Jesuit Chronicle 2019 November Issue vol. LXIII

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The Jesuit Chronicle

NOVEMBER 2019, EDITION LXIlI

LIVE NEWS UPDATES @ www.jesuitnews.com

Bell schedule altered for upcoming year BY SHAWNA MUCKLE, ’20

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eginning in the 2020-21 school year, Jesuit will adopt a new bell schedule that contains a few notable changes. The most major update to the schedule will implement two “flex” periods, longer breaks where students may meet with teachers, work on homework, or meet with friends, on Tuesdays and Thursdays. To accommodate Tuesday’s flex period, school will begin at 8:45 a.m. on Tuesdays, as opposed to 9:25. Occupying those additional 40 minutes on Tuesdays will be a 40-minute flex period in the middle of the day. Thursdays will also have an embedded 40-minute midday flex period. School will still begin at 7:45 a.m., but each class will last only 50 minutes to accommodate the flex period, which will occur after 2nd period in lieu of break. Many elements of the bell schedule will remain the same. School will start and end at the same time on Monday and Wednesday-Friday. Passing periods will still be five minutes, and each class will still meet 4 times per week. The rotation of 7th period and the placement of Friday Mass also remain untouched. While the changes to the bell schedule are relatively modest, a faculty-based bell schedule committee who designed and finalized the new schedule hopes that flex periods will offer students a much needed chance to rest or organize themselves twice a week. The committee relied on research, insights from other Jesuit and Oregonian high schools, and faculty and student input to make its final decision. A committee is still determining exactly what the flex periods will involve, but it’s anticipated that students will have a faculty advisor and a homeroom to check in to before dispersing. Students may use the period to work on homework or schedule longer meetings with a teacher during the school day. Assemblies can be programmed into a flex period if they are shorter or only pertain to one

NEWS II

grade level. Flex periods provide a natural window for assemblies and virtually eliminate the need for assembly schedules 1, 3, and 4, according to the bell schedule committee report. At the core of the administration’s and faculty’s rationale for flex periods is student wellness. The bell schedule committee’s report cited a fishbowl discussion with 10 students in which many of them reaffirmed the importance of break for relaxing and spending time with friends or for organizing themselves before their next class period. Twice-weekly flex periods extend the downtime break offers, giving students the opportunity to address their mental health, visit their counselors, and manage their stress levels. “At least one day a week we really do want there to be downtime or free time,” Principal Mr. Hogan said. “Part of what we really want to develop is students’ ability to manage their free time efficiently because you’re going to have a lot of it in college and you don’t have a lot of it right now.” Jesuit’s faculty and administration have been deliberating if and how to alter Jesuit’s bell schedule for over two years. The process began with a faculty committee who determined whether the schedule should change at all. “Jesuit’s unusual in that we have not significantly changed our bell schedule for 30 years,” Mr. Hogan said. “Most schools evaluate and shift their schedule every 5-10 years. We felt like our schedule works pretty well, and there are a few things in there that are important to us. The reason we really entered into the process is that we could see for a variety of reasons that students and staff felt our schedule is a bit frenetic, especially as we continue to add programs and courses.” After the initial faculty committee decided Jesuit should change the bell schedule, another faculty committee, chaired by Vice Principal of Academics and Student Life Ms. Hagelgans and English Department Chair Mr. Falkner, compiled information to

BEE COMPANY: Read about senior Jonas Larson’s beekeeping and honey business. Also on this page check out the new environmental science gardens! pg. 3

SPORTS I

determine specific changes the new bell schedule should adopt. The 10-person committee included at least one teacher from each department, a counselor, and an administrator. The bell schedule committee drafted a final report that stated conclusions agreed upon by a majority of members. Each conclusion garnered either unanimous approval or had only one dissenting vote. One major consideration the committee debated was whether to change school start and end times by moving them back approximately 30 minutes every day. While the committee recognized teenagers increasing struggle with sleep deprivation, they concluded that moving start times back would likely incentivize more before-school activities. The final committee report argued that moving start times back would only promote sleep for the student body if before-school activities were restricted, a step that the school currently doesn’t plan to take. The 2020-21 bell schedule has not yet been publicized to students, but some students have been informed by faculty of planned changes. For senior Kavya Ravishankar, flex periods provide a useful time for conferences with teachers and assemblies, but she questions how scaling back Tuesday’s late start will affect students. “I think the students who have the current Tuesday schedule are used to coming in at a certain time [on Tuesdays],” Ravishankar said. “They’re going to have to adjust how they balance their Monday-Tuesday work and schedules.” Junior Amreen Sandhu embraces the attempt by the administration to recognize student’s wellbeing as well as the time management benefits of the new schedule. “I like the idea of flex periods,” Sandhu said. “I think it’s an attempt by the school to value students personal wellbeing. A lot of teachers are unavailable during lunch, and break is too short for us to ask teachers questions while taking time for ourselves.”

AMERICAN NINJA WARRIOR: Sophomore Lucy Langer is planning to participate in American Ninja Warrior. Head to the Sports I page to read all about her training! pg. 8

ARTS

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE: Check out this page to learn more about the upcoming production of Pride and Prejudice. Also read about student music producers at JHS! pg. 10

PAGE EDITOR: Virginia Larner

BACK

HOROSCOPES: Head to the back to read your horoscope for the month of November. Find out how your month will be with our special horoscope predictions. pg 12


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NOVEMBER 2019, EDITION LXIII

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Pope Francis holds synod at Vatican for new ideas BY VIRGINIA LARNER, ’20

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ct. 6 marked the beginning of a special synod directed at making vast changes in the pan-Amazonian region of the Catholic Church. The synod, made up of selected bishops and various advisors, concluded Oct. 27 with a closing mass lead by Pope Francis.

A synod is a special assembly of Church clergy and other individuals in the laity to decide upon issues of administration, doctrine, and application. At the end of this three week meeting, the Pope will approve a document listing the decisions made. The synod, which has been in preparation since its announcement in 2017, will focus on issues of protecting the environment and exploited lands, inculturation and liturgy, migration, protection of water, human trafficking, forming effective communicators, access to preists, and women’s role in the Amazonian Church. Many followers believe this synod will be the hallmark of Francis’s papacy. “This Pope is interesting, because he tackles relevant issues that haven’t been dealt with before,” senior Peter Murphy said. Of the 200 participants of the synod, over 145 are coming

from South or Central America. With the focus being on the Amazonian region, it is important that indigenous people remain part of this discussion. Among the issues being discussed, the access people in the Amazon have to mass and the Sacraments is a top priority. In some regions, it is common for people to have mass with a priest only once or twice a year. One proposed idea is for older, possibly married, men, already ordained as deacons in the communities to be ordained. Additionally, the idea of women being ordained as deacons has again risen as a proposal.

However, there was a time when Catholic women could be deacons in the church and were included largely in the clergy. In areas of South and Central America it is common that women are the leaders of communities. Ordaining women in the Amazonian region would allow these leaders to include the Church more regularly in their

the synod is the protection of the earth and the land in the Amazon. A key proposal includes the establishment of a “permanent observatory of human rights and protection of the Amazon” which would entail a new Church law directing the actions of Christians towards the environment. Another detail of this includes Catholic universities making a preferential option for the education of indigenous people (americamagazine.org). Francis has made a point of encouraging people to be more environmentally conscious. He works to spread awareness of climate change, an issue seen clearly by people living in the Amazon region. Pope Francis, a Jesuit, has been open to discussing more progressive ideas since he was voted into the papacy. He has spoken about topics such as gay marriage, abortion, and even possible schism. Francis is unlike many popes who came before him, and appeals to more young Catholics. “Young people and young

A synod is a special assembly of Church clergy and other individuals in the laity to decide upon issues of administration, doctrine, and application.

There is controversy surrounding this idea, as many believe this topic should be discussed at a regular synod due to the potential effects and changes to tradition it would have on the rest of the Church. The ordination of women has been in question for years, but many resist this idea as they argue it sways from Catholic tradition.

communities. “What happens if you’re in a position of leadership as a women [in the Church] and you do not have to report to a male at the end of the day?” Campus Ministry Director Don Clarke questioned. “How would that happen in the Church?” Another main focus of

adults who follow what he says are edified, meaning there is some encouragement that the pope knows who they are, and wants them to be a part of the church,” Clarke said. Since he began as Pope, Francis has tackled many corruption issues left over by previous popes. “One of the things that the Pope really addresses is the issue of power and how the church has used and abused power,” Clarke said. “The Pope has said we can not keep doing this.” After the synod concludes, proponents are looking to establish a permanent organization in the Amazonian region to implement the changes made by the synod. The impact of this synod will be great within the Church, and the decisions made have the potential to change the way the Catholic Church operates. “There are different times of excitement when it comes to the Church starting to move,” Clarke said. “For me I would say to people in high school this is unbelievably exciting because we’ve never really seen anything like this.”

Brebeuf High School faces controversey with Church BY JACK KELLY, ’20

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n ongoing conflict between Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School in Indianapolis and the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has garnered international attention following the involvement of the Vatican in late September. The conflict stemmed from an order by the archdiocese for the school to fire an openly gay teacher who has been legally married to another man since 2017. Following two years of dissent between the archdiocese and the Midwest province of Jesuits on the manner, the archdiocese rescinded the high school’s status as a Catholic institution this past June. “To effectively bear witness to Christ, whether they teach religion or not, all ministers in their professional and private lives must convey and be supportive of Catholic Church teaching. The Archdiocese of Indianapolis recognizes all teachers, guidance counselors and administrators as ministers,” the Archdiocese said in an official statement printed alongside the decree. “Regrettably, Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School has freely chosen not to enter into [an] agreement that protect the important ministry of communicating the fullness of Catholic teaching to students. Therefore, Brebeuf Jesuit Pre-

paratory School will no longer be recognized as a Catholic institution by the Archdiocese of Indianapolis.” Brebeuf Jesuit responded to the decree with a statement signed by the school’s president, Fr. William Verbryke, stating, “Brebeuf Jesuit has respectfully declined the Archdiocese’s insistence and directive that we dismiss a highly capable and qualified teacher due to the teacher being a spouse within a civilly-recognized samesex marriage… After long and prayerful consideration, we determined that following the Archdiocese’s directive would not only violate our informed conscience on this particular matter, but also set a concerning precedent for future interference in the school’s operations and other governance matters that Brebeuf Jesuit leadership has historically had the sole right and privilege to address and decide.” That same day, the Midwest Province of Jesuits began an appeal of this decree through the formal appeal process of the church, which ultimately led to the matter being taken up by the Vatican. “The general reaction was that a lot of [students] felt extreme disappointment in the archdiocese but also a lot of us were proud that our school made the decision to not fire the teacher,” Dexter

King, an editor of The Brebeuf Arrow, said. “Students quickly rallied around the school.” While awaiting response from the Vatican, the school was no longer identified or recognized as a Catholic institution by the Archdiocese and was no longer allowed to officially hold mass. The implications of this order were additionally felt in athletics, after Brebeuf was barred from two All-Catholic Invitationals between other schools in the Indianapolis Archdiocese, a girls golf tournament on August 5th and a cross country meet on September 14th. On September 23rd, the Vatican announced an interim suspension of the decree while the school awaits the final decision of the Congregation of Catholic Education, a process that will take months, if not years. In the meantime, Brebeuf Jesuit has returned to holding mass on campus and has regained recognition as a Catholic institution. “I am very hopeful that the resolution will favor Brebeuf because our school is Jesuit primarily and therefore the Jesuit superintendent should have authority over the Archbishop as to the governance of my school,” King said. “I only hope that the Church makes the best, most inclusive decisions possible going into the future.”

PAGE EDITOR: Jayla Lowery


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LIVE NEWS UPDATES @ www.jesuitnews.com

Larson’s buzzing beekeeping business BY STEELE CLEVENGER,’21

bees inside the honey,” O’Scannlain said. The bees, however, had other plans. Each time Larson brushed the bees from the hive, they would fly right back into their home. To ensure that the bees would fly away from the hive, Larson, Curran, and O’Scannlain placed the hive in a wagon, and walked around Larson’s neighborhood. “Every bump, we were trying to catch [the hive], making sure it didn’t fall out of [the wagon],” Curran said. After collecting the first hive, the three beekeepers drove to the location of Larson’s second hive, repeating the brushing process, afterwards placing the hive and the leftover bees in the back of Larson’s car. “We drove to get lunch, and we left the windows open in hopes that [any remaining] bees would fly away,” O’Scannlain said. “Instead, every bee in the Bethany area came and swarmed our car!” Curran said. The Sheriff’s department was called and the thousands of bees swarming Larson’s car began to swarm a nearby car as well. Finally, Larson, Curran, and O’Scannlain, along with some

bees that were reluctant to leave the hive, drove towards a farm in Aloha, where the honey is extracted from the hives. “You put the [hive] in a centrifuge, and it spins really fast. As it spins, the honey goes to the outside [of the centrifuge], and then goes down and collects in the bottom [of the machine]. Then you put a bucket under [the centrifuge] and collect [the honey],” O’Scannlain said. The collected honey comes in a variety of flavors, including blackberry and Oregon wildflower. “My favorite part has been getting people come to me and say my honey tastes great,” said Larson. “[Beekeeping] is pretty difficult work, but it ends up being very rewarding once you get the honey out.” With his first successful honey harvest, Larson extracted five gallons of honey, which sold to friends, Jesuit students and students at Wilson and Lincoln High Schools. Larson says he never anticipated making money from beekeeping, however, until he began harvesting honey, and realized he had a lucrative new hobby. “The hardest part for me is logistics: figuring out who wants honey, how much, where to deliver

it, etcetera,” said Larson. “Most of the real labor was done earlier in the year, though, when I was managing the hives more actively. That’s what pays off later.” When asked how he balances managing a business with school and other activities, Larson replied calmly. “For the most part, it’s been pretty easy, since I only need to spend a few minutes a day jarring the honey when I get it,” said Larson. “More recently, though, it’s been hard to find time to market and sell when I have to work on college

applications. Hopefully, when I get those finished, I’ll be able to expand the business and sell the rest of my honey, as well as selling t-shirts.” As Larson heads off to college, he plans to leave his hives in the hands of trusted friends. “I’m giving one hive to a friend of mine whose dad wants to try beekeeping, while the other one will stay where it is to be managed by a couple friends. They might not be selling [honey], but they can help the bees with their hive.” To purchase honey or a t-shirt, email Larson at jlarson20@ jesuitmail.org.

The garden was originally proposed to be located in the alumni quad. However, with the help of Mr. Clarke, a member of the sustainability committee at Jesuit, the garden was relocated and the measurements for the space were determined. “When we got the approval for Lower Arrupe, we were able to put three 4-by-12 planter boxes there that would be 15 inches deep,” Mr. Clarke said. “We used about six and a quarter yards of dirt.”

While Mr. Clarke worked to get the supplies, environmental science teacher Ms. Mahoney pushed for the students of her classes to build and maintain the garden and the plants within it. “The kids built the beds [and] shoveled the soil,” environmental science and biology teacher Ms. Mahoney said. “We could have hired somebody to build [the beds]. I wanted [the students] to do it because then [they] take ownership in the process and [they] understand the work.”

As a result, many students of the class enjoyed the opportunity to build and maintain the garden. “I think it was good [and] I think we definitely needed [a garden],” said senior Lance Paglinawan . “We [framed] [the garden] and then [established] the boxes. Everyday we [worked on] it.” There are also plans to continue the use of the garden into the winter and spring. However, in the winter, hoop houses will

serve as a miniature greenhouse, keeping the warmer air in and assisting the plants to grow with the moderate winter temperatures here in Oregon. In addition to the pragmatic uses of the garden, it also symbolically serves as a reminder to preserve and provide for a greener earth. “I am a firm believer that, unless we all do something, we’re going to be in trouble when it comes to the planet,” Mr. Clarke said.

Youth Outreach Board, so they wanted to integrate Rosehaven osehaven Club connects and their message into Jesuit the Rosehaven day shelbecause it was kind of ignored ter and community cenbesides [in] Christian Service,” ter to the Jesuit community. senior Nikhita Mathur said. Roshaven, a day shelter Mathur has been infor women, children, and genvolved in Rosehaven since her der-diverse individuals, provides sophomore year when she volsafety and security, as well as unteered for the organization for resources for many people to her Christian Service. Since then, meet their physical and emotionMathur has been a leader of Roseal basic needs. Rosehaven also haven Club and an integral memworks with people experiencing ber of the Youth Outreach Board. “Youth Outreach Board is a group of 15 [to 20] girls from about 10 schools across the Portland Metropolitan Area...We all work together, and meet once a month,” Mathur said. “We work on goals throughout the year [such as] fundraising goals, advocacy goals, and outreach goals. We are able to work with our highschools and other members of our community to be a catalyst for change and teach other peoNikhita Mathur and Lucy Keane, both members of the Youth Outreach Board. ple about what is going on.”

Along with Mathur, junior Lucy Keane is a member of the Youth Outreach Board, and has been a member since the summer following her freshman year. Keane was motivated to bridge the gap between youth and people experiencing homelessnes, so she turned to the Youth Outreach Board and Rosehaven for support. “We organize youth outreach because...there’s a real disconnect between youth and people experiencing homelessness,” Keane said. “It’s an empowerment issue where you feel like you can’t have an affect, but [it is] also an exposure issue where youth, especially youth in positions of privilege, tend to have a fear surrounding people experiencing homelessness. We use our platforms as people who have that exposure from working at Rosehaven to bring that back to our own communities [or] our school communities by running clubs.” Mathur and Keane utilize

the resources at Jesuit to promote Rosehaven Club, striving to inspire students to work with people experiencing homelessness. “We do club fair, announcements, as well as drives at Jesuit,” Mathur said. “When people ask about drives, we let them know about what Rosehaven is. Another big part is [that] we are a part of Christian Service, so people learn about it through that.” Along with exposure, Keane values the education she has gained from Rosehaven, striving to influence students to address the biases surrounding homelessness. “By working through this program [you gain] the support and opportunities to educate yourself,” Keane said. “The education empowers you to make those [personal] connections... Through Rosehaven, I’ve learned and addressed those biases that would otherwise make me fearful or encourage me to avoid people experiencing homelessness.”

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ow did senior Jonas Larson get into the beekeeping business? Shrugs Larson, “I just thought it would be a fun thing to do.” Larson, who owns Larson Bee Company, began beekeeping his freshman year at Jesuit. “My first season with [the bees] didn’t go that well,” he said. “The bees all died in the winter.” According to Larson, 80 percent of first time beekeepers quit within the first five years. “I wanted to keep going,” Larson said. “So, I bought some new bees. They were doing great over the summer and were making a lot of honey, so some friends [and I] went to harvest it.” To harvest the honey, Larson recruited seniors Sam Curran and Declan O’Scannlain. The first step in harvesting honey is “collecting the hive.” Larson, Curran, and O’Scannlain went to work, brushing bees off the hive in Larson’s backyard using a bee brush, (although both Curran and O’Scannlain agree that Larson did most of the brushing). “The goal is to get all of the bees out of the hive because it’s harder to extract the honey if there’s

New garden grows outside of Lower Arrupe Hall BY MICHAEL LANG, ’20

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he environmental science class built a new garden just outside of Lower Arrupe Hall. There are three new enclosures for the garden and, in its current state, the garden is home to new vegetables planted by the environmental science class. The garden regularly requires attention from the class, allowing students to recognize the efforts that go into a garden and the need for students to upkeep it.

Rosehaven provides safety and security BY SCOUT JACOBS, ’21

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any life-altering challenges, such as domestic violence or divorce, providing tangible resources, such as clothing and hygiene products, as well as providing a sense of community and safety. Rosehaven Club recently started at Jesuit in 2017, with the purpose of more students and youth becoming involved in interacting with people experiencing homelessness. “A few seniors in 2017 started it because they created

PAGE EDITOR: Scout Jacobs


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NOVEMBER 2019, EDITION LXIII

Are digital models the future for fashion? BY ROSA MADDEN, ’21

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hudu, a popular model, is the epitome of beauty. Her stunning figure accentuates the fashionable clothing she models and attracts many clothing companies. Shudu’s social media platform highlights her impeccable photos, leaving fans in awe of her seemingly unreal beauty. The only issue? Shudu, however human she may appear in photos, is simply a fabrication of the London-based photographer Cameron James-Wilson through the means of a computer. Shudu, a digital model created using a specialized program to make her appear life-like, challenges the beauty standard and creates an unprecedented way of viewing the complexities of modeling. Wilson fully utilizes modern day’s advanced technology to create art like Shudu, channeling his creativity through designing her outfits and poses. He explains Shudu as a form of self-expression, creating something beautiful with art. “Basically Shudu is my creation, she’s my art piece

that I am working on at the moment,” Wilson said (Revelist). Wilson describes the process of creating an image of Shudu as taking anywhere from a few days to a few weeks (Elle). To create an image of Shudu, Wilson first scans a real life person, this image used as a foundation to craft Shudu’s features. He then digitally edits her clothing and makeup. In just two years, Shudu has gained an Instagram following of nearly 200 thousand followers and many supporters. When Shudu first started posting on Instagram, fans were captivated by her flawless image. However, once she was revealed as a computer generated model, many people experienced the feeling of the “uncanny valley”, the eerie feeling one gets when looking at an object almost life-like but not quite (Highsnobiety). Some people think digital models aren’t effective and would like to look at a real person due to the digital model’s lack of a personality. Many times companies want to hire a model not just for their image but also for their reputation and unique personality, making people gravitate towards

them, thus creating profit. Digital models are simply an image without real thoughts and emotions, severing any hope of connecting with their audience. “I would rather see a real human, because they have feelings, they have emotions, [and] they have struggles that every other human has. Even if models have more money, you can still connect with them on a more real level than you can with a digital model,” sophomore Shaila Daniels said. Conversely, many people would also say digital models can be effective if used in certain situations. Wilson hopes that digital models will spark interest in quickly advancing technology and the effect that has on the fashion industry. “When brands book Shudu, they’re not booking her instead of a real model. They’re booking her because she’s a virtual model and they want to spark a discussion about technology in fashion,” Wilson explained (Elle). Digital models are also impacting our beauty standards, in some ways more than others. Since digital models are literally unreal, is it dangerous to expose impressionable chil-

dren and teenagers to their “fake” beauty? This kind of representation in the fashion and beauty industry could be detrimental to their mental health, as they might compare themselves to something they physically cannot achieve. “If you see like a digital model, [you’re looking at] an ideal standard of beauty that nobody can attain because it’s fake,” junior Kristine Marek said. A good amount of fashion companies already photoshop their models to perfection, so including a digital model would only add to the growing idea of an unrealistic beauty standard. However, despite the influx of Photoshop used for modeling today, many companies also recognize the imperative need to include models with all different body types, ethnicities and races, etc. Theology teacher Mr. Schulte worries that the creation of digital models would only detract from the growing importance of diversity. “It’s kind of a step in the wrong direction,” Schulte said. However, Wilson views the inclusion of digital models into the beauty and fashion

industry differently. Instead of taking away from the strides companies are making to include diverse models, he plans to use technology to fuel this idea. Wilson also views the modeling industry as lacking in representation, and he wants to use technology advancements for change (Highsnobiety). “It is trying to add to the standard of beauty that’s being shifted to something much more inclusive,” Wilson stated (Highsnobiety).

COURTESY OF WWD

What freshman can learn from seniors “Sports at Jesuit have allowed me to meet some of my closest friends and it is a place where I can have fun and enjoy playing the sports I love, The coaches are very supportive and push the athletes to be better people on and off the field and court.”

“I wish I would have known that I would be okay and have good friends by the time I was a senior. If I could give one piece of advice is to buy into the Jesuit community as soon as you can because it’s worth it. It is hard at first to find your friends, but if you talk to people in your classes and in sports, you’ll find them.”

Connor Kollas

“If you cannot play a sport, manage it. I’ve managed the girls JV lacrosse team, and it has been an amazing experience. Managing is a great way to stay involved in the sport you love. Talk to a coach and see if they need help managing for the coming season.”

Logan Horton

“School is not always about the sports you play. Branch out. Try something new. It’s insane the different options you will find. I got to know my teachers well, which has helped me in school whenever I am stressed. My advice would be to get to know your teachers.”

Grace Wetzler

Ella Howe

PAGE EDITORS: Annie Landgraf and Rosa Madden


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NOVEMBER 2019, EDITION LXIII

Andrew Yang in the race for presidency BY TRISTAN ROBBINS, ’20

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ver the course of 2019, presidential candidate Andrew Yang has seemingly sprung out of nowhere into the political spotlight. But what makes him so popular? “Andrew Yang’s experience in tech and entrepreneurship sets him apart from anyone else trying to find their way to the Oval Office in 2020,” senior Ethan Kerman thinks. ”He Photos Courtesy of Wikimedia

Andrew Yang

brings unique ideas to the table and changes our perception on what is possible. Most importantly, his Universal Basic Income policy, and Value Added Tax are extremely popular among his supporters”. A Universal Basic Income is a periodic payment to each citizen of a country, and in Yang’s case, he proposed that each citizen would receive $1000 per month. He says that this payment will lead to a “trickle up economy”, where the middle class uses their widespread ability to stimulate the economy. A Value Added Tax counters the actions of large tech companies like Google, Amazon, Apple, and Facebook, who take a large portion of their consumer’s data and sell it to the highest bidder. Yang advocates for this tax because it allows the government to tax

Elizabeth Warren

that data, closing the loophole these companies use to take advantage of their patrons. Yang’s ideas and opinions have sparked much delight from the millennial generation, who have taken the Internet by storm with “Yang Gang” memes and support pages. But how are the other Democratic candidates appealing to broader audiences? Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren offered her plan for a “Ultra-Millionaire Tax”, which is a tax on people with a net worth upwards of $50 million, an abolition of the death penalty, and among many others, an increase of the federal minimum wage to $15/hour. She has gained support from lower-middle class voters. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has long stood

Joe Biden

with his policies of Medicare for all, raising the minimum wage to $15/hour, and his most controversial item, tuition-free public college education. Sanders has support from all over the age and race spectrum, with significant followings from younger black voters. Former Vice President Joe Biden stands with plans to expand student debt-relief programs, to stop the use of tariffs to pressure countries because of the effect it has on the American economy, and a promotion of researching new, clean methods of nuclear energy production. Biden’s primary voter base resides in the older population. As of the writing of this article, the next Democratic debates are Nov. 20 and Dec. 19, 2019, with six more to be scheduled for the first half of 2020.

Bernie Sanders

Democratic Presidental Candiates

Amy Klobuchar

Cory Booker

Julian Castro

Pete Buttigieg

Kamala D Harris

Party-based clubs arrive on campus BY SHAWNA MUCKLE, ’20

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hen students register to vote at 16, one of the first questions they must respond to is which political party they would like to join. Party association, most often presented as a dual choice between Democrat and Republican, is so pervasive in political discourse that it’s difficult to be civically engaged without adopting a partisan lens. In light of the supremacy of the two major political parties and their corresponding ideologies—conservative and liberal—it may seem surprising that Jesuit’s clubs surrounding political goals or discussions steer away from partisan labels. Instead, neutral names such as “Current Events Club” or “Junior State of America” provide a space for students of all political philosophies to educate themselves on topical issues and develop a more nuanced perspective. Clubs like JSA provide a useful forum for a large coalition of politically-engaged students: those questioning their party affiliation, those who consider themselves independent or somewhere in the center, as well as students with relatively defined partisan stances who are looking to challenge their existing beliefs. “Being partisan-related makes it super constrictive about what is okay to say,” JSA leader Brian Xu said. “Here we’re all about ‘you can say

anything you want’, and you might say something [controversial] and get repercussions for it, but at least you can express your opinion. I think the majority of people who join JSA would rather debate about the issues, whether it’s a Republican or Democratic idea.” However, neutral current events clubs still have their limitations. While high school students have a reputation for being politically ignorant or for juggling emergent, uncertain political views, a significant majority feel attached to a particular party. In a November 2018 Jesuit Chronicle survey, 75.1% of respondents expressed a preference for either the Republican or Democratic Party, with only 15.3% identifying as unsure. Senior Parthav Easwar decided to join the Democratic Party after informing himself extensively on its platform and on current issues, but he emphasizes an acute awareness of its flaws. “I felt that liberal ideology more aligned with my own beliefs about how the world works and how the world should be,” Easwar said. “I don’t necessarily like everything the Democratic Party does, and if there was a party that aligned with my beliefs more, I would subscribe to that over the Democratic Party.” When the labels Republican and Democrat, conservative and liberal remain abstract, secondary facets of

political discussion, it’s easy to treat each of the major parties as a monolith representing only a single policy viewpoint on crucial issues. Yet in reality, both the Republican and Democratic Party have internal intraparty fissures and contradictions that demand discernment for those who identify with a broad party banner. Organizations like Young Democrats and Young Republicans, while nearly universally absent among high schools, are ubiquitous on college campuses. Often falling somewhere between an ideological safe space and a forum for hashing out intraparty variation and disagreement, party-based clubs for students can help establish a clearer outline of the contours and ideological breadth of each political party. Party-affiliated organizations can also provide a place for students to find agreement, rather than dissent, that uplifts their principles and helps them better defend their policy stances. That philosophy has received representation through Jesuit’s only current ideological club: Young Conservatives for Change. Established this year by senior Caesar Tyson, the club outlines its purpose as “a space for students that identify with more traditional conservative values or beliefs to engage in healthy discussion and debate, as well as introducing ideas to others and establishPAGE EDITOR: Gwynne Olson

ing a rough idea of this ideology” (Jesuit Clubs and Activities Guide). Tyson declined a request for comment. Given Young Conservatives’ mission statement, the club’s pursuits appear twofold: it attempts to create a mutual space for conservative students while also establishing the merits of conservatism. However, both the name of the club and its description leave unclear what precise branch of “conservative” ideology it plans to emphasize. Even some students with a partisan affiliation are hesitant towards the precedent Young Conservatives sets for ideologically-oriented clubs on campus, particularly concerning their potential for creating an echo chamber in an already fraught partisan environment. “If you have Young Conservatives club, and if we were to have a Young Liberals club, all that’s happening is people are going to go to the clubs that they align with and they’re going to be indoctrinated with what they already believe,” Easwar said. “They’re never going to get the idea that this country is one that’s built on cooperation and bipartisan relationships.” Young Conservatives for Change has yet to meet since its creation, and as a monthly club, its impact on political discourse outside the confines of the club remains indeterminate. However, rumors have abounded among

the student body since word spread of Young Conservatives’ existence, suggesting students have more opinions about party affiliation than politically neutral outlets allow for. “I think that underneath the surface there’s a lot of stigma based on the connotations each party has,” senior Lauren Haines said. “If your parents are conservative and constantly talking about how stupid the other party is, then if your friend is like, ‘hey, I’m a liberal,’ there’s going to be at least an undercurrent of malease.” Regardless of whether Young Conservatives for Change will prove itself an effective forum for students to transparently discuss their interpretations and disagreements with party labels or if it will devolve into an insulated safe space, Haines acknowledges the cultural tension that avoiding partisan discussions creates within the student body. “Young Conservatives is grounded in rumor and speculation, and the same problem exists with liberalism and conservatism at this school,” Haines said. “If people are not willing to talk explicitly about it, if you can’t talk about something to etch out its nuances, you’re not going to be able to define conservatism more than this shadowy figure, and I think that’s the problem with party and politics at this school.”


THE IMPEACHMENT PROCESS, EXPLAINED: What started the impeachment process?

What’s an impeachment inquiry? -An impeachment inquiry is the first step of the presidential impeachment process, and it simply involves gathering facts about a potential crime or abuse of power. -The House impeachment inquiry, led by the House Judiciary Committee, has been subpoenaing officials, documents, and hearing testimony, mostly behind closed doors. -House members recently voted to proceed to the public phase of the inquiry in an primarily party-line vote. -The inquiry allows members of the House to determine whether the House should actually vote to impeach the president.

When did impeachment last happen?

Whistleblower An anonymous whistleblower reported their concern regarding Trump’s phone call with Zelensky, and their identity has yet to be disclosed outside the House Intelligence Commitee.

-A complaint by a whistleblower raised concerns about a July 2019 phone conversation between President Donald Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. -Complaint alleged that President Trump brought up the subject of Ukraine investigating his Democratic political rival, Joe Biden, and his son, Hunter Biden, for corruption. -The State Department delayed aid to Ukraine for unclear reasons. -House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the beginning of a formal impeachment inquiry due to the possibility that the aid was stalled for political reasons, which Democrats frame as an abuse of power.

In U.S. politics, whistleblowers are members of the executive branch who report concerns about a government official or department acting illegally/unethically to the Solicitor General, who determines whether or not to submit the whistleblower complaint to Congress.

Subpoena

House committees have issued subpoenas for documents/testimony from several White House officials, including Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giulani, and Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo.

A subpoena is a legal summoning of documents or testimony to a court of law or a Congressional committee.

Impeachment Trump’s presidential impeachment process in its first stage, an impeachment inquiry. Inquiries simply gather facts about a potential presidential abuse of power and may not result in impeachment.

Impeachment occurs in the House of Representatives. It requires a simple majority vote to pass the House, and it doesn’t remove the president from office. Rather, impeachment acts as a legal mechanism to hold a trial in the Senate. Some compare it to an indictment.

Haven’t we heard about impeachment before? -Until recently, impeachment was premised on a few different controversies unrelated to Ukraine. In 2017-2018, special counsel Robert Mueller was investigating Trump’s campaign for possible collusion (conspiracy) with the Russian government to influence the 2016 election. -Mueller’s investigation laid out several instances of Trump potentially obstructing justice, but it didn’t recommend any particular conviction. -The uncertain outcome of the investigation caused talk of impeachment to fall relatively flat.

-The last time an impeachment inquiry was formally launched was for President Bill Clinton. -In 1998, the Republican-controlled House opened an inquiry into President Clinton’s act of perjury, or lying under oath, regarding his affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. -The House eventually voted to impeach, marking the second presidential impeachment in American history (the first being Andrew Johnson in 1868). -The Senate did not vote to convict, and Clinton remained in office.

Trial

It’s unclear if or when the impeachment inquiry into President Trump will proceed to a trial. For Bill Clinton, the House relied on an extensive special counsel report that explicitly detailed Clinton’s crimes, but the House will likely take much longer investigating Trump before voting on impeachment.

A trial is what happens in the Senate once the House votes to impeach the president. The Senate continues to compile documents and testimony from both sides and conducts a “trial” to determine whether the president should actually be removed from office. The Chief Justice presides over a trial and senators may not speak out of turn or make floor speeches.

Conviction Most political experts suggest that without a bombshell revelation, Trump will not be convicted. The Senate is currently controlled by a 53-47 Republican majority. At least 14 Republicans would need to convict. So far, only one Senate Republican, Mitt Romney, has issued a serious condemnation of Trump’s conduct.

If senators believe the president should be removed from office, they vote to convict the president. Conviction requires 2/3 of the Senate (67 senators) to vote in favor, which officially removes the president from office. There has yet to be a conviction in presidential history.

High crimes and misdemeanors Throughout the beginning of President Trump’s impeachment process, pundits and constitutional scholars have speculated about whether Trump’s crimes fit under the umbrella of “high crimes and misdemeanors”.

High crimes and misdemeanors is a specific phrase in the text of the Constitution that is considered a general standard for determining whether the president’s “crimes” meet the threshold for impeachment and/or conviction. Keep in mind “high crimes and misdemeanors” can refer to a more abstract political “crime”, which may include presidential abuses of power to varying degrees. Legislators ultimately judge this threshold.

PAGE EDITOR: Shawna Muckle


THE IMPEACHMENT PROCESS, EXPLAINED: What started the impeachment process?

What’s an impeachment inquiry? -An impeachment inquiry is the first step of the presidential impeachment process, and it simply involves gathering facts about a potential crime or abuse of power. -The House impeachment inquiry, led by the House Judiciary Committee, has been subpoenaing officials, documents, and hearing testimony, mostly behind closed doors. -House members recently voted to proceed to the public phase of the inquiry in an primarily party-line vote. -The inquiry allows members of the House to determine whether the House should actually vote to impeach the president.

When did impeachment last happen?

Whistleblower An anonymous whistleblower reported their concern regarding Trump’s phone call with Zelensky, and their identity has yet to be disclosed outside the House Intelligence Commitee.

-A complaint by a whistleblower raised concerns about a July 2019 phone conversation between President Donald Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. -Complaint alleged that President Trump brought up the subject of Ukraine investigating his Democratic political rival, Joe Biden, and his son, Hunter Biden, for corruption. -The State Department delayed aid to Ukraine for unclear reasons. -House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the beginning of a formal impeachment inquiry due to the possibility that the aid was stalled for political reasons, which Democrats frame as an abuse of power.

In U.S. politics, whistleblowers are members of the executive branch who report concerns about a government official or department acting illegally/unethically to the Solicitor General, who determines whether or not to submit the whistleblower complaint to Congress.

Subpoena

House committees have issued subpoenas for documents/testimony from several White House officials, including Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giulani, and Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo.

A subpoena is a legal summoning of documents or testimony to a court of law or a Congressional committee.

Impeachment Trump’s presidential impeachment process in its first stage, an impeachment inquiry. Inquiries simply gather facts about a potential presidential abuse of power and may not result in impeachment.

Impeachment occurs in the House of Representatives. It requires a simple majority vote to pass the House, and it doesn’t remove the president from office. Rather, impeachment acts as a legal mechanism to hold a trial in the Senate. Some compare it to an indictment.

Haven’t we heard about impeachment before? -Until recently, impeachment was premised on a few different controversies unrelated to Ukraine. In 2017-2018, special counsel Robert Mueller was investigating Trump’s campaign for possible collusion (conspiracy) with the Russian government to influence the 2016 election. -Mueller’s investigation laid out several instances of Trump potentially obstructing justice, but it didn’t recommend any particular conviction. -The uncertain outcome of the investigation caused talk of impeachment to fall relatively flat.

-The last time an impeachment inquiry was formally launched was for President Bill Clinton. -In 1998, the Republican-controlled House opened an inquiry into President Clinton’s act of perjury, or lying under oath, regarding his affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. -The House eventually voted to impeach, marking the second presidential impeachment in American history (the first being Andrew Johnson in 1868). -The Senate did not vote to convict, and Clinton remained in office.

Trial

It’s unclear if or when the impeachment inquiry into President Trump will proceed to a trial. For Bill Clinton, the House relied on an extensive special counsel report that explicitly detailed Clinton’s crimes, but the House will likely take much longer investigating Trump before voting on impeachment.

A trial is what happens in the Senate once the House votes to impeach the president. The Senate continues to compile documents and testimony from both sides and conducts a “trial” to determine whether the president should actually be removed from office. The Chief Justice presides over a trial and senators may not speak out of turn or make floor speeches.

Conviction Most political experts suggest that without a bombshell revelation, Trump will not be convicted. The Senate is currently controlled by a 53-47 Republican majority. At least 14 Republicans would need to convict. So far, only one Senate Republican, Mitt Romney, has issued a serious condemnation of Trump’s conduct.

If senators believe the president should be removed from office, they vote to convict the president. Conviction requires 2/3 of the Senate (67 senators) to vote in favor, which officially removes the president from office. There has yet to be a conviction in presidential history.

High crimes and misdemeanors Throughout the beginning of President Trump’s impeachment process, pundits and constitutional scholars have speculated about whether Trump’s crimes fit under the umbrella of “high crimes and misdemeanors”.

High crimes and misdemeanors is a specific phrase in the text of the Constitution that is considered a general standard for determining whether the president’s “crimes” meet the threshold for impeachment and/or conviction. Keep in mind “high crimes and misdemeanors” can refer to a more abstract political “crime”, which may include presidential abuses of power to varying degrees. Legislators ultimately judge this threshold.

PAGE EDITOR: Shawna Muckle


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LIVE NEWS UPDATES @ www.jesuitnews.com

NOVEMBER 2019, EDITION LXIII

Students journey through fencing careers BY SCOUT JACOBS, ’20 GWYNNE OLSON, ‘20

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hree Jesuit students compete in international and national fencing tournaments across the US and the globe. Each fencer, senior Noah Shepanek, junior Sean Kim, and freshman Siobhan Sullivan, have been fencing since they were in elementary school. Starting off young, each fencer began fencing as a casual side activity, but it soon evolved into one of their primary passions. Noah Shepanek has been fencing since he was in third grade, starting in a recreational fencing class in Lake Oswego. Now fencing at a club called PDX Fencing, Shepanek evolved from fencing in regional tournaments throughout the state to na-

tional tournaments across the country. “Once you start fencing at a higher level, you don’t go to the regional tournaments anymore,” Shepanek said. “There is a national tournament once a month called a NAC, or a North American Cup, and those are where people from all over the country except international fencers go and compete.” As fencing has become a passion for Shepanek, he now practices 6 days a week for multiple hours a day, dedicating immense time and effort into the sport. Despite fencing being a time-consuming commitment, Shepanek loves many aspects of the sport, including the dynamic of the competitions. “In the sport of fenc-

ing itself, I love how everything is based off of something that you can do; it’s action and reaction,” Shepanek said. “If you fence someone better than you, you could get absolutely destroyed. If you change and have a different attitude, or maybe do some different action, you can actually make it a close battle or fight.” Along with Shepanek, Sean Kim began fencing in fourth grade. He tried many other sports including baseball, soccer, and basketball; he did not particularly enjoy any of these sports. Kim’s dad was adamant for him to play a sport, so Kim decided to give fencing a try, and he eventually fell in love with the sport. “The thing I love most about fencing is that it is not just a physical game,”

Kim said. “It pushes you physically and mentally. The goal is just to get the touch in any way possible so it brings a lot of creativity to the game.” Kim serves as an Athlete Representative of the Oregon Fencing Alliance (OFA). Nationally ranked as a cadet fencer, Kim has been a representative of the OFA since January 2018. This summer he also attended a training camp at the North Manhattan Fencing Club, one of the most prestigious clubs in the nation. In addition to the two upperclassmen, Siobhan Sullivan has also been fencing for multiple years, constantly working towards improving her fencing skills and developing her techniques for tournaments. “I started it when I

was in second grade,” Sullivan said. “It was around the time when [I] heard that someone from Oregon got to the Olympics in fencing, so I started going to summer camps and the teacher was working at OFA, so I decided to go there.” Re c e n t l y, S u l l i va n earned a silver medal in the Cadet Competition at the regional tournament in March, coming in eighth place in Juniors. Sullivan ranks 4th in the nation for her age group and also fences for the OFA. Sullivan has also traveled across the globe for numerous international tournaments. “National are around the country, but the internationals are around the world,” Sullivan said. “[There are] some in Godola, Hungary, Bulgaria, [and] Austria.”

Sean Kim is currently ranked as a cadet fencer and serves as a representative of OFA (at left). Noah Shepanek stared fencing in the third grade and now fences for PDX fencing (at right).

Langer sets sight on American Ninja Warrior BY JJ GRAY, ’22

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e have American Ninja warrior in training among us, her name is Lucy Langer and her family thinks she can win it all. Lucy has been all over the United States doing different ninja competitions: she has been to Idaho, Washington, Minnesota, and New Mexico. Most recently she has earned top female at Ninja Warrior Klamath Falls. Lucy also got second the last two years at Ultimate Ninja Athletics Association World Finals. American Ninja Warrior is a TV show on NBC where competitors compete for the fastest time through a course of obstacles. A sophomore, Lucy has watched the show and started training in the sport during seventh grade, when

she received a slackline, which is a tight rope that can be walked across and the one Lucy has she can even hang obstacles on. As Lucy became more involved, she went to a gym in Tigard and eventually took one-onone classes with a trainer. Lucy also trains at a gym she and her dad made in their garage. Lucy tries to train every day, when she is not run cross country. Lucy’s training includes hanging, balance and gripping different objects. Lucy has also purchased different obstacles for her garage gym. In Lucy’s competitions, she competes on most of the same obstacles but never knows what is coming her way. “People just invent obstacles like they’re brand new, but I practice the motions which are normally the same and Grip strength,”

Langer said. “It’s never the exact same setup as I train on.” Lucy has many things planned for her future, but one thing is certain: when she is 19 she will sign up for American Ninja Warrior. “I think she could totally do it honestly I think she could win,” Senior Lilly Langer, Lucy’s sister, said. “If she keeps with she’ll be on of the top girls on the show.” Lucy Loves being a ninja and training so much. She wants to inspire younger kids to get into the sport. One of her goals is when she is older is to start a ninja gym. “I really want to keep doing this as long as I can hopefully I will have enough time to keep doing it and maybe like open a gym later on,” said Lucy Langer.

PAGE EDITOR: JJ Gray

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LIVE NEWS UPDATES @ www.jesuitnews.com

NOVEMBER 2019, EDITION LXIlI

New NCAA rule allows athletes to profit BY ANNIE LANDGRAF, ’21

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new California bill will allow college athletes to profit off their name, image, and likeness. The new bill runs contrary to the N.C.A.A rules prohibiting athletes against profiting from their sport while in college. “I think this bill being passed is a good first step in the change that needs to happen in college athletics,” Jesuit alumni and former University of Oregon football player, Doug Brenner said. “However, because the N.C.A.A is still the governing body of college athletics it is unclear what this bill will actually change. I’m hoping this bill starts a conversation about what could be improved for student athletes.” The bill pertains only to California schools, which is one of the reasons why its effects on college athletics in other states is unclear. “You can’t have different rules among different states,” athletic director Mr. Hughes said. “Let’s say for example, there is an elite basketball player that being recruited out of high school and is being recruited to UCLA and Michigan State, well he knows that at UCLA, he could earn money of his signature, that gives a huge

competitive advantage to California schools in the recruiting process. So much so that it will not be allowed to stand.” Even though the N.C.A.A is still coming to terms with this new bill, it sparks the question of whether college athletes should get paid for playing. Former Oregon offensive lineman Doug Brenner played with the Ducks from 2013-2017 season and agrees with this new change in college sports. “Every student athlete I have ever known thinks that the N.C.A.A. can and should do better,” Brenner

said. “In the 2015 season we won the PAC-12 Championship, the Rose Bowl, and went to the National Championship game. Because we had such a successful season, the coaches all received bonuses of about one million dollars. I remember thinking it wasn’t fair that coaches get bowl bonuses and performance bonuses but the players can’t. That same year Oregon football brought in about 70 million dollars of revenue to the university, and I remember thinking it’s not right that student athletes have to live on McDonald’s and ramen noodles while the schools, NCAA, and

coaches are all making millions.” Jaiden McClellan, a senior committed to playing soccer at Westpoint next year, thinks this bill could benefit college sports as well. “I think that it should’ve been made a long time ago, because when you’re a student athlete and everyone around you is getting paid like the coaches and staff, they are making a lot of money off student athletes that are not getting anything,” McClellan said. “Especially in college as a student athlete, I know that I have no time to hang out, so

COURTESY OF JESUIT PHOTOGRAPHY

Jesuit alum and former college athlete Doug Brenner shares his perspective on paying college athletes.

there would be no way that I could get a job, so the idea of getting sponsors would benefit me and help me to get through college.” As of now, there is no clear idea of when or if this bill will even get passed. Many people question the fairness this would have to every player that is on a specific team. “This might be fair to the .5% of elite athletes on a team, the Lebron James of the world, I think it can be properly argued that for those elite athletes by going to play college, the university is making a lot of money off of those few rare elite athletes,” Hughes said. “However, in my opinion, for 99.5% or higher percent of full scholarship athletes in college, they are getting a spectacular deal. Free college tuition for four years to play college athletics.” This new bill will provoke a conversation about the future college athletics. “I hope this will open up the door for negotiations with the N.C.A.A, to make student athletes lives better,” Brenner said. On October 29th, the NCAA voted unanimously to implement the new rule of athletes profiting off their name, image, and likeness. The board hopes to get this rule into effect by January 2021.

Column: athletic expectations at JHS

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BY JACK KELLEY ’20

t’s no secret that Jesuit has developed a reputation for athletic success. In the past three years, JHS was twice named the number one athletic program in the nation by MaxPreps in 2019 and 2017 and named the number two program in the nation in 2018. Heading into the Fall playoffs, Jesuit holds the number one seed in three of the four OSAA brackets and won first place in the Metro League in all six fall sports, and last year the Crusaders took home eleven state titles, eight more than the school with the second most, Summit. It is also no secret that athletic achievement has become somewhat normalized at Jesuit. Achievements such as winning the Oregonian Cup in 13 of the past 14 years and the administrative move that took place last fall to no longer hold assemblies following every state championship victory has caused some students to feel like this success is expected. “I would definitely say that success at Jesuit

has become normalized,” Nolan Gregg, a goalie on the 2018 state championship men’s soccer team, said. “But I don’t really think that it’s a bad thing.” Gregg feels that there is an expectation for athletic success, but he credits this as a motivating factor and a reason why Jesuit has been dominant in the state of Oregon. “When I put on [a Jesuit] jersey, I feel that I need to play well to represent our school,” Gregg said. Like Nolan Gregg, I have also found the normalization of athletic success at Jesuit to have beneficial effects. From my first JV2 soccer practice in August of my freshman year, I remember my coach telling us about this reputation and that many teams considered the game against us to be the biggest of the year. Having coached previously at various other high schools around the state, he told us that his players would prepare to play Jesuit for weeks and that we had a target on our back to per form as best as we

Courtesty of Jesuit Photography

could. This is a challenge that pushed my teammates and I to go to star t practice early and to stay late, and as I have moved on to levels of competition beyond JV2 soccer, the expectation for success and the work that I have put in with my teammates to follow these expectations has become much greater. Living up to this reputation is a part of the reason why my track teammates and myself have developed an intensive yearlong training program. I have found that there’s a certain pride that comes with competing with “Jesuit” across your chest that creates a Senior Nolan Gregg takes a goal kick in a match up against Grant. desire to emulate the athCourtesty of Jesuit Photography letic greatness that JHS has become known for. In the weight room, on the track or on the athletic fields hundreds of athletes in a variety of sports can be found every afternoon, working to meet these expectations. Ultimately, it is this desire to live up to the reputation that Jesuit has developed in athletics that drives students towards state championships and the other accoGary Hollands passes the baton to Jack Kelley in a meet against Sunset. lades that follow. PAGE EDITOR: Jack Kelley


ARTS

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November 2019, EDITION LXIII

Artist of the Month: Nathan Hasbrook BY STEELE CLEVENGER ‘21

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s a three year old, junior Nathan Hasbrook would watch Dora the Explorer on TV, drawing the beloved cartoon character as she entertained with songs and Spanish. “Ever since then, I [have loved drawing].” In second grade, Hasbrook created his first comic strip called “Weirdos.” “It was [about] three little boys, and they got into weird situations. And one of them was a baby.” This comic marked the beginning of Hasbrook’s career as a cartoonist. In middle school, Hasbrook took art classes and was able to develop his humorous and wildly creative style. “I took art all through middle school. My favorite art to do was little cartoons and doodles, and that’s what kept

me artistically satisfied,” said Hasbrook. “I realized it was easier to draw [cartoon] versions of people than real versions. It’s more fun and quicker.” Juniors and fellow artists Ella Jewell and Jamie Turner, friends of Hasbrook since freshman year, agree that Hasbrook’s talent is incredibly unique. “He’s so mature in the way that he thinks, and he’s also so immature when he draws, but sometimes he can find a really good balance. He’s like Albert Einstein,” said Turner. Both Turner and Jewell agreed Hasbrook’s art is hilarious, reflecting his dry humor and constant pun-making, which is why they seek his guidance for artistic endeavors. “Whenever we need

ideas, we go right to Nathan,” said Turner. Jewell agreed, “Nathan has good ideas. A lot of them are sarcastic.” Hasbrook has been an inspiration to both Jewell and Turner. As Turner puts it, “He inspires me to think less about my work, and just do it.” Teachers, too, enjoy Nathan’s doodles. Tom Manning, Hasbrook’s former scripture teacher and former teacher at Jesuit High School, was a big fan of Hasbrook’s notes, which were always covered in cartoons. “He was so clever in being able to come up with some fun cartoons that add a little interest into the daily grind of life,” Manning said. “I enjoyed [Nathan’s doodles] because they would break up the monotony of grading papers.”

dents who produce their own music as an independent hobby. Senior Ethan Anderson, for example, has been making music since eighth grade, seriously committing to it his sophomore year. “I started with the School of Rock, which is an institution that allows you to

perform, and started on the drums,” Anderson said. “And then I transitioned into more melodic instruments like guitar, and, realizing that I could do both of those things, the only other step was to really just put it down into a format.” Anderson’s style has shifted throughout his time producing, but currently it features synths and simplistic beats with complexity arising in the arrangement and layering of the parts. He described his genre as “Bedroom Pop.” Sophomore Matty Rojas had a similar experience when he got into making music. “For me it was just the natural ‘I like playing guitar and drums so it’s like in high school you gotta join a band’,” Rojas said. Rojas’s bandmate junior Nicky Tcherven explained

COURTESTY Nathan Hasbrook

Student music producers express themselves BY JAMES MARTINI ‘20

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hen you think of musicians at Jesuit, you likely think of students in the Jazz Band or Symphonic Band programs. Or maybe you think of students who have spent years mastering an instrument. What you likely don’t think of, however, are the stu-

COURTESY GOOGLE IMAGES

that their band, Body Magazine, makes music in styles ranging anywhere from hard rock, like “The Smashing Pumpkins,” to softer pop like “The Drums.” Their process for writing generally begins with Tcherven coming up with a riff or a beat. “I record a video of it on Snapchat and send it [to Rojas],” Tcherven said. “And then I rate it out of 10 and then we show it to the other two people [in the band],” Rojas continued. “We improvise and then we refine it.” In Contrast to Tcherven and Rojas, Anderson’s process generally began with a drum beat, due to his background as a drummer. “Lately, I’ve been starting with chord progressions, getting a basic synth down and

then leading into sort of layering and bass and drums, so starting from the top down instead of the bottom,” Anderson said. Because these students all learned to create music mostly on their own, they all had some ideas for how Jesuit could better encourage and support students interested in creating music. “They should have a music theory class,” Tcherven said. “Yeah, a music theory class. I’d legit take that,” Rojas added. Anderson’s ideas were simpler to implement. “There’s a lot of free software they could put on the computers to give access to that for people,” Anderson said. “And with that software, they could also have maybe a club spring up that related to it.”

Pride and Prejudice goes contemporary BY JAYLA LOWERY, ‘20

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esuit Drama’s first show this year is Pride and Prejudice, set to open on November 7. This is the first time the program has performed the show. The play centers around a young woman named Elizabeth and her endeavors with love, status, and morality, as well as her relationships with family and her love interest, Mr. Darcy. The production features senior Eoin McDounagh and junior Mackenzie Jaimes in the lead roles with drama teacher Elaine Kloser directing. Playwright Janet Munsil’s adaptation of the story caught the eye of Kloser, who had been searching for an engaging adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel for years. The script had been performed as an

off-Broadway play in 2016. “I think Pride and Prejudice purists are going to appreciate the show because the storyline is there, but it is adapted in such a way that it moves and feels contemporary,” Kloser said. Jesuit’s reimagining of the show will feature a minimal set, one that cast members and Kloser find unique about their production. “The set is different than other renditions,” Eoin McDounagh said, who is playing Mr. Darcy. “We’re using a pretty minimal set without a lot of props and pieces, which is a different spin than what others might have seen.” McDounagh and his fellow lead, Mackenzie Jaimes, have both enjoyed their time

crafting the show. Jaimes is playing the protagonist of the story, Elizabeth Bennet. “Rehearsals are fun, as well as getting to know what kinds of things they did in that era,” Jaimes said. “Seeingever ything come together with the costumes and the sets will be so exciting.” Immersing themselves and learning about the time period of the book has been an important part of the process for the cast and crew. Pride and Prejudice was written and takes place the early 1800s. The cast had the opportunity to rehearse at an antique home in Portland. “We’ve gotten to do a bit of studying up on how to age a person and how to carry themselves differently,” said Kloser.

COURTESY JESUIT DRAMA DEPARTMENT

The cast of Pride and Prejudice rehearsing a scene.

Pride and Prejudice cast members gather under autumn leaves in Mary’s Way.

PAGE EDITOR: Steele Clevenger


OPINION

11 NOVEMBER 2019, EDITION LXIlI

LIVE NEWS UPDATES @ www.jesuitnews.com

Gen Z faces pressure to “fix everything” BY JAYLA LOWERY, ’20

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eneration Z, or the people born between 1997 and 2010, were recently the subject of an Affinity Magazine article titled “Gen Z is Here, and They Are Going to Fix the World’s Mess.” Affinity’s article continues a trend of calling upon Gen Zers to provide remedies for today’s societal and economic problems. But is it fair to place such pressures and socialital responsibility upon Gen Zers? Generation Z is known as the technological generation, and are the first to grow up immersed in technology and the Internet. Gen Zers are known to have gotten their first phone before their 12th birthday. They are found to spend 15.4 hours a week on their phones, as compared to the generation before them, millennials, who are at about 14.8 hours a week (Visioncritical.com). Gen Zers are the most ethnically diverse generation in US, and make up 27% of the population. Gen Zers were found to get a majority of their news from social media apps like Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat. Naturally, social media has transformed the way Gen Z receives news. Due to various social justice-centered accounts and easy-to-share posts, Gen Zers tend to be more socially aware and inclined to activism than their older generation counterparts. Gen Zers tend to be in universal agreement on topics such as climate change and legalized marijuana (BusinessInsider). This does not necessarily make Gen Zers more liberal; in fact, Gen Z is often found to be split almost evenly between liberal and conservative ideologies. Issues regarding gun rights and

immigration are more divisive within the population. However, conservative Gen Zers are found to promote diversity and are more likely to argue for LGBTQ+ rights than conservatives of older generations (BuisnessInsider.com) All of the signs point to a revolutionary generation, one that comes as idealized savior of the political and social issues currently plaguing America. It’s easy for older generations to point to Gen Z to right the wrongs the last few decades have created. But does all of this praise result in the stepping back of older generations in attempting to solve these problems as well? A common narrative often presented is that baby boomers wrecked the economy, and Gen Zers are here to fix it. This

story, however, makes it easy for baby boomers to proclaim the younger generations as heroes and avoid the responsibilities of participatory activism. Millennials and Gen Zers have been steadily increasing their voter participation, jumping from 20% in 2014 to 36% in 2018, a record high for young voters. This number is expected to increase in the following election. Prominent social activists are shown to be young people. Swedish girl Greta Thunderberg, 16, is one of the world’s most prominent and outspoken environmental activists. After the mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School, thousands upon thousands of kids walked out of their schools, the largest event mobilized by teens since

the Vietnam War. The stories of young people’s activism tend to be heavily featured in media, with stories of social media and marches such as the Climate Strike displaying the political action of young people. But where does this encourage participation and action from baby boomers and Gen Xers? It doesn’t— and that is an issue. Although there are many effective and famed activists from the boomer and Gen X’s generations, the burying of their stories further the idle attitude held by members of older generations. With such a heavy emphasis on the activism of Gen Zers, older generations are seemingly given a pass to sit back and observe as opposed

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Gen Zers take part in challenging world leaders for climate action at one of the global climate strikes.

to participating in social and political activism with their younger counterparts. Social change doesn’t happen with some people taking the backseat. If baby boomers and Gen X see things they want changed, it takes their voices along with Gen Zers to promote their ideas to the government and beyond. And, it isn’t hard for this ‘next generation’ attitude to get passed into Gen Z. In the future, Gen Z could easily say they’ve put in their time and pass the responsibility onto the generation after them. And this could go on to the next generation, creating a cycle of passing a torch that will ultimately go nowhere. Older generations might avoid responsibility for issues of society by placing high expectations on younger generations. If baby boomers wrecked the economy, why not get involved and help fix it? By looking to Gen Z’s to fix older generations mistakes, baby boomers and Gen Xers avoid culpability; and, they imply all change must happen in the future by young people, and not now by people both young and old. But why does this torch of social change and activism need to be passed? The truth is, it doesn’t. Sure, it may be the easiest thing to do, but it’s the least effective. If baby boomers and Generation X want change, they need to participate as well. The battle for an improved society should not be fought by certain generations alone. It takes an effort and leadership from the generations before Gen Zers to provide effective change to the problems that need to be fixed. So no, it’s not just Gen Z who is going to “fix the world’s mess”— it must be all generations, together.

Does Jesuit need to hire a school nurse? BY VIRGINIA LARNER, ’20

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hen it comes to availability of school nurses, Oregon has a serious shortage. The state is ranked #47 on the list by the National School Nurse Association, and students and parents are starting to wonder if they are medically safe attending schools that do not employ an on campus nurse. Jesuit is among the majority of schools in Oregon that lack a school nurse. When students are sick at school they are sent to Mrs. Pieratt and Mrs. McQueen. They determine if the student should be sent home depending on the severity of the illness. There is also a heath room in the office where students can lie on a bed or wait in one of the five chairs.

“If the student has a fever or has vomited they are automatically sent home,” Mrs. Linda Pierrat said. When a student is severely injured or has fainted there is another protocol. Teachers radio the office for assistance, then the Director of Security and members of the administration report to the location. They assess the injury and alert the parents as well as determine whether 9-11 should be called. While it may be easy for any administrator to send a student home who isn’t feeling well, there are many students with more serious illnesses who may not be receiving the attention they need when there is no available school nurse. Students with type one diabetes who need to actively monitor their health might be

one demographic who benefit from having an on-site nurse readily available. Parents of students who require more extensive medical care might wonder if their children are being adequately cared for at schools where there is no nurse present. Additionally, school nurses can offer medical advice to students who are not receiving information anywhere else. “We definitely need a nurse,” senior Yosan Tewelde said. “The people I work with always say to go to your school nurse for more information, but what if there is no school nurse to go to?” Tewelde, who works with Planned Parenthood, stresses how important a school nurse can be to stu-

dents who need access to additional information and resources. According to Mrs. Pieratt, Jesuit has considered hiring a school nurse in the past, however, the school still does not employ a nurse. The recommended student-to-nurse ratio is one nurse for every 750 students. In Oregon, the ratio is currently one nurse to every 2,600 students. The shortage of school nurses in Oregon has been an issue for the last decade, and legislators have tried to pass bills requiring one school nurse for every 1,500 students. These bills have repeatedly failed to pass. One explanation of this shortage is the budget for schools. Many schools are not able to hire another employee

PAGE EDITORS: Michael Lang and Tristan Robbins

as a school nurse. In some districts there are “district nurses,” who divide the days in the week between multiple public schools within a district. These nurses will spend certain days at one school and others at a different school. School nurses are generally RNs, but there can also be instances where a person acts as the school’s nurse, but is not an official registered nurse. Currently, there is a push to hire nurses with specific qualifications regarding mental health, however some argue that student counselors are meant to serve this purpose. Jesuit does not currently employ a school nurse, however may consider this option in the future.


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November 2019, EDITION LXIII

LIVE NEWS UPDATES @ www.jesuitnews.com

Horoscopes

COURTESY Scout Jacobs ’21 and Annie Landgraf ‘21

Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 20)

Aquarius (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18)

Pisces (Feb. 18 - March 20)

Aries (March 20 - April 20)

Taurus (April 20 - May 21)

Gemini (May 21 - June 21)

Cancer (June 21 - July 23)

Leo (July 23 - Aug. 23)

Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 23)

Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 22)

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 - Dec. 22)

November is the month for you to be social! Go out with your friends, talk to people you may not normally talk to, and maybe even clear the air with a friend you have miscommunicated with. This month will be full of fun and forgiveness for you, so put yourself out there.

November might be a month where you have to work harder for successful results. Work extra hard this month, and remember your worth! (#selflove) Also, if you’re single, this month is the time to be bold. Ask your crush out on a date, for it might end in a special relationship for the both of you.

Virgo (Aug. 23 - Sept. 23)

November will start on a stressful month, but will luckily end on wonderful work news. Virgo, try to just let things be what they are and enjoy what’s in front of you. Don’t be critical of yourself during stressful times, and you will find good things to celebrate.

You may be second guessing yourself quite a bit in the beginning of this month, but you need to persevere through this time to figure out exactly what you want. The end of November will then bring many achievements for you, as your hard work will pay off, and you will find great success.

Lean into your creative side and continue to work hard for success. We know you always multitask, but November may be the month to slow down and take time for yourself.

You have the power and ability this month to get things done. The forward movement of planets makes you get work done efficiently and swiftly. You may even be aggressive as you try to get things done. Stay calm and help others out while you’re busy doing work.

November will bring bright opportunities for you, as you may receive a special award or recognition for your hard work. If you are experiencing any setbacks now, the end of this month will present you with success and honor that will make these setbacks worth fighting against.

In the beginning of the month, rest up and conserve your energy for the following weeks. These weeks may include power struggles, but keep being yourself cancer. Speak clearly and directly to be heard and good things will come.

Even though this month will start out maybe a little emotional, keep pushing through because the best is yet to come. We know you love the nice things in life, so spend time this month eating delicious food and spending time with the people you love.

This month, you will experience harmonious relationships and inner peace. This might be a good time to go on a vacation because it’s #noschoolnovember. Treat yourself!

This month, your focus will be on home and family. You will find yourself helping others, which will boost your confidence and happiness. Fun activities will be in order this month, so get prepared for a busy month.

There is so much to be excited about this month! Your charismatic personality will be out this month as the sun and venus slide into your sign. With your birthday coming up, your ruling planet will bring high self-esteem and money.

CARTOON BY Steele Clevenger ‘21

Chief Editors: Virginia Larner, Shawna Muckle Associate Chief Editor: Jack Kelley Managing Editor : Scout Jacobs, Annie Landgraf Social Media Director: Annie Landgraf Assistant Social Media Director: Gwynne Olson Moderator/Teacher: Mr. Dan Falkner

Staff Box

Staff Writers: Virginia Larner, Shawna Muckle, Jack Kelley, Scout Jacobs, Annie Landgraf, James Martini, Jayla Lowery, Michael Lang, Gwynne Olson, Tristan Robbins, Rosa Madden, JJ Gray, Steele Clevenger

PAGE EDITOR: James Martini