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Perfect powder and sensational runs — why skiing in Japan is as cool as it gets

F R EE T O TA K E H O M E

MAGAZINE

READY

SET

SKI JAN 2019

MAUI

GOLD COAST

COOK ISL ANDS

CHRISTCHURCH

HOI AN

KINGS CANYON

HOBART

HONG KONG


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WELCOME TO TE WAI POUNAMU (SOUTH ISLAND)

Mā kā karu hōmiromiro ka kitea te rerehua o te whenua. Sometimes you can only see the beauty of the land through the eyes of someone who loves the land.

PICTON

5HRS

We are all born explorers, some more intrepid than others. Whatever you are looking for, you will find it here – in the land of the long white cloud. At Ngāi Tahu Tourism, we’re proud to connect millions of visitors to our people, our place and to our culture. Call in and visit us on your way around the South Island and immerse yourself in an authentic New Zealand experience. Nau mai, haere mai (welcome); we look forward to hosting you.

5HRS FRANZ JOSEF CHRISTCHURCH 5HRS

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Drive times approximate.

Agrodome / Dart River Adventures / Earth & Sky / Franz Josef Glacier Guides / Franz Josef Glacier Hot Pools / G  lacier Southern Lakes Helicopters Guided Walks NZ / Hollyford Track / Hukafalls Jet / NZ Snowshoe / Queeanstown Snowmobiles / Rainbow Springs / Shotover Jet


JOURNEY TO THE UNIVERSE

EXPLORE AN UNTOUCHED WORLD

In the heart of the Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky Reserve – an area recognised for being among the best places in the world to view night skies – Earth & Sky offers exclusive stargazing experiences, including the world-renowned Mount John Observatory and the iconic Church of the Good Shepherd. World-class observatories, expert astrophotographers and astronomy guides create the ultimate stargazing experiences.

Dart River Adventures is the only operator in the pristine Dart River Valley, offering adventures from jet boating to kayaking and horse riding in Glenorchy, 45 minutes from Queenstown. Journey from Lake Whakatipu deep into Mount Aspiring National Park where myth, heritage and fantasy come to life. Here, you will explore an untouched world, inaccessible by other means.

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DISCOVER THE FAMOUS ROUTEBURN TRACK

SPIN 360° THROUGH SPECTACULAR CANYONS

Journey into one of the most iconic New Zealand walking tracks on this guided day walk and you’ll come home with much more than just photographs. With exclusive guiding access and exceptional local knowledge, you’ll avoid the crowds and get more from your Routeburn Track experience with Guided Walks New Zealand.

Shotover Jet is the only operator permitted in the spectacular Shotover River Canyons. Marvel at epic scenery and hold on tight for exhilarating 360 degree spins and canyon action. The awa (rivers) are part of who we are, and we are part of them. The only way to experience our canyons and feel their power is to come on a journey with us.

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JAN 2019

CONTENTS

the traveller W HERE T O G O N E X T

the checklist ALL T HE T R AVEL IN T EL YO U NEED N O W

0 1 6 T R A V E L T R E N D S: 2 0 1 9

Five experts predict the biggest travel trends for the year ahead.

0 2 0  T W O S I D E S O F...

Cairns, Australia.

040 JAPAN A beginner’s guide to skiing in the Land of the Rising Sun.

022 TECH  Nine clever gadgets to ensure you get a good night’s sleep.

0 2 4 P O S T C A R D F R O M ...  Lahaina, West Maui.

0 2 7 T R AV EL H A C K:

W AT ER PA RK S Five tips and tricks to get the most out of a day on the slides.

0 2 8 T R A V E L H A C K : RESP O NSIBLE TR AVEL  How to limit your environmental footprint while on holidays.

0 3 0 T R E N D S : C O O L ROOFTOP BARS  The top Aussie joints to grab a drink and take in the view.

0 3 2 7 M Y T H S A B O U T...  The Gold Coast.

035 CALENDAR  Cycling, theatre and glam slams – what not to miss this month.

048 COOK ISLANDS Relax, recharge and rediscover your sense of adventure in the Polynesian paradise.


006

C O N T EN T S

056 PHUKET lanning a fun-filled P family trip to the Thai island? Here are 14 ways to have a blast.

the cut T H E BES T OF W H ERE T O E AT, D R IN K A N D PL AY

0 8 0 E A T + D R I N K : H O I A N

Where to find the tastiest bites in the ancient Vietnamese city.

0 8 8 A N AT O M Y OF A DIS H We delve into the rich history of a Singaporean classic – chilli crab.

0 9 0 H A P P Y H O U R : CHRISTCHURCH

A local’s guide to the best drink deals in the Garden City.

094 FOOD TRENDS What you can expect to see (and taste) heading into the new year.

097 EXPERIENCE 062 THE RED CENTRE How to uncover the real magic of Uluru and Kings Canyon.

068 HOBART 

The best ways to spend 48 hours in Tasmania’s historic capital.

We get hands-on and learn a new skill in Kuala Lumpur.

1 0 0 M Y P L A C E :

BELL ARINE PENINSUL A

Cyclist Cadel Evans shows us around his part of the world.

105 FASHION

Go from the beach to the bar in style with these essentials.

the insider JE T S TA R N E W S, M AP S A N D EN T ER TA IN MEN T

072 HONG KONG Explore the calmer side of the buzzing metropolis along its walking trails.

1 1 0 JE T S TA R N E W S 1 1 4 EN T ER TA IN M EN T 120 AIRPORT TO CITY 1 2 4 W H E R E W E FLY 126 GAMES + PUZZLES 1 3 0 W H E R E’S W A L LY ? 1 3 6 H I G H E R , BI G G E R ,

F A S T E R , LO N G E R

Cover photography by Hiroya Nakata.


E DITOR I A L .

CONTRIBUTORS.

EDITOR Jacqueline Lunn DEPUTY EDITOR Sudeshna Ghosh CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jon Gregory DESIGNER Lisa Emmanuel CHIEF SUBEDITOR Nancy Merlo SUBEDITOR Kaitlyn Palmer-Allen PHOTOGRAPHIC EDITOR Amy Heycock

EDITORIAL INQUIRIES EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Rachel Gray Suite 58, 26-32 Pirrama Road, Pyrmont, NSW 2009 P (02) 8114 8944 E jetstar.editorial@mediumrarecontent.com

CLAIRE TURRELL When Claire isn’t diving in Oman or riding motorbikes in Cambodia, the Singaporebased journalist writes for publications around the world. This month, she tries her hand at pewtersmithing in Malaysia (page 97).

MANAGING EDITOR, JETSTAR Simon Tsang

A DVERT I S I N G . VIC & QLD ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

NATIONAL ADVERTISING MANAGER

Chris Joy | (03) 9292 3207

Amanda Atkinson | (02) 8114 8920

VIC AD MANAGER/CLIENT SERVICE

NSW SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER

Rohan Green | (03) 9292 1817

Andre Hammond-Parker | (02) 8114 7626

JETSTAR COMMERCIAL

NSW ACCOUNT MANAGER

INTEGRATION SPECIALIST

Stephanie Leon | (02) 8114 8936

Simone Elliott

NZ BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

VIC SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER

Stuart Tovey | +64 21 711 606

Tim Maidment | (03) 9292 3218

JETSTAR ADVERTISING

VIC ACCOUNT MANAGER

SALES COORDINATOR

Angeline Gleeson | (03) 9292 2781

Emily Whelan | (02) 8114 8908

QLD & NT ACCOUNT MANAGER

VIC ADVERTISING COORDINATOR

Kasia Brzezicka | 0447 383 072

Peggy Ford | (03) 9292 3222

MEDIUM R A R E C O N T E N T A G E N C Y . MANAGING DIRECTOR Gerard Reynolds EXECUTIVE GENERAL MANAGER Sally Wright CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Margaret Merten DIGITAL STRATEGY DIRECTOR Karla Courtney SOCIAL STRATEGY DIRECTOR Scott Drummond CREATIVE SERVICES EDITOR Georgia Booth CREATIVE SERVICES ART DIRECTOR Philippa Moffitt FINANCE MANAGER Paul Martin

Jetstar magazine is published monthly and is complimentary to domestic and international passengers. Published for Jetstar Airways by Medium Rare Content Agency (ABN 83 169 879 921), Suite 58/26-32 Pirrama Road, Pyrmont, NSW 2009. ©2018. All rights reserved. Printed by PMP Limited. Paper fibre is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. Articles express the opinions of the authors and not necessarily those of Jetstar Airways or Medium Rare Content Agency. For a copy of Medium Rare Content Agency’s Privacy Policy, please visit mediumrarecontent.com. ISSN 1443-2013.

We want you to know that at Jetstar our writers are not armchair travellers. Any assistance we do accept from the travel industry to produce our stories does not compromise the integrity of the coverage.

For flight reservations jetstar.com For hotel bookings and holiday packages jetstar.com/hotels jetstar.com/holidays

GLENN CULLEN As a journalist, blogger and keen skier and snowboarder, Glenn has spent the better part of two decades chasing fresh powder, hitting the slopes and writing all about it. In this issue, Glenn enjoys scoping out Japan’s best ski spots for beginners (page 40).

RACHEL GRAY Jetstar magazine’s editorial coordinator has worked in news media for two years and likes to spend her time flamenco dancing and writing about travel. This issue, she asks the travel experts to crystal ball-gaze and reveal the next big trends (page 16).


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CEO’S LE T T ER

A little thought goes a long way > Happy New Year and welcome on board today. We’ve just emerged from one of our busiest times of the year, when thousands of people travel across the country and the globe to visit friends and family for the festive season. During this time of giving and sharing, I heard a story that reminded me that even the smallest gesture can go a long way and make a lasting impression. When flight JQ913 from Sydney landed in Townsville recently, our crew were handed a handwritten letter from 11-year-old passenger Mitchell, who was travelling with Jetstar for a family holiday. “Dear Jetstar. Thank you for flying us home,” Mitchell wrote. “The service was great and the plane ride was smooth and elegant. When I grow up, I want to be a pilot or a teacher or a police officer.”

MI TCHELL’S DR AWING OF T HE PL ANE

“I T’S T H O SE S M ALL IN TER AC T IO N S BE T W EEN O U R CRE W A N D C U S T O MERS T H AT M AKE E VERYO NE’S FL IG H T M ORE SPECI AL.” Mitchell went on to say he had a few questions about our careers and asked our crew what it is like to work in the sky, if they found the work challenging and when they knew they wanted to fly. His letter touched our crew so much, they recorded a special video message for him just to answer all his questions. Mitchell was over the moon when he watched it and can’t wait to fly again. Whether our customers are visiting friends and family or taking that muchneeded and long-awaited holiday, it’s those small interactions between our crew and customers that make everyone’s flight even more special. When you land, scan the QR code to check out Mitchell’s full letter and our crew’s message on Jetstar’s Facebook Page. Enjoy the trip with us today and we hope to see you on board again soon. G ARE T H E VA N S CEO, JE T S TA R G R O U P

011


01 2

JE T S TAR S O CI AL

LIKE. FOLLOW. CLICK. SHARE. Get social with us and join the conversation online.

< WHITE MAGIC > CHIANG RAI'S WAT RONG KHUN IS PART CONTEMPORARY ARTWORK, PART BUDDHIST TEMPLE. @JAY_LORDING

jetstar.com THE ONLINE HUB FOR ALL THE TRAVEL INSPO YOU NEED TO EXPLORE THE WORLD YOUR WAY.

< WONDER FALL > SOME VIEWS ARE WORTH THE HIKE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ESPECIALLY THIS ONE OF WALLAMAN FALLS IN FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND.

< PURPLE REIGN >

@_SARAHLATHAM

THE STREETS OF GRAFTON IN NSW NEVER LOOK PRETTIER THAN DURING JACARANDA SEASON. @KEYKODESIGN

< UNDER THE SEA > SPOT THE WHALE SHARK AT OSAKA AQUARIUM KAIYUKAN! @JEMERR

U SE T HESE H AS H TAG S A N D YO U C O UL D BE O N T HIS PAGE!

#JETSTARAUSTRALIA

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F O L L O W U S.

@ J E T S TA R A U S T R A L I A @ J E T S TA R N Z

@ J E T S TA R A U S T R A L I A @ J E T S TA R N Z

@ J E T S TA R A I R W AY S @ J E T S TA R _ N Z


20156640AA_OZ 2018-12-11T16:25:58+11:00

LIVING + DINING

S TO R E S LO C AT E D I N N SW | ACT | V I C | Q L D s h o p o n l i n e at ozd e s i g nf u r n i t u re . co m . a u


015—038

the checklist > ALL THE TRAVEL INTEL YOU NEED NOW

WAT ER PARKS PA G E

027 JAPA N

PA G E

016

> After a couple of years in circulation, the Bank of Japan recycles worn banknotes and turns them into toilet paper.

WEST M AUI

PA G E

024

> Why send a postcard when you can mail a coconut? Yes, it’s possible to send coconuts from Hawaiian post offices.

G OL D C OAST

PA G E

0 32

> Since 1964, bikini-clad meter maids have walked the streets of Surfers Paradise, topping up expired parking meters.


—Forget New Year’s resolutions, it’s time to set some serious travel goals instead. To help you along, five experts forecast how we’re going to holiday this year—

10 T R AV E L TRENDS T O W AT C H IN 2019 04

Konnichiwa, Japan!

“Aussies will get better acquainted with Japan. The Land of the Rising Sun is set to saturate our screens with the Rugby World Cup in September followed by the Summer Olympics in 2020. This will see travel to Japan by Australians deepen.” James Thornton, Intrepid Travel

01

#MeToo hits the road

“Travel will become a way to empower women in developing countries. With 2018 being all about the Me Too movement, people this year will look for opportunities to make a real difference through the products they buy and the places they travel to. More women will head to developing countries to support local women.” James Thornton, Intrepid Travel

05

The deep dive

“Travellers in the luxury sector will seek more experience, more sensation and more in general. The desire for deeper experiences is complemented by the rise of a small, closely knit band of counterconsumers adhering to the motto of ‘less is more’.” Jinou Park, Design Hotels


T H E C H ECKL IS T

Digital detox is still going strong

“The desire to truly get away from it all, cut yourself off from everything and leave your phone behind has not faded – it’s only grown stronger. The aim here is to holiday internet-free and really unplug and relax. You can do that in a very basic way with a camping holiday or opt for luxury in a resort that specialises in digital solitude.” Angus Kidman, Finder.com

06

Passport foodies

“Curious about local cuisines, travellers want to learn about regional ingredients and dishes, and maybe even assemble them in the kitchen of a local, to then replicate back home for dinner party guests.” James Thornton, Intrepid Travel

03

Access all areas

“The elite traveller now thirsts for unique and memorable experiences rather than holidays centred on splashing cash. So, with growing interest in gaining access to new, unseen places and unusual environments, destinations, experiences and events that tell a story will be big business.” Lexi Shuttleworth, Lightfoot Travel

07

Intimate connection

“This year is all about the rise of smaller hotels. Guests are now looking for ultra-immersive experiences that will help them grow as people or as a family. Resorts are becoming less about pampering and more about connecting with the people around you and your environment.” Lexi Shuttleworth, Lightfoot Travel

C O M P IL E D B Y_ R A C H EL G R AY

02

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T R AV EL T REN D S

08

09

Wellness travel

“More travellers are seeking to boost their personal wellbeing while on holiday, whether it’s going on a spa retreat or hitting the road on a cycling trip. They’re not just holidaying to relax but to improve their health and increase their fitness.” Lexi Shuttleworth, Lightfoot Travel

< T H E S TAT S >

Pop culture tourism

“More people will travel to destinations where their favourite movies or television series are filmed. There are now location tours for cult and major movies and television shows or you can research your own celluloid trails online before you go.” Angus Kidman, Finder.com

10

TRAVEL TO JAPAN IS UP 37 PER CENT AND BOOKINGS FOR 2019 ARE AT AN ALL-TIME HIGH. JAPAN NOW RECEIVES 257,000 AUSSIE HOLIDAY-MAKERS A YEAR, UP FROM 46,000 10 YEARS AGO. WELLNESS TOURISM IS THE FASTEST GROWING GLOBAL TRAVEL SECTOR, WORTH ABOUT $680 BILLION PER YEAR. THINK IT’S TIME FOR A DIGITAL DETOX? IT MIGHT BE. THE AVERAGE AUSTRALIAN CHECKS THEIR MOBILE PHONE AROUND 130 TIMES A DAY.

Travel with heart

“Giving back to communities holiday-makers visit is going to be huge this year. For example, planting jackfruit and mango trees bought from local farmers in Cambodia is just one of the activities offered by tour organisers with a conscience.” Natalie James, On The Go Tours

019


Thala Beach Nature Reserve An hour’s drive north of Cairns, you’ll find this lush eco escape that’s home to a coconut plantation of almost 700 trees. Guests staying at the reserve can sign up for Australia’s only coconut tour.

T WO SIDES


021

Reuben Nutt, James Vodicka

T H E C H ECKL IS T

OF CAIRNS

Nudey Beach, Fitzroy Island Head off the coast of Cairns and switch over to island time at this secluded cove that was named Australia’s best beach in 2018 by Tourism Australia’s Beach Ambassador, Brad Farmer.


022

T HE C HECKL IS T

TEC H N OL O GY

Sleep tight —Whether at home, away or in the air, a good rest is essential and these devices offer a little high-tech help to boost the Zzzs—

> FI T BI T VERS A

W O R D S _ R O S A LY N PA G E

FR O M $29 9.95

Count your steps while sightseeing during the day and track your sleep at night on your next trip. The newest feature of the health and fitness smartwatch monitors sleep stages using heart rate and motion sensors and keeps track of how long you sleep. There’s even an alarm so you never miss a flight again. fitbit.com/au

> BOSE NOISE-MASKING SLEEPBUDS $ 379.95 Known for its noise-cancelling headphones, Bose now has sleep-boosting earbuds that mask common sleep-disturbing sounds. The smartphone app (Android and iOS) is pre-loaded with 10 relaxation sounds such as waves and rustling leaves – just set the timer and an alarm for when you want to wake up. They run for 16 hours, plus the case doubles as a charger. bose.com.au

> P HIL IP S S M A R T SLEEP A B O U T $ 55 0

Business travellers short on time might benefit from this headband that boosts sleep quality, rather than length, by playing special audio to improve deep sleep. The app (Android, iOS) logs sleep metrics to track improvements. It’s not shipping to Australia yet but they will soon so keep an eye out. philips.com


> BA BY S H U S HER $ 59.95

Travel can disrupt your little one’s sleep but help is on hand with this small device. The gadget plays a rhythmic shushing sound to soothe your baby, plus it’s compact enough to be used anywhere. babyshusher.com.au

> SLEEP D OT

$ 59 Turn any hotel pillow into a smart pillow with this device. It attaches to your pillowcase and measures sleep cycles (which can often be interrupted when travelling) and movements to analyse sleep. If dropping off is the problem, it also has specially designed music to help you fall asleep. ahbeard.com.au

> FL ARE AU DIO SLEEEP E ARPL U G S ABOUT $54

If you ever find yourself needing a nap while in transit, the Sleeep earplugs are ideal. Unlike traditional foam earplugs which absorb sound, these are made from metal to block it. A small, rounded core ensures comfort, even for side sleepers, and their ergonomic shape provides an easier fit. flareaudio.com

> SLEEP P H O NES SIMPLE

ONE DE V ICE T O T R ACK T H EM ALL This wearable helps fine-tune your sleep and fitness routine. > Sleep like a royal with the support of an Oura ring – the very same accessory Prince Harry was spotted wearing during his recent visit to Australia. Stylish and high-tech, the Oura is both a fitness and sleep tracker in one, measuring your steps taken and calories burnt as well as your quality and length of sleep. The smart ring uses the information to determine your “readiness” for the day or can tell you if you need more rest. It’s available in two shapes and four colours (and one with diamonds). FR O M A B O U T $ 410 ouraring.com

A B O U T $1 4 0

Sleep soundly thanks to binaural beat technology with this rechargeable sleep headband. Six timer options and 17 pre-loaded relaxation tracks let you customise your rest wherever you find yourself. Various styles and sizes are available for a truly comfortable night’s sleep. sleepphones.com

> N APUP FLY

FR O M A B O U T $ 82 Get some shut-eye on your next flight with this all-in-one sleep mask, neck rest and headphone system, designed to be attached to your airline seat. Connect your phone or music player so you can listen to relaxing sounds while you fly. kickstarter.com

T H E D E TA I L S B AT T E R Y L I F E UP TO 1 WEEK S I Z E S AVA IL A B L E E IG H T (U S 6- U S 1 3) W E IG H T 4-6 G R A M S W I D T H & T H IC K N E S S 7.9 M M & 2.5 5 M M M AT E R I A L TITANIUM AND DIAMONDLIKE CARBON COATING


W O R D S _ K A I T LY N PA L M E R-A L L E N

ILL U S T R AT IO N _ G ER G Ő GIL IC ZE

024 T HE C HECKL IS T


T H E C H ECKL IS T

025

P O S TC ARD FR O M

L AHAINA, WEST MAUI —Once the capital of the Kingdom of Hawaii, a busy port and plantation settlement, this beachside town has an eclectic mix of history, culture and nightlife that’s so rock ’n’ roll, a rock star opened a bar on the main street—

  1 SUGARCANE TRAIN With their sugar-transporting days behind them, West Maui’s steam trains now take visitors on a scenic 10-kilometre trip past the corn and coffee crops surrounding Lahaina. While kids and locomotive fans alike will be delighted by the sound of the train’s departing whistle, the trip itself is equally enthralling for discovering the area’s plantation past. sugarcanetrain.com   2 LAHAINA PRINTSELLERS For over 40 years, Lahaina Printsellers have stocked everything from maps of Hawaii dating back to the 1700s to vintage photographs of hula dancers, menu covers and movie posters. If you’re a lover of vintage, this is heaven on earth. printsellers.com   3 FLEETWOOD’S ON FRONT ST Want rooftop views and a drinks list compiled by a rock star? You’ll find it at this establishment from Mick Fleetwood of Fleetwood Mac fame, boasting ocean views, a sophisticated ambience and tasty bites. Stop in for happy hour from 2-5pm daily, with half-price drinks, plus $1 oysters – you might even catch a rock concert. fleetwoodsonfrontst.com

  4 THE VILLAGE GALLERIES, MAUI Explore Lahaina’s thriving art scene at the island’s oldest gallery. Aside from exhibiting an extensive collection of works by local artists, it’s also the place to find beautiful artisan jewellery and framed prints. villagegalleriesmaui.com   5 BALDWIN HOME MUSEUM Discover a slice of Maui’s past at Baldwin Home, the oldest house still standing on the island. The historic landmark in the heart of Lahaina lets you delve into the lives of the missionaries from the 1830s. Explore the various rooms furnished with period pieces, photos and letters. Wander the landscaped grounds dotted with fruit trees, where you’ll also find the historic outdoor kitchen. lahainarestoration.org/baldwinhome-museum   6 DOWN THE HATCH Craving a shrimp po’boy? This place has you covered. Started by three mates from Georgia who wanted to bring Southern tastes to the island, this seafood eatery plates up killer sandwiches. Come for the lobsterand crab-stuffed grilled cheese and stay for the $7 happy hour cocktails. dthmaui.com   7 THE WHARF CINEMA CENTER This charming shopping destination is home to a hotchpotch of offerings. Located opposite Lahaina’s famous banyan tree – a landmark in its own right – it offers plenty of shopping and dining options. Head to L’Infini for souvenirs, cool down at Breakwall Shave Ice Co with an adult-style Mai Tai shave ice or explore the free Plantation Museum on the upper level. When you’re done, rest by the koi pond in the open-air courtyard before seeing a movie at the cinema. thewharfcinemacenter.com


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T H E C H ECKL IS T

027

TR AVEL H ACK

Slide into summer —Top tips to get the most out of a family day at the water park—

Huge numbers of Aussies have been throwing themselves down flumes since 1981 when Grundy’s Entertainment Centre on the Gold Coast in Queensland introduced the first water-based rides into their amusement complex (think dodgems next to water slides, all opposite Surfers Paradise beach). Since then, competing water parks around the world have pushed the slides to higher highs and lightning-fast speeds – some rides are now so extreme they require you don a back harness before taking the plunge. Whether you ride on a mat, in an inflatable ring or as nature intended – on your back struggling to hold up your bathers – the smiles at the bottom are guaranteed. Follow these tips to make the most of your day at the park. > Check the height restrictions before leaving. While there is usually a ride to suit all ages, if your youngest is deadset on trying the Kamikaze or the Tornado, get the tape measure out before you go. No-one wants tears or tantrums at the top of the slide.

> Arrive early. As the slides grow in size and complexity, the queues increase, too. With this in mind, you need to maximise your hours on site. Even if you’ve had enough rides, it just means more time in the wave pool. > Be sun safe. An obvious one but with the constant semi-submerged daredevilry, your sunscreen will not last long. You should also consider renting a cabana or at least securing a shady spot for lunch and other pit stops. Check out the water park’s website the day before to find out what is available. > Dress appropriately. Not just rash vests – don’t forget waterproof footwear for those summer days when the concrete pathways are too hot for bare feet. Also remember that a lightweight bikini is not sensible attire for whizzing down a flume propelled by jets of water. > Use a locker. Make sure you only pack essentials and keep them safely locked away until your hands are finally dry again. No-one really needs a selfie from the top. Instead, take advantage of the hidden cameras positioned midway down the ride with photos available for purchase – they make for a perfect memento of exactly what you look like when you scream.

TOP OF T HE DROPS > Guangzhou, China: Chimelong Water Park Try: Slide Wheel, Python Slide, Extreme River chimelong.com/waterpark > Kuta, Bali: Waterbom Try: Smashdown 2.0, Boomerang, Green Vipers waterbom-bali.com > Queensland, Australia: Wet’n’Wild Try: AquaLoop, Blackhole, Tornado wetnwild.com.au > Hua Hin, Thailand: Black Mountain Water Park Try: The Bee, The Blue Snake, Wide Wave blackmountain waterpark.com > NSW, Australia: Jamberoo Action Park Try: The Perfect Storm, The Taipan, Funnel Web jamberoo.net

WORDS_ JON GREGORY

It is widely accepted that once you reach a certain age (roughly 10 years old) it is only socially acceptable to descend a plastic slide when propelled by thousands of gallons of high-pressure water. The good news is that a day at the water park is much more fun than any slippery dip – and twice as slippery.


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How to travel more responsibly —Environmentalist and adventurer Huw Kingston shares his tips for travelling with a lighter eco-footprint so you can have a fun and feel-good holiday— CEN TR AL M ARKE T IN H OI A N, VIE T N A M

> Clean it up. Soap bars are a great invention – swap out shower gels in single-use plastic bottles for a bar and use it until the end of your trip. Don’t leave behind that part-used hotel soap bar, either. Carry along a reusable container to pop it in and bring it to your next destination to stop it ending up in landfill. > Ethical experiences. Experiential travel is a big buzzword and all about immersing yourself in a destination. However, not all experiential activities and tours are created alike and many – particularly animal encounters – can be exploitative and invasive. Do your research to choose ethical, sustainable, community-focused tourism operators and you will return from your trip with great memories as well as a clear conscience.

> Plastic not fantastic. With at least eight million tonnes of plastic entering our oceans every year, it’s imperative to reduce our plastic waste. Make a travel pack with reusable items such as a bottle, cup and straw and take it wherever you go. If you’re always prepared, you can say “no” to all the everyday plastics that you often end up using mindlessly. You can even use your own cup on your flight. > Head to the market. Apart from being a lot of fun, markets are a brilliant way to connect with the locals, taste locally grown foods and buy handmade crafts. You can make a big difference by contributing to small communities and you could come away with a great souvenir, too.

C O MPLEMEN TARY READING > The Edge of Memory (Bloomsbury) by Patrick Nunn captures the wisdom of ancient folk tales passed down through spoken word before the written word existed. Described as “a must-read book, if you care about the future of the planet”, it helps unravel the scientific lessons we can learn from these oral traditions. A book like this can inform your next trip in unimaginable ways.

ADDITIONAL WORDS_ SUDESHNA GHOSH

> Opt for a homestay. It’s a good idea to take advantage of the increasing options for homestays when travelling. These can range from urban Airbnb rooms to being welcomed into family homes in off-the-radar destinations. Sharing a home with a local family will not only be educational, it can be inspirational, too. As a traveller, your environmental footprint will be lower and you will ensure your tourism dollars go towards supporting the local community and maintaining traditional cultures. In the interest of engaging with locals, try leaving your phone and camera in your room every now and then and focus on enjoying the moment.


Sky-high Mai Tais TR AVEL TREN D S

COOL ROOFTOP BARS

HENNESSY

—Come for the cocktails and stay for the views. This summer, grab a friend and hit Australia’s best open-air bars – all you have to do to find them is look up—

WA

> VIEWS WITH NEWS. If you like politics with your beer or beer with your politics, try Bob’s Bar, named after Australia’s former ale-loving prime minister Bob Hawke. Located on the roof of Perth’s Print Hall – which once housed The West Australian newspaper – here, you can take in some of the best cityscape views washed down with local brews such as Rocky Ridge, Mountain Goat and Mash Brewing (best sellers are Colonial Brewing Co’s draught and small ale). Pair your ale with a Bob’s Box for a cheeseburger, chicken wings, fries and a drink for $20. Or order pizza to be delivered hot from Gazette Italian eatery on the ground floor. printhall.com.au/bobs-bar

SA

> SMOOTH OPERATOR. Dress in your finest for a night at Hennessy bar on the 13th floor of the Mayfair Hotel, Adelaide. Enjoy views across the CBD on the terrace, while indoors, cowhide chairs and crystal chandeliers create a cool but luxe vibe. There’s an extensive champagne and cocktail list (try the Honey Trap with vodka, lime, ginger and honey). Or live large with a bottle of 2009 Louis Roederer Cristal champagne for a heart-stopping $550. mayfairhotel.com.au/hennessy

TA S

> FILM NOIR. Catch a movie under the stars in the Apple Isle’s only rooftop cinema. The bar on top of North Hobart’s 1913-built State Cinema is quaint and cosy, serving James Boag and Cascade bottled beers and Tassie pinot noir. Movie nibbles are sold at the bar but for serious snacks, like a tandoori chicken panino, pop into the café downstairs before the film starts. The cinema is open in the warmer months from December to February but if wind or rain forces a film to be cancelled, head into one of the 11 indoor cinemas inside the heritage-listed building. statecinema.com.au

NINE TEEN AT T HE STAR


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NSW

> FRIENDLY SECRET.

T HE C ORNER H OTEL

The first challenge is finding Old Mates Place, which is hidden on the fourth floor of an old office building at 199 Clarence Street in the heart of Sydney’s CBD. Take the lift or the stairs to the rooftop where the friendly owners have softened vistas of skyscrapers with greenery, candles and snug booths. Choose from 63 types of rum, 30 gins or 22 tequilas or take your tastebuds on a ride with their signature Retox, a mix of activated charcoal, coconut sugar, dehydrated basil, rye, montenegro, lemon and whites. Hungry? Try the tasty Philly cheesesteak, jamon cheesesteak or go all imposter-like with a veggie cheesesteak made with mushrooms, roasted capsicum, onion and provolone cheese. Yum! oldmates.sydney

V IC

QL D

> GLITZ AND GLAMOUR. Ride up to the 19th floor of The Star and check out one of the Gold Coast’s highest infinity pools before you slip into your private booth at Nineteen. Order the “secret recipe” Chilli and Coconut Martini or Pear Shaped (vodka, elderflower, lemon and pear puree) and top it off with a share plate of oysters dressed with Ruinart Blanc de Blancs Champagne mignonette, their signature lobster bolognese or local’s favourite – Patagonian toothfish. The bar caters for up to 500 people and regularly showcases Australian DJs who crank up the beats as the sun sets against a striking view of the glamorous Goldie. star.com.au/goldcoast

An institution in Melbourne, The Corner Hotel in Richmond combines the city’s two greatest loves: live music and sport. Mick Jagger and Crowded House have rocked the downstairs stage, while the Melbourne Cricket Ground is a 10-minute walk away and Rod Laver Arena, not much further. Up on the industrial-style rooftop, crack open a beer, indulge in one of the signature cocktails and nibble on a share-plate of jalapeno croquettes as you wait for the next gig to turn up the bass. cornerhotel.com

W O R D S_ R A C H EL G R AY

> MUSIC GOALS.


7 M Y T H S AB O U T...

T HE G OL D C OAST —The Goldie may conjure images of skyscrapers, meter maids and sun-kissed surfers in thongs but local Craig Tansley is here to prove that there’s plenty of substance under all the glitz—

MYTH #1

MYTH #3

MYTH #2 It’s full of retirees > The Gold Coast was once where your grandparents retired for the $5 roasts at sports clubs served daily at 5.30pm. Now some 12,000 people of all ages move here each year, making this one of Australia’s fastest growing regions – most are families from Sydney or Melbourne. The average age on the Gold Coast is now under 40.

It’s all about the beaches > Sure, there are 57 kilometres of coastline but what about the rainforest and the mountains of the Gold Coast Hinterland? Drive less than an hour west of the beach and you’ll find some of the largest tracts of warm temperate and sub-tropical rainforest on earth in UNESCO World Heritage-listed national parks, with waterfalls, hiking trails and private rainforest retreats.

Jason Charles Hill, Lauren Bath

There’s no culture > “Bogan Wonderland” has become culture central in recent years with arts precincts emerging across the coast, transforming industrial areas in Miami, Currumbin Waters and beyond. Artists, ceramicists, potters and designers set up at weekend markets, while innovative local bands play (try the Miami Marketta in Miami, Night Quarter in Helensvale or the Green Marquee in Currumbin Valley).


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MYTH #4 The Gold Coast is Surfers Paradise > The high-rises, nightclubs and meter maids of Surfers Paradise used to typify a visit to the Gold Coast. But the majority of locals never even visit the “Glitter Strip”. These days, the most innovative new accommodation, dining options, entertainment and leisure activities are further south in Burleigh Heads, Palm Beach, Coolangatta and beyond.

MYTH #6 MYTH #5 The locals are all tradies > About 20 per cent of Gold Coasters own and operate their own business – one of the highest rates of entrepreneurship in Australia. The Queensland city is the breeding ground of the new-age entrepreneur, with multi-millionaires in the world of beauty, property, food and social media calling it home.

L AMINGTO N NATIO NAL PARK

Surf clubs are the only place to dine out > Sure, surf clubs sit on some of the priciest real estate on the coast but grabbing a meal goes far beyond a chicken parmi and chips for $24.95. Some of the state’s most awarded restaurants are here – like Rick Shores (rickshores.com. au) in Burleigh Heads, which won Best Restaurant in Delicious magazine’s Top 100 Restaurants in Queensland. Plus, more than 25 new vegan and vegetarian restaurants have recently opened, including Australia’s first vegan marketplace, The Lovechild (thelovechild.com.au).

MYTH #7 They only drink XXXX up here > Hardly. The GC is fast becoming Australia’s craft beer capital. Balter (balter.com.au) – founded by local surfing world champs Mick Fanning and Joel Parkinson – was voted number one in the Hottest 100 Aussie Craft Beers of 2017, while Stone & Wood (stoneandwood.com.au), brewed south in Murwillumbah, was number two. Trendy craft breweries and bars are all over the coast – try Black Hops Brewery (blackhops.com.au) and Burleigh Brewing Co. (burleighbrewing.com.au).

AND 3 TRUTHS Everybody surfs > This is a city built on surfing – it contributes $3.3 billion per annum to the city’s economy and employs an estimated 21,000 locals directly. The last two Australian surfing world champions were from here and there are about 20 surf schools spread across 50-plus kilometres of beaches. It’s the theme park capital of the country > There’s every sort of “world” here – from Sea World to Movie World and Dreamworld. And now, it is also home to the world’s first Holoverse (hologram centre). You can even find water parks and ice rinks within some resorts here, such as the family-friendly Paradise Resort Gold Coast in Surfer’s Paradise. It’s always sunny > The GC is blessed with an average of 300 glorious days of sunshine a year – even the wettest month (February) is characterised by short bursts of subtropical afternoon storms clearing in an hour. Winter temperatures rarely drop below an average high of 21°C (it gets cooler in the hinterland) – and similarly, the water never dips below a comfortable 20°C.


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C ALEN DAR

PUT IT IN THE DIARY —No matter where you are this January, there are plenty of events to enjoy—

VIC. Cycling: Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race 24-27 January Geelong cadelevansgreatocean roadrace.com.au Tennis: Melbourne Midsumma Glam Slam 25-27 January Albert Reserve and Melbourne Park midsumma.org.au

SA.

NSW. Arts and culture: Sydney Festival 9-27 January Various venues, Sydney sydneyfestival.org.au

Music: FOMO Festival 6 January Elder Park, Adelaide fomofestival.com.au

NEW ZEALAND. Music: Auckland Folk Festival 25-28 January Kumeu Showgrounds aucklandfolkfestival.co.nz

I T'S A D AT E 8 January Bubble Bath Day 20 January Cheese Lover’s Day

Brett Crockford, Kate Cornish

Theatre: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory From 5 January Capitol Theatre, Sydney charliethemusical.com.au

WA. Arts and culture: Fringe World Festival From 18 January Various venues, Perth fringeworld.com.au

TAS. Music and arts: MONA Foma Festival 13-20 January Launceston mofo.net.au

HAWAII. Golf: Sony Open 7-13 January Waialae Country Club, Honolulu sonyopeninhawaii.com

25 January Opposite Day

QLD. Concert: Florence and the Machine 22-23 January Riverstage, Brisbane florenceand themachine.net


A DVER T ISEMEN T A DVER T ISEMEN T


Present your boarding pass at the ticket counter to receive a 20% discount off entry*

@eureka_skydeck #eurekaskydeck


039—078

the traveller > WHERE TO GO NEXT

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> All the single ladies: don’t sing while cooking or eating. Thais believe doing so will ensure you end up with an old husband.

H O BART

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> The Tasmanian capital city is Australia’s second-oldest (after Sydney), established in 1804 as a penal colony.

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> The main ballroom at Hong Kong Disneyland Resort is 888 square metres because 888 is said to be a “wealthy” number.


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S . K O I W

A DVEN T U RE

— Dreaming of speeding down a mountain covered in fresh powder but need to learn the ropes first? Japan’s ski resorts are perfect for first-timers hitting the slopes, with upwards of 40 per cent being beginner terrain. Glenn Cullen discovers the best places to find your feet on two planks or one—


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NISEKO W H E R E . 90 kilometres south-west of

Sapporo in the Hokkaido prefecture. W H O . Powder seekers, luxury lovers

and those who want more of an international resort experience.

CR O S S-C O U N TRY SK IIN G IN NISEKO

W HEN T O G O Christmas and January can be extremely busy. Late February is the sweet spot when you can still get powder without the people, while discounted deals are readily available around March.

> When Australian brothers Dale and Glenn Goulding took a handful of intrepid skiers on their Deep Powder Tours back in 1993, Niseko was a ghost town of poor facilities, little signage and even fewer people. A generation on and it’s a global winter phenomenon. With four interconnected resort areas (Annupuri, Niseko Village/ Higashiyama, Grand Hirafu and Hanazono) making it the biggest in Hokkaido, countless accommodation options and the best après ski scene in the land at Grand Hirafu, it is understandable why this place is now referred to as the Aspen of Japan.

The international flavour has seen the quality and quantity of English skiing and snowboarding instruction shoot through the roof and you’ll get as good as anywhere in the world with the Go Snow school (gosnowniseko.com) in Grand Hirafu. The Niseko Village (niseko-village. com/en) area is best for beginner terrain. There’s also a good selection of terrain parks if that is – or could become – your snow thing. Grand Hirafu (grand-hirafu.jp/winter/en/) is definitely the pick there with stunning views of Mount Yotei. What remains unchanged in Niseko is the glorious snow. Consistent, deep and invariably drier than a speech on macroeconomic reform, you know you’re onto a winner when 10 metres of snow has fallen – in a bad year. niseko.ne.jp/en

Grady James, , Myoko Snowsports, Darren Teasdale, Matthew Wiseman

S T A Y. Aya Villas (ayanisekovillas.

com) for stunning ski-in, ski-out villas near the Hirafu gondola. Pension Woody Note (pensionwoodynote. com) for a fun, funky and good value bed and breakfast in lower Hirafu. Shiki Niseko (shikiniseko.com) for spacious apartments with super views – ideal for groups.

NISEKO IS K N O W N AS T HE ASPEN OF JAPA N


The

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MYOKO KOGEN

or those looking for a quiet snow trip. > Blending tradition with convenience, Myoko Kogen is not a ski resort but a region with nine areas that are either interconnected or a bus ride away. Suginohara Ski Resort (myokokogen.net/resorts/suginohara) boasts one of the longest runs in Japan – an 8.5-kilometre quad-killer from the top to the valley, with everything except the top skiable for beginners. With almost 90 years of history, you won’t see any bubble-era (when the economy was booming and money was being garishly splashed around) 1980s monoliths here, rather a quirky mix of traditional Japanese architecture and the odd updated ryokan (inn) and izakaya (pub). Given 40 per cent of terrain is marked for beginners across the multiple resorts, it’s hard to go wrong but the cream of the crop is Myoko Snowsports (myokosnowsports.com). Run by Falls Creek-based Australian Tom Langtry with his wife, Nozomi, and located at Akakura resort (myokokogen.net/resorts/akakuraonsen), they offer Honshu’s best group, private and multi-resort skiing and snowboarding lessons in English. myokokogen.net

“SU GIN O H AR A SK I RES ORT B OASTS O NE OF T HE LO N GEST RU NS IN JAPA N AT 8.5 K ILO ME TRES.”

M YOKO SK I L IF T

of Tokyo in the Niigata prefecture. W H O . Traditionalists, variety seekers

A LES S O N WIT H M YOKO SN O WSP ORTS

W H E R E . 281 kilometres north-west

S T A Y. Silverhorn (myokosilverhorn.

com) for a beautifully renovated lodge with great meals that’s centrally located at Akakura Kanko ski area. Lotte Arai Resort Hotel (lottehotel. com/arai-resort) for a huge, recently refurbished hotel at the base of Mount Okenashi. Akakura Kanko Hotel (akr-ski.com/english) for a classic stay with ski-out-the-door convenience for Akakura Onsen.

TALK T HE TALK Learn a little of the language, be respectful and read a few tips here: japan-guide.com M ORE EXPERIEN CED SK IERS WILL ALS O EN JOY T HE AREA


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N OZAWA O NSEN VILL AGE TEMPLES

N OZAWA SK I SC H O OL OFFERS GR O UP TO URS

NOZAWA ONSEN W H E R E . 255 kilometres north-west

of Tokyo in the Nagano prefecture. W H O . Families, groups of mixed

skiing abilities, people who love après-ski village life. > Unquestionably the prettiest ski village in Japan and surely one of the most attractive in the world, Nozawa Onsen lays on the charm as thick as its mid-winter snows. It’s both a visual and gastronomic feast: gorgeous cobblestone streets give way to vendors selling oyaki (steamed buns) and a bevy of restaurants that will comfortably look after you for less than $25 a head. Nozawa’s onsens – the 13 public hot baths (plus dozens of private ones) with which this resort is synonymous – are its liquid jewel. They’re the perfect place to chill after a day on the slopes. As for the white powder riding – while intermediate terrain is a bit light-on, beginner terrain is excellent. There are six specific beginner areas and with 14 metres of snow in an average season, there’s every chance you’ll get to enjoy them on a fluffy base. nozawaski.com/en S T A Y. Nozawa Peaks

(nozawapeaks.com) for well-priced, traditional Japanese lodging within a 10-minute walk of all the action. Sasa-Nozawa (sasa-nozawa.com) for a gorgeous, boutique lodge with all the bells and whistles. Ryokan Sakaya (ryokan-sakaya. com) for traditional but top-end accommodation with great food offerings and service.

R U G-U P The higher and further north you go, the colder it will be. Blue-sky days, particularly in Hokkaido, are the exception, not the norm in winter.

TAKE A SN O WB OARDIN G CL AS S WIT H N OZAWA SK I SC H O OL


E S T. 1 9 9 9

www.shopmadeinearth.com M E L B O U R N E • LO S A N G ELES • S A N DIEG D I EGO O @madeinearthofficial


MADARAO W H E R E . 273 kilometres north-west

of Tokyo in the Nagano prefecture. W H O . Bargain-beaters, families

and quiet types. > The little resort that could – Madarao proves you don’t need gondolas, garish apartments or Gucci stores to have a good time skiing or snowboarding. Initially seen as only a single-day option from Nozawa, Madarao has enough going for it to make it a short-stay destination in its own right. With a vertical drop of 440 metres, it won’t be hosting World Cup downhill races any time soon but there are 15 lifts and access to 30 named runs, so there’s plenty of riding for a few days. (Spend the extra $7 per day to access the Tangram side of the mountain for five more lifts and more terrain.) Depending on your confidence levels, there’s outstanding skiing and snowboarding amongst the beech and pine trees. Action Snow Sports (actionsnowsports.com) operates a small English-speaking ski school that specialises in multi-day improvement clinics. If you’re up for a party, this probably isn’t the place for you and dining options are limited but if you want to avoid the throngs and still feel comfortable, it’s hard powder to beat. madarao.jp/en

EVEN T HE M ACAQ UES EN JOY JAPA N’S H OT SPRIN G S

“IF YO U WA N T TO AVOID T HE CR O W D S A N D ST ILL FEEL C O MF ORTABLE, I T’S H ARD

K ICK IN G UP P O W DER IN M ADAR AO

P O W DER TO BE AT.”

(snowballchalet.com) for a cute, recently refurbished chalet. Madarao Kogen Hotel (madarao.jp/hotel/ english) for older-style but perfectly located digs at the base of Mount Madarao. Fujio Pension (fujiopension. com) for a classic Japanese pension with welcoming hosts.

T R A IN S ARE T ERR IFIC Consider getting a J-Rail pass if you are doing a longer, multi-destination trip. jrailpass.com

ITAR A RES TAUR A N T AT CLUB MED, TO M A M U

STAY. The Snowball Chalet


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HAK UBA VALLEY W H E R E . 270 kilometres north-west

of Tokyo in the Nagano prefecture. W H O . Adventurers.

CLUB MED’S SK I SC H O OL IN TO M A M U

TOMAM U W H E R E . 143 kilometres east of

Sapporo in the Hokkaido prefecture.

W HI T E M AGIC

W H O . All-in-one holiday lovers and

With flexible packages to

families with young children.

suit all ski abilities, you can hit the slopes in

> The first things you notice are the towers. Sticking out like two Lego creations in a sea of white bricks, the dual hotel buildings are Tomamu’s calling cards. As odd as they seem, they kind of suit this quirky ski resort. Bare bones just won’t do in Tomamu, where there’s an 80-metre wave pool, high-end restaurants and a mid-winter ice village that’d look right at home in the movie Frozen. For all that, it’s affordable for families. With 28 marked runs, it isn’t huge but the grooming is excellent and you can ski or board top-to-bottom green (beginner) runs on both Tomamu and Tower Mountains. snowtomamu.jp/winter/en

Japan with Oz Snow for a

H AK UBA VALLEY

S T A Y. Tomamu The Tower

(snowtomamu.jp) for well-appointed digs. Pension Ing (ingtomamu.com/ english) for a small but good value pension. Club Med (clubmed.com.au) for an all-inclusive hotel stay – check their early bird specials in February.

> Hakuba Valley sets the standard for big mountain riding and diversity in Japan’s alps. But you don’t have to be a gun athlete to enjoy the huge alpine area of 10 resorts. If you’re new to the snow, Tsugaike Kogen (tsugaike.gr.jp/ english) is the best place to start. Run-wise, there’s more green here than a St Patrick’s Day parade and great transition spots for lower intermediates to find their powder legs without getting into too much trouble. For English language instruction, head to the areas of Hakuba-47/Goryu, where you’ll find the excellent Hakuba Snow Sports School (hakubasnowsports.com). Happo One (happo-one.jp) offers more diverse terrain and nightlife. Another bonus is its link with the Australian resort Perisher – if you have an Epic Australia Pass, you’ll get five days at the Hakuba resorts included. hakubavalley.com/en

fun-filled snow experience.

S T A Y. Sierra Resort (sierrahakuba.

ozsnowadventures.com.au

com) for a sprawling resort with good access to Tsugaike and Iwatake. Mominoki Hotel (mominokihotel.com/ en) for hot springs. Balls Deep Inn Hakuba (ballsdeepinnhakuba.jp) for its handy location near Hakuba-47.


FOUND LOST

AN D

DRE A M

—The relaxed, remote and outrageously beautiful Cook Islands is one of the Pacific’s best-kept secrets. Susan Horsburgh swaps school pick-ups, laundry and play dates for a taste of Polynesian paradise—


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hen the holiday planner asks what kind of activities might interest me, I give it to her straight: “Nothing that raises my heart rate.” So when the itinerary for my four-day trip to the Cook Islands arrives, I’m puzzled by a scheduled session of something called “SUP yoga”. I google it and up comes an alarming picture of a perky twentysomething in a string bikini doing a downward dog in the middle of the ocean – on a stand-up paddleboard. I have all the flexibility of an iron bar – I can’t do yoga on a solid surface – so doing the aquatic version a week later, on Rarotonga’s Muri Lagoon, is predictably challenging. Deep breathing on our backs while bobbing in a protected cove is blissful but then we’re on our knees and it’s all “cat-cow” and “threading the needle” and “reverse tabletop”. Long-neglected muscles shudder in protest as they’re called into service. Next thing, we’re on our feet, hands in the prayer position, and I’m tumbling off the board – just from closing my eyes. I topple into the water twice more, much to the delight of a bendy 10-year-old classmate. The instructor (kitesup.co) tells us to “find our core” but I suspect mine went AWOL some time between my second and third babies.

I may have lost my sense of adventure around the same time. Blame a rinse-andrepeat routine of school pick-ups, swimming lessons and sausage sizzles but the breeding program over the past decade hasn’t allowed for much international jetsetting. In fact, my first thought when I clap eyes on Rarotonga from the air – with its lush mountainous interior and wreath of sapphire, reef-fringed waters – is Moana, the Disney movie. My last real island holiday – the kind that involves sleep-ins and swim-up bars – was my 2005 honeymoon in Phuket. A dozen years passed before we went back to recapture the magic but by then, we had three kids in tow. This time, I’m living every mother’s holiday dream – in splendid isolation. My only household admin involves calculating the ideal balance between lounging and experiencing the delights of this extraordinary place. Plonked in the centre of the Pacific, halfway between New Zealand and Hawaii, the Cooks are a chain of 15 islands, all with idyllic sandy beaches and clear tropical waters, yet the country seems almost a secret destination:

Franz Russ, David Kirkland

W


A S UP YO GA SES SIO N

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DID YO U K N O W? It is illegal for buildings in the Cook Islands to be taller

A DISH OF IK A M ATA

it attracts around 26,000 Australian visitors a year, compared with Fiji’s 300,000-plus. Home to more than 10,000 of the country’s 17,000-strong population, Rarotonga is the main island – a sleepy place of banana and taro plantations, low-slung homes made of concrete blocks and louvre windows and white family gravestones in the front yards. Dogs and goats roam freely and the sultry, gardenia-scented air carries the sound of crowing roosters. “Kia orana!” says my Cook Islands Tourism host, Tina Kae, offering the ubiquitous local greeting as we set off on a drive past the island’s countless churches and postcardperfect beaches. With one 32-kilometre road around the circumference and not a single traffic light, you can rent a car or scooter and

A LO CAL S TRIN G BA ND PR OVIDES DINERS WIT H EN TERTAIN MEN T

REL A XIN G IN T HE C O OK ISL A NDS

than a coconut tree.

take a spin around “Raro” in 45 minutes flat but it’s more fun to explore along the way. A definite must-visit is the Mooring Fish Café (themooringfishcaferaro.com), not far from the tourist hub of Muri Beach on the island’s east side, where you can treat yourself to a sensational crumbed mahi and lime mayo FOB (fresh off the boat) sandwich. Right on Avana Harbour, next to local fishermen bringing in their catches and kids playing in the shallows, the café is a blue-and-green converted shipping container with a photo wall of famous past patrons, most of them rugby heroes that Tina is appalled I can’t identify. The sixth of nine children, Tina is the only one of her siblings who has not moved to Australia or New Zealand but she reckons her island home has no competition. “We’re living a lifestyle others pay millions for,” she says. In the Cook Islands, where Christianity has flourished since the first missionaries arrived in 1821, the culture is all about faith and family: there is no need for nursing homes, meals start with a prayer and messages like “May God bless you” are emblazoned across roadside stores. There are atheists here, insists Tina, but she doesn’t know any. If family and faith define Cook Islands culture, then food and music must not be too far behind. Twangy island tunes seem to accompany every event in the Cooks, from the moment you touch down at Rarotonga’s tiny airport. There, an elderly man in an orange hibiscus-print shirt serenades new arrivals with an electric ukulele, perched above the baggage carousel. On a progressive dinner tour (cookislandstours.co.ck) the following night, 32 of us eat at three local homes in one evening,


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entertained by family musicians aged four to 84. “Make yourself at home – for 40 minutes,” quips our second host, retired teacher Kafo Tuteru, before we tuck into a spread of pan-fried tuna, rukau (cooked taro leaves) and banana poke on her hillside verandah. The national dish is ika mata, raw fish marinated in lemon juice and soaked in coconut cream, which turns up in every Cook Islands buffet, including the one the next night at the Te Vara Nui Over-Water Night Show (tevaranui.co.ck). Local cuisine is laid on before a super-slick cultural spectacular of traditional flame-throwing, drum-beating and grass-skirted dancing – a hip-flipping marvel that looks a bit like ancient twerking. The next morning, I wake up in my own time to sweet, sweet silence. I am momentarily disoriented: why isn’t a child screaming for her socks or assaulting a sibling? In my spacious one-bedroom villa, I have a private swimming pool out the front and a beach at the bottom of my back steps. A yellow kayak is glaring from under the house, trying to guilt me into action but I lounge on a day bed on the ocean-front deck instead. Gazing out on the islet just

DID YO U K N O W? Actors John Wayne and Marlon Brando stopped at the dreamy Aitutaki islet of Akaiami on their way to Tahiti in the 1950s, when they flew the famed “Coral Route” in a flying boat.

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“GA ZIN G O U T O N T HE ISLE T BE YO N D M URI BE AC H, I W O N DER IF I T GE TS A N Y BE T TER T H A N T HIS.” beyond Muri Beach, coconut trees framing the scene, I wonder if it gets any better than this. I have my answer two days later when I take a daytrip (airraro.com) on a 34-seat propeller plane to heavenly Aitutaki, an island located just 40 minutes from Rarotonga. Lonely Planet co-founder Tony Wheeler calls Aitutaki’s lagoon the most beautiful in the world and he won’t get any argument from me. It’s absurdly idyllic – an island paradise straight out of central casting – with otherworldly ombré waters that graduate from aqua to turquoise to royal blue. Four of the 15 islets in this dreamy lagoon played host to the 2006 season of reality television series Survivor and I now suspect the contestants didn’t suffer that much at all. On a 21-metre by six-metre catamaran, we go island hopping through the blue lagoon, which is so big it could fit Rarotonga inside it. The local crew ham it up on the boat with a coconut-husking demonstration and later join us in the water, touching giant clams on the sea bottom as we snorkel among the coral reefs. Giant trevally a metre long swarm around the back of the boat, nibbling on our shiny jewellery and jumping for the raw tuna a crew member feeds them (between bites of it himself). Post-snorkelling, there’s a buffet


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lunch of salads and tuna fillets barbecued on the boat. “Everything runs on ‘island time’ here, except when it comes to food,” jokes our generously proportioned guide, Andrew Rave. “Then we are very punctual people.” The last stop is a swim at the uninhabited One Foot Island and then it’s a weary, lateafternoon cruise back to Aitutaki, the crew entertaining us with a drum-and-ukulele mash-up of everything from Bob Marley to Jessie J. It’s my last full day in the Cook Islands and a spectacular finale. Still, I wish I had a bit more time to sample some other local highlights: a cross-island hike in Rarotonga, perhaps (or at least a gentle hinterland stroll), a Sunday church visit to hear the harmonising congregation raise the roof, and definitely a lot more of nothing, sitting on a beach, soaking in the sunshine and staring into the middle distance. The next day, after a farewell massage at the Islander Hotel (islanderhotel.co.ck) opposite the Rarotonga airport, I leave the self-indulgence behind and hop on a plane home. Within hours of touching down, I’m at my 12-year-old’s early-morning soccer match. It’s a bleak Melbourne day and yet the return to suburban reality doesn’t seem so brutal. A few days in paradise have reminded me there’s a whole wondrous world out there, beyond play dates and laundry piles. And maybe that sense of adventure hasn’t gone AWOL after all.

JE T S TA R H A S G RE AT L O W FA RES T O R A R O T O N G A.

DID YO U K N O W ? Tourists and Cook Islanders under the age of 25 have to wear helmets on scooters, motorbikes and bicycles but older locals are let off the hook – because it messes up their hairdos and church hats on Sundays.

> Rendezvous Villas A 15-minute walk from tourist central, Muri Beach, these two adjoining one-bedroom villas are generously sized and right on the water – each with their own private swimming pools and barbecues. Wake up to a killer view and laze the day away on the oceanfront deck or make use of the villas’ kayaks and snorkelling equipment to explore crystal-clear Muri Lagoon. About $490 per night for two people. No children under 12 allowed. rendezvousvillas.com > Te Vakaroa Villas The ultimate in waterfront luxury, these six architectdesigned villas are nestled among lush tropical gardens, with spacious living rooms and private patios overlooking the infinity pool and, beyond that, beautiful Muri Lagoon. Thanks to fully equipped kitchens, guests can choose to self-cater or order room service from Sails Restaurant next door. Situated in the heart of Muri Beach, these five-star villas are close to cafés and restaurants, as well as water activities such as kitesurfing and lagoon cruises. One-bedroom villas are about $780 per night for two people; two-bedroom villas are about $1050 for up to four people. No children under 12 allowed. tevakaroavillas.com

JE T S TA R.C O M


PH UKE T’S BIG B U DD H A

child’s

L Y P A

FA MILY TIME AT T HE BEAC H

FA MILY

can mean more than just lovely long days at the beach. Kerrin O’Sullivan rounds up the most offbeat and unexpected adventures you can get up to with the kids on this picturesque Thai island—

ZIP-L ININ G T HR O U G H T HE JU N GLE

—A fun holiday in Phuket


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> Zip-lining through the lush rainforest area around the Kathu Waterfall guarantees beautiful views and an adrenaline rush for all ages. Flying Hanuman offers eco-sensitive flying fox adventures for the whole family – you can even opt to be filmed so you can re-live the experience back home. If that doesn’t sound quite crazy enough, why not learn the high-flying art of trapeze on the sands of Micky Monkey Beach, Mai Khao? Flying Trapeze Phuket provide safety briefing, skills training and supervision in classes for both kids and adults. BYO sense of adventure. flyinghanuman.com; kidzsole.com

SAVE T HE GIBBO NS > With their big eyes and furry faces, gibbons are undeniably cute. Sadly, poachers keen to make quick tourist dollars often remove them from their rainforest homes, exploiting baby apes as photo props for tourists. Once mature, the adult apes are abandoned and replaced by more photogenic baby gibbons, leading to them becoming endangered. In Khao Phra Thaeo National Park, the Gibbon Rehabilitation Project rescues abused gibbons, nurses them back to health and releases them into the rainforest. The GRP sanctuary is not a petting zoo – so no cuddling, feeding or flash photography – but it is a great place for kids to learn about conservation and spend time in nature. gibbonproject.org

TEMPLE TIME > To add a dose of spirituality to your trip, seek out one of the 40 Buddhist temples on the island – some more than a century old. At Wat Chalong, set amongst manicured gardens about 10 kilometres south of Phuket city, the inspiring architecture, beautiful murals and sacred relics, such as a walking stick with healing powers and a splinter of bone from Buddha, will have the whole family intrigued. It’s just as interesting to watch local worshippers make offerings of lotus flowers and pay their respects by sticking gold leaf on the idols. wat-chalong-phuket.com

G O O D M A N N ER S Don’t forget Thai temple etiquette – cover your shoulders and knees, remove hats, leave shoes outside and speak in inside voices.


BALL TOSS > If rolling down a hill in a giant plastic ball sounds like your kind of fun, then check out zorbing (aka rollerballing) at Kalim Beach, north of Patong Beach on the island’s west coast. Two people – it can be a parent and child – climb into the three-metre-wide ball filled with 40 litres of water before turning and tumbling, sloshing and sliding along 190 metres of thrills, spills and laughs. Choose from the straight hill run or the more adventurous twister – and bring your togs, towel and trust. It’s ideal for a rainy day, as you’re going to get wet anyway. rollerball.co

NIN JA T URTLES > Each year, sea turtles leave their Andaman Sea home to lay eggs on Mai Khao Beach, in Phuket’s north-west. While habitat loss means their numbers are declining, turtles still return here during nesting season (October to March) to hatch their young. The Mai Khao Marine Turtle Foundation, located on the grounds of JW Marriott Phuket Resort, holds free information and feeding sessions (donations are appreciated). maikhaomarineturtlefoundation.org; marriott.com

576 SQUARE-KILOMETRES IS PHUKET’S TOTAL SIZE, MAKING IT THAIL AND’S BIGGEST ISL AND

BIG B U DD H A SITS ATOP T HE N AKKERD HILLS

LIT TLE CHEFS > There’s a smorgasbord of cooking courses that offer hands-on tuition in Thai cuisine but an excellent option is the Phuket Thai Cooking Academy, which hosts children’s classes. The day begins with a trip to Kathu Market to shop for fresh ingredients such as rice noodles, lemongrass and mangoes that will be used to cook up a wide range of dishes (think pad thai, massaman curry and mango with sticky rice). Chop, simmer and sizzle at your individual cooking stations while taking in stunning views, then share the meal you cooked together. phuketthaicookinhacademy.com

ISL AND VIEWS > The gleaming marble Big Buddha, propped benevolently on the top of the Nakkerd Hills, impresses with its sheer size (it’s a staggering 45 metres tall). With tinkling bells, fluttering prayer flags and the chanting of orange-robed monks, it’s a serene place to enjoy 360-degree vistas of the island. To beat the crowds, it’s best to get there early in the morning but it’s also an idyllic spot to watch the sun setting over Chalong Bay. You can contribute to the statue’s maintenance by buying a marble tile, on which you can write a message to be placed inside the Buddha. mingmongkolphuket.com


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GET BEACHED No trip to Phuket is complete without beach time. These are the best family-friendly ones: > Best shallow bay Kamala Beach > Best shade Nai Harn Beach – under the casuarina trees > Best for sandcastles Kata Beach – snow-white, super-fine sand > Best surfing breaks Kalim Beach > Best secret beach Banana Beach – reached only by longtail boat or a jungle path

SU ND O W NER SP OT > Shake off the sand, scrub up and head out for a sunset cocktail at Phromthep Cape Restaurant. Located on Phuket’s southernmost promontory, the open-air restaurant offers lovely views and balmy ocean breezes. Try the local prawns with an ice-cold beer while the kids tuck into a seafood basket with fresh coconut water. For anyone after a slightly more upscale experience, several resorts dot the coastline boasting to-die-for views. phuketdir.com/phromthepcaperest

TAKE A BIKE TO UR OF KO H YAO N OI

RIDE O N

PH UKE T ELEPH A N T SA N C T UARY CEO, M O N TRI TODTA NE

> A cycling tour of sleepy Koh Yao Noi (Little Long Island) will show you a different side of Thailand, pedalling through fishing villages, rubber plantations, lush rice paddies, mangrove forests and stretches of jungle. A mini-bus transfer to Phuket’s pier for a one-hour boat ride across Phang Nga Bay is all it takes to be transported into the quiet rural haven. These full-day tours are available for children 10 years and over but shorter tours and simpler itineraries to other places can be tailored by Amazing Bike Tours. amazingbiketoursthailand.asia

BORN TO BE WILD > The island’s only genuine shelter, the Phuket Elephant Sanctuary, rescues and rehabilitates sick, injured and old elephants that have been mistreated while working in Phuket’s logging or tourism industries (while many operators still offer elephant rides, treks or shows, training these majestic creatures to “perform” or “work” is often harsh and cruel). The whole family can learn about elephants while watching the herd bathe and socialise – you can also feed the majestic creatures. phuketelephantsanctuary.org


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T HE UPSIDE D O W N H O USE

W HEN IT R AINS …

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> Head to the quirky Upside Down House of Phuket located on the northern outskirts of Phuket Town. The inverted three-storey house rests on its roof, with furniture nailed to the ceiling. A wander through its rooms promises an illusory experience plus goofy photo opportunities. Fancy a family brainteaser? Also on-site is The Chamber of Secrets with two escape rooms – using teamwork to solve puzzles and break out of the room is a fun and challenging way for everyone to bond. When the rain stops, tackle the hedge maze outside or climb up to the teak tree house for a bird’s-eye view over the grounds. upsidedownhouse-phuket.com

AF TER DARK > When dinnertime rolls around a feast for the senses awaits at the island’s night markets. One of the newer options is the open-air Chillva Market in Phuket Town. Created from shipping containers, the market has a cool vibe with artisan clothing stalls, live music and the mouth-watering aromas of local delicacies wafting from the grill. Get a dragon fruit juice to wash down kai jeow (omelettes over rice) and klnay tod (deep-fried finger bananas). Feeling adventurous? Try the fried grasshopper or red ants.

OLD SCH O OL SURF’S UP > On days when the wind is whipping up the Andaman Sea with gnarly waves, you can head inland for a surf. Across the road from Kata Beach, Surf House Phuket offers gentle sloping artificial waves for both stand-up flowboarding and bodyboarding. Parents can surf or just chill poolside with a snack and a Singha beer from the Wipeout Bar while cheering on the kids as they hang ten, perform tricks or learn the basics. Surf sessions run hourly and it can get busy so book early. surfhousephuket.com

60K T HE N U MBER OF H OTEL RO O MS IN PH UKET

> Give the kids an old-fashioned paper map of Phuket’s Old Town (find one at the tourist information centre on Thalang Road) and let them lead the way. Check out the Shrine of the Serene Light, note Thai Hua Museum’s striking Sino-Portuguese architecture and learn about Phuket’s tin-mining history. Walk Thalang Road which, at 4pm on Sundays, becomes Phuket Walking Street with Lard Yai market offering amazing food. Stop for a Thai coffee at UnforgetTablePhuket, then grab a pa thong ko (doughnut) from a street stall. When everyone’s tired of walking, head back in a tuktuk. thaihuamuseum.com; fb.me/unforgettablephuket


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JOURNEY

TO OF

—The beating heart of Australia, the Red Centre, is home to majestic landscapes, rich culture and a deep spiritual legacy. Sudeshna Ghosh uncovers the wonders of Uluru and Kings Canyon—

A N U N U S U A L LY P O T E N T H E R B A L aroma drifted off smouldering barks of weeping emu bush and prickly wattle burning in a flat bowl on the ground in front of us. “The smoke has a calming effect and reduces anxiety,” explained Peter Abbott, our Indigenous tour guide. “We also burn these leaves and twigs at the end of our ceremonies – the smoking is used to close the porthole into the spirit world.” As the smoke washed over me, I did feel an unexpected sense of calm – a feeling that I was right where I was meant to be, a rare sense of being centred with the earth. Not that I was overly stressed to begin with. I was in the midst of immersing myself in the magic of the Red Centre and had just landed in Kings Canyon after a 45-minute charter flight from Uluru. As the small aircraft bobbed 5000 feet over the seemingly limitless lunar landscape, I could spot other-worldly salt flats and distant gorges on the horizon. For a first-time visitor, the journey provides a real perspective on the sheer enormity of the Red Centre.


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CENTRE

AUSTRALIA

DISCCOVER OVER DIS


is an evocative name for Central Australia, the region smack-bang in the middle of the continent. The desert region starts roughly 735 kilometres south of Darwin and, with Alice Springs at its heart, encompasses the West MacDonnell Ranges, Simpson Desert and several national parks. Of course, it’s also home to some of the country’s best known attractions – Kings Canyon and Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park – which I had come to see. With year-round sunshine (summers are hot and winters are surprisingly mild) and a sparse population, this is the quintessential Australian outback. After tucking into a camel burger from the cute café at sprawling outback cattle farm Kings Creek Station (kingscreekstation.com. au), we wound our way through the dusty plains to Karrke, an Aboriginal cultural experience led by Peter and his wife, Christine. Following a traditional welcome song, the lovely couple offered us a glimpse into Aboriginal culture. They talked us through the intricacies of native art, ancient weapons and told us about bush medicine, including how the versatile weeping emu bush is used for healing wounds as well as spiritual cleansing. Our guides also introduced us to traditional foods – think “bread biscuits” made of edible tree seeds, baked in an earth oven with hot ash and sand. Peter and Christine’s humble explanations and patient answers to our many questions

A WITC HE T T Y GRUB AT T HE K ARRKE C ULT UR AL TO UR

THE RED CENTRE

provided an eye-opening insight into the ancient wisdom of their culture – one that shares a symbiotic relationship with nature. In Aboriginal culture, the land, plants and animals provide all the sustenance they need – goannas and witchetty grubs are a source of protein, mulga trees provide the wood for spears and utensils, which are glued together with the stronger-than-superglue spinifex resin, and jewellery is crafted from colourful seeds. What I found fascinating was that most Aboriginal rituals and traditions are still alive and actively practiced, while in many other ancient cultures, they have been relegated to the annals of barely remembered historic texts. Feeling appropriately cleansed from the smoking ceremony, we sped on to Kings Canyon, located in the heart of Watarrka National Park on the western end of the majestic Georges Gill Range. Kings Canyon Resort (kingscanyonresort.com.au), set just

348 THE NUMBER OF METRES ULURU RISES ABOVE THE SURROUNDING PL AIN

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nine kilometres from the national park, is built at the edge of an escarpment to blend into the natural environment. Its strategic location offers stunning views of the canyon and Carmichael’s Crag, the rocky mountain you see in all the iconic images of the canyon. Watching the mysterious fissured formation glow and change from rusty brown to vivid orange and almost purple, over very civilised sundowners at the sunset viewing platform, is a captivating experience. And it set us up for the Kings Canyon Rim Walk the following morning, which we head off for bright and early at 6am. The six-kilometre loop takes around three to four hours and it gets hotter as the day goes on, but we scaled the 100-metre ascent up the natural steps hewn out of the sandstone quite quickly. You can easily take on the walk yourself but doing it with a guide can greatly enhance the experience. Marcus, a card-carrying outback resident and our guide, peppered the trek with interesting nuggets about how the Aboriginal people have survived and thrived on this harsh land, about the unique local flora and fauna and, well, Priscilla’s Crack – a begging-to-beInstagrammed V-shaped opening in the canyon wall made famous by iconic film The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. Early in the piece, Marcus stopped our group to explain that “the closest town to where we are at the moment is 1800 kilometres away”. It helped put in perspective the remoteness and epic splendour of the canyon. This isn’t an

YOUR GUIDE TO ULURU The Ayers Rock/Connellan Airport is located 10 minutes from Yulara, a resort township about 25 kilometres from the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. While no-one is allowed to stay within the national park, Yulara offers accommodation options for various budgets, including five-star hotel Sails in the Desert (also home to the luxurious Red Ochre Spa). Uluru can be visited independently by foot or bike, or with an organised tour. Tours range from camel rides with sunset drinks and canapés to sunrise breakfast tours. The energy of the rock can be felt after dark, too. There are activities available such as an alfresco barbecue dinner overlooking the Field of Light (an immersive light art installation by British artist Bruce Munro, on exhibit until 2020) with a side of stargazing led by a resident astronomer. ayersrockresort.com.au; kingscanyonresort.com.au


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obvious sort of beauty. It has to be teased out and appreciated in the context of the millions of years of weathering that has gone into creating the curious ridges, the sheer drops of the canyon walls and the hidden oases within, such as the aptly dubbed Garden of Eden. This lush green watering hole on the canyon floor offered a welcome pit stop about halfway through our walk and made the return home feel easy. If hiking the canyon is humbling, then seeing it from above is awe-inspiring. A scenic helicopter flight from Kings Creek Station (which is home to the regional airstrip) offers a bird’s-eye view of the mountain ranges. Our friendly pilot made sure we got all the photoops we needed, including that of the famous “dingo pups” formation – a large rock that juts out with eight smaller projections alongside. Local Aboriginals refer to it as a mother dingo sitt ing with her eight puppies. It is this blurring of lines between what is human, animal and nature, as well as the past, present and future that stood out to me the most on this exploration of culture and the land. Only 48 hours earlier, I’d had another stirring experience when I touched Uluru. It was impressive to see from afar, of course – like a giant, mythical creature lying in repose. I had witnessed it rise up from the spinifex grassland surrounding it at sunrise and, over a glass of bubbly, I had watched it turn a brilliant red at dusk. But it was only when I walked around its base and put my hands on its undulating surfaces, that I truly sensed its might.

A LO CAL LO N G-N O SED DR AG O N

OVERNIG H T DEL IG H T Offering the perfect way to make the most of a visit to the Red Centre, Kings Canyon Resort has introduced an all-inclusive Overnight Delight package, which includes charter flights from Ayers Rock Resort, overnight accommodation, the Karrke Indigenous cultural tour, a guided Kings Canyon Rim Walk, plus breakfast and lunch. Prices start from $715. kingscanyonresort.com.au

Uluru is essentially a sandstone formation that, over the last 550 million years, has been pushed and tilted up by movement of the earth’s tectonic plates to become the uniquely proportioned structure we see today. The local Anangu people tell a far more interesting creation story however. Amidst the rock’s many nooks, crevices, gashes and cave paintings lie a millennia of tales and their inherent life lessons. The monolith has been a source of shelter and sustenance to the Anangu people for centuries – its caves providing a home and its watering holes offering fresh water and food. It’s not hard to see why Kings Canyon and Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park are not only counted among Australia’s greatest natural wonders, but also hold a special significance in Aboriginal culture. By making an effort to comprehend their mystical power, I was rewarded with an insight, however small, into a culture as vast as the land that surrounds it, and the opportunity to make a real connection with the earth and its energies.

JE T S TA R O FFER S G RE AT L O W FA RES T O AY ER S R O C K (UL U R U).

JE T S TA R.C O M


LOST FREIG H T CAFÉ

4 8 H O U RS IN

HOBART PART 1: T HE ULTIMATE HIT LIST

> BUT NOW, COFFEE. The caffeination of Hobart dates back to 1804 when the first beans hit our shores (probably to keep the prison wardens awake to watch over the convicts). Hobart’s café scene is now thriving with plenty of quality options. Experience the best on a Hobart Café Culture walking tour – sort of like a progressive morning tea, the tour winds through the city’s lanes and arcades seeking out the best espresso, cold brews, pastries and chocolates. You’ll hear the fascinating history of how coffee took hold in Hobart from expert guides and visit six genuine local haunts – exact venues vary depending on what’s new and seasonal – for behind-the-scenes tastings. hobartwalkingtours.com.au

Chris Crerar

D O T HE H OBART CAFÉ C ULT URE TO UR

—Markets, edgy art and natural beauty… Local Stephanie Williams takes us on a tour of Tassie’s capital and reveals a few secrets on the way—

> GET WILD WITH THE LOCALS. Did you know a wombat marks its territory with a square poo so it doesn’t roll away? Scat humour abounds at Bonorong, a wildlife sanctuary located 30 minutes’ drive from the city centre. Owner Greg Irons worked here as a youngster before taking over. Time your visit with one of the tours at 11.30am, 2pm and 3.30pm to get up close with wombats and koalas, then take a walk to see the rest of the crew – there are kangaroos (which you can hand-feed), Tasmanian devils and Eastern quolls, among others. It’s an absolute winner with families. bonorong.com.au


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L O C AL T IP. Call into the Country Women’s Association (fb.me/cwagiftshop) shop to pick up preserves, cakes and chutneys, as well as hand-knitted scarves and beanies – perfect souvenirs, especially if the weather suddenly changes.

SAL AMANCA MARKE T

> CLIMB EVERY MOUNTAIN. If you want to breathe in some crisp Tasmanian air, it doesn’t get fresher than at Kunanyi/Mount Wellington. Rising 1270 metres above sea level, the mountain stands over Hobart as a reminder of the beautiful wilderness at the city’s doorstep and a barometer of the ever-changing weather. The base of the mountain is a 20-minute drive from the city and you can now catch the new all-terrain shuttle bus from Brooke Street Pier on the waterfront (the road sometimes shuts when it snows so check conditions beforehand). Wellington park offers a huge range of walking and mountain biking trails – you can hire a bike from one of the local operators such as Tasmanian Mountain Bike Adventures (tasmba.com.au). Once you’ve expended all that energy, pop into Lost Freight (lostfreightcafe.com) at The Springs, a cute café in a shipping container, for a pick-me-up. wellingtonpark.org.au

> TO MARKET, TO MARKET. As Tasmania’s most visited tourist attraction, the Salamanca Market (salamancamarket.com.au) is as popular as it is enduring, having started in the late 1970s. From 8.30am until 3pm each Saturday, the market showcases Tasmanian food, wine, art, craft, curiosities and clothing. Savour a salted caramel crepe while you enjoy the talented buskers and pick up some unique souvenirs. Alternatively, on Sunday mornings you can join locals at Farm Gate Market (farmgatemarket. com.au) for breakfast and a chat with charismatic local producers. Be sure to grab an almond croissant from Cygnet Woodfired Bakehouse. Street Eats Franko (streeteatsfranko.com.au), a vibrant weekly food fair at Franklin Square, is also great for Friday night dining in summer.

> OH, MONA.

T HE M O NA RO MA FERRY

Visiting Hobart's Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) is a no-brainer. The vision of part-gambler, part-art collector David Walsh, MONA pushes the boundaries of contemporary art and collectable objects in Australia’s largest private art collection. Don’t miss Snake (1970-72) by Sidney Nolan and bit.fall (2001-06) by Julius Popp. You can drive 20 minutes from the city centre to the gallery but catching the MONA ROMA ferry is the best way to fully appreciate the incredible architecture by Nonda Katsalidis on approach – all taken in via the comfortable seating for “ewe” (trust me, this will make sense when you take a seat!) or the “Posh Pit”, complete with complimentary canapés and drinks. mona.net.au


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PART 2: D O SO MET HING DIFFEREN T

PEO NY P OPPIES

—After taking in MONA and getting active on Mount Wellington, Stephanie Williams slows down to smell the roses (and posies) in the Tasmanian countryside—

IMAGES_ CHRIS CRERAR

ooking at the green, spotted foliage planted in the garden bed in front of me, I suddenly realise that it’s not a weed. I had spent the best part of yesterday morning removing this very “weed” from my garden at home and now it’s dawned on me that I’ve been ripping out potentially beautiful flowers. Costa Georgiadis I am not. It’s lucky I am here, at local florist and flower grower Lisa Kingston’s flower farm. The drive to Woodbridge, 40 minutes south of Hobart, on a slow Sunday morning was worth it alone. The winding roads hug the coastline and pass through tiny towns like Kettering and the appropriately named Snug, all while overlooking the D'Entrecasteaux Channel and out to Bruny Island. Every Saturday, Lisa and her husband Steve sell their beautiful flowers at Salamanca Market and have cultivated a loyal following for their arrangements and Instagram feed. Last year I bought a historic Hobart cottage with my first proper garden and a white picket fence. Gardening had never been on my radar but I’m starting to discover the joys of spending time with plants; it’s relaxing, meditative even. Gardening is a big thing in Tassie, especially maintaining traditional English-style gardens, so I’ve come to one of Lisa’s seasonal farm tours and flower workshops to get a better idea of how to tend to my own garden. I’m not a natural green thumb and hope that my budding flowers back home will thank me later. I’m joined by 10 other women – a few Lisa fan-girls (she is kind of a big deal in these parts),


D E TA IL S > Where Woodbridge, 40 minutes’s drive south of Hobart. > Highlights Taking home huge bunches of flowers and a few bulbs for the garden. > Handy hint Go with an empty stomach – morning tea and lunch are included, as well as a glass of local bubbles. > Cost $320 per person. lisakingstonflowers. com.au

“I T’S A N IMPRESSI VE ACRE AGE OF C OLO URFUL ORN A MEN TAL GARDEN BED S NE AR T HE H O USE A N D R O WS OF HERI TAGE FRUI T TREES BE YO N D.”

some floral enthusiasts and others here just for the experience. Once we’re armed with freshly brewed coffee and homemade shortbread, Lisa shares the story of how she came to the island when she was four, escaping the heat of the mainland with her parents. They built a house using recycled timber and established the flower farm and heritage orchards, which Lisa and Steve took over 15 years ago. It’s an impressive acreage of colourful ornamental garden beds near the house and rows of heritage fruit trees beyond. As we wander the grounds, Lisa and Steve share information about cultivating the 200-plus plant varieties on their property, including many Australian natives – from pretty ranunculus, poppies and roses, to their bestsellers, sweet peas, chincherinchees and sunflowers. Taking notes on how to make the most of a flower while it’s in the ground, I learn that chook poo and sawdust makes excellent

fertiliser and to pick my flowers rather than just leaving them on the plant because it will fool the plant into producing even more. I also learn that being a florist is as much about carefully nurturing growth as it is about massacring. At the rustic timber flower shed, Lisa lets us have a go at separating dahlia tubers by hacking them with a sugarcane knife. Having worked up an appetite, we break for lunch at the house, tucking into a delicious spread of salads, quiche, pies, breads and cheeses – all either grown here or from other stallholders at Salamanca Market. Then comes the bit that everyone is looking forward to – the business of bouquets. Lisa kicks off the afternoon session with a demonstration of a large posy followed by a vase arrangement, after which we’re left to work on our own. Like kids in a candy shop, we wander between the cut flowers in the workshop and the garden beds to cut more of what takes our fancy. My first bunch feels clumsy but Lisa shows me how to hold the bunch with a more open hand, which helps me place more flowers into it. The vase arrangement is easier and I find myself enjoying the sculpting – I start with tall foxgloves and ground the bunch with a huge peony, then add everything from lavender to peach ranunculus, yellow billy balls and poppies. Lisa encourages us to use our imagination – I do just that, ending up with six bouquets in the end. Lisa and Steve’s connection with their little patch of Tasmania runs deep and I understand now why their flowers are so sought after. Armed with just a small slice of their extensive knowledge and after spending a day in the fresh Tassie air, I already feel more in touch with nature and inspired to run wild in my own garden.

L ISA H OSTING A WORKSH OP

JE T S TA R H A S G RE AT L O W FA RES T O H O B A R T FR O M A R O U N D A U S T R AL I A.

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—It can feel like the “on” switch is always activated in this bustling city. But you’ll find a calmer side to Hong Kong along its hiking paths and nature trails. Jennifer Johnston tackles a track on Victoria Peak to escape the chaos—

T HE VIE W OVER H O N G KO N G FR O M L IO N R O CK


T HIR T Y-SI X T HIR T Y-SE V EN T HIR T Y-EIG H T… I’m counting the stone steps as I make my ascent up the evenly spaced blocks. My breath quickens with the exertion. I look up to see the steps continue winding their way upwards, disappearing into a canopy of lush subtropical forest. The only sounds are occasional bird calls and the rustle of leaves from the soft gusts of wind blowing through the dense green trees embracing the path (and my own panting). This silence is surreal, considering only 10 minutes earlier I’d left behind the cacophony of traffic and construction in a busy city. I pause for a moment to wonder whether I’ve been teleported into a remote Australian rainforest. I’m actually on one of the circuit trails that winds around Victoria Peak in Hong Kong, right in the heart of this bustling city. Images of towering skyscrapers and busy, chaotic streets usually come to mind when picturing Hong Kong but not many people know about its “green” side, with mountains and protected country parks making up about 75 per cent of its 1108 square-kilometres. This large expanse conceals an abundance of hiking and walking trails, which provide a retreat for the city’s seven million-plus inhabitants – and regular visitors like me – looking to escape the crowds and noise that is inherently Hong Kong. At 552 metres above sea level, the top of Hong Kong Island’s Victoria Peak provides magnificent views of the skyscrapers hugging Victoria Harbour. On previous visits, I’ve ticked this touristy “must-do” box and stood on the lookout, during the day and at night, admiring the sweeping vista over the body of water separating Hong Kong Island from Kowloon. I’ve travelled to the highest point by taxi (quick but expensive) and caught the Peak Tram (slow but economical). But on this occasion, I’m exploring the peak on foot.

SQ UARE-K ILO METRES OF C O U N TRY PARKS IN H O NG KO NG

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“T HE BEST WAY TO SH AKE OFF H O N G KO N G’S STRESSES IS TO HI T T HE TR A ILS T H AT T HRE A D T HR O U G H T HE C O U N TRY PARKS.”

I’m with two local friends, Chris and Ali, who regularly walk the Pik Shan Path on a Saturday morning. The path is conveniently close to their apartment in Sai Ying Pun but is relatively unknown to visitors. Chris has lived in Hong Kong since 1989 and possesses an in-depth knowledge of the city, making him the perfect guide. “Hong Kong is a busy city, so I’ve found the best way to shake off its stresses is to hit the many trails that thread their way through the country parks and hillsides,” he says. “You can start in Central or near the airport and end up on a remote beach with a cold beer or two.” Thanks to Hong Kong’s compact size and efficient public transport network, most of this parkland is easily accessible and takes in everything from wild isolated beaches to lush green forests. You can plan half- or full-day adventures around the city’s perimeter or a short stroll from the bars and restaurants of Soho and Lan Kwai Fong, leading into the heart of peaceful woodlands on Victoria Peak. I meet Chris and Ali at Caine Road in Mid-Levels. The predominantly residential Central and Western District can be a bit of a hike on its own, depending on the direction you’re coming from. If you’ve arrived in Central on the Star Ferry or via the subway rather than zigzagging up hundreds of stone steps (Mid-Levels is steep), I recommend using the escalators – and saving your energy for hiking. From our meeting point, we walk about 10 minutes to busy Bonham Road (named after Sir George Bonham, the third governor of Hong Kong). Turning into Kotewall Road, we pass

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a street sweeper wielding an ancient-looking bamboo broom with straw bristles, reminding me of a witch’s broomstick. “The government hires cleaners to sweep Hong Kong streets day and night,” Chris tells me. “Some streets are swept up to six times a day.” The rhythmic swish of the sweeper’s broom fades as we walk further up the gentle incline and I realise why, in such a densely populated city, the streets are surprisingly rubbish-free. A right turn brings us to the start of Pik Shan Path in the 47-hectare Lung Fu Shan Country Park, the smallest of the country parks in Hong Kong. Adjacent to the entrance is a small building, built between 1914 and 1919. The government-owned house was originally used to accommodate workers from the nearby Water Reservoir but in 2008 it was converted into the Lung Fu Shan Environmental Education Centre (lungfushan.hku.hk/en). Inside the centre, videos warn visitors to be aware of wild boar and porcupines roaming the reserve. “While these creatures do come out in the day, the best time to see them is at dawn and dusk,” says Chris. “Night-time hikes are becoming popular as people are taking an interest in nocturnal animals.” I enter the park with a little trepidation as I’ve no desire to step on any sharp porcupine quills, but within minutes I have relaxed into a state of zen, letting the silence and the fresh earthy scent envelop me. We clamber past creek beds filled with moss-covered mottled grey and brown stones. The water trickles slowly because there has been little rain. Birds frolic in the woodlands (a result of the colonial government’s reforestation efforts).

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There’s no jostling through crowds or hawkers on Hong Kong’s hiking trails. Here, the only passing traffic is other hikers, dog walkers and the occasional runner. About halfway up, a diminutive Chinese man solitarily practises tai chi facing a rock wall, his measured, intricate movements clearly perfected with years of practice. Walking in these woodlands, I feel like I’ve unlocked a Hong Kong secret. The Pik Shan Path connects to the Morning Trail, which can take about three to four hours to complete the 2.3-kilometre route and requires some ascent walking but isn’t too strenuous (a moderate fitness level is necessary). We decide to take a shorter option, exiting onto Hatton Road, passing another historical relic. A granite pillar, less than a metre tall, is embedded into a retaining wall with “City Boundary 1903” etched into its facade. It’s one of seven boundary stones that marked the city limits of Victoria – the de-facto capital of Hong Kong during British Colonial rule from 1841 to 1997, which spread across the areas now occupied by Sheung Wan, Central and Wan Chai. We cut through the University of Hong Kong campus, stopping at Chong Yuet Ming Fountain, apparently a popular spot to take graduation photos. Exhilarated from the serotonin hit I’ve got from the hike, the restored calm from being in nature and having discovered another fascinating facet to this city, I decide to commemorate this moment with my own graduation photo. JE T S TA R H A S G RE AT L O W FA RES T O H O N G KO N G.

W HEN T O HIK E The best times to hike in Hong Kong are between early November to January, when temperatures are usually about 20°C. May to September is hot and humid and rain is usually plentiful – this is not the best time to consider the trails for hiking, unless you decide to do it later in the day. Biting insects may be a problem during summer months.

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> Cape D’Aguilar Marine Reserve is on the south-eastern tip of Hong Kong Island and has trails hugging the South China Sea. The walk begins on a flat bitumen road with views towards the quaint seaside village of Stanley. Passing a few houses, the road changes to a dirt path and the scenery transforms into rugged coastline. Spend a half-day or full day here; it’s a relatively easy hike. > Lamma Island is another daytrip option that’s popular with locals and tourists (it’s only accessible by boat – take the ferry from Central). It offers a relatively easy hike along coastal trails through fishing villages, forests and beaches. Beginning at Sok Kwu Wan Village, follow the circular trail to Yung Shue Wan. > The MacLehose stage-five trek near Shatin is a full-day hike with a high degree of difficulty, offering great mountain views, historical relics and wild monkeys. Climb to the top of Lion Rock for views of Kowloon and Hong Kong Island on a clear day. Trail markers and pillboxes identify the path. Devon Constantine, Christopher Wise, Barry Wu

CIT Y VIE WS FR O M VIC TORIA PEAK

T HREE T OP HIKES ARO U ND HONG KONG


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079—108

the cut > THE BEST OF WHERE TO EAT, DRINK AND PL AY

H OIBAL A NI PA PAGGEE

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> If you look closely, you’ll see the country’s national anthem is printed in teeny tiny text on the back of their $1000 note.

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> Since 1990, New Zealand has had a government-appointed wizard, whose duties include protecting the government.

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> Renowned shoe designer Jimmy Choo is Malaysian. He was born in Penang into a family of shoemakers.

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T HE C U T

H OI AN OL D TOWN

E AT + DRINK

HOI AN —Vietnam’s ancient riverside city is a culinary melting pot of flavours with influences from across Asia and Europe. Dining out is a journey in itself. Lara Dunston leads the way—

Jean Pierre Candelier, Jonathan Sayeb

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> REACHING OUT TEA HOUSE. With its low-slung Art Deco chairs and big round windows that let a cool breeze flow into the shaded courtyard, this beautiful Chinese-style tea house is a retreat from the heat. Order a pot of oolong tea while you browse the range of ceramics and handicrafts made by local artisans with disabilities at their Reaching Out Arts and Crafts workshop nearby. reachingoutvietnam.com/teahouse

> COCOBOX. This welcoming café and farm shop has a rustic-chic vibe, with a recycled timber counter, organic produce piled in crates and open sacks of aromatic coffee beans luring in passers-by for coconut ice-cream coffee, cold-pressed juices and smoothies. Artisanal souvenirs fill the shelves, including coffee-flower honey, Marou chocolate bars and highlands tea. cocobox.vn

tea houses

wine bars cafés > WHITE MARBLE.

Hoi An’s best wine bar just so happens to be owned by an Australian expat, Nick Hatton, who has thoughtfully curated a wine list including top drops from his brother, Peter, who operates French Island Vineyards, south of Melbourne. Come for the friendly staff, nostalgic 80’s soundtrack and excellent pours – stay for the deep-fried money bags packed with plump prawns. fb.me/whitemarblehoian

LOCAL TIP Don’t miss a sunset cocktail at one of the An Bang beachside bars, a 15-minute taxi ride from Hoi An. WHI TE MARBLE

> MARKET BAR. Opened in April 2018, this open-air patio bar, tucked away on the first level of the cloth market, still flies under the radar. From the corner of Bach Dang and Hoang Dieu streets, look up. Spot the blue lanterns in the tree and the “Market Terrace” sign and you’re there. Expect affordable bottles of wine, Vietnamese craft beers from the likes of Hanoi’s Furbrew, cheese and charcuterie plates and fantastic river views. marketbar.org

REACHING O U T TEA H O USE

> HOI AN ROASTERY. You can find Vietnam’s traditional robusta-based ca phe sua da (iced coffee made with condensed milk) everywhere but until Hoi An Roastery opened in 2015, it was hard finding a decent flat white. Four years later, you can order a pour-over brewed from fair-trade Arabica beans sourced from Dalat (in southern Vietnam) and roasted in Hoi An at one of the roastery’s seven branches. They also do coffee-making workshops. hoianroastery.com


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markets + food H OI AN CEN TR AL MARKE T

> HOI AN FOOD TOURS.

> HOI AN CENTRAL MARKET. Make a beeline for this market early in the morning for the colour and atmosphere as much as the culinary offerings. First, browse the market, where you can buy a stainless steel single-cup coffee filter for as little as a dollar. Post-shopping, head for breakfast in the high-ceilinged food hall where cooks will call out to invite you to sample their specialties, such as banh xeo (crispy yellow pancakes filled with pork, prawn, sprouts and herbs) and bun bo Hue (a zesty beef soup). Don’t be surprised if a spoonful of spicy broth is thrust in your face – and don’t refuse it either!

tours SHOP LIKE A LOCAL Ba Le Market is a smaller, more relaxed food market option. Come early for the fresh banh mis from the bakery on the main street.

If 40 tastings sounds like 30 too many, then do Hoi An Food Tours’ Morning Street Food Walking Tour, which offers 10 delicious local tastings, including a banh mi stop. You’ll also have the chance to watch the family of the inventor of Hoi An’s famous white rose dumplings make the delicate morsels before you sample them for yourself. hoianfoodtour.com

> EAT HOI AN CULINARY TOURS. For the more adventurous, cheery Phuoc – or Mr Happy, as he prefers to be called – offers food tours that include strolls through Hoi An’s backstreets, trying snacks such as baby duck eggs. On his cycling tours through the lush emerald paddies to Tra Que village, where he was born, you can participate in rice planting or harvesting, depending on the season. eathoian.com

Australian retiree and long-term Hoi An resident Neville Dean established the Original Taste of Hoi An food tours. Neville introduced food-loving travellers to Madam Khanh, an elegant woman with a neat grey bun nicknamed “the Banh Mi Queen”. Neville’s excursions include 40 tastings over four hours at backstreet stalls and simple eateries and restaurants. Skip breakfast and be prepared to skip dinner. tasteofhoian.com

H OI AN’S PRO D UCE VEND ORS

Dennis Rudge

> ORIGINAL TASTE OF HOI AN.


H OI A N

classes > EAT HOI AN COOKING CLASS.

> RED BRIDGE COOKING SCHOOL. If the idea of learning to make a pho soup stock and fresh noodles from scratch gets you excited, then do the seven-hour deluxe course at this outstanding cooking school on the tranquil Hoi An River bank just out of town. It kicks off with a quick shop at the market to buy ingredients and includes a saunter through Tra Que organic community garden for a lesson on local produce and a boat cruise back to town when you’re done. redbridge.visithoian.com

Mr Happy of Eat Hoi An also offers a special family-focused culinary experience. Starting with a brief shop at a lively local farmers’ market to purchase ingredients, you’ll then pick fresh produce from Mr Happy’s own family vegetable plot in Tra Que village and engage in a laid-back cooking lesson in his grandma’s traditional farm-house kitchen. eathoian.com

SPICE IT UP Visit 41 Nguyen Thai Hoc to buy Hoi An’s famous Ot Tuong Trieu

> NAM HAI COOKING ACADEMY. If you’ve ever had MasterChef aspirations and money is no object, check into Four Seasons Resort The Nam Hai for the ultimate holiday culinary education. The hotel’s cooking academy offers everything from one-day to week-long courses, all of which begin with an immersive experience. You might start with a tour of their on-site organic farm, where 35 varieties of vegetables and herbs are grown, or visit the nearby Phuoc Hai district, where you can learn how to row a traditional, round bamboo basket boat. The bespoke courses are completely customised and they can host classes for kids. fourseasons.com/hoian

Phat chilli sauce, made from a 150-year-old family recipe.

> MY GRANDMA’S HOME COOKING. In a town awash with cooking classes, local resident Phuong wanted to offer something different and created this slow food experience with her grandmother. A leisurely 35-minute boat cruise from Hoi An to a small island on the river delta, sets the scene for this unhurried experience. Starting with a countryside tour, there’s the opportunity to interact with local farmers, before returning to the family home where you’ll cook grandma’s recipes using the island’s native ingredients. cooking-hoian.com

NAM HAI C O OKING ACADEMY

Andrew Chan

TR A Q UE VILL AGE

best cooking

RED BRID GE C O OKING SCH O OL

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H OI A N

BANH MI PH U O NG

CAO L AU N O O DLES

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> MISS LY CAFÉ.

eats

local > BANH MI PHUONG. They may have originated in Vietnam’s south but the nation’s best baguettes are in Hoi An. Banh Mi Phuong’s crunchy rolls crammed with pork, pickles and salad were loved by locals long before late celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain called them a “symphony in a sandwich”. Schoolteacher Phuong’s banh mi is special thanks to her sister-in-law’s homemade pâté, mayo and chilli jam.

> MANGO ROOMS.

MAI FISH

Grab a stool on the upstairs balcony of this riverside restaurant and sip cocktails like sangria with passionfruit and watermelon (happy hour runs from 5-7pm) as you watch the sunset on the Thu Bon River. Magic! Later, slip downstairs to savour bandanawearing chef Tran Thanh Duc’s Vietnamese fusion cuisine, influenced by his travels around the world. mangohoian.com/mango-rooms

JE T S TA R H A S G RE AT L O W FA RES T O D A N A N G FR O M A R O U N D A U S T R AL I A.

> MI QUANG ONG HAI. Don’t go for the atmosphere (there is none) but for the finest renditions of Hoi An’s must-try noodle dishes at this eatery in a family home. Mi Quang is a silky, turmeric-tinted noodle dish with prawns, char siu pork and quail eggs. Cao lau are rustic noodles nursing succulent pork and a pile of aromatic herbs. Both are drizzled with spiced pork broth. Pop in around 11am to eat with the regulars.

> MAI FISH. If it’s a clear evening, opt for the breezy bougainvillea-filled courtyard to watch illuminated candles float on the still river – an enchanting sight. In rainy season (October to February), sit inside this French colonial-style villa to graze on refined Vietnamese food. mangohoian.com/mai-fish

F O O D, G L O R I O U S F O O D You can try most local specialties at Morning Glory Original restaurant, run by Hoi An-born chef Ms Vy. tastevietnam.asia

JE T S TA R.C O M

Holly Lithgow

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There are few lovelier spots for lunch than the mustard-walled dining room of this centuries-old house. Miss Ly is on the woks out the back making her beautifully balanced sauces for Hoi An specialties such as flat fried shrimp wontons and white rose dumplings. You don’t need a booking but arrive before noon to beat the rush.


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CHILLI CRAB SINGAPORE

A N AT O M Y OF A DIS H

—Chilli crab dates back to 1956 when Cher Yam Tian is said to have created the first incarnation. Rachel Gray tracks down Cher’s son, Roland Lim, to learn more about the origin of Singapore’s national dish— How was the Singapore chilli crab born? > During the old days in the 1950s, we were living in a kampong, which is similar to a village, on a hill in Singapore. My mother loved to cook and my father loved to eat. We lived near the water and my father would catch crabs and bring them home and give them to my mother to cook. One day, my father asked her, “Why do you only steam cook the crabs? Can you do something different with them?” So my mother emerged from the kitchen with the chilli crab and started cooking it more often.

she sold chilli crabs because of the kerosene lamp hanging from the tree.

Where was the chilli crab first sold? > In front of the place where we lived near the river, there was a tree – my mother cooked the chilli crab under that tree over a charcoal fire with only two tables, a wooden stool and a kerosene lamp. Customers soon started recognising the place where

What were the difficulties with setting up a restaurant back then? > During those days in Singapore, it was very difficult doing business because not many people could get a license to cook and sell, so my mum and dad had to move between places and hide themselves so the


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government would not catch them. I remember, once, the government took the whole stall away because we didn’t have the license to cook at that time. They had a truck and lifted up the whole stall and put it on the truck and drove away. When were you legally allowed to sell the chilli crab? > We finally found a place that we could rent and we got a temporary [health and environment] license for store holders and then a formal license. But our customers still only knew we were selling the chilli crab because of the kerosene lamp hanging from that tree nearby. If the lamp was on, then it meant we were selling tonight. If the lamp was off, then it meant we were closed for the day. What does the chilli crab taste like? > It’s not spicy, as everyone thinks. It is difficult to describe the taste, so you have to come and try my mother’s chilli crab here. It is very unique. I don’t know how she came up with it. She is amazing!

How old were you when you first tasted the dish? > Maybe about six or seven years old. I was at home, sitting with my father, mother, brother and sisters. Tell us about how you started Roland Restaurant. > I dropped out of school when I was about 12 to help my father full-time in his restaurant – but it was my mother who taught me how to cook the chilli crab. The business was doing very well and my father decided to sell the name in 1985 and migrate to New Zealand where some of his relatives lived. We kept the recipe – we only sold the name. But I thought it was a waste because my mother had built up this chilli crab legacy and made it famous in Singapore. After I got married, my wife and I decided to move back to Singapore and opened Roland Restaurant in 2000, where we now serve chilli crab using the original recipe. Do you eat chilli crab with a knife and fork or chopsticks? > Oh, no, no, no… We use our hands! Can you tell us the recipe? > The recipe? I cannot tell you. It is a family secret kept even today.

TA S T Y LEG ACY When Roland Lim’s father passed away in 2012, his mother, Cher Yam Tian (pictured above with Roland), moved back to Singapore. To this day, the sprightly 85-year-old, still visits her son’s restaurant to make sure the chilli crab tastes exactly how she made it more than 60 years ago. rolandrestaurant.com.sg

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B O O R ADLEY’S

H APPY H O U RS

CHRISTCHURCH —There’s an abundance of enticing cocktail bars, beer gardens and social clubs where you can treat yourself to a drink (or two) in New Zealand’s Garden City—


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> THE POPLAR SOCIAL CLUB. Award-winning bartender Charles Gillet draws in crowds with his cheeky banter at this sophisticated cocktail lounge, located at the crossroads of the four avenues that form the city centre. With six craft beers on tap as well as 24 cocktails, it’s easy to sit back and enjoy the relaxed ambience and tunes over pre-dinner drinks. The social club is open Wednesday to Sunday from 5pm until late with occasional deals like $10 cocktails. thepoplarsocialclub.co.nz

> RED LIGHT DISTRICT.

RED L IG H T DISTRICT

> BOO RADLEY’S. A favourite with locals, this award-winning bar is famed for having the largest bourbon collection in New Zealand so it’s no surprise that bourbon-based cocktails are their specialty. This relaxed space with comfy wall booths has great food and even better live music so you’re in for a good time any night of the week – and every hour is happy hour as there is always a good deal on. Arrive after 10pm and try any of the 250-odd whiskies, over 40 craft beers and eight tap beers. Boo’s is open seven days from 4pm to 3am but Wednesday’s open mic nights are infamous. booradleys.co.nz

If damn tasty cocktails are your thing, don’t miss the hidden Victoria Street entrance to Red Light District – you’re looking for Charlie Winston’s of Chelsea Drycleaners in the laneway. This place has a mysterious vibe that will make you feel like you’re in a spy film. Low, red lighting and down-tempo hip hop set the mood and the enthusiastic staff take a unique approach to creating cocktails in all shapes and sizes. If you try just one, make it the 36th Chamber – a refreshing blend of dry gins, pomegranate, herbal liquor and citrus. Bar snacks are also available and drinks are flowing from 5pm until late from Tuesday to Thursday and from 4pm, Friday and Saturday. Ask a bartender for “the menu behind the menu behind the bar behind the dry cleaners” menu to unlock special drinks and discounts. redlightdistrict.nz

Located opposite Christchurch Arts Centre, this Star Wars-themed beer garden is popular for its fun loving, child- and pet-friendly atmosphere. With live music on most nights, the quirky bar serves more than 20 craft beers, two tap beers and a selection of burgers, snacks and platters such as the Constellation Platter of ”Yoda cold cuts” and “Vulcan pickles”. Cocktail lovers shouldn’t miss the Passionfruit Mojito. Find low-priced drinks Thursday to Saturday from 4pm onwards and Sunday from 12pm. cooknwithgas.co.nz/ the-astro-lounge

T HE ASTRO LO U NGE

W O R D S_ H E AT H ER W O O D S

Naomi Haussmann

> THE ASTRO LOUNGE.


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C H R IS T C H U R C H

FAT EDDIE’S

SO CIAL WINE BAR

> FAT EDDIE’S.

This is a classy after-work hotspot in the CBD with a marble-top bar that James Bond would approve of. Try the Passion Mojito or one of five tap beers, including the popular Cassels and Sons Milk Stout. Hungry? Don’t miss their legendary cheese platter. “The Social Hour”, when you can sip on $12 cocktails, runs Sunday to Thursday 5.30pm to 6.30pm. christchurch.crowneplaza.com

T HE INSTIT U TIO N

> THE INSTITUTION. Tucked away behind the historic Isaac Theatre Royal is the monochrome entrance to this boutique bar. The Institution has five rotating taps with Kiwi and international beers but if you can’t decide, just order the tasting tray. There are blackboard tables you can get creative on or just perch at the upstairs window and soak up the views. With deals like $10 craft beers and cocktails changing daily, it’s open from 4pm Tuesday to Friday and 2pm on weekends. theinstitution.co.nz

> RETROPOLITAN SOCIAL CLUB. Step back in time to the 1970s and sun yourself in the garden bar (under a retractable roof), relax on the mezzanine or dine at the restaurant of this versatile venue. Located three kilometres south-west of the city centre, it’s decorated with over 800 items of 70s-themed décor – complete with paisley carpet – offering a museum-like feast for the eyes. You’ll find the quintessential dish of the decade here: fondue mains and desserts. But this is also home to the city’s best reuben sandwich. If you’re feeling energetic, there’s a seven-metre shuffle board to compete on. Happy hour is 4-6pm on Wednesdays with $12 cocktails and 25 per cent off house wines, tap beers and ciders. fb.me/RetropolitanSocialClub

Mauro Risch, Naomi Haussmann

> SOCIAL WINE BAR.

Located on the terrace, above sister bar Kong on the Avon River, this jazz mecca is one of the grand masters of bars in Christchurch. With live music every night, the balcony and dancefloor provide a mellow environment for traditional jazz, blues and soul while still catering for late-night crowds with big party-style bands until the wee hours. There are cocktails, six tap beers and a huge wine list on offer. They always have deals (think $15 cocktails), which you can find on social media and are open daily from 2pm until late. fateddiesbar.co.nz


THERE IS NOWHERE IN THE WORLD WHERE YOU CAN EXPERIENCE SO MUCH, SO CLOSE AND SO EASILY.

Your South Island experience begins with just an hour’s drive from Christchurch New Zealand, whether you’re driving North, South, East or West, Mid Canterbury is the perfect stop. Stay as long as you can to explore Mid Canterbury to the fullest. With stunning snow capped mountains as its backdrop and bordered by impressive braided rivers and crystal clear lakes, the scenery is so magnificent it will take your breath away. Mid Canterbury is one of the great secrets of New Zealand, with an inspiring range of both energetic and relaxing activities. Join us for a journey of exploration and exhilaration.

www.midcanterburynz.com


T HE C U T

PL ANT POWER

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W HAT'S

Now that eating greens has gone mainstream, expect to see more root-to-stem dining and meat alternatives like lobster mushrooms (a bright orange fungi that’s just as pricey as its namesake). Even pasta has been given the vegan treatment, with Alibi in Woolloomooloo, Sydney, serving up cacio e pepe (usually a cheesy spaghetti dish) made using kelp noodles and a creamy cashew sauce. Now we’re living that #plantbasedlife. alibibar.com.au

ON SHROOMS

[TRENDIN G]

FOR LUNCH? —It’s actually easy being green. Plant-based and fermented foods are back with a 2019 twist. So raise your glass of kombucha and welcome the new year. Cheers!—

Are mushrooms, indeed, magic? Packed with all the good stuff that’s said to help us live longer, this humble pizza topping is making its way into our drinks. Bar Ishinohana in Tokyo mixes an original take on a classic cocktail with their Japanese Old Fashioned, using shiitake mushroom-infused whisky. ishinohana.com

You’ve heard the raves about home-brewed kombucha – now fermented ingredients are giving our favourite foods a gut-friendly twist. Afterglow by Anglow in Singapore has updated sushi, using sprouted almonds as “rice” topped with probiotic-packed kimchi that’s sure to satisfy your tastebuds – and sensitive tummy, too. afterglow.sg

W O R D S _ K A I T LY N PA L M E R-A L L E N

G U T FEELING


MADE IN NEW ZEALAND


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EXPERIEN CE

—Want to return from a holiday a different person? Try a self-improvement vacation, where you recharge by picking up a new skill. Claire Turrell learnt pewtersmithing in Kuala Lumpur and came back with more than just a story to tell— or someone who could easily spend breakfast, lunch and dinner at Tiffany & Co., I couldn’t be happier than I am right now, plunging a ladle into a pot of silver-coloured molten metal and using it to make my own treasure trove of keepsakes. I’m at The Foundry at the Royal Selangor factory in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. And I’m here to learn some of the skills that have given the folks at this 134-year-old pewter factory a royal warrant and business from luxury brands such as Formula 1 and champagne house Veuve Clicquot. You see, I’m embracing the latest travel trend – achievement holidays. Travellers are increasingly trading fly-and-flop getaways for self-improvement vacations involving anything from foraging with chefs to learning a new language or climbing mountains. In a 2017 trend report, travel researcher Skift said holiday-makers were no longer interested in “esteem” – it was about “realising one’s full potential”. So after ticking off the tourist sights in KL, I decide to realise my full potential at this workshop, which promises me the chance to experience “living Malaysian heritage” and learn

F

A RUBBER M O UL D OF A ROB OT TRINKE T

Upskill in downtime

“H OL IDAY-M AKERS ARE N O LO N GER IN TERESTED IN ‘ESTEEM’ – I T’S AB O U T ‘RE AL ISIN G O NE’S FULL P OTEN T I AL’.”

P O URING IN TO A M O UL D

all the secrets of pewtersmithing. A history lesson mixed with creating something sparkly? I’m sold. After watching too many historical TV dramas, I half expect to walk into a dark brick room filled with billowing steam but the reality is less Dickensian factory and more Tesla showroom. (There’s even a chic café onsite for me to enjoy a ciabatta sandwich and cappuccino.) Beneath the gleaming white walls, each stainless steel workbench contains a bubbling pot of pewter. Every valuable pewter shaving left over from previous smithing attempts has been carefully swept off the floor and returned to the smelting pot to be recycled into another tankard. Kitted out in an apron and thick woollen gloves, I join my pewtersmith instructor Hafiz Ezman Bin Azmi at the table, where he demonstrates


M AL AYSI A

A FREEHAND P O UR DEM O NSTR ATIO N

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< NEED TO KNOW > HANDS-ON EXPERIENCES AT ROYAL SELANGOR’S THE

how to work the 230°C liquid pewter into paperweights, key rings and jewellery. It looks quite simple. “You need the liquid to be hot so that it’s malleable and avoid the oxidised pewter that lies on the surface of the pot, otherwise the metal will start to corrode,” he explains. Plunging a ladle deep into the pot of silver-coloured liquid, he then pours the contents into a heartshaped rubber mould screwed tightly into a wooden vice. While it cools, he returns the ladle to the pot for another scoop and produces freehand designs on the table. Using a small spout on the ladle, he writes his name and creates a bracelet out of three strands of pewter wrapped around a metal cylinder. Now it’s my turn. While the professionals on the other side of

A WORKSH OP IN PRO GRESS

LEARN HOW TO BE…

> A horse whisperer in New Zealand Andrew Froggatt is New Zealand’s real horse whisperer. He will teach you the tricks you need to communicate with your fourlegged friends. Priced at $1406 for a two-day course. lead-the-way.co.nz

FOUNDRY COST ABOUT $58 FOR A ONE-HOUR WORKSHOP. ROYALSELANGOR.COM

the glass walls are busy labouring over everything from engraved plates to Star Wars lightsabers, I start with a key ring from a mould. This should be easy, right? As I pour the metal into the mould, rich, silvery liquid seeps out between the seams. I didn’t screw the two pieces of the mould together tightly enough and I’m left with a glittering puddle on the table. I try again and manage to forge a mini (albeit slightly dented) plane. Filled with encouragement, I start working the liquid freehand. And it’s not long before I’ve crafted a bangle that (I thought, at least) could sit happily in a bijou boutique. Chen Tien Yue, the great-grandson of the founder of Royal Selangor, tells me, "Our visitors enjoy expressing their creativity. Many of them throw their early works back into the casting pot and start again but what matters in the end is that they have made something themselves." At the end of the hour-long session, my slightly dented plane and handmade bracelets leave me with a real sense of achievement. It’s not often I get to create something from scratch – and they are all, in their slightly bent glory, unique.

> A wildlife photographer in Japan Join master photographer Daisuke Kondo on a seven-day tour of Hokkaido. Snap a volcano, sunsets and the famed dancing red-crowned cranes. Priced at $5542 for two people. asiaarttours.com

> A triathlete in Thailand Want to hang a medal around your neck before the end of the year? Thanyapura Health and Sports Resort’s expert athlete coaches will help you polish your running, swimming and cycling skills. Priced at $157 for a three-day program. thanyapura.com


Turn their ‘some day’ into a holiday.

Jetstar Gift Cards in stores now. • $50 or $100 Gift Cards • Available from leading retailers • Valid for 12 months

These cards can be used on jetstar.com to book flights, or flights plus accommodation/activities in one transaction. For Australian dollar gift cards, bookings can be made in Australian dollars on our Jetstar Australia site only. Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd – ABN: 33 069 720 243.


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Bellarine Peninsula, Victoria

W O R D S_ R A C H EL G R AY

—He’s won the Tour de France and the Men’s World Championship but Cadel Evans’ favourite cycling route is right outside his front door in Barwon Heads on the Bellarine Peninsula—


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ome to the Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race, as well as the former racing cyclist himself, the Bellarine Peninsula boasts a stunning coastline of sandy beaches and clifftop lookouts. Here, Cadel shares his favourite places to eat, drink and take in the sights (by bike, of course) around Barwon Heads and beyond.

H

What do you do now that you’ve retired from professional cycling? > At the moment I’m busy making sure everything is humming along for my Great Ocean Road Race but every day is different – family, health and exercise take priority.

P OIN T ADDIS LO OKO U T

Where is your favourite cycling route? > Of course, I’m a bit biased but I do love riding along the Great Ocean Road. I have a house in Barwon Heads [22 kilometres south-east of Geelong] and I like to ride to Lorne [a 67-kilometre ride south-west of Barwon Heads] and back just because it is so spectacular. It’s one of my favourite rides in the world. You don’t realise how good this country is until you live overseas – the smell of the eucalypts, the clear skies, the people are friendly and when the sun is shining, it is just beautiful. I really know what I miss when I come back home.

LORNE

“I L IKE TO RIDE TO LORNE A N D BACK JUST BECAUSE I T IS S O SPEC TAC UL AR. I T’S O NE OF M Y FAVO URI TE RIDES IN T HE W ORL D.”

Speaking of being on the road, what are three things that you never travel without? > I always travel with some eucalyptus oil because it’s useful as a disinfectant and a stain remover, plus a tub of Vegemite, just in case any other Australian asks if I have any to share. The third essential is something from my son. I have a key ring he made for me at school. Describe your ideal day in Barwon Heads? > I would wake up reasonably early for a run along the beach, then go and have a great breakfast with my partner and a ride along the Great Ocean Road alone or with friends. In the evening, a barbecue with friends and family is my favourite end to the day.

You travelled the world as a professional cyclist for 20 years. Is there one moment that stands out as your most challenging as an elite athlete? > Probably the most difficult time was in 2003 when I was strapped up to a hospital bed in Badenweiler, Germany, after crashing into a traffic island during a race going 60 kilometres per hour and I was pretty much on my own. Not having a support network over there made the situation extra hard. What were your injuries? > My shoulder was broken and I waited to get a plate put on my clavicle [collar bone]. But mostly, it was the year I was supposed to be debuting in the Tour De France. The injury was the end of that. Where are the best places along the Bellarine Peninsula for views? > If I have cyclists or visitors from overseas, I take them up to Teddy’s Lookout to see the really nice view of the road and the coastline above Lorne. Point Addis, too, because of the views over the sandy cliffs towards Torquay, Anglesea and Bells Beach.


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T H REE OF C A DEL’S FAV O U R I T E L O C AL R IDES. 24KM > 1HR 26MINS TORQUAY

THE CADEL EVANS GREAT OCEAN ROAD RACE 24-27 JANUARY CADELEVANSGREAT OCEANROADRACE.COM.AU

What are your favourite cafés and wineries in the area? > I like Otway Estate brewery (otwayestate.com.au). They serve a few nice brews that are hard to find elsewhere and as the Otways are a mountain biking mecca, any reason to stop by is a good reason. Wineries? Well, I like By Farr (byfarr.com.au) in Bannockburn – they have some of the best reds and pinot noirs in our area. And Jack Rabbit (jackrabbitvineyard.com.au) is great for lunch because it has a beautiful view over Port Phillip Bay. Another special place would have to be Bellbrae Harvest (bellbraeharvest.com.au) – it’s like an old farmhouse that has been turned into a restaurant. Where are the best cycling routes for novices? > The back roads between Barwon Heads and Torquay are great for a more sedate ride, where you can enjoy good coffee and some fabulous food along the way.

Tell us the best spots to cheer on the cyclists during the Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race. > If you have young kids, then we have a set-up along the water at Geelong with big screens, food and fun activities in Steampacket Gardens. For keen cycling fans and local residents, Challambra Crescent in Highton [Geelong], which is a short but steep climb, is often where the race is won and lost. Hitchcock Avenue in Barwon Heads and The Esplanade in Torquay are great coastal spots to cheer the peloton on. What’s a fond memory you have of life in the Bellarine Peninsula? > My best memories have been connected to this race, actually. When you are an ex-rider and you see all the kids roll up at the start of a race and they start singing the national anthem – that has been a goosebumps moment for me each year. It is also on these roads where I have prepared for the biggest wins of my career, including the 2009 Men’s World Championships in Switzerland and the 2011 Tour de France.

BELLS BEACH

1. Torquay to Bells Beach

and return (via Addiscott Road).

60KM > 4HRS 14MINS

POINT ROADKNIGHT

TEDDY’S LOOKOUT

2. Point Roadknight to Teddy’s Lookout and return. 56KM > 5HRS

LORNE

CAPE PATTON LOOKOUT

3. Lorne to Cape Patton Lookout and return.


An unforgettable evening to fight wildlife extinction. Every Friday and Saturday evening from November to March. In this new and exclusive after-hours event, adventure onto the Savannah for a guided tour, feast with friends, and enjoy an immersive performance that showcases the soul of Africa. Proceeds from Sunset Safari help Zoos Victoria support international conservation partners such as Rhino Fund Uganda.

BOOK NOW zoo.org.au/sunsetsafari


TESALATE · BEACH TOWELS

AUSTRALIA

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Blue crush —Here’s all the gear you need to go from beach to street in style—

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< SUNNY SIDE UP > 1. Gazman wave-print beach shorts, $59.95, gazman.com.au 2. Clean Up NY Yankees cap in khaki, $39.99, gluestore.com.au 3. Sheridan waterfront beach towel in blood orange, $69.95, sheridan. com.au 4. The Upside ‘Big Logo’ muscle tank, $89, theiconic.com.au 5. Staple Superior ‘Staple Plus’ shorts in sand, $39.95, theiconic.com.au 6. Le Specs unisex ‘Paradox’ sunglasses in tortoiseshell, $59.95, gluestore.com.au 7. Tommy Hilfiger pool slides, $69.95, myer.com.au 8. Wrangler ‘Garageland Dusk Palms’ shirt, $89.95, wrangler.com.au 9. Nixon ‘Time Teller P’ in matte cool gray, $99.99, nixon.com/au

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STYLING_ LARA TURNBULL

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< KEEP YOUR COOL > 1. Cotton On Body ‘Darcy Longline Bandeau’ bikini top, $34.95, cottonon.com.au 2. Ace Of Something ‘Rhea’ fedora hat, $59.95, aceofsomething.com.au 3. By Johnny ‘The Lani’ one-piece swimsuit, $170, byjohnny.com.au 4. Seed ‘Sienna’ tote, $59.95, seedheritage.com 5. Wrangler ‘Hourglass’ denim shorts in salty blue, $99.95, wrangler.com.au 6. Sol Sana ‘Teresa’ slides in white, $99, sol-sana.com.au 7. Shevoke ‘Monroe’ sunglasses in milky cream white, $99, shevoke.com 8. Minkpink ‘Limonada’ gingham dress, $89.95, davidjones.com 9. M.N.G. ‘Boston’ earrings, $29.95, theiconic.com.au


@BloomsburySyd BloomsburyPublishingAustralia


Connect with Nature®

CERTIFIED VEGAN

CERTIFIED ORGANIC

CERTIFIED VEGETARIAN

New Zealand DISCOVER YOURS AT: David Jones, Priceline, Chemist Warehouse, National Pharmacies, selected Myer and Malouf Pharmacies, Great Earth stores and Adorebeauty.com.au, independent pharmacies and health stores nationwide.


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the insider > JETSTAR NEWS, ENTERTAINMENT AND MAPS

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> Keep up to date with Jetstar news and our StarKids charity. Plus, go behind the scenes with our staff.

EN T ERTA IN MEN T

PA G E

> Let us entertain you with a huge selection of movies, TV shows, podcasts, music videos and much more.

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A IRP O RT TO CI T Y

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> Heading from the airport to the city centre? Use our guide to find out the best way to get there by bus, train or taxi.


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T HE IN SIDER

Jetstar news

STAFF Q+A. NAME SAMEER PATIL POSITION FLEET PROJECTS ANALYST, ENGINEERING

T HAO WI T H HER SO N NHAT ANH

Tell us, what does your job involve? > As an analyst, I am responsible for ensuring our aircraft are up to standard and safe to fly by conducting regular inspections to monitor the overall aircraft health and reporting that back to our engineering team.

K NOWLEDGE IS POWER StarKids donations are helping communities put an end to child malnutrition. Here, Margaret Spencer shares one mother’s story.

> High in the lush green mountains of north-east Vietnam, the

sound of a toddler’s laughter fills the air. Two-year-old Nhat Anh is excitedly chasing chickens in his family’s yard. Not long ago, his mother, Thao, wondered if she would ever see her son playing with such energy. Nhat Anh had been weak, constantly sick and showing signs of malnutrition. “My only wish back then was to see him healthy,” Thao explains. “I’m happy that he can now enjoy little things like this.” In the remote and mountainous Luc Yen district, close to half of all children under five are malnourished. A combination of factors contribute to this alarming reality, including poor hygiene and limited knowledge within the community about child health and nutrition. In addition, many families lack the financial means to provide their children with a healthy and balanced diet. With support from StarKids, World Vision is working with mothers and communities around the world to empower them with the skills and knowledge needed to turn the tide on child malnutrition. At local Vietnamese nutrition clubs, women like Thao learn from the mothers of healthy children about ways to prepare nutritious meals. There are cooking demonstrations where recipes are shared. At the same time, Thao has started growing vegetables and raising chickens, selling them to increase her income and support her young family. Now, one year after joining the nutrition club, her son Nhat Anh is full of life and at a healthy weight for his age. “When a mother is equipped with knowledge and skills to provide nutritious meals, other mothers will follow her example and the children will benefit,” says local health worker Thi Hoàng.

How long have you worked with Jetstar and how did you end up here? > I got an internship at Jetstar while studying aerospace engineering at RMIT University. I then completed a master’s degree in mechatronics engineering and took on a graduate role as an engineer at the Department of Defence. I started this position six months ago, after finishing my graduate program. It’s somewhat of a homecoming story. Can you talk us through a typical day?

> My day starts with a cappuccino

and then I go through my emails and respond to any immediate tasks. I work on various projects, which may involve planning an aircraft inspection or providing detailed reports on our fleet. At the moment, my project is to map out the time line of Jetstar milestones to prepare us for the future. What has been a career highlight?

> I successfully completed my thesis

on microwave radar technology at the Department of Defence. My paper was presented at the Australian Microwave Symposium in February 2018 and is now an official Defence technical document.


29%

#BEACHPLEASE Beach season is here. We asked our passengers about their favourite sandy spots… and here‘s what they said.

of millennials want to visit Hawaii in 2019

FAVE BEACH ACTIVITIES

86%

76%

Swimming

OF RESPONDENTS THINK AUSTRALIAN BEACHES ARE BETTER THAN OVERSEAS

60%

Eating fish and chips

51%

Reading a book

40%

Having a barbecue

WHICH STATE HAS THE BEST BEACHES?

48% QUEENSLAND

19% NEW SOUTH WALES

39% 15%

17%

Playing cricket

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

83% OF RESPONDENTS HAVE BEEN TO SYDNEY’S BONDI BEACH, MAKING IT AUSTRALIA’S MOST POPULAR BEACH

Collecting seashells

THE TOP 5

AUSSIE BEACHES

Fine print: Based on a 2018 Jetstar customer panel survey

26% 19% 19% 16% 12%

Whitehaven Beach, Qld Bondi Beach, NSW Wineglass Bay, Tas Cottesloe Beach, WA Bells Beach, Vic


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THE HEART OF CAMBODIA Jetstar cabin crew and StarKids ambassadors, Jay-Elle O’Hara and Irene Godfrey, share their photo diary from a recent trip to Cambodia, where they saw firsthand the work World Vision is doing, with the help of StarKids, to improve the lives of local children and their communities.

“These beautiful local girls performed a traditional dance for us. Their movements were so delicate, it was perfect. They were actually performing in a local family’s home, the same home where the community has all their group meetings to discuss growth and their plans for the future.” – Irene

“WE WERE LUCKY ENOUGH TO JOIN THE LOCAL CHILDREN ON THEIR FIRST DAY AT PRE-SCHOOL. THE TEACHER WAS FROM THE VILLAGE AND SHE CHOSE TO STAY AND TEACH IN HER COMMUNITY WITH THE AIM OF CREATING A BRIGHTER FUTURE FOR THE CHILDREN THERE.” — IRENE

“This village hub was a place for families to meet and learn and discuss any issues they may need help with. It was very interesting to hear how open they were about the challenges they faced and how everyone in the room was there to help, with the number one priority being to keep the family together and do what’s best for their children.” – Irene


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“I DIDN’T THINK I COULD BE SO FASCINATED BY A WATER PURIFICATION TREATMENT STATION BUT WHEN I SAW THE IMPACT IT HAS HAD ON THE COMMUNITY AND HOW PROUD EVERYONE WAS OF WHAT THEY HAVE BUILT AND ACHIEVED, IT WAS ACTUALLY HARD TO DRAG ME AWAY!” — IRENE

“It was incredibly humid as we walked along this well-worn path toward a mother’s support group. But the heat didn’t deter the local mums, who came to learn about nutrition. Things we know and take for granted back home are being taught here and this education will help the next generation grow up healthy, which is what every mother wants.” – Jay-Elle

“THROUGHOUT OUR TRIP WE SAW PEOPLE REALLY TRYING TO FIND WAYS TO IMPROVE THEIR SITUATIONS, LIKE THESE WOMEN GIVING US MANICURES. THEY USE THEIR SKILLS TO MAKE A LIVING AND SUPPORT THEIR COMMUNITY.” — JAY-ELLE

“On one hot day towards the end of our journey, we spent time with some local girls and taught them how to play naughts and crosses. The laughter and joy that a simple piece of paper and pencil brought everyone was so uplifting. It was the perfect way to end a fabulous trip.” – Jay-Elle


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In-flight Entertainment —Take off into a world of entertainment – we’ve rounded up today’s most talked-about movies and TV shows, plenty of kids’ favourites, plus hit music and podcasts to keep you occupied throughout your flight— MORE THAN 40 MOVIES AND 500 TV EPISODES AVAILABLE

ONLY $10 BLOCKBUSTER MOVIES TV COMEDY AND DRAMA KIDS’ FAVOURITES HIT MUSIC PODCASTS

> NEW RELEASE MOVIES.

Kin

In Like Flynn

Sci-fi | M An ex-con and his adopted teenage brother flee with a mysterious weapon.

Adventure | MA15+ The early life of actor Errol Flynn as he inspires a group of friends to set sail in search of gold.

©2018 MARVEL

Ant-Man and the Wasp Action | PG Scott Lang, aka Ant-Man, fights alongside the Wasp to uncover secrets of their past.

©2018 Universal City Studios Productions LLLP and Legendary Pictures Funding, LLC. All rights reserved.

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again Musical | PG Donna’s past relationships continue to affect the present.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

Crazy Rich Asians Comedy, Romance | PG A native New Yorker travels to Singapore with her boyfriend to meet his family.

RATINGS

©2018 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

Christopher Robin Family | G Winnie-the-Pooh heads off on an adventure to help his lifelong friend who’s lost his way.

Skyscraper Action | M Security expert Will Sawyer is framed for a building blaze and becomes a wanted man.

G General. PG Parental guidance recommended. M Recommended for mature audiences. MA15+ Not suitable for people under 15. Under 15s must be accompanied by a parent or adult guardian.

PRE-PURCHASE IN-FLIGHT ENTERTAINMENT WHEN YOU BOOK YOUR FLIGHTS AND SAVE!


© Disney Enterprises, Inc.

> NEW RELEASE MOVIES.

©2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Darkest Minds Sci-Fi | M A group of superhuman teens are declared a threat and held in internment camps.

> FAMILY MOVIES.

The Spy Who Dumped Me Comedy | MA15+ Best friends Audrey and Morgan become entangled in an international conspiracy.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

The Meg

Ice Age

Mulan

Animation | G A woolly mammoth, a sloth and a saber-tooth tiger try to help a lost human baby.

Animation | G A Chinese girl bravely takes her father’s place in the Imperial Army.

Ice Age 2: The Meltdown

Gnome Alone

Animation | PG When the ice starts to melt, Manny, Sid and Diego must journey to higher ground.

Animation | PG A teenage girl discovers her new home’s gnomes aren’t all that they seem.

Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs

Teen Titans Go! to the Movies

Animation | PG The trio dodge dinosaurs in a strange, new world.

Animation | PG The Teen Titans seek fame in Hollywood.

Ice Age 4: Continental Drift

Ice Age 5: Collision Course

Animation | PG A continental crack leads to a high-seas adventure.

Animation | PG The gang needs to survive the Scrat-tastrophe. © 2014 Disney

Action | M A creature attacks a deep-sea submersible and the race is on to save the trapped crew.

©2018 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Predator

Frozen

Action | MA15+ The universe’s most lethal hunters return to earth stronger and deadlier than ever.

Animation | PG Anna and Kristoff battle the elements in a race to find Anna’s sister Elsa and save the kingdom.


> HOLIDAY HITS.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

The Polar Express Family | G A mysterious train visits a young boy on Christmas Eve and takes him on a ride to the North Pole.

© 1990 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All rights reserved. ©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

Elf

Comedy | M The Griswold’s holiday plans predictably turn to disaster.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

Home Alone

Four Christmases

Family | PG Accidentally left home alone over Christmas, Kevin must defend his house from burglars.

Comedy | M A happy couple spend Christmas visiting all four homes of their divorced, dysfunctional parents.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

Comedy | G Buddy, a man raised by elves in the North Pole, goes in search of his true identity.

National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation

> FOREIGN FILMS.

> FAVOURITE MOVIES. The Grand Budapest Hotel

Birdman

Comedy | M The adventures of a legendary hotel concierge and the lobby boy who becomes his friend.

Comedy, Drama | MA15+ An actor famous for portraying a superhero struggles to mount a Broadway production.

27 Dresses

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Romance | PG Having served as a bridesmaid 27 times, a young woman begins to re-examine her own love life.

Adventure, Fantasy | M Death Eaters wreak havoc in the Muggle and Wizarding worlds.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Adventure, Fantasy | M Harry and his friends prepare to battle their greatest foe.

Adventure, Fantasy | M A young wizard arrives in New York with a suitcase of creatures.

Tomorrow is Another Day Drama | Cantonese A woman finds out her husband is having an affair and seeks revenge.

Doraemon the Movie: Nobita’s Treasure Island Animation | Japanese Doraemon, Nobita, Shizuka, Gian and Suneo set sail on a high-seas adventure in the Caribbean Sea.


EN T ER TA IN MEN T

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> TELEVISION.

©2014 Fox and its related entities. All rights reserved.

© 2016-2017 American Broadcasting Companies. All rights reserved.

American Dad (Season 13)

Speechless (Season 1)

Comedy | MA15+ Stan Smith leads the all-American family – wife, daughter, son, goldfish and escaped alien – in this animated sitcom. Everyday life is taken to the limit as Stan applies the same drastic measures used in his job at the CIA at home.

Comedy | M A comedy about a family – led by outspoken matriarch Maya DiMeo – with a special-needs child. They are good at dealing with the challenges that come up day-to-day but also excellent at creating new problems.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

iZombie (Seasons 1-4) Drama | MA15+ A medical resident turned zombie takes a job in the coroner’s office to snack on brains. But with each brain she eats, she inherits the corpse’s memories.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

Full House (Season 8) Comedy | PG Stephanie rebels, Michelle buys a donkey and Nicky and Alex don’t like Santa. Meanwhile, Joey gets an opportunity to meet the Queen of England.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

©Disney

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

Animal Kingdom (Seasons 1-3)

Stuck in the Middle (Season 2)

Frosty’s Winter Wonderland

Drama | MA15+ When 17-year-old Joshua “J” Cody moves in with his freewheeling relatives, he is pulled into their life of crime and excess.

Kids | G Middle child and teenager Harley uses a little extra ingenuity to navigate life in her large family as one of seven children.

Kids | G Our favourite snowman has lots of friends but he’d like another snow-person, so the children build him a wife named Crystal.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

Trial and Error (Seasons 1-2) Comedy | M A New York City lawyer relocates to a small South Carolina town to represent locals with the help of his oddball defense team.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes (Season 2) Lifestyle | G Architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin explore architect-designed houses in extreme locations.

©2018 Warner Bros. Ent. All Rights Reserved.

Teen Titans Go! (Season 4) Kids | PG Robin, Starfire, Cyborg, Beast Boy and Raven head off on new adventures and show us what life is really like as a teen superhero.


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EN T ER TA IN MEN T

> MUSIC VIDEOS.

Eurythmics

New Hits Various

> ALBUMS. Bloom Troye Sivan The second album from Aussie singer-songwriter Troye Sivan explores his experiences as a young gay man and includes the title track “Bloom”, “Seventeen”, “My My My!” and the “Dance To This” duet with Ariana Grande.

To A Stranger Odette UK-born, Sydney raised singer Odette grew up with an eclectic musical palette. Her Zulu mother introduced her to African music, soul and funk, while her jazz-loving English father passed on his musical talents.

> PODCASTS & RADIO.

Fitzy and Wippa

Romance of the Jukebox Human Nature The world-renowned Aussie band takes on classics by the Bee Gees, The Beatles, The Troggs, The Monkees, Otis Redding, The Everly Brothers, Aretha Franklin, Simon and Garfunkel, Van Morrison and The O’Jays.

Greatest Hits... So Far!!! Pink (Language warning) Pink’s first greatest hits compilation features all her early hit singles “Raise Your Glass”, “F***in’ Perfect”, “Don’t Let Me Get Me”, “Sober”, “So What” and more of your favourites.

The Mentor with Mark Bouris Kyle and Jackie O The Grill Team Kennedy Molloy Aussies In Hollywood Gold FM Kinderling Conversations The Property Couch We Fact Up

The freshest new clips from today’s biggest artists, featuring Tash Sultana, Troye Sivan, Ariana Grande, George Ezra, Odette, Amy Shark, Logic, Calvin Harris, Sam Smith, Sia, Diplo, Labrinth and Matt Corby.

00s + 10s Various Millennium hits for you to enjoy, featuring Mark Ronson, Daniel Merriweather, Kate Miller-Heidke, Something For Kate, Savage Garden, Justin Timberlake, Pink, Guy Sebastian, Taylor Swift and Kendrick Lamar.

90s Various You Am I, 1927, Martika, Will Smith, Sophie B Hawkins and rock royalty Aerosmith with “I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing” are some of the 90s hit music artists included in this line-up.

80s Various Featuring awesome 80s clips from John Farnham, Eurythmics, Rick Astley, Billy Joel, Midnight Oil, Band Aid as well as the hit song “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life” from the iconic 80s movie Dirty Dancing.

Will and Woody The Coach with Paul Roos Fitzy and Wippa Jase and PJ ChangeMakers The Hot Breakfast Lady Startup No Filter The Slow Home Podcast

Game on AUS The Disruptive Entrepenuer A Plate to Call Home with Gary Mehigan Meditation Minis Fifi, Fev and Byron Birth, Baby and Beyond with Midwife Cath Crappy to Happy with Tiff Hall and Cass Dunn


SYDNEY. >

TAXI ABOUT $45

>

>

AIRPORT TO CIT Y Touching down in a new city? Here's how to get to the centre of the action your way.

>

TAXI ABOUT $40

>

BUS $4.80 Bus Route 380, which takes its name from the Airbus A380 aircraft, departs T1 and T2 and is a limited stops service, terminating at Elizabeth Quay Bus Station in the city centre. For those travelling from T3 and T4, Route 40 operates daily between the airport and Elizabeth Quay Bus Station.

>

TIP... The Experience WA smartphone app gives you access to the latest information on local tourist attractions, restaurants, accommodation, transport options and more.

TRAIN $18.70 Catching a train into the city is easy and takes about 10 minutes. Grab the T8 Airport and South Line towards City Circle, which stops at Central Station.

> BUS $5.80 While it does not head into the CBD, Route 400 operates between Bondi Junction in the city’s east and Burwood in the west. You can catch the bus from outside the T1 International and T3 Domestic terminals. > TIP... Trains and buses from the airport start around 5am daily and end at midnight.

ADELAIDE.

PERTH. “THE ONE THING I CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT WHEN I’M TRAVELLING IS TEA TREE OIL. IT’S NOT THE MOST GLAMOROUS THING BUT IF YOU GET A CUT, A MOSQUITO BITE, A SMALL BREAKOUT – NO MATTER WHAT IT IS, IT’S MY LITTLE CURE-ALL.” MEGHAN MARKLE

>

MELBOURNE. (TULLAMARINE)

TAXI ABOUT $30

>

BUS $10.40 (DAYTRIP) The JetBus and doubledecker JetExpress airport to city services depart the terminal from Sir Richard Williams Avenue and stop at Currie Street in the city centre. From there, it is just a short walk to Adelaide Oval, Rundle Mall and the city’s main train station on North Terrace.

> TIP... If you are staying in the city of churches for the weekend, purchase a $25 Metrocard Visitor Pass. The ticket gives tourists unlimited travel on buses, trains and trams across three consecutive days.

TAXI ABOUT $65

>

BUS $19.50 The Skybus Melbourne City Express departs the airport every 10 minutes and stops at the busy inner city Southern Cross Station. From there, you can catch another bus, train, tram or slip into a cab at the taxi stand located directly outside on Spencer Street.

> TIP... Explore the CBD onboard the free City Circle tourist tram between 10am and 9pm from Thursday to Saturday and between 10am and 6pm from Sunday to Wednesday.

MELBOURNE. (AVALON)

> TAXI ABOUT $130 TO MELBOURNE, $50 TO GEELONG >

BUS $22 TO MELBOURNE, $18 TO GEELONG The SkyBus Avalon City Express takes about an hour to travel from Avalon Airport to Southern Cross Station in Melbourne CBD. If you are heading to Geelong, the SkyBus Avalon Geelong Express takes about 40 minutes to reach the port town.

> TIP... Download the handy Avalon Airport smartphone app for information about transport, car hire, parking and flight schedules.


T HE IN SIDER

BRISBANE.

GOLD COAST.

HOBART.

>

>

>

TAXI ABOUT $45

> TRAIN $18.50 The Airtrain is a quick and easy option for travelling from the airport into the city. Trains depart every 15 minutes during peak hour and every 30 minutes during off-peak periods. The Airtrain takes just 20 minutes to get to Central Station in the city centre. The service starts at 5am on weekdays and 6am on weekends and the last train departs at 10pm. >

TIP... Download the BNE app to help you find transport options, maps, where to dine and shop, parking information and more.

TAXI ABOUT $60

> BUS $21 The SkyBus Gold Coast Airport Shuttle operates seven days a week and is a dedicated service for visitors travelling from the airport to the Gold Coast’s most popular tourist spots. The shuttle departs from outside the airport terminal and stops at Burleigh Heads, Broadbeach, Surfers Paradise and Southport.

TAXI ABOUT $50

> “THE JOURNEY, NOT THE ARRIVAL, MATTERS.” T.S. ELIOT

BUS $19.50 The SkyBus Hobart Express service operates daily and departs regularly from the airport. The bus takes about 30 minutes to travel to the city centre, stopping at Brooke street Pier before terminating at 19 Macquarie Street, which is located behind the Grand Chancellor Hotel.

> TIP... Download the Hobart Cabs 131 008 smartphone app to order and track your taxi from the airport. For everything to see, eat, sleep, shop and play in Hobart, get The Guides by Lonely Planet app.

> TIP... Gold Coast Cabs offer special flat rate fares from the airport to accommodation located in Surfers Paradise ($65) or Broadbeach ($55).

CAIRNS.

BALLINA.

DARWIN.

>

> TAXI ABOUT $100 TO BYRON BAY

>

TAXI ABOUT $30

> BUS $6 The Airport Connect bus departs from Cairns Airport every 30 minutes from 4.30am until the last flight of the day. The bus takes passengers on a 10-minute trip to a bus depot at Sheridan Street in the city, where they can continue their journey on a Translink public bus. Alternatively, you can book a shuttle into the city for $6 one-way with Backpacker Shuttle Cairns. > TIP... It is not a joke – crocs are about! Look out for the red and yellow signs around town and stay croc aware.

“I LOVE TRAVEL. I LOVE ADVENTURE. I’M ALWAYS WANTING TO GO SOMEWHERE NEW.” KATE WINSLET

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>

BUS $7.20 The Route 640 bus from Ballina Airport takes close to an hour to make the 37-kilometre journey to the popular beachside town of Byron Bay.

> TIP... If you prefer to have your transport organised and booked in advance, check out the Ballina Byron Gateway Airport website for information about shuttle bus services. For those who want to explore and find their own way, all major car rental companies are represented at the airport.

TAXI ABOUT $30

>

BUS PRICE ON BOOKING The Darwin City Airport Shuttle Service is available seven days a week to take you from the airport to your accommodation in the city. The shuttle departs every 20 minutes during peak period and services all major flights to the airport. Online bookings must be made 24 hours in advance.

> TIP... If you are staying at the Mercure Darwin Airport Resort or Novotel Darwin Airport Hotel, a free shuttle bus service is available for transfer from the terminal to your accommodation.


BALI. >

TOKYO. “I HAVE ALWAYS HAD GREAT EXPERIENCES TRAVELLING ALONE. WHILE THERE ARE DANGERS, I HAVE FOUND THE SAME FACTORS THAT MAKE YOU VULNERABLE AS A WOMAN ALSO MAKE YOU POWERFUL.” ELIZABETH GILBERT

TAXI ABOUT $7 TO KUTA

>

BUS $2 There are a range of bus options to choose from but a popular choice is the bright green Kura-Kura tourist bus, which stops at most major locations across the island. The closest departure point to the airport is outside the Aston Kuta Hotel, which is a brisk 16-minute walk from the terminal.

(NARITA AIRPORT)

>

TAXI ABOUT $250

>

>

TRAIN $37 The Narita Express or N’EX departs every 25 to 40 minutes and takes under an hour to reach Tokyo Station. Buy your ticket at JR EAST Travel Service Centers, which are located inside each of the three airport terminals.

> BUS $11 The Keisei group’s Tokyo Shuttle takes 90 minutes to reach the city centre near Tokyo Station.

> TIP... Knowing how to say a few phrases in the local lingo can go a long way in Bali. To ask a local to help you call for a taxi, try saying, “Bisa tolong untuk telepon dan order taksi?”

OSAKA. (KANSAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT)

> TIP... Grab the free shuttle to travel between the airport’s three terminals.

TAXI ABOUT $250

> TRAIN $28 Ride the Kansai Airport Express Haruka to Tennoji Station. There you can easily catch another train to Osaka or stay on the same train and head directly to Kyoto, which takes about 75 minutes. >

BUS $19 Travel in luxury aboard the Kansai International Airport Limousine Bus, which will take you directly to Osaka or Kyoto (for $31).

> TIP... Taxis are expensive. Travel by train or bus instead.

HO CHI MINH CITY.

SINGAPORE.

FIJI.

>

>

> TAXI ABOUT $10 TO NADI

TAXI ABOUT $10

> BUS $1 The Route 109 bus departs the airport every 15 to 20 minutes between 5.30am and 1am. The bus travels to the city centre (District 1), terminating at 23/9 Park via Pham Ngu Lao backpacker district and the Ben Thanh bus station. Travel time depends on traffic, but the yellow bus generally takes about 30 minutes to reach the city. > TIP... Show the name of your hotel to the bus conductor so the driver can tell you where to get off. It is also handy to have a map available on your phone.

TAXI ABOUT $35

> TRAIN $2 The Changi Airport MRT Station (CG2) is located under Terminal 2. Take the train to Tanah Merah station and change to the East West Line heading towards City Hall. > BUS $9 The City Shuttle bus departs every 15 minutes during peak periods and every 30 minutes during off-peak. The trip to the city takes 25 minutes and stops at most major hotels. > TIP... Save your roaming budget and connect to the free Wi-Fi at Changi Airport.

> “PEOPLE DON’T TAKE TRIPS. TRIPS TAKE PEOPLE.” JOHN STEINBECK

BUS $11 Airport Shuttle Fiji operate a 24-hour shuttle service from Nadi International Airport to most major hotels and resorts in Nadi. Bookings must be made at least one day prior to arriving at the airport.

> TIP... It is an offence for taxi drivers to take passengers without having their meter running. If your driver is not using a meter, note the taxi registration number and report it to the police. The driver may have their license suspended and receive a fine.


A IRP O R T T O CI T Y

AUCKLAND. >

TAXI ABOUT $60

> BUS $16 The SkyBus departs the airport every 10 minutes and takes approximately 55 minutes to arrive in the centre of Auckland. Alternatively, Super Shuttle can take you straight to your accommodation for $23 for the first passenger and $9 for every extra passenger travelling in the same group. >

TIP... The Auckland Transport mobile app makes it easy to move around the city. Download the app to help you plan and track AT Metro buses, trains and ferry services in real time.

QUEENSTOWN. >

TAXI ABOUT $25

> BUS $5 The Orbus departs the airport every 15 minutes and takes approximately 25 minutes to reach the town centre. For $13, you can opt to share an 11-seater Super Shuttle for a convenient, tailored door-to-door journey from Queenstown Airport to your accommodation. > TIP... If your accommodation is anywhere in the centre of Queenstown, you can simply rely on foot power to get around – most things in the adventure capital are within easy walking distance.

HONG KONG. >

TAXI ABOUT $50

>

TRAIN $20 The Airport Express departs every 10 minutes and takes around 24 minutes to reach Hong Kong Station in the bustling business district.

>

BUS $6 The Cityflyer route A21 is ideal for travellers heading into the city and perfect for those who want a preview of Hong Kong from the bus window. Buses depart every 15-20 minutes from the airport.

> TIP... Download the MTR Next Train app to keep track of real-time train schedules.

Flying overseas for the holidays?

We’re screening our biggest collection of blockbuster entertainment yet.

500+ hours of inflight fun: • New blockbuster films • 200+ hours of TV shows • 80+ hours of music and more Pre-purchase and save! Visit jetstar.com for more information

Inflight entertainment is available on selected long haul international flights. It is included in business class fares and can be added for a fee to all other fare types. Check jetstar.com for more information. Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd – ABN: 33 069 720 243

123

HAWAII. (DANIEL K INOUYE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT)

> TAXI ABOUT $61 TO WAIKIKI >

BUS $4 Routes 19 and 20 depart from the second-level roadway at Honolulu Airport and stop off at downtown Honolulu, Ala Moana Shopping Centre and the hotel-dense Waikiki precinct.

> TIP... Taxi drivers are referred to as “ambassadors of aloha”. They are proud of their island and love pointing out landmarks and places of interest. Ask questions – you never know what local secrets you might learn.


WHERE WE FLY Here’s how to get around our network – have fun planning your next trip.

INTERNATIONAL. Tokyo (Narita)

Zhengzhou Shanghai (Pudong) Shantou Guangzhou Chiang Mai

Dong Hoi

Phuket Penang Medan

Nagoya (Chubu)

Okinawa Taipei

Hong Kong Haikou Sanya

Hanoi

Da Nang Siem Reap Bangkok Phnom Penh

Yangon

Osaka (Kansai)

Hawaii (Honolulu)

Clark

Manila

Ho Chi Minh City Kuala Lumpur

Singapore Jakarta Surabaya

Bali (Denpasar) Darwin Fiji (Nadi)

Cairns

Cook Islands (Rarotonga)

Brisbane

Gold Coast

Perth

Sydney Adelaide

Operated by Jetstar Airways Operated by Jetstar Asia Operated by Jetstar Pacific Operated by Jetstar Japan

Auckland

Melbourne (Tullamarine)

Wellington Christchurch Queenstown


T HE IN SIDER

DOMESTIC VIETNAM.

125

DOMESTIC JAPAN.

Hanoi Sapporo

Hai Phong Thanh Hoa Vinh Dong Hoi Nagoya (Chubu)

Hue

Matsuyama Osaka Fukuoka Takamatsu Nagasaki Oita Kochi Kumamoto Miyazaki Kagoshima

Da Nang Chu Lai Quy Nhon

Pleiku

Tokyo (Narita) (Kansai)

Tuy Hoa Buon Ma Thuot Okinawa

Nha Trang Da Lat

Miyako (Shimojishima)

Flights are operated by Jetstar Japan and commence 30 March (Tokyo-Miyako), subject to regulatory approval

Ho Chi Minh City

Phu Quoc

Operated by Jetstar Pacific

Operated by Jetstar Japan

AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND.

Auckland New Plymouth

Darwin

Nelson Cairns Townsville Hamilton Island Whitsunday Coast Mackay

Queenstown

Sunshine Coast

Ayers Rock (Uluru)

Brisbane

Operated by Jetstar Airways Operated by Eastern Australia Airlines for Jetstar Airways

Gold Coast Newcastle

Sydney

Adelaide

Melbourne (Tullamarine)

Auckland

Melbourne (Avalon) Wellington

Launceston Hobart

Operated by Jetstar Airways

Christchurch Queenstown

Palmerston North Wellington

Christchurch Dunedin

Ballina Byron Perth

Napier


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PICTURE A

PICTURE B

QUIZ 1 Henley, Loftus and Mays Hill are suburbs in which Australian city? 2 The leatherback sea turtle is the world’s largest turtle and can weigh up to how many kilograms? 3 Which Australian state shares borders with four other mainland states and one territory? 4 Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (pictured far right), was born in which country?

PICTURE C

5 What’s the common name for Anigozanthos manglesii – the floral emblem of Western Australia? 6 The 2019 Rugby World Cup will be hosted in which country for the first time? 7 John Hamblin, Benita Collings and Noni Hazlehurst were presenters on which children’s television program during the 1980s and 1990s? 8 What part of an elephant never stops growing?

CROSSWORD AND PUZZLES COMPILED BY LOVATTS

CROSSWORD Across 1 Entranceway (6) 4 Little angel (6) 9 Surname of Picture A (5) 10 Journalist and TV presenter who is the younger sister of Nicole, ... Kidman (7) 11 Exclusive control (8) 12 First name of Picture B (4) 14 Water birds (5) 16 Drawback (5) 18 Audacious (4) 19 Fast approaching (8) 22 The Castle actor, ... Curry (7) 23 Dislodge (5) 24 Australian stand-up comedian and actress, ... Scott (6) 25 Choose (6) Down 1 Embarrassed (7) 2 Pioneering female MP who features on the Australian $50 note, Edith … (5) 3 Most precipitous (8) 5 Homburgs and pillboxes (4) 6 Coil of hair (7) 7 Surname of Picture C (5) 8 Director of Moulin Rouge! (3,8) 13 Write untidily (8) 15 Australian historical novelist, ... McCullough (7) 17 Most fiery (7) 18 Stationed (5) 20 Aboriginal land rights champion, ... Mabo (5) 21 Consequently (4)

9 “All the world’s a stage” is a phrase that begins which Shakespeare play? 10 In 2013, the first season of The Bachelor Australia premiered. Who was the bachelor? 11 The cerebral cortex (outer surface of the brain) can be divided into four sections known as lobes. What are the four lobes? 12 What is the name of the Swedish pop group who won the Eurovision Song Contest in 1974?


T HE IN SIDER

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13 True or false: Australia has a national quidditch team called the Dropbears. 14 On 17 December 1967, then-Prime Minister Harold Holt famously disappeared from which Australian beach? 15 Which island and external Australian territory did The Thorn Birds author Colleen McCullough call home? 16 What two colours feature on Indonesiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flag?

R O

Create words of 4 letters or more using the given letters once only, but always including the middle letter. Do not use proper names or plurals ending with S. See if you can find the 9-letter word using up all letters.

12 good

18 very good

24+ excellent

17 What is the name of the Russian chemist known for creating the periodic table of elements? 18 The informal competition among birdwatchers who try to identify as many bird species as possible in a single year is called what? 19 New Zealanders Jim, Jenny, Helen and John have all been what? 20 The crest of the Newcastle United Jets Football Club depicts three F/A-18 Hornets in a nod to the RAAF base located where? SOLUTIONS ON PAGE 132


Find the solutions on page 132.

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What happens if you eat yeast and shoe polish?

S

4

Every morning you’ll rise and shine! You can’t tuna fish.

7

The lettuce was ahead and the tomato was trying to ketchup.

6

What gets wetter the more it dries?

Because it was framed. Why are frogs so happy?

SO URCE: JOKES4US.C O M

You’re looking sharp! Why did the picture go to jail?

9

9 5

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3 2

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A towel. What did one pencil say to another pencil?

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Did you hear about the race between the lettuce and the tomato?

BL ACKBERRY C HERRY G R APEFR UI T G R APES H O NE Y DE W M A N DAR IN NEC TAR INE ORANGE R ASPBERRY R O CK MELO N ST R AWBERRY TA N G ELO WAT ER MELO N

2 6

What’s the difference between a guitar and a fish?

T

There are 13 fruits hidden in the grid. Search up, down, forwards, backwards and diagonally for the words. Can you find them all?

4 2

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They eat whatever bugs them.


P U ZZLES

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Can you spot the EIGHT DIFFERENCES between these two images? Circle what’s changed on the image below.

1 MOVIES Test your knowledge with these super fun, totally awesome trivia questions.

1 What is the name of the fifth Ice Age movie? 2 Which Disney character has a dragon sidekick named Mushu? 3 Which character sings the song, “I Just Can’t Wait to be King”?

2 HUMAN BODY 1 Which organ in the human body pumps blood? 2 What is the name of the bones around your chest that protect organs such as the heart and lungs? 3 Which blood cells in the body help to fight infection?

3 INSECTS 1 How many pairs of eyes do caterpillars have? 2 True or false: all insects have nine legs? 3 Are spiders insects? 4 True or false: bees are found on every continent except Antarctica?


the cake! scene takes This baking U can fi nd then See IF YO il), wen da, FIND ME and n see is his ta ca u yo l al u woo f (but . Also, ca n yo d an d od law ar be te hi w woo f’s wizard spot my ke y, ca m era, ’s da en bone, w beard’s wizard white od law ’s scro ll, an d bi nocu la rs? Handford, 1987–2019 Martin erved. Where’s Wally? © Ltd. All rights res ks Boo r lke Wa published by

More things to find...

An apple serving pie

A bear

A giant wooden spoon

A horse

A flower

A fan


P U ZZLES

A mug

A pair of scissors

A baker painting

A steamboat

A giant whisk

A clown

Two sled dogs

A clock

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132

P U ZZLES

SOLUTIONS CROSSWORD

C C E S S O T A W K E A E O N O P O E U C K S O T O L D I L T T E P H E U E E N I S E

A S H A M E D B A S E D

B A Z L U H R M A N N

C H A N T S Y S C R M I B B L S E

E R I O N G E L E A T N E D U D I L E

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WHEEL WORDS Anti, Dart, Dirt, Into, Iota, Rant, Riot, Rota, Taro, Tart, Tint, Toad, Torn, Tort, Trio, Trod, Trot, Ditto, Idiot, Intro, Ratio, Taint, Tarot, Titan, Train, Trait, Triad, Adroit, Ration. 9-letter word: TRADITION

QUIZ 11 Frontal, parietal, temporal

Sydney About 900 kilograms

and occipital

12 ABBA 13 True 14 Cheviot Beach, Victoria 15 Norfolk Island 16 Red and white 17 Dmitri Mendeleev 18 Big Year 19 Prime Ministers 20 Williamtown

South Australia Greece The Red and Green Kangaroo Paw

6 Japan 7 Play School 8 The tusks 9 As You Like It 10 Tim Robards

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SUDOKU 3

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7 The colour of Mulan’s father’s hair tie. 8 The hair across Mulan’s forehead is missing.

Movies

Human Body

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1 Collision

1 Heart

1 Six pairs

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2 Ribs

2 False, they have six legs

2 Mulan

3 White

3 No, they’re arachnids

3 Simba

blood cells

4 True


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A L AUNCESTON AIRPORT PROMOTION

SPECI AL FE AT U RE

ADVENTURE ALL AREAS

LAUNCESTON Your next holiday of a lifetime is in Northern Tasmania


— Hike, swim, bike, drive, eat, relax and repeat. Let a holiday in

Launceston and Northern Tasmania take you wherever you want—

ADVENTURE ALL AREAS CONTENTS C R A D L E M O U N TA I N 0 2 ADVENTURE 04 EAST COAST DRIVE 06 TA M A R VA L L E Y W I N E R O U T E 0 8 FOOD + DRINK 10 THE ROAD TO BARNBOUGLE 12 EVENTS 14


CRADLE M O U N TA I N [ 140KM FROM LAUNCESTON ]

—A stunning hike that pays homage to Tasmania’s majestic Cradle Mountain is worth every challenging step along the way—

Peak performance > On the boardwalk, I stop and wait for the traffic to pass. Two wombats amble down the track towards me, as unhurried as time itself. Just centimetres from my feet, they turn away, bustling on through the buttongrass clumps at the track’s edge. I walk on but it’s as though the wombats have triggered a change in the day, for at this moment, the most familiar shape in Tasmania finally appears. Dawn mist lifts from the land, rising like a stage curtain to reveal the bowed summit of Cradle Mountain. From where I stand, the mountain’s cliffs look as puzzling as the Rubik’s cube. Rising sheer and severe from above Dove Lake, they look impossible to anyone but rock climbers, yet for hikers like me, there is a way to reach the top of Tasmania’s most famous mountain. This 1545-metre tall mountain is the centrepiece of the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park in Tasmania’s north-west. It doesn’t yield easily – but it can be climbed


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ROCKY ROAD At the start, it’s classic Tasmanian terrain – clusters of pandani, the world’s largest heath plant, erupting like fireworks from a yellow sea of buttongrass. But quickly, the trail begins to climb, rising through rainforest and past Crater Falls to reach the shores of Crater Lake. Things get exciting beyond the lake, with a steep, chain-assisted climb rising to Marions Lookout, poised atop a bare ridge, looking onto Dove Lake and directly across to the cliffs of Cradle Mountain. For walkers on the Overland Track, Marions Lookout is the highest point and the toughest climb of the week, but it’s neither of those things on the shorter – but trickier – hike to Cradle Mountain.

1545 HEIG H T OF CR ADLE M O U N TAIN IN METRES

I continue walking towards the peak, cutting across one of Tasmania’s most exposed mountain plateaus. When the westerly cold fronts blow through from the Southern Ocean, even in the middle of summer, wind, sleet and snow can chip painfully at your face – there are days you can barely stand up here. But the cloud has now cleared and the landscape is as still as a painting. Cradle Mountain looks almost etched against the perfect sky. At the base stands Kitchen Hut, a basic day shelter that seems well named, as hikers huddle over stoves, brewing up soup, tea and coffee – fuel for the walk ahead. It’s here that the climb turns upwards and enters a world of rock and rubble. The slopes below Cradle’s cliffs are littered with boulders, seemingly discarded as excess by the mountain. The idea of a trail through the cliffs almost seems like a practical joke, but I soldier on, hopping from boulder to boulder, stretching my legs at times like rubber bands. VIEW FROM THE TOP Despite appearances, the way through the cliffs suddenly becomes straightforward, if not simple, as the trail funnels into a gully, rising up steep, rocky slopes that require the use of hands as much as feet. The gymnastics end along the mountain’s summit ridge, where rock towers rise like quills. In a few minutes, I’m standing atop the fifthhighest mountain in Tasmania, staring out over almost half of the island state. The familiar view of Cradle Mountain from across Dove Lake might be one of Tasmania’s most famous images but the view from its summit is even better. Here, the landscape stretches away like an eternity of mountains. Barn Bluff rises immediately beside me like a fin and Mount Ossa, Tasmania’s highest peak at 1617 metres, sits nearby amid a clutch of curiously shaped peaks. There are few mountain views in Australia to equal this and few more exciting climbs. It’s a place I’ve stood at more than half-a-dozen times, as though it’s my second mountain home, always pausing to savour the wild wonder of the view and delaying the descent, which is as challenging as the climb. But finally, the inner call comes to leave – a voice filled with anticipation about that first beer and meal back in Cradle Valley after eight hours in the presence of this mighty mountain.

WORDS_ ANDREW BAIN

in a day. The hike, which requires a national parks pass (parks.tas.gov.au), begins from the same place as the weeklong Overland Track walk, sharing the track until the base of the mountain. I’ve set out from Ronny Creek just before the shores of Dove Lake, located only a two-hour drive from Launceston.

03


M U S T D O ...

Adventure —Whether it’s mountain biking on hidden tracks, kayaking over a shipwreck or zipping down a 110-metre slide, the top end of Tassie has some of the state’s best outdoor experiences—

BLUE DERBY

WORDS_ ANDREW BAIN

ALUM CLIFFS > The town of Mole Creek, 75 kilometres west of Launceston, is best known for its limestone caves. But at the edge of town is a 1.6-kilometre walking track to the spectacular Alum Cliffs ‒ listed as one of Tasmania’s 60 Great Short Walks. The track crosses a lightly forested ridge and ends at a two-tiered wooden platform staring straight down into a gorge carved by the Mersey River, 200 metres below and across to the sharp-toothed Alum Cliffs. parks.tas.gov.au

TARKINE FOREST ADVENTURES > Blanketing Tasmania’s north-west corner is the mighty Tarkine, the world’s second-largest tract of temperate rainforest. At its northern edge, 32 kilometres from Smithton, you can hurtle down a 110-metre-long slide into the green depths of the southern hemisphere’s largest sinkhole. The slide begins in the forest canopy and ends 55 kilometres per hour later at the start of more than a kilometre of boardwalk trails across the rainforest floor. dismalswamptasmania.com.au


LAUNCESTON

W UK AL IN A WALK

MOUNTAIN BIKING AT BLUE DERBY > Less than five years ago, the town of Derby, 95 kilometres north-east of Launceston, was a forlorn and forgotten mining centre. Today, it has transformed into one of the world’s best mountain biking destinations. Of its many bike tracks, the Blue Derby trail network is an ever-evolving web of rides that flow as smoothly as streams, providing glorious descents through deep rainforest. Launched in 2015, the network has grown to more than 100 kilometres in length, with the latest addition being an easy two-kilometre track around a previously hidden lake at the town’s edge. Trailhead shuttles and bike hire are available in Derby from Vertigo MTB and MadMtb. ridebluederby.com.au

CATARACT GORGE > One of Launceston’s most striking natural features is Cataract Gorge, a deep incision in the hills right at the city centre’s edge. Running through the gorge is a walking trail that threads along the banks to the former Duck Reach hydroelectric power station. From here, you can climb through Trevallyn Nature Recreation Area to Trevallyn Dam, one of Launceston’s favourite water playgrounds. The return walk takes around five hours, depending on how much time you spend at the many attractions. Back at the gorge’s mouth, you can turn up the adrenaline factor by climbing the cliffs or leaping off them at Penny Royal Adventures. launcestoncataractgorge.com.au; pennyroyallaunceston.com.au

KAYAKING ON THE PIEMAN RIVER > Dawn on the Pieman River is a special time, with the dark, rainforest-edged waters typically as calm and reflective as meditation. Hiring a kayak from Corinna, a former gold-mining town turned tourist centre, you can paddle downstream across your own reflection to the quixotic Lovers Falls, where the giant ferns seem almost as tall as the waterfall itself. As you paddle back, turn up a few metres into the more ominously named Savage River to drift over Australia’s most inland shipwreck, the steamship Croydon, sunk here in 1919 with a load of Huon pine logs on board. The bow of the ship still pokes above the river surface. corinna.com.au

CATAR AC T G ORGE

WUKALINA WALK > Tasmania’s palawa (Aboriginal) culture lives on in this four-day guided walk along the vibrant Bay of Fires coastline. The first tourism venture from the palawa community begins by climbing low Mount William (known as wukalina) near Tasmania’s north-east tip and then threads along the white beaches and lichen-smothered granite headlands. Nights are spent in an awardwinning, architect-designed camp and cottages on Eddystone Point, while the rich history and palawa culture ‒ middens, bush tucker, creation stories ‒ are unveiled along the journey. wukalinawalk.com.au

05


< ROAD TRIP >

EAST COAST DRIVE You can’t miss these vivid orange-dusted boulders. Painted this unusual hue by lichens (an algae-fungus hybrid), these granite rocks punctuating the beaches that fringe the turquoise waters of the Bay of Fires (pictured) are a dramatic sight. Set less than three hours’ drive north-east of Launceston, this picturesque shoreline is the perfect spot to stop for a swim in a secluded cove and picnic on a secret beach. You can take the scenic route south from here through Freycinet National Park, towards the crescent-shaped Wineglass Bay – counted among the world’s best beaches – to discover pink granite headlands, beautiful bays and charming coastal towns.


LAUNCESTON

07

B AY O F F I R E S

LAUNCESTON

FREYCINET W I N E G L A S S B AY


TA M A R VALL E Y WINE ROUTE [ APPROXIMATELY 170KM LONG ]

— On a two-day escape, Jo McKay finds the Tamar Valley has plenty to tempt the palate ‒ all within easy reach—

You had me at merlot > It’s a crisp Saturday morning in Tassie. While it’s around the time I’m usually ordering my second flat white, someone is refilling my wine glass instead. Between you and me, it’s already been re-filled four times. This is less shocking than it seems: I’m at the beginning of a wine-tasting weekend in the Tamar Valley and, trust me, the refilling has been in respectably small measures. This pocket of northern Tasmania is home to some of Australia’s best wine. The cool climate delivers modern chardonnay, elegant pinot gris, snappy riesling, arguably Australia’s best sparkling, and for red-lovers, earthy pinot noir. But for me, what makes this 50-kilometre route such a sensational proposition is its proximity to Launceston. Less than half an hour ago, I was in the heart of town, finishing a tasty bacon butty (complete with HP sauce and havarti) from Bryher Cafe (bryherfood. com). It took less than 15 minutes to get to the Josef Chromy cellar door (josefchromy.com.au),


LAUNCESTON

where I’m now propping up the tasting bench, sipping chardonnay. Even the furthest away Tamar vineyards are no more than 50 or so kilometres from Launceston’s CBD. This makes it easy to tour the region in just a couple of days, which is exactly what I’m planning to do. At Josef Chromy, there’s a huge line-up on offer. “When it comes to what you can buy and taste, we’ve got a cast of thousands,” jokes David Milne, the brand’s sales and marketing manager. There are three labels to try: Pepik, which David describes as “the Monday to Friday” label, Zdar, the high-end range, and Josef Chromy, “the more complex, dinner-party wines”. It was the 2011 vintage chardonnay from this eponymous range that won the Regional Chardonnay Trophy at the Decanter World Wine Awards and the Tasmanian Chardonnay Trophy at the 2013 International Wine Challenge – wins that put both Josef Chromy and the Tamar Valley on the map. Today, the region boasts over 30 wineries, spread along 170 kilometres of road. It’s aligned somewhat like an upside-down triangle, with Relbia (where Josef Chromy is located) at the base point and two separate arms reaching northwards up the western and eastern sides. I’ve decided to tackle the north-west strip today, stopping at sleek Tamar Ridge (tamarridge. com.au), Stoney Rise (stoneyrise.com) with its awesome pinot noirs, and Wines for Joanie (winesforjoanie.com.au) where tastings are conducted in a rustic-chic barn. I pause a little longer at Goaty Hill (goatyhill.com) because the generous tasting platters are too good to pass up for lunch. Then I hit Holm Oak (holmoakvineyards.com.au), a light-filled cellar door with stunning views and an

adorable resident pig appropriately named Pinot. My final stop is at Grey Sands (greysands.com.au), a little off the beaten track. It’s open once a month for tastings or by appointment, which I highly recommend. Sampling the tight range of five wines while sitting in the verdant garden is an unexpected highlight of the wine trail. It’s said that the Tamar’s sparkling wines are second only to those of Champagne itself – so on Sunday, it seems sensible to head to Australia’s foremost sparkling-only cellar door. Jansz (jansz.com.au) is on the eastern side of the Tamar, about 45 minutes from Launceston. At the rammed-earth cellar door, there are five bubblies for tasting – all exceptional. Nearby, I also check out Sinapius (sinapius.com.au), set on a hilltop with lovely views (plus another smashing chardonnay), and Delamere Vineyards’ (delamerevineyards.com.au) selection of estate-grown fizz. All too soon, the end of the weekend is here and even though there’s more to see, it’s time to head back to the city. I tally up my cellar door score: 10 wineries in two days – a solid strike rate. And in a region where touring is such a breeze, I’ve no doubt I’ll be back for another round very soon.

09


BL ACK C O W BIS TR O

T A S T E I T...

Food + drink — Launceston is the gateway to some of Tassie’s finest gastronomic delights. Sip on award-winning wines, feast on fresh, local produce grown on the city’s doorstep and work your way through the best on offer, one meal at a time—

FREYCINET MARINE FARM C OLES B AY > Slurping oysters fresh from the ocean is one of north-east Tassie’s most awesome foodie experiences. On Oyster Bay Tours’ twice-daily expeditions around Freycinet Marine Farm, you wriggle into waders before striding through the shallows to see oysters at home in the estuary. Head back to dry land to learn how to shuck them and enjoy half-a-dozen with a glass of local wine and freshly steamed mussels, also grown by Freycinet Marine Farm. Tours leave and return from the Freycinet Marine Farm Shop, so you can feast on oysters, mussels, scallops, abalone, hot-smoked salmon, rock lobster and more ‒ before and after the experience. oysterbaytours.com; freycinetmarinefarm.com

DEVIL’S C ORNER

BLACK COW BISTRO L A U N CES T O N > Launceston or “Lonnie”, as the locals call it, offers up sumptuous fare. Buzzy eatery Black Cow Bistro, set on a prime corner in a former butchery in Lonnie’s centre, serves some of the country’s best beef. Top menu picks include the Robbins Island Wagyu Rump, which is perfect for sharing and the Cape Grim Rib Eye ‒ just try to resist gnawing on that bone! There’s an upscale-yet-unpretentious vibe and the wine list is a corker, too. blackcowbistro.com.au


LAUNCESTON

011

DEVIL’S CORNER CELLAR DOOR

230 VINEYARDS IN TASMANIA

430 DAIRY FARMS ACROSS T HE STATE

AP SL A W N > If sitting on a sun-drenched deck, drinking vino and snacking on seafood share plates and wood-fired pizzas sounds like a good time, put Devil’s Corner cellar door on your list. Located on the Tasman Highway, this impressive cellar door is hard to miss, thanks to a towering 12-metre-tall lookout with sensational views of the Moulting Lagoon and the Freycinet Peninsula. A word to the wise: climb the stairs to the top before any wine tasting. Afterwards, kick back on the deck as you sample up to 10 wines (Resolution pinot noir is a hit) and feast on mussels, oysters and pizza. devilscorner.com.au

PYENGANA DAIRY FARM GATE CAFÉ

PYEN GA N A DAIRY

TASTE.WALK.TALK TOUR L A U N CES T O N > The best way to uncover Lonnie’s gourmet hotspots is with a local. Brock Kerslake, who has called this town home since he was 12, launched his taste.walk.talk tours in 2016 – and they’ve become one of the best experiences in Launceston. Excursions range between two and four hours and Brock, a former school teacher, combines interesting snippets about the city’s past with visits to local foodie gems, including cafés, bars, cider makers, beer brewers, delis, providores and more. tastewalktalk.com

PYEN G A N A > Cheese devotees should hotfoot it to the picturesque Farm Gate Café at the awardwinning Pyengana Dairy. Wander down to the robotic dairy to see cows being milked then head to the café and peer through the floor’s glass pyramid into the cheese cave below before settling in for a meal – the grassy meadow outside has picnic tables with views of the valley and the farm’s lush paddocks. Cheese tastings are available, with more than 15 varieties on offer. If you try just one, make sure it’s the Vintage Cloth Bound Cheddar ‒ it’s the cheese that put Pyengana on the map. thetasmanianfoodco.com.au FREYCINE T M ARINE FARM

L A U N CES T O N > Steeped in history, the James Boag Brewery is the longest single operating brewery site in Australia, churning out amber nectars since 1881. A brewery tour offers a brilliant behindthe-scenes look into the history and beer-making process. You’ll don safety glasses, a high-vis vest and earplugs for the 90-minute experience, which takes in the brewhouse, fermentation processes, maturation, lagering tanks and the bottling room. You’ll find out about Tassie-grown barley and hops – and might even get to try hops in its dried, pre-beer form. Save yourself for the best of the tour at the end – a tasting of three beers, paired with local cheeses. jamesboag.com.au

W O R D S_ J O M C K AY

JAMES BOAG BREWERY TOUR


< ROAD TRIP >

T H E PAT H T O B A R N B O U G L E The extra wide fairways, steep bunkers and windswept ocean vistas of Barnbougle’s two golf courses may be less than 20 years old but they already have the attention of international golf addicts. Snaking its way along the dramatic north-east coast of Tasmania, its courses – The Dunes and Lost Farm – are ranked among the top 10 in Australia and The Dunes (with its killer eighth hole) sits at number 33 in the world. Wind your way through tempting wineries, an hour north of Launceston up the Tamar Highway, to play 18 holes and stay for local oysters washed down with a Little Rivers Tassie craft beer in the clubhouse or a visit to Barnbougle Spa (barnbougle.com.au).


LAUNCESTON

BARNBOUGLE

LAUNCESTON

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D O N ’ T M I S S ...

Events

— Mark these dates on your calendar because this year is jam-packed. Mofo heads to Lonnie, Lily Allen takes to the stage and penny farthings hit the streets in a year of events not to be missed—

MONA FOMA 13-20 JA N UARY 2019 > Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) founder David Walsh played a hand in reinvigorating Tassie’s economy when he opened his elaborate, boundary-pushing private art museum and its solstice festivals on the northern edge of Hobart. After a decade of unique performances and art installations in the southern city, MONA Foma, the museum’s eccentric summer festival, is moving north to Launceston. In 2018, the event bravely dipped its toe in Launceston’s Tamar and Esk rivers with a weekend of performances. This year, the festival is getting right in the water, making northern Tasmania its new, permanent home.

M O N A FO M A

The 2019 line-up features local Tasmanian musician Courtney Barnett, who’s been dubbed the antipodean answer to Bob Dylan. There are also eclectic artists such as Swedish performer Neneh Cherry, who mixes soulful R & B with electronic pop music, as well as Ethiopian jazz legend Mulatu Astatke, who will perform with an eight-piece Ethio funk band. Watch out for the Soma (Sound or Music Architecture), a mobile recording studio that was designed and built by the University of Tasmania School of Architecture. It will be roaming the streets, filling the city’s urban landscape with sound. Although it’s unlikely there will be free spotty pink onesies at the early morning block party (that happened last year), be on the lookout for other fun surprises. MONA has long been blazing a trail with bold and sometimes uncomfortable but always sensational performances and installations. In the words of festival curator and Violent Femmes bassist Brian Ritchie, the event is epitomised by “kick-ass musical anarchy and artistic abandon”. Launceston, being pretty “kick-ass” itself, makes the perfect place for the festival to spend its next 10 years. mofo.net.au


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QUEEN VICTORIA MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY > It’s remarkable that a town of 100,000 people could have one of Australia’s largest art galleries but such is the case with Launceston’s Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, which has collections that illuminate Tasmania’s colonial and natural history. Between interactive exhibitions and travelling shows, make sure to observe Chinese religious practices in Tasmania during the late 1800s at the Guan Di Temple and see the fascinating, now extinct, Tasmanian Tiger. qvmag.tas.ov.au

N ATIO N AL PEN N Y FART HIN G C H A MPIO NSHIPS

TEN DAYS ON THE ISLAND 8-11 / 15-17 M AR C H 2019 > This delightful cultural event only happens every other year and 2019 promises to be epic. If you see nothing else, make sure to check out Australia’s physical theatre company Gravity and Other Myths. The company combines dance, acrobatics and even invites the audience to throw things at them during impossible balancing acts. The show is exclusive to Burnie, 140 kilometres west of Launceston, and with local and international music, it’s not to be missed. tendays.org.au

PART Y IN THE PADDOCK 7-9 FEBR UARY 2019 > It’s an event that’s come a long way since its local-acts-only beginnings. This year sees international headliner Lily Allen plus Australian acts like The Presets and The Jungle Giants. partyinthepaddockfestival.com.au

BIG BASH LEAGUE CRICKET 31 JA N UARY 2019 > This year the Hobart Hurricanes will take on the Adelaide Strikers in Launceston. Conveniently falling the day before Festivale, it’s the perfect excuse for a four-day weekend. bigbash.com.au

FARMGATE FESTIVAL 23-24 N O VEM BER 2019 > There is nowhere that epitomises farm-to-plate dining like the Farmgate Festival. Tour apple orchards and pig farms, collect freshly-laid eggs and sample honey straight from the hive. farmgatefestival.net.au

EVANDALE NATIONAL PENNY FARTHING CHAMPIONSHIPS 23 FEBR U A RY 2019 > You don’t often see a peloton of cyclists riding one-and-a-half metres off the ground but that’s exactly what happens at Evandale’s penny farthing championships. evandalevillagefair.com

LAUNCESTON NIGHT MARKET 8 FEBR U A RY / 8 M A R C H 2019 > While Festivale is massive, the Launceston Night Market is a gathering that shouldn’t be overlooked. Pop-up food trucks abound, offering a cornucopia of delicious local fare and there’s plenty of live entertainment. launcestonnightmarket.com

WORDS_ PIL AR MITCHELL

1-3 FEBR UARY 2019 > Tens of thousands of people flock to this three-day festival of food, wine and music at Launceston’s idyllic City Park. This is one of the few times when Tasmania’s premium producers of food, beer and wine all come together in one place. Enjoy with a group to take advantage of the many tasting plates (that way you can have a bit of everything!) and kick back on the grass with a cider to take in a comedy show or musical performance. festivale.com.au

L ILY ALLEN

FESTIVALE

Profile for Jetstar Magazine

Jetstar Australia Magazine — JAN 2019  

Jetstar Australia Magazine — JAN 2019