, I’m pretty confident they’re expressing their feelings of affection and intimacy, using the ordinary vocabulary of Jewish life, terms for which any of us might reach. The problem is that those feelings of personal affection and intimacy are in tension with a whole bunch of received ideas about the relative worth of the language. Without even knowing it, we’ve all absorbed a set of intensely negative beliefs about Yiddish. The origin of those beliefs is so distant and has become so tangled up with recent history, as to be mystified. But, if we were to unravel those negative beliefs to their origins, I believe we would find that they lie in the very foundations of Western academia, in which Europe’s Jews were depicted as a deformed, corrupted Other. The first scholars to

study Yiddish were German Humanists, who believed that the language was a “degenerate” ancestor of the evolved German they spoke. The beliefs of these scholars were clothed in the new language of science and scholarship, which made their truth all the more undeniable; even to the Yiddish-speaking Jews they diminished. But if those negative beliefs about Yiddish are so strong, what explains the extraordinary success of the Yiddish “Fiddler,” or “Yiddler”? (Aside from the fact that it’s a beautifully executed, fresh production.) One theater observer wrote recently: “It seems to unlock deep memories for Jewish viewers… audience members told me that words were jumping out at them that they hadn’t heard since they were little kids… A few also told me that it was encouraging to hear this language, which has been so diminished by the Holocaust and diaspora assimilation, spoken in a giant theater in New York City.” I think there’s quite a bit of truth

within those explanations. I would suggest that there’s another, even more powerful process at work. “Fiddler” is one of the most beloved and well known texts in American Jewish culture, not to mention American pop culture overall. It is so well known that by attending the show in Yiddish, even non-Yiddish speakers can have the experience of direct access to a language that would otherwise be closed off to them. “Yiddler” bestows the feeling of bilingualism, without the risks of investing in formal language study. It is deeply, uniquely, accessible to everyone, not just a small circle of Yiddish lovers. As much as I want to see more Yiddish language shows land offBroadway, it’s unlikely that the smashing success of “Yiddler” will translate to similar levels of success for other Yiddish theater, or that there will be a sudden increase in American Jews signing up to learn Yiddish. For one thing, though See YIDDISH on Page

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‘Uncut Gems’ Is Adam Sandler’s Oscar Moment

Adam Sandler plays Howard Ratner in "Uncut Gems." (Courtesy of A24)

NEW YORK (JTA) — As soon as I got out of a recent screening of “Uncut Gems,” I had to share the feelings of sheer cinematic bliss I had just experienced nonstop for two hours. “Just got out of ‘Uncut Gems,’ the new Adam Sandler movie coming out. He is sooooo good in it,” I texted my friend. “Oh cool! What’s it about?” she responded. “He plays a sleazy diamond dealer,” I said, adding a laughing emoji. “Wow! So he does dramatic

movies? Pulling a Steve Carell!” She wasn’t exactly living under a rock: Sandler is obviously best known for his many potty humor comedies that pimply teenagers love and their parents hate. Some film fans are aware that he’s also come into his own as a dramatic actor over the past couple of decades. His foray into that world started around 2002 with Paul Thomas Anderson’s bizarre “PunchDrunk Love,” and continued most recently in Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” in 2017. But the name Adam Sandler in pop culture still evokes that feeling one might experience after lighting a bag of poop on fire on your nemesis’ doorstep: I’m laughing at this, but I feel dirty doing so, and I shouldn’t be. Or perhaps, especially for Jews, his name brings to mind the lovable

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Hanukkah song. That could be about to change. His performance in “Uncut Gems” might just bring him an Oscar. “Uncut Gems” is the sixth film by Josh and Benny Safdie, a pair of thirtysomething Jewish brothers who have earned serious acclaim for their gritty indie works that probe the New York City underworld — like “Heaven Knows What” (2014), about a homeless heroin addict, and “Good Time” (2017), which stars Robert Pattinson as a bank robber. In “Uncut Gems,” Sandler plays Howard Ratner, an unscrupulous jeweler in New York’s extremely Jewish Diamond District. Howard’s marriage (to Dinah, played with steely resolve by Idina Menzel) is in tatters after he has had an affair with a young employee in his shop, and he has a debilitating gambling problem. He pools money he makes from sales and under-the-table deals to bet impulsively on NBA games, and is in debt to the kinds of characters whom no one wants to be indebted to. But there’s so much more going on here above and below the surface that words on a page won’t do the visceral experience of watching the film justice. It’s a frantically paced freight train of suspense and emotion capped off with a bombshell ending. It’s full of nuanced underlying commentary on consumerism, the downsides of international trade, addiction, family life and even basketball — former NBA star Kevin Garnett portrays himself in a slightly alternate universe in which he believes a rare stone that Howard lends him improves his play on the court. The film also deeply explores modern Jewish identity. Like the Safdies, who are distant relatives of the famed architect Moshe Safdie, Howard is part of a tight-knit Syrian Jewish clan rooted in New York City. While he fits in comfortably among the other Jews of the Diamond District, he is still a proud outsider to the wider world of wealth with which he regularly interacts. His Jewishness defines him to that world — to Garnett and his posse, he’s a “crazy Jew,” not a crazy jeweler. The Garnett role was actually written with Amar’e Stoudemire — the fellow former NBA star

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who has converted to Judaism and played pro ball in Israel — in mind. A large part of the plot revolves around an opal from Ethiopia that takes on a mystical significance for everyone who comes in contact with it. Howard believes it’s a kind of gem coveted by Ethiopian Jews, which endears it to him even more. Through it all, Sandler is uncannily good. He deploys a subtle but idiosyncratic ethnic New York accent. He oozes an eagerness to please his many clients and the many people he owes money to. He explodes with frustration when conflict caves in on him. Sandler not only keeps up with the film’s frenetic, disorienting pace — he pushes it forward. The now 53-year-old actor has been great in dramatic form before, perhaps most notably in “The Meyerowitz Stories.” But this is a new level for Sandler, an intense character study that ranks alongside other Oscar-winning performances from years past. In fact, Sandler just beat out the likes of Joaquin Phoenix, Robert De Niro and Adam Driver to win the National Board of Review’s award for best actor, an early indicator of Oscar success. The Safdies originally wrote the lead role for Sandler, but he didn’t see the script for years. As he told sports radio host Dan Patrick in a recent interview, Sandler’s manager kept it from him at first, thinking it wasn’t a good fit. “Maybe he was right, I was a little young for that movie 10 years ago,” Sandler said. Years later, after seeing some of the Safdies’ other films (and after Jewish actors like Jonah Hill and Sacha Baron Cohen were considered for the part), Sandler grabbed the role. But he went on in the Patrick interview to describe how scared he was at tackling the dark character. “I read the script and I was terrified … I said, ‘I’m terrified to do this, it’s two months of being this guy,’” he said. Sandler would call his wife at times while filming, asking for her help to prepare for an emotional scene. But eventually it clicked. “I grew to love being the guy,” he said. Well, it shows.  THE

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These Jews Made Time Magazine’s New List Of ‘Rising Stars’ By Josefin Dolsten

(JTA) — Time magazine is building on its list of the most influential people of the year by releasing a list of “rising stars,” or what it calls the Time 100 Next. The list features what the publication says is an increasing number of influential people who aren’t establishment types — the world leaders, CEOs of big companies and blockbuster actors that make up its Time 100 list. The new list includes a diverse range of figures, from pop star Camila Cabello to the viral rapper Lil Nas X to presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg. Among them are a few Jews and one Israeli politician. Keep reading to learn more about them. Beanie Feldstein

Beanie Feldstein at the 2019 Billboard Music Awards at MGM Grand Arena in Las Vegas, May 1, 2019. (Daniel Torok/ Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)

Feldstein, 26, became a household name after portraying the quirky best friend of the title character in the 2017 film “Lady Bird.” Recently she appeared in “Booksmart,” a comedy about two nerdy high school seniors directed by actress Olivia Wilde, who penned Time’s blurb on Feldstein. “Who else is that earnest and irreverent?” Wilde asks. “So prepared

YIDDISH Continued from Page 13 we’re living in a golden age of Yiddish education, the resources and infrastructure just aren’t there for large numbers of people to begin learning the language. Moreover, American Jews are still Americans, and monolingualism is a powerful American value, one much stronger than the unsexy time and effort it takes to learn a second language — especially a low prestige language like Yiddish. It’s exhausting to have to justify to everyone why you are spending your precious time learning what is supposedly a “dead” (and useless) language. The search for roots and longing THE

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and yet so present? Such a strong physical comedian and a subtle dramatic actor?” Ezra Miller Miller is a 27-year-old genderqueer actor who got his big break in

Ezra Miller attends the Saint Laurent Womenswear Spring/Summer 2020 show as part of Paris Fashion Week, Sept. 24, 2019. (Dominique Charriau/ WireImage via Getty Images)

“We Need to Talk About Kevin.” Most recently he appeared in the Harry Potter spinoff “Fantastic Beasts” films. “Miller has fully embraced and broadcast the pieces of his life that set him apart, from his love for his 95-acre farm in Vermont to his queerness, gender fluidity and polyamory,” reads Time blurb about him. Aly Raisman

who was convicted of molesting girls. “Aly is a true role model, inspiring and urging all of us to be proud of who we are, inside and out, and to learn that confidence is the most beautiful thing of all,” model and activist Ashley Graham Zach Weinberg is the co-founder, writes of the six-time medalist, president and COO of Flatiron Health. (Flatiron Health including three golds. Nat Turner. The health tech comAudrey Gelman pany uses data from millions of patients to improve cancer care. “Flatiron’s software helps researchers track which cancer treatments — at which doses, delivered at which times — work for which patients,” the blurb reads. Ayman Odeh Audrey Gelman attends a dinner for The Wing to celebrate its London opening, June 12, 2019. (David M. Benett/Getty Images for The Wing)

Audrey Gelman attends a dinner for The Wing to celebrate its London opening, June 12, 2019. The 32-year-old businesswoman is the founder of The Wing, a Ayman Odeh attends a news conference women’s co-working space and at an Arab-Israeli protest in front of the Prime Minister’s Office in Jerusalem, social club in New York that now Nov. 3, 2019. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90) has nine locations in the United Odeh, a 44-year-old Arab-Israeli States and England. “As a young professional with a hectic sched- lawmaker, leads the Joint List, a ule, Audrey Gelman relied on coalition of Arab parties that ended coffee shops and Amtrak bath- up endorsing Benny Gantz’s bid to rooms to change clothes between become prime minister. “As the commitments,” her listing in contest for leadership of the selfTime reads. “It was this experi- declared Jewish state teetered Aly Raisman attends the premiere of ence — and her desire for a more between right-wing and centrist “Charlie’s Angels” at the Westwood Regency professional alternative — that factions, Odeh emerged not only as Theater in Los Angeles, Nov. 11, 2019. a possible kingmaker but also as a first inspired The Wing.” stirring new voice for equality and The 25-year-old Olympic gymZach Weinberg nast made waves last year after she In 2012, Weinberg founded Flat- inclusion,” writes Karl Vick, Time’s testified at the trial of Larry Nasser, iron Health with his college friend former Jerusalem bureau chief.  the former USA Gymnastics doctor From our table to yours, Best Wishes to our many friends and customers in the Jewish community to connect still has to compete with our internalized distrust of the very things we are seeking. I was only half-surprised recently to see a “just for fun” social media posting We have the largest selection of Wine, Beer, & Spirits in the state! addressed to fellow Jews, asking us to share the “old country” names we thought sounded the most awful or embarrassing. My heart broke at the thought of Tevye ending up on this person’s list. No quantity of off-Broadway tickets sold can undo the toxic effect of centuries of unexamined, internalized Jew-hatred. That will take a much more sustained effort www.acquistapaces.com to rid ourselves of the Otherness we 985-951-2501 985-893-0593 carry inside, and a new understand631 N. Causeway Blvd.,, Mandeville 125 E. 21st Ave ing of the treasures that have susFacing East Causeway Approach In Historic Downtown Covington tained us. 

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More Doctors Changing Approach To End-Of-Life Care, Hadassah Study Finds By Larry Luxner

Dr. Charles Sprung of Hadassah Hospital found that doctors now favor palliative care for terminal patients at the end of their lives rather than aggressive medical interventions. (Courtesy of Hadassah Medical Organization)

Not long ago, an Orthodox rabbi in his early 70s with lung cancer was rushed to Jerusalem’s Hadassah Hospital with heart failure. The dying patient previously had asked his family not to be hooked up to life support, but when the time came and relatives had to make decisions, his wishes were ignored. “They decided to do a tracheostomy, even though he had explicitly told them not to,” recalled Sigal Sviri, director of Hadassah’s Medical Intensive Care Unit. “The family had consulted another rabbi, who said you must prolong life no matter what. So we ended up doing something our patient didn’t want us to do.” Call Our Trained Experts & Experience the Difference

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The patient survived another few weeks in the ICU and then died. While doctors at Hadassah say they see cases like this from time to time, a new study by the director emeritus of Hadassah’s General ICU, Charles Sprung, found that physicians’ approaches toward endof-life care has shifted considerably in the past decade and a half, including in Israel and traditionalist European countries. More than before, doctors now favor palliative care for terminal patients at the end of their lives rather than aggressive medical interventions to forestall the inevitable. “Practices have changed, and I think that’s good,” said Sprung, who authored the study with Dr. Alexander Avidan, Hadassah’s director of the Medical Informatics Unit. “Most of the time, we’re talking about patients at the end of their lives, when it’s pointless to do CPR.” Sprung and colleagues surveyed 22 hospitals in 13 European countries and Israel and compared the results with a similar study conducted 16 years earlier. Today, more often than in the past, doctors will not resort to life-prolonging interventions: 89.7 percent in the 201516 study vs. 68.3 percent in 19992000, Sprung and his team found. They also found that opting not to use all means possible to extend life didn’t necessarily condemn a patient to death. In fact, despite having fewer interventions in 201516, patients were more likely to survive than those in the same situation 16 years ago. Sprung’s team surveyed 13,625 intensive care unit patients admitted over a six-month period in

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2015-16 to study 1,785 patients who died or had limitations of lifesustaining treatments and constituted the study population. “It used to be that physicians saw death as failure, and they tended to use methods with limited success rates to try and prolong life,” said Sprung, who is also a medical ethicist and a lawyer. “Now there is more openness in discussing endof-life issues, new laws and a change in consensus. “You do whatever you can to save patients, but when a times comes where you cannot save them, giving them palliative care so they don’t suffer is extremely important — not only for the patients but also the families.” Sprung presented his study Oct. 2 at the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine’s Annual Congress in Berlin. It was also published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association, or JAMA. In Israel and southern European countries, doctors are more likely to use tools to extend life than in northern Europe, North America and Australia, the study found. But even so, there is more emphasis today on avoiding prolonged suffering than there was 16 years ago. In the United States, Sprung said, surveys show that the general population tends to favor physicianassisted suicide and euthanasia more than the physicians themselves. “Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia are morally wrong,” Sprung said. “Our job is to preserve life when it’s appropriate, but not to prolong it when the outcome is inevitable and when suffering might be enormous during that time.” It’s almost impossible in Israel to refuse the wishes of relatives who want all efforts made to prolong life, even when putting a patient on dialysis or treating crucial organ failures that clearly will not change the outcome, said Peter Vernon Van Heerden, who has been the director of Hadassah’s general ICU since 2015. “I’ve been working in intensive care for 30 years, and we deal with this almost on a daily basis,” Van Heerden said. “Sometimes we’re presented with patients on ventilators with absolutely no chance of survival, such as advanced cancer. In another country, they wouldn’t have been put on a ventilator in the first place. But in Israel, the community expects it and the rabbis demand it — sometimes for very

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spurious reasons.” Withdrawing continuous lifeprolonging therapies such as a ventilator from a patient once it has begun is against the law in Israel. Withdrawing intermittent life-prolonging therapies is permissible. An added complication in Israel, Sviri said, is that very few people have made living wills in the event that they are incapacitated and cannot communicate. She said it’s also not customary in Israel for hospital staff to ask newly admitted patients of their wishes. “Unless you have a legally signed document that you bring to the hospital, the risk of you ending up on a ventilator is very high,” Sviri said. “In America, you can extubate if there’s no response in three days, but not in Israel. So we end up ventilating some patients who may not want to be ventilated. However, some of these patients may still do pretty well.” Yet Sviri warned that in some European countries, the pendulum has swung too far the other way. In Belgium and the Netherlands, for example, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia are legal and rates are rising. “For every patient who didn’t want to be ventilated, there are patients who want to live and are not given that chance — especially in Europe — because somebody decided that it’s futile or that their quality of life will not be good,” she said. “In Israel, we do the opposite: continue life support for most patients, including those who end up who are vegetative. “The truth is somewhere in the middle. You need to be very careful in your decision-making and not go to either extreme.” This article was sponsored by and produced in partnership with Hadassah, The Women’s Zionist Organization of America, Inc., which is celebrating the 100th year of Hadassah Medical Organization, the Henrietta Szold Hadassah-Hebrew University School of Nursing and the Hadassah Ophthalmology Department. This article was produced by JTA’s native content team. 

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10 WAYS Continued from Page 10 Spain and Portugal Invite Their Expelled Jews Home

(fdecomite/Flickr)

In 2015, Spain and Portugal offered citizenship to descendants of Sephardic Jews who had been persecuted and expelled more than 500 years before. The laws were intended as atonement for the historic wrong of the Inquisition, which destroyed one of the most accomplished Jewish communities in the world. At a time of rising anti-Semitism around the world, the laws were cheered by Jewish leaders. “Spain is roots, beloved and painful memories,” Israeli President Reuven Rivlin said in a 2017 visit, adding that it’s “not just nostalgia but an actual home: a place where Jews need not be told to feel at home.” In practice, the application process was anything but simple. Spain’s law, whose window for applications ended in October, required applicants demonstrate an affinity with Spanish culture and have their family trees vetted. In Portugal, where the law is open ended, one of the two Jewish communities that the government tasked with vetting applications approves only people who are currently Jewish. Despite millions of potential applicants, the laws resulted in only about 132,000 applications in Spain and another 50,000 in Portugal. The low response owes to multiple factors. Most Sephardim live in affluent economies, which may limit their appetite for a second citizenship. Non-Jewish descendants of Sephardim often have no proof of their lineage. About 50,000 citizenship applications have been approved, two-thirds of them by Spain. — Cnaan Liphshiz Jews Of Color Gain Greater Exposure Jews of color have long pushed the wider community to better acknowledge its racial and ethnic and diversity, but a number of highprofile Jews of color made that fact much harder to ignore in the 2010s. In 2014, Angela Buchdahl became one of the most prominent Jews of color in the world when she was named senior rabbi of Central Synagogue in New York, one of the largest THE

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synagogues in the country. The daughter of a Buddhist mother and Jewish-American father, Buchdahl was born in Korea and became the first Asian-American rabbi in 2001 when she was ordained by the Reform movement’s Hebrew Union College. She was far from alone in drawing public attention to Jewish diversity. Barack Obama’s election in 2008 helped raise the profile of Rabbi Capers Funnye, an African-American rabbi in Chicago who also happened to be first lady Michelle Obama’s cousin. Amar’e Stoudemire, the former NBA star who told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency in 2013 that he believed he had

Jew, threw herself a star-studded bat-mitzvah at age 40 presided over by Sarah Silverman’s sister, Rabbi Susan Silverman. In 2019, the American Sephardi Federation and the Morocco-based Association Mimouna hosted the first conference focusing on Jews in Rabbi Angela Buchdahl speaks at Africa that was not exclusively for an interfaith prayer vigil on Oct. 30, 2018, at the Central Synagogue in academics — a step Funnye said New York City for victims of the Tree represented a major step forward. of Life synagogue shooting. (Michael “It means a great deal to the Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket African-American Jewish commuvia Getty Images) “Hebrew” roots, would eventually nity [and] the Jewish community of convert to Judaism and play in West Africa because we’ve been a Israel. Tiffany Haddish, the actress long time in saying we’re here,” and comedian who only learned at Funnye told JTA. — Ben Harris  27 that her father was an Eritrean

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The Top 4 Home-Selling Myths, Busted! “Fake news” has become one of the trendiest terms of the last few years—even when it comes to real estate. Homeowners are often bombarded with selling advice that promises to get their home sold quickly and for top dollar… but more often than not, these “tips” are nothing more than misleading—and can throw you off-track. As we begin a new year, we want to set the record straight. Here’s our list of the top four selling myths, debunked. Myth #1: It’s Just like Reality TV

If HGTV is your guilty pleasure, you’ve probably watched hundreds of buyers and sellers navigate the real estate process on camera. Although the shows do get some things right, they’re often scripted and don’t provide an accurate idea of what it takes to sell your property. One of the biggest misconceptions created by these programs is the length of the selling process. Don’t fall for the TV magic—it actually takes a lot more than a showing and a phone call to close a deal. In reality, homes can sit on the market for 60 to 100 days or more, and the closing process might last for up to 45 days. Instead of expecting instant gratification, it’s best to talk with your agent to create a realistic timeline before listing. Myth #2: Selling Without an Agent is Cheaper

Many sellers are tempted to list their home as “for sale by owner” because they want to avoid a commission fee. However, the risks involved definitely outweigh the savings. Real estate agents have to wear a lot of hats—they act as everything from property value analyzers to professional marketers to legal negotiators, all of which require years of experience. When you opt to sell on your own, all of that responsibility falls onto your shoulders, and it’s a lot to handle at once. Although it might seem like you’re saving money by doing it all yourself, an agent can protect you from scams, guide you through paperwork, and even sell your home for up to 75% more. In fact, a recent assessment by the National Association of Realtors notes that the average FSBO home price was $185,000, while homes sold by a Realtor went for $245,000. That’s a $60,000 price difference, which is much more than what you’d pay in commission! Myth #3: You Can Only Sell in Spring or Summer

petition, which will make your home stand out more and give you extra negotiating power. Myth #4: You Can Price Your Home by Yourself

There are countless mistakes to avoid when it comes to pricing your property, especially if you’re a first-time seller. Many homeowners believe they know their home best and can set their own price, but this isn’t necessarily the case. Oftentimes, sellers put more value into their home than it’s actually worth due to personal feelings—after all, it’s hard to see your own home without an unbiased eye! The right agent will know the ins and outs of the local market and won’t be so biased, which

makes them qualified to give you a more accurate estimate. It’s also crucial to be wary of online home estimators that promise instant results. Believe it or not, they won’t take into account any recent upgrades or repairs you’ve made on your home. A website also lacks the same personal touch as a real person. An agent will do thorough research into real estate trends in your area, as well as other properties that have sold nearby. Their hyper-local analysis paints a better picture of what your home can actually sell for. Looking for More Selling Advice? Whether you’re selling your first home or your fifth, it’s always a good idea to brush up on your real estate knowledge. If you have questions or are ready to list, feel free to reach out to The Nugent-Freeland Team in Metairie at 877-4091939. They can’t wait to team up and tackle the selling process together! 

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Bayou Tree Service: Caring For Louisiana’s Historic Live Oaks Since 1978 Whether you live in New Orleans or Baton Rouge, perhaps nothing says “Southern Louisiana” like the stately, historic Live Oaks that decorate our commercial, educational, municipality and plantation landscapes, and even some private residences. Hundreds of years in age and having witnessed centuries worth of history firsthand, these beautiful Live Oaks require an arborist’s knowledge and artful touch to provide proper historic tree care. Caring for historic Live Oaks isn’t just a specialty of ours here at Bayou Tree Service; it’s an honor and responsibility that we take very seriously. If you’re fortunate enough to have one of these amazing trees on your commercial or residential property, then you know just how important historic tree care is to maintain these southern treasures for generations to come. But do you know exactly what needs to be done on a regular basis to care for these grand giants? And do you have a team of professional ISAcertified arborists on hand to care for your historic trees? The Importance of Working with ISA-Certified Arborists for Historic Tree Care

While you can easily perform a Google search for a “tree company” in the New Orleans or Baton Rouge areas, chances are you won’t find many of our competitors who have as many team members certified by the ISA (International Society of Arboriculture). With only about 20,000 members worldwide, ISA requires arborists to truly understand both the art and science of tree biology, and study for and pass strict examinations to receive certification from the organization. This means, when you select Bayou Tree Service, you are working not only with the best of the best in historic tree care service, but also with a company that has been a part of the Southern Louisiana historic tree care community since 1978. How We Care for New Orleans and Baton Rouge’s Beautiful Live Oaks Historic Live Oaks require special treatment and considerations to maintain these majestic trees for years to come. At Bayou Tree Service, we care for historic Live Oaks in a variety of ways, including: • Consulting with property owners • Working alongside architects, landscape architects and city planners to develop and enhance

historic Live Oak tree preservation guidelines in project specifications and city code • Annual maintenance including tree trimming, pruning, mulching and fertilizing • Inspection of historic Live Oaks to identify any diseased branches or pest infestations • Saving Live Oaks that have been damaged in Hurricanes and Storms • Transplanting Live Oaks Bayou Tree Service: A Proven Record in Historic Tree Care As professional, Louisiana-certified arborists who are specialists in caring for New Orleans and Baton Rouge Live Oaks, we’ve worked on several projects to care for our region’s historic trees, in which we’ve provided consulting services, pruning, fertilization, transplants and tree salvations. Some of our happy historic tree clients include: • Audubon Park and Zoo, New Orleans, Louisiana • Audubon Tea Room, New Orleans, Louisiana • Iberville/Treme Housing Project, New Orleans, Louisiana • Jesuit High School, New

Orleans, Louisiana • Live Oak Society, Metairie, Louisiana • Longue Vue House and Garden, New Orleans, Louisiana • Jackson Barracks, New Orleans, Louisiana • New Orleans City Park, New Orleans, Louisiana • Oak Alley Plantation, Vacherie, Louisiana • Ohr-O’Keefe Museum, Biloxi, Mississippi • US 190 Live Oak Preservation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Trust Bayou Tree Service to Care for Your Historic Live Oaks Historic Live Oaks provide curb appeal and aesthetic beauty to properties that are unmatched by no other. If you’re fortunate enough to be an owner of one of these majestic trees, you need a professional arborist service that will treat them like the national treasures they are. That service is Bayou Tree Service. To call us for assistance with your historic Live Oaks, dial (504) 837-8733 to reach our New Orleans office, or (225) 399-4356 to reach us in Baton Rouge. 

We’re Caring For Trees And People. Bayou Tree Service understands the relationship that people have with trees. Trees give us oxygen, shade, beauty, and history. So we give them everything they need to stay healthy. Forever.

264 Industrial Ave., New Orleans, LA 70121

(504) 837-8733

Pruning, Fertilization & Planting • Large Scale Transplanting Arboricultural Consulting • Preservation Lightning Protection • Insect & Disease Treatment

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A Breakthrough Solution for Optimal Performance at any Age

WHY WAIT?

“Guys have a tendency not to talk about erectile dysfunction. I’d recommend anyone in their 50s or older to look into GainsWave, and not wait until they’re 62 like me.” -Alan, 62, Lawyer “In under 30 minutes, the O-Shot uses a woman’s own plasma to help overcome urinary incontinence and low libido!” -Megan, 38, RN

New Orleans Age Management Alan Arrington, MD 8422 OAK ST. • 504-662-9584 NEWORLEANSAGEMANAGEMENT.COM THE

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Southeast Waterproofing New Orleans has many examples of spectacular architecture, in many cases over a century old! But if you need to restore or clean the exterior, you can’t call just anyone to work on it. You need a recognized professional, such as Southeast Waterproofing, owned by Scott Heidingsfelder. Scott advises that inappropriate cleaning and coating treatments can be a major cause of damage to historic buildings. Cleaning may sometimes be followed by the application of a water-repellent coating. However, unless these procedures are carried out under the guidance and supervision of a professional, they may result in irrevocable damage to your historic building. Southeast Waterproofing is well-versed on the variety of cleaning methods and materials that are available for use on the exterior of historic buildings. There are several major reasons for cleaning a historic building including the need to improve the

appearance of the building, by removing dirt, address deterioration by repairing cracks and water intrusion, and certainly to provide a clean surface to accurately match the original exterior material, especially when dealing with masonry. Historic masonry includes stone, brick, architectural terra cotta, cast stone, concrete and concrete block. Most people would consider that water is the most effective tool in cleaning any property, however in the case of many historic properties, water, especially high velocity water streams, such as a pressure washer, is likely one of the most damaging tools that could be used in cleaning the property. If the building isn’t watertight, any moisture that gets in through the exterior can exasperate damage and cracks in the exterior, especially the complex masonry, marble, and other soft stones on many historic properties. Abrasive cleaning methods

are not appropriate for use on historic masonry buildings, either, because abrasive cleaning methods are just that—abrasive. Since the abrasives do not differentiate between the dirt and the masonry, they can also remove the outer surface of the masonry at the same time, and result in permanently damaging the exterior. Abrasion of carved details causes a rounding of sharp corners and other loss of delicate features, while abrasion of polished surfaces removes the polished finish of stone. Beyond the potential of causing catastrophic damage to their historic building, property owners also need to consider the safety of the environment when planning to rehabilitate the property. Southeast Waterproofing recognizes the potential effect of any method proposed for cleaning historic properties should be carefully evaluated. Chemical cleaners and paint removers may damage trees, shrubs, grass, and

Before

plants. Scott’s team will have a plan providing for the environmentally safe removal and disposal of all cleaning materials involved in your project. It is absolutely imperative to consider the historic appearance of the building. For example, Southeast Waterproofing recently completed two major historic projects including St. Joseph Church in Gretna and the Tulane University President’s House. Both buildings were returned to their historic grandeur and are excellent examples of meticulous care, attention to detail, and a passion for the work that Southeast Waterproofing performs with each project they undertake. Indeed, Scott and his team can do the same for your special historic property. The first step of your wellplanned project is to call Scott and Southeast Waterproofing at 504-473-7390 today to set an appointment to discuss your needs and concerns. 

After

CHAR DA’ High-end Level 5 Smooth Finishes 504-835-0463 Family owned for 50 years 22 Business Referral Guide

Licensed & Insured www.thejewishlight.org

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JEWISH LIGHT Best Wishes from all of us to all of our friends and clients in the local Jewish Community!

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CALL Me FIRST to LIST or BUY a Home!

504-330-0901

CAROLYN TALBERT

Barbara Robinson Picou 504-452-2602

Jennifer Lacoste 985-373-4927

Peggy Talbert 985-869-0798

TOP Producer Since 1985 · SOLD OVER $865 Million · Experience Makes a Difference

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“I want to sell your home!” 5 Bedrooms · 5 Full Baths · 2 Half Baths · Pool On the Lake · Double-Car Garage

31 Waverly Place · $990,000

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5 Bedrooms · 3 Baths · Garage · Rear Yard Access

1117 Aurora Dr. · $589,900

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5 Bedrooms · 4 Baths · Double-Car Garage · Place Pontchartrain

413 Champs Elysees · $599,900

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3 Bedrooms · 2 Baths · Rear Yard Access!

1-888-351-5111, LLC 4 Bedrooms 3 Baths 3 Car Garage! Acre Lot!

THE

3 Bedrooms · 2 Baths

1813 Princeton St. · $269,000 More listings at www.CarolynTalbert.com

Beauful Circular Driveway! · 3 Bedrooms · Rear Yard Access!

1112 Giuffrias · $319,999

669 Cameron Ct. · Kenner · $159,900

More listings at www.CarolynTalbert.com

More listings at www.CarolynTalbert.com

4 Bedrooms

Condo

2 Baths

3 Bedrooms

Double-Car Garage

2 Baths

303 Ormond Blvd. · $639,000

2500 Houma Blvd., Unit 215 · $122,500

3305 Lake Trail · $288,500

More listings at www.CarolynTalbert.com

More listings at www.CarolynTalbert.com

More listings at www.CarolynTalbert.com

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Realtors Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission Independently Owned & Operated www.thejewishlight.org

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United Cab New Orleans is a wonderful walking city and offers convenient, cheap and totally fun streetcars as an option for getting from neighborhood to neighborhood. It's easy to do without a car if you're not on a road trip to the Crescent City. But many visitors find themselves needing a taxi now and then in addition to getting to and from the airport. A quick run from the French Quarter to the famous Mid-City Lanes Rock 'n' Bowl, for example, is best accomplished by cab for expediency's sake. But in New Orleans, taxicabs are not controlled by a central dispatch, and they are hard to flag down except on busy hotel-heavy stretches in the French Quarter and Central Business District. So how on earth do you find one? Well, you just pick up the phone and call United Cabs when you need them or reserve online or with their app. As the largest and oldest taxicab company in New Orleans, United Cabs look like police cruisers. They are the standard go-to for hotel concierges and restaurant hosts and the like. This is the best company to call if you're in the Central Business Dis-

trict, downtown or the French Quarter. Call dispatch and you'll usually have one within a few minutes. Although rideshare services have increased in popularity over the past few years, their safety and customer service ratings pale in comparison to the record of an established cab service like United Cab. Check out some of the customer reviews for United Cabs: Jodi says, “My husband didn’t want to go on one of the night tours & I didn’t want to walk to the starting point alone at night. My hotel suggested United Cab & called them for me & he was at the hotel to pick me up within 5 minutes. The drivers on both my going & return trips were extremely nice & made me feel comfortable right away. Also they didn’t go around the long way to run up the bill. I highly recommend this cab service if you need one while in New Orleans.” Karen says, “We were picked up from the airport by a very delightful United Cab driver for transport to our stay at the B&W Courtyards Bed & Breakfast. Our driver Nancy gave us a history of N’awlins on our drive. She also asked what we

NOW AVAILABLE FOR YOUR SMARTPHONE AND ON THE WEB YOUR TAXI IS WAITING AT THE CURB! Passenger Transport Corporate & Personal accounts Airport Transportation Package Services (including food delivery/prescriptions/etc.)

UNITEDCABS.COM 24 Business Referral Guide

504-522-9771

were interested in and gave us hints and recommendations on where to go and what to eat. This was not our first visit and because of Nancy we visited places we had not gone to in the past. We became instant friends and used her services for the remainder of our stay. When in N’awlins again we will be sure to request Nancy.” Krissy says, “I called for a cab at 4:00am and it arrived within 5 minutes. I needed help finding someone at a location based only on the businesses that were nearby and the driver was able to get me there very quickly because of his knowledge of the area. It was an extremely stressful situation and the driver was very kind.” Diane says, “While visiting New Orleans, with my dog and dog stroller, I thought it better to take a taxi to visit rather than trying to find parking, paying whatever and have to search for a space at the motel upon return. Reviewed online information and chose United Cabs. Called to confirm that a dog was welcomed and he was. Requested the service and arrived very quickly. Very kind and courteous driver. Most helpful. Arrived at Bourbon Street to start the walk. Upon return, requested same cab company in similar location. A second very nice driver. Both fares were close to the same. Additional tip for superior service. Made the trip a much more enjoyable experience. Would definitely use again anytime I may be in the area.” Gabriel says, “We visited New Orleans for five days and had multiple cab rides during that time. In general, the cabs were clean, the drivers polite and the service efficient. All cabs take credit cards, making rides that much easier. One of the cabbies was a clarinet player, so at the end of our ride, he gave us a brief clarinet concert!!! Another one was a wealth of information about New Orleans restaurants. Additionally, the cab rates are relatively inexpensive.” Ava says, “We had an early flight out and required a prompt 4am pickup to go to the airport. This made us a little nervous and after looking into a few options I gave United Cab a call. The dispatcher reserved my car and in the morning when I called to confirm the car, it was already on the way. Arriving early really put us at ease, morning flights are always

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stressful for us, especially when we have plans the same day in our destination city. Our driver arrived early, waited for us to lock up and dispose of trash, loaded our baggage and made great conversation on our way to the airport. He was friendly, professional, and a delight. I will not hesitate to use this service again in the future and even with a tip, this trip was half the price of a black car. Highly recommend!” Susan says, “We don't drive when we travel, so we hailed a cab around Jackson Square as we had tickets to the Zephyr's game that night. The first cab driver who stopped had no idea what the words "baseball" or "Zephyrs" meant so we immediately got out. The next cab driver was Olu. He was awesome! Born in Nigeria, he has lived in New Orleans for 31 years. He has three teenage children all in school and doing very well (the American dream). He took us to the ballpark and picked us up promptly when we were ready to leave. He even recommended a great restaurant for dinner that night. If you're in need of a cab when visiting New Orleans, I hope you're lucky enough to get Olu as your driver. Kathleen says, “Although my very 1st cab ride, from NOLA airport, to my Hotel was a lot disconcerting; I feel VERY lucky to have had the bell boys whistle for Gary, of United Cabs. He took me to the place I stayed at for my 2nd week. We chatted & laughed all the way there! He was upset; when I told him about my 1st driver! He gave me his card; so I called him for a ride, to the airport! Not only did he remember me & thanked me for calling; but he texted & called me, to inform me, that he was stuck in traffic!! He guaranteed I'd get to the airport on time! We talked all the way there! I got to hear his VERY talented daughter sing a dynamite version of an Adele song!! Wow! Impressive!! For a Safe, great ride call Gary!!” Amelia says, “I have used several taxis/cabs while in New Orleans, but this company is extremely efficient compared to the rest. Everyone drives nuts in New Orleans, that's a given. I recommend using the following people: Ali, Ramsay, Sault. They were great! They made us laugh and were knowledgeable about the city.”  THE

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Jacqueline F. Maloney Attorney at Law Notary Public SUCCESSIONS ∙ WILLS CRIMINAL DEFENSE ∙ DWI BUSINESS FORMATION & LITIGATION

3445 N. Causeway Blvd., Suite 210 · Metairie, LA 70002

(504) 333-6934

Licensed to pracce law in Louisiana since 1998

Get ready for the ball!

Ask About FREE Pick Up & Delivery

Our Mardi Gras colors don’t run!

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(504) 861-7812 8128 Willow Street New Orleans LibertoCleanersNOLA.com

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s i n c e 19 8 3

Over 3,000 cars, trucks and SUV’s across New Orleans!

www.RayBrandtAuto.com 26 Business Referral Guide

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New Orleans Facial Plastic Surgery leave them with an unnatural or “oper- graphs, a standard facial worksheet is ARTISTRY + EXPERTISE Trust your face to a Facial Plastic ated on” appearance. The best cosmetic used to illustrate potential incisions and ensure adequate communication of surgery does not draw attention to Surgeon

Dr. Thomas Moulthrop is double board certified and fellowship-trained in Head and Neck Surgery and Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the premier practice in New Orleans for both surgical and non-surgical facial rejuvenation. Patients return to his office and refer their friends and families because he takes the time to explain and customize the approach for a natural, refreshed look. The refined, inviting atmosphere provides patients with a calm and elegant setting in which to explore facial plastic surgery. His mission is to improve your life by aesthetically enhancing your appearance. His meticulous and artistic approach is based on years of experience. The first and foremost goal is to achieve a result that appears as natural as possible. It is far better for prospective patients to remain as they are than to undergo surgical procedures that

itself and never says “something is not right here.” In fact, one colleague in our community often says, “You pay as much for what he doesn’t do as for what he does do.” This succinctly captures the philosophy of Dr. Moulthrop. The preoperative facial plastic surgery consultation is the foundation of the surgical approach and allows Dr. Moulthrop to evaluate what course of action is best for each patient, by taking time to understand your most pressing concerns. Two important components of the preoperative visit are photographic analysis and the mirror examination. By utilizing digital photographs at a variety of angles, patients can visualize their own faces more objectively. The artistry becomes evident as drawings on these photographs demonstrate the proposed enhancement that may be achieved. In addition to the photo-

expectations. The mirror examination provides an opportunity to show patients these aesthetic changes on their own face as well as to illustrate what can and cannot be achieved with a given technique. The goal is to produce a natural result that does not inappropriately alter the patient’s unique facial appearance. Following the consultation, each patient will be given further information regarding surgical preparation and recovery. Second consultations are always welcome. When you are ready to consider Facial Plastic Surgery for yourself or a loved-one, you can feel confident that Dr. Moulthrop is ready to speak with you in a comfortable environment at either the Southshore or Northshore office. Both locations have ample parking available. Call to schedule your appointment today at 504-895-7642. 

Thomas Moulthrop, MD, FACS Trust Your Face to a Facial Plastic Surgeon

Surgical Services Provided • • • • • • • • •

Brow Lift or Forehead Lift Chin Implants Mohs Reconstruction Neck Liposuction Otoplasty Rhinoplasty Rhytidectomy / Facelift / Necklift Scar Revision Upper and Lower Blephardoplasty / Eyelid Surgery

Non-Surgical Services Provided • • • • • • •

Fractional CO2 Laser Injectables Neuromodulators Botox Dysport Xeomin Fillers: Multiple products in the families of Restylane and Juvaderm • Skin Care

Proudly continuing the standard of aesthetic excellence established by Dr. Calvin M. Johnson, Jr. New Orleans Hedgewood Plastic Surgery 2747 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 (504) 895-7642

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Northshore Arbor Walk Professional Center 395 Highway 21, Suite 500-B Covington, LA 70447 (985) 792-4355 Fridays 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm *Except 1st Friday of the Month - Full Day Appointments www.thejewishlight.org

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Backyard Printing Backyard Printing brings years of creative arts teaching in public schools to our very popular and highly efficient printing and embroidery business. We would love to work with you to create the perfect design and have it beautifully conveyed onto t-shirts, caps, tote bags, towels and other cloth items of your choice. We specialize in screen printed t-shirts, working with you to

arrive at a satisfactory design and layout that conveys what you want on the shirt. We screen print for businesses, schools and many other small and large organizations. Another item that we have

ing of items at www.secondlinehandkerchiefs.com. Personalized embroidery is also a popular part of the business. Please do not hesitate to contact us through email at backyardprinting@gmail.com or by phone (985-231-7789) if you have any questions you may also email us at Secondlinehandkerchiefs@gmail.com. ďƒŹ

with printed handkerchiefs. We also offer printed and decorated Secondline umbrellas! We offer white umbrellas and black umbrellas with a variety of screen printed images. Decorations can be team colors or added to our specialized items colors to match your wedding, Bar or Bat Mitzvah, or special is Secondline handkerchiefs. event theme. Make your event even more You can view a select offermemorable with a second line

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A CARING COMMUNITY CLOSE TO HOME. Specializing in Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care The cornerstone of our Schonberg community philosophy is that exceptional assisted living and memory care is personal. Personal care begins and ends with each unique person, and the family, friends, and loved ones of each resident play an important role in shaping and strengthening our communities. Our four convenient locations offer the best of the best in amenities, programming, and care throughout the Greater New Orleans area. Schonberg communities ensure that quality time with your loved one is just a few minutes away, and you can feel the comfort of knowing you are always close by when needed.

Visit Your Nearest Schonberg Community Today!

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NEW ORLEANS

MANDEVILLE

www.VistaShores.com • (504) 288-3737

www.BeauProvence.com • (985) 778-0755

SLIDELL

LULING

www.ParkProvence.com • (985) 781-0072

www.Ashton-Manor.com • (985) 785-8288

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Business Referral Guide Greater New Orleans 507 Upstream Street River Ridge, LA 70123 504-734-0140

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St. Joseph Hospice and The Carpenter House

Greater Baton Rouge 10615 Jefferson Hwy. Baton Rouge, LA 70809 225-769-4810 Website: www.thecarepenterhealthnetwork.com

About Us St. Joseph Hospice and The Carpenter House are a part of The Carpenter Health Network. Founded in 2002, our mission is to joyfully provide optimal patient care seamlessly across service lines to ensure spiritual, emotional and physical healing wherever possible, while always respecting life, fostering dignity and preserving quality of life. St. Joseph Hospice, named for Joseph of Nazareth, serves the community with a commitment to help patients welcome each day with the hope and expectation of tomorrow. Providing compassionate comfort care and support to both the patient and the family is a fundamental tenet of hospice care. Patients are cared for by a team of trained healthcare professionals who focus on each patient’s unique needs and wishes. Under the direction of board certified hospice palliative care physicians, care — physical, emotional and spiritual, is provided by registered and licensed practical nurses, medical social workers, chaplains, certified home health aides, bereavement counselors, trained volunteers, and 24/7 on-call nurses. St. Joseph Hospice also provides in-home palliative care through AIM Palliative Home Health, a program of The Carpenter Health Network. Palliative home health is a care option for patients receiving chemotherapy, radiation, dialysis or other curative treatments. This level of care allows both the patient and family time to explore options and make decisions about how they wish to deal with a life-limiting illness. The Carpenter House, is separate and apart from any hospital, assisted living facility, or nursing home. The Carpenter House serves as a place of comfort, peace, and dignity for when end-of-life symptoms are not well managed at home. It also offers a warm, home-like setting that allows patients to transition directly from the hospital into the hospice unit as they plan for long-term arrangements at home. Families and friends are encouraged to spend as much time as they would like with their loved ones at The

Carpenter House. Visits from children and family pets are also welcomed.

Why Choose Hospice and Palliative Care?

Two of the most sacred events in a person’s life and for a family are birth and death. However, in the modern healthcare system, patients with advanced chronic illnesses commonly spend their last weeks in and out of hospitals. These frequent emergency room visits and hospital stays often result in the additional discomforts of futile procedures and the stress of being away from the comforts of home. As likeliness of any cure from a life-limiting illness fades, and the focus of care shifts to comfort – physical, emotional, and spiritual, home based palliative and hospice care become options. Both offer a level of expert, compassionate care that is personal and meaningful to both the patient and the family. The hospice philosophy of care is consistent with Jewish tradition as it does not aim to hasten death nor cease patient care. The primary tenant of hospice care is to preserve individual dignity while offering comfort care during the final stages of a life-limiting illness. The goal is always to manage physical symptoms and increase the quality of life for as long as possible. Simultaneously, spiritual and emotional support is provided to the patient and family – all of which are equally important during this sacred time. St. Joseph Hospice does not deny hospice care services based on age, race, nationality, disease, handicap, religion, gender, or sexual orientation. Hospice care is covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurance plans, like all hospice agencies, whether they are for-profit or nonprofit. No patient will be turned away from St. Joseph Hospice based on their ability to pay. St. Joseph Hospice is always available to compassionately listen and share all care options to help you decide what is best. Call us to speak with someone today or visit our website to learn about all the full range of services available through The Carpenter Health Network. 

There is no medicine better than hope, no comfort more than home, and no power greater than the expectation of tomorrow.

ST JOSEPH 

HOSPICE

THE

CARPENTER HOUSE

Call today for information on palliative and hospice care services, or if interested in becoming a hospice volunteer.

Baton Rouge w 225-769-4810

New Orleans w 504-734-0140 www.StJosephHospice.com 30 Business Referral Guide

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Memory Care Assisted Living Homes

The Difference Between “Home Like” & Home! E njoy all of the benefits that assisted living can provide

without giving up the privacy and comfort of home. At Peristyle Residences, the best of both worlds is at your fingertips. We offer senior care services in a true residence that larger assisted living communities can emulate but never truly capture. We are committed to providing your loved one with the exceptional care, compassion, comfort, communication, community, and choice that we would expect for our family members. Our team of professional caregivers includes a Registered Nurse/Wellness Coordinator, RN’s that manage Medication Administration, House Manager, Activities Coordinator, and a caring, experienced team of CNA’s. Our caregivers are trained in dementia care and undergo background checks. We ensure a unique experience that is catered to your needsright in the comfort of your new home.

• 24-hour personal a including bathing, dressing & grooming assistance • Laundry service & housekeeping (bed & bath linens provided) • Specialized dementia care training for team members • Medication assistance & administration from our team of RN’s • Menu created by Chef Aaron Burgau of Restaurant Patois • Ambulation/transferring supervision • Spiritual services chapel • Activities & entertainment • Daily music & therapy performances • Aroma & pet therapy

A CARING, COMFORTING HOME CLOSE TO YOUR HOME Lakeview House 858 Mouton New Orleans, LA 70124

Metairie Heights 2701 Metairie Heights Metairie, LA 70002

Henican House 5511 Meadowdale Metairie, LA 70003

Old Metairie Gardens 344 & 348 Lake Avenue Metairie, LA 70005

Richland House 3521 Richland Avenue Metairie, LA 70002

Honeysuckle House 824 Honeysuckle Street Gretna, LA 70056

Beau Maison 3520 Cleary Ave. Metairie, LA 70002

Lake Louise 4613 Lake Louise Metairie, LA 70006

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THE JEFFERSON

OPENING SPRING 2020 224 CENTRAL AVENUE IN OLD JEFFERSON

(504) 517-3273 • www.PeristyleResidences.com www.thejewishlight.org

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Own the Road. Or lease it for $349 a month.

Introducing the 2019 Mercedes-Benz A-Class. The most advanced Mercedes-Benz now comes at a most attainable price. Equipped with the groundbreaking Mercedes-Benz User Experience (MBUX), the A-Class ties car and driver together like never before. Loaded with new technology, its built-in artificial intelligence quickly learns your driving tendencies, while its natural voice control system awaits your voice commands. So intuitive, so innovative—the all-new A-Class is bound to get people talking. Learn more at MBofNO.com

THE 2019

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STARTING AT

32,500

$

*

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3727 Veterans Boulevard Metairie, LA

504-456-3727

2019 A220 Sedan shown in Jupiter Red with optional equipment. *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. 36 monthly payments at $349. $3,643 due at singing includes $2,499 cap cost reduction, $795 acquisition fee and first lease payment of $349, $0 security deposit. Credit permitting. Plus tt&l and registration fee. 30,000 mile lease.

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Mercedes-Benz continues to lead the world in innovation, and, Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans offers such leadership in Sales and Service. It’s a reputation that has grown in New Orleans for decades. Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans is the Luxury Automobile Dealership that stands apart from the rest. They offer not only Mercedes-Benz vehicles… they excel in their award winning service department. This is the type of service that prides itself on customer relationships. Their Veterans Boulevard location provides most any and everything for your transportation needs since 1993, with an emphasis on customer service. They are not only Louisiana’s largest MercedesBenz franchise, but one of the largest and state-ofthe-art dealerships in the nation. Featuring a 6,000 square foot showroom with marble floors, children’s play area, customer internet lounge, and executive seating, to the climatecontrolled technician bays with computer analysis ability, provides Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans’ customers and their vehicles with the very finest care available. Their service department begins receiving customers at 7:30 am, Monday-Friday, and even offers service on Saturdays, from 7:30 am until 5:00 pm. It’s easy to care for your Mercedes-Benz by just simply making a phone call to your personal service advisor, or sending an e-mail. Luxury Mercedes-Benz loaner cars are available as well. Or, if you would like to be chauffeured somewhere, we offer our customers a free shuttle service. If you would possibly experience any difficulty on the road, rest assured that Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans also provides factory authorized road service 24/7/365. And, if you should be involved in an accident rest assured that the Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans Collision Center is a full “pro shop” with all major insurance companies, offering the finest luxury collision repair available. Come experience what customer service really is; an enduring commitment to excellence combined with an entrepreneurial spirit and the absolute dedication to customer service. Friend us on Facebook, Instagram, or see our entire inventory and learn more about MercedesBenz of New Orleans at www.MBofNO.com. 

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The magical wedding of your dreams awaits.

Let us create a celebration for the most special day of your life. For more information about hosting an event with The Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans, contact us at (504) 670-2855 or visit www.ritzcarlton.com/neworleans.

NEW ORLEANS

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English Turn Once reserved for the exclusive use of its members, the Clubhouse and grounds are now available for public and private events. Guests from all over the country are welcomed to host events at English Turn Golf & Country Club. You do not have to be a member of the club or a resident of the community to host your event at the clubhouse or on the grounds. Our centrally located Club includes a large ballroom with floor to ceiling windows, a glass ceiling atrium, and an impressive main dining room overlooking the 18th hole. The views are stunning and we always pre-order blue skies and sunshine. We understand you want your wedding reception to be personal, elegant and a true reflection of your style as a couple, and you want to select items that best suit your vision. There are menu packages available for you to choose from, or you have the option to create your own menu while working with our Chef. The second level of our clubhouse can hold up to 500 guests reception style and 320 seated. Our silk linens and gold chiavari chairs come with every reception package. Our Event Coordinators will help

you design a floor plan to fit the needs of your event. We offer several rooms that adjoin to each other creating a space that is truly elegant and unique, with tall ceilings and panoramic golf course views are the perfect setting for a romantic wedding celebration. We welcome the opportunity to prepare a complete event proposal for your review, including everything that you will need to have a celebration you will always rememberfrom linens to flowers, appetizers to cake, we can help you with it all. We welcome all professional wedding planners to assist in planning your event at English Turn, and we have developed many relationships with every kind of vendor from florists to transportation services. English Turn Golf and Country Club offers traditional and elegant locations for a wedding ceremony. Whether you choose our lush outdoor location offering scenic views and unparalleled privacy or our indoor garden room or dining room with classic design and warmth; the club is the perfect location for your ceremony. Each space can be customized to fit your personal style and can comfortably accommodate both intimate

nuptials and large scale affairs. Many couples are also avid golfers and Tee Times are available and scheduled within 30 days advance of your event. Your event manager will provide complete details on availability for golf tournaments, bachelor/bachelorette events, and corporate outings. Every wedding reception secured at English Turn will receive complimentary green fees. More than just weddings are celebrated here. Within eight short miles of downtown New Orleans and the French Quarter, English Turn Golf and Country Club offers an escape from the hustle and bustle of the busy city and is the perfect place for a luncheons, dinners, or cocktail parties. Celebrate with your sales staff, to showcase products to prospective clients, or to roll out a new advertising campaign. We understand the unique challenges that large-scale corporate events can experience and have the flexibility to ensure your company’s event is successful. Contact our dedicated and professional catering staff for complete details on how together, we will prepare a customized event proposal for your next event. ďƒŹ

THE PERFECT PLACE...

Bridal Showers & Luncheons

to say I do.

Rehearsal Dinners Indoor & Outdoor Ceremonies Receptions Corporate Meetings & Luncheons Only 15 minutes from Downtown New Orleans

Contact Jessica King: jessicak@englishturn.com or Alisha Adams: alishaa@englishturn.com 34 Business Referral Guide

504.392.2200

englishturn.com

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Are you searching for a compassionate nursing home in New Orleans? Ferncrest Manor Living Center is a nursing home community with a highly trained staff to provide professional care, comfort and security to seniors in the New Orleans area. They are also equipped with state-of-the-art medical facilities and experienced physicians that will custom-tailor a treatment plan for each individual based on their unique needs while monitoring their progress throughout their stay. Whether your loved one needs shortterm post-operative care or long-term rehabilitative care, Ferncrest Manor Living Center is the place to consider for exceptional senior care. But, the best part of living at Ferncrest Manor Living Center is the sense of community shared by all of the residents and caring staff members. From the exquisite grounds and luxurious surroundings to the diverse calendar of activities, the concept of community is the main component of everything they do. Striving for a taste of true New Orleans hospitality and having a sense of community truly adds to the quality of life enjoyed by all the residents of Ferncrest Manor. Complex Care Unit For residents who require long-term dependence on sophisticated health technology in settings other than the acute care hospital, Ferncrest Manor Living Center offers a skilled level of care, providing highly technical skilled nursing care to meet the intense level of respiratory needs for ventilator-dependent residents. These specialized tasks are performed by a staff of registered nurses, certified respiratory therapists, social workers, and other qualified professionals under the supervision of a qualified physician. They also provide specialized care for patients with ventilator dependency

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requiring dialysis; Medicaid rehabilitation for closed head injuries; and Tracheostomy. Medicare Skilled Nursing Unit Ferncrest Manor provides a skilled nursing unit for residents with Medicare insurance. They maintain a high level of healthcare standards and procedures to ensure all residents receive quality treatment. The medical director and staff of physicians make regular visits to residents and are on call for emergency treatment 24 hours a day. Some of these services include tube feeding, tracheotomy, renal failure requiring dialysis, short and long-term rehabilitation, wound care (including decubitus ulcers), and physical, speech, occupational and respiratory therapies. Respite Care Respite care is available for individuals requiring a short-term stay. For caregivers going on vacation, the Ferncrest staff can care for their loved ones. Activities for All Ferncrest Manor Living Center encourages residents to take an active part in their own lives through programs designed with their special needs in mind. Whether it’s strolling in the courtyards, visiting in the gazebo or attending a traditional religious service, they have the activities that will make your loved one feel at home and a part of a truly great community! Some of the regular activities include: arts & crafts, bingo, bowling games, card games, field trips, ice cream socials, monthly birthday parties, movies & popcorn, music hour, pizza parties, pokeno games, reading time, resident meetings, and wine & cheese socials.Ï

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Tips For Choosing A Wedding Reception Menu Weddings are memorable for a host of reasons. While couples remember their weddings because they mark the day they officially tied the knot, guests may remember weddings for other reasons, including the food served at the reception. Some wedding venues are known for their stunning landscapes, while others build their reputations on unique interiors that provide unforgettable ambiance. But regardless of where weddings take place, guests are liable to discuss the food served at the reception. Guests might rave about the escargot or complain that the fish was flaky, but couples who choose reception menus wisely can go a long way toward ensuring there are more compliments than complaints once the dinner bell rings. Don't Zero In On Specialties.According to The Knot 2017 Real Weddings Study, a survey of nearly 13,000 brides and grooms who tied the knot in 2017, the average wedding hosted 136 guests. While couples might be tempted by specialty dishes when choosing their wedding menus, couples who are hosting dozens, if not hundreds, of guests should keep things simple.

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Consider Potential Allergies In regard to entrées, make sure guests with food allergies can choose something that won't make them sick. According to Food Allergy Research & Education®, an organization devoted to improving the quality of life of individuals with food allergies, some common foods cause the majority of allergic reactions. Peanuts, soy, sesame, and shellfish are among the most common food allergies, according to FARE®, who also notes that allergies to wheat, milk and eggs are common in children. While such foods can still be served at wedding receptions, make sure to also include foods that are unlikely to trigger allergic reactions. Couples can even ask guests to inform them of any food allergies. Don't Hesitate To Offer A Favorite Food While specialty entrées might not be a great choice, especially at large receptions where lots of mouths must be fed, a couple who has a favorite food that's symbolic of their relationship should not hesitate to offer it during the cocktail hour. For example, a couple who met in Thailand may want to offer a favorite Thai dish.

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Offer An Elaborate Dessert The last bite guests will take is dessert, so couples who want their guests to go home raving about the food may want to offer something special after the entrées have been taken away. Some guests may not indulge, but those who do might end their nights thinking about the delicious dessert they enjoyed as the festivities drew to a close. If the dessert is especially unique, offer something more traditional alongside it for more hesitant guests. Choosing a wedding menu should be fun, and the catering professionals at Generations Hall are able to help guests consider many options. Reach out to them at 504-568-1700. 

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Best Wishes to our many Customers and Friends in the Jewish Community from the Paretti family of dealerships

Paretti Mazda Paretti Jaguar Metairie and Baton Rouge Land Rover New Orleans and Baton Rouge

GATHER DINE CELEBRATE Catering at Our Venue & Around Town • Rehearsal Dinners • Wedding Receptions • Post Wedding Brunches • Conference Dinners • Corporate Lunches & Dinners

930 Tchoupitoulas Street, New Orleans, LA 70130 504.588.2188 | calcasieurooms.com

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• Social Events • Holiday Celebrations

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Outdoor Improvements That Boost Home Value Whether home improvement projects are design to improve the interior or exterior of a house, focusing on renovations that make the most financial sense can benefit homeowners in the long run. The right renovations can be assets if and when homeowners decide to sell their homes. So how does one get started? First and foremost, speak to a local real estate agent who is knowledgeable about trends in the community. While a swimming pool may be something coveted in one area, it may impede sales in another. It also helps to study generalized trends and data from various home improvement industry analysts to guide upcoming projects. The following outdoor projects are just a few renovations that tend to add value. • Fire pit: A fire pit is a great place to gather most months of the year. Bob Vila and CBS news report that a fire pit realizes a 78

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percent return on investment, or ROI. • Outdoor kitchen: Many buyers are looking to utilize their yards as an extension of interior living areas. Cooking, dining and even watching TV outdoors is increasingly popular. Outdoor living areas can be custom designed and built. In addition, prefabricated modular units that require a much smaller commitment of time and money are available. • Patio: Homeowners who do not already have a patio will find that adding one can increase a home's value. Patios help a home look neat, add useable space and may help a home to sell quickly. The experts at Space Wise, a division of Extra Space Storage, say that refinishing, repairing and building a new patio offers strong ROI. • Deck: Deck can be as valuable as patios. A deck is another outdoor space that can be used for entertaining, dining and more.

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Remodeling magazine's 2018 "Cost vs. Value" report indicates that an $11,000 deck can add about $9,000 in resale value to the home, recouping around 82 percent of the project's costs. • Door update: Improve curb appeal with a new, high-end front door and garage doors. If that's too expensive, a good cleaning and new coat of paint can make an old door look brand new. These easy fixes can improve a home's look instantly. • New landscaping: The National Association of Realtors says an outdoor makeover that includes well-thought out landscaping can net 105 percent ROI. Installing a walkway made of pavers, adding stone planters, mulching, and planting shrubs are ideas to consider. When trying to make your backyard dreams come into reality, speak to JimStone Co. at 985-882-5907. 

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We Are Here For You Saying goodbye to a loved one can be overwhelming but giving them the celebration they deserve and creating a lasting memory for those that live on is a loving experience. For over 145 years we have continued our tradition of sharing our experience and compassion with New Orleans families to help bring them the ease, comfort and peace of mind needed to allow family and friends to remember, grieve and console one another. Our mission since 1874 is to provide the highest standard of funeral service to all faiths regardless of financial circumstance. As a fifth generation Schoen, I am proud to continue my family's legacy. We are here for you to help you thoughtfully plan your goodbye to take away the stress and create a lasting memory. Whether the need is immediate or to memorialize wishes, we will help you navigate the intricate details of beliefs, family and wishes to create a fitting celebration at a fair price.

J. Garic Schoen Chapel

We are here for you as a resource when needed whether to answer questions, assist with pre-planning to guarantee one’s wishes at today’s prices or honor the pre-need arrangements from other funeral homes. We are located at 3827 Canal Street in our renovated mansion which includes our new, non-denominational, 350-seat J. Garic Schoen Chapel. The mansion, chapel and ample parking offer the convenience of having all your needs attended to in one location. From my family to yours, I invite you to come see the new, bright and airy space, discuss what innovative options are now available for memorial and learn more about how we can help you or a loved one realize their wishes to be remembered and celebrated. Please stop by or give me a call at (504) 605-0349 and I will personally arrange a tour for you. And as always, if you ever have a question, please do not hesitate to ask.

Patrick M. Schoen, Managing Partner

www.SchoenFH.com |3827 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA 70119 | (504) 605-0349 THE

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St. Joseph Church Gretna, LA

We specialize in masonry repair and restoration, including the cleaning, repair, coating and caulking of new & existing commercial and residential structures. We take great pride in being the oldest and most experienced waterproofing contractor in the city, having worked on modern and historic properties across town, including the Vieux Carré. Our reputation for knowledge, service, performance and quality has made us one of the premier waterproofing and coating contractors in the Southeast United States.

BEFORE

AFTER

We are ready to bring our solutions to any masonry restoration, waterproofing or coating problem to your home or business.

504-822-1684

southeastwaterproofinginc.com Sco� Heidingsfelder, President 1028 Jus�n Street, Metairie, LA 70001

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