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PORTFOLIO

2020

JESSE EWART Selected Graduate Work Victoria University of Wellington Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts


JESSE EWART. Age: 29

DOB 22/01/91

E ewartjesse@gmail.com W

Nationality : New Zealander

Jesseewart.nz

MArch prof with distinction, BAS

M +64 277229766

NZIA Architecture Graduate Member

PRACTICE Architecture+

3/2019 - 3/2020 architectural graduate, Wellington NZ for Stuart Gardnye and Stephen Poulopoulos

Selected Projects

8 Willis and Stewart Dawson Tower Roseneath House

Athfield Architects

11/2015 - 2/2016 Architectural Intern, Wellington, New Zealand for John Hardwick-Smith, Andre BIshop, Chris Winwood Nick Strachen.

Selected Projects

Picton Library Ferry Bank Urban Competition (1st place) VUW School of Music Wellington Civic Square Redevelopment

EDUCATION Victoria University of Wellington, School of Architecture 2016 - 2018 Graduated: Masters of Architecture (Prof) with Distinction Thesis: København Traces Supervisor Dr. Simon Twose

The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of

Architecture/Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademis Skoler for Arkitektur [KADK], Institute of Architecture and Culture, Copenhagen Spring 2016 MA Department: Political Architecture · Critical Sustainability Programme Instructors: Niels Grønbæk & Dag Petersson

Victoria University of Wellington , School of Architecture 2013 - 2015 Graduated: Bachelor of Architectural Studies, Architecture Wellington

Wellington Institute of Technology, Built Environment 2011 - 2012 N. Dip Arch. Wellington

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REFERENCES

ACADEMIC TEACHING Communication Design Tutor 2019

Stuart Gardnye Architecture+ Director NZIA Gold Medalist +64 21 801 999

VUW 02 Year Architecture 261 Communication Course Coordinator - Simon Twose

Communication Design Tutor 2017

VUW 02 Year Architecture 261 Communication Course Coordinator - Simon Twose

stuart@architectureplus. co.nz

Architecture Design Tutor 2017

VUW 02 Year Architecture 211 Design Course Coordinator - Mark Southcombe Lecture 22 May - Speculative Vision

Dr. Simon Twose VUW School of Architecture Senior Lecturer Thesis Supervisor

Assistant Tutor and Guest Lecture 2017 VUW 02 Year Architecture 212 Design Course Coordinator - Martin Hanley

+64 4 4636169 simon.twose@vuw.ac.nz

SKILLS

AWARDS

Rhinoceros 3D

VUW MArch (prof) with distinction

Autodesk Revit Architecture ArchiCAD Adobe Design: Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign.

New Zealand Institute of Architects NZIA Graphisoft Student Design Award First year prize - 1st place VUW | 2013

CV

Audodesk 3ds Max Sketch Up Pro Drawing and Model making Laser Cutting 3d Printing

COMPETITION

2019 | FIRST PLACE: Te Waka Huia - NZIA Wellington Central Library Design Competition 2019 2018 | Finalist: Lake Tekapo Cabins, AAA Visionary Architecture Awards [Open Conceptual] - Tyler Harlen and Jason Tan 2017 | Finalist: SANNZ 24 Hour Competition 2nd Place - Daniel Christev, Tyler Harlen and Jason Tan 2013 | Hi-Fly, SANNZ 24 Hour Competition

PUBLICATIONS

Te Waka Huia · Featured in Issue 3 of the NZIA publication Tāpoto, the brief within Architecture New Zealand , November 2019 (issue 6) Te Waka Huia · NZIA Wellington Central Library Design Competition Journal & Exhibition at Te Auaha - NZIA festival of Architecture Lake Tekapo Cabins · Auckland Architecture Association Visionary Awards Exhibition Thesis · København Traces featured in KooZA/rch - An Architecture Visionary Platform Designed for Curious People Worldwide | 2018 Thesis · København Traces Fortress Model Drawing on Critday | 2018 Thesis · København Traces Fortress Model featured on Critday, 5 top Architecture student models November | 2017 Thesis · København Traces New Thoughts on Space - VUW Exhibition | 2017 Visual Assembly Field VUW School of Architecture and Design End of Year Exhibition | 2016 Cityhood VUW School of Architecture and Design Faculty Website | 2016 Profile with Open City, Cabin of Curiosity and Cityhood projects in VUW School of Architecture and Design Handbook | 2016 End of Year Exhibition 2015 VUW School of Architecture | 2015 Earthquake Museum - Online publications of The Architectural Review Folio, CCANZ Quarterly Magazine, Volume 58 Issue 3-4 | 2015

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I . T E I K A -A -M Ā U I

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01 TE WAKA HUIA 2019 FIR ST PLA C E: NZ I A W E L L I N G TO N C E N T R A L L I B R A RY D ES I G N C O M P E T I T I O N 2019 With Tyler Harlen, Jason Tan and Poet Michelle Curnow Exhibited at the NZIA festival of Architecture at Te Auaha. Featured in Issue 3 of the NZIA publication Tāpoto, the brief within Architecture NZ

SYNOPSIS Te Waka Huia: The treasure box. Te Waka Huia looks at Wellington Central Library as a collection of memories within the city, rather than just a collection of books. This collective memory of the city is represented through designed and collected forms and objects. These objects denote the past present and future histories, both Māori and Pākehā, of Wellington city and its library. Each memory is made to be shared by the people of Wellington city and those who come to use the library.

JURY CITATION Greg O’Brien, Robin Simpson & Stuart Gardnye While neither a particularly complete nor coherent architectural plan, ‘Te Waka Huia’ - The treasure box’ offers a deep and nuanced sense of what a library is at heart: a transformative, imaginative space. The proposal is an eloquent playing out of Rem Koolhaa’s notion that architecture should extend beyond the construction of ‘built solutions’. ‘Te Waka Huia’ honors the present library building by incoporating elements (mostly notably the nikau palms) into its design. The opening image in the presentation lays out the present library within a matrix of architectural forms (with some imaginary forms added, for good measure). In some ways, the design can be seen as an accurate depiction of the library as it has functioned since its construction, rather than as a plan for its replacement. The opening image, in particular, acknowledges the library as a foundational and integral presence in the life of the city. The proposal reminds us that a library has many undercurrents and understories, pictorialised here as a labyrinth beneath the visible structure. The library is shown as a metaphysical space (or series of linked spaces) animated by myths and histories, by the words and images gathered therein. It is a place of the past, present and the future. The design asserts that the library is a powerhouse; yet it is also an enigma - a place of hidden meanings and mystery. Just as everyone’s reading is different, so everyone’s mind-map of a library is different. The design suggests as much, while at the same time hinting at the institution’s role as a repository of communal and (cross-) cultural links. At the heart of the ‘Te Waka Huia’ is the book (a form which the drawing echos). Channelling the works of Italo Calvino, Jorge Luis Borges, Elizabeth Knox and Margaret Mahy, the design is at once alien and familiar. As well as having Gothic overtones, there is a baroque quality - jewel-like and precious. This is the version/vision of the library we construct inside our minds and hearts - architecture as memory, dream and poetry.

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II. TE NGÄ€KAU

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I I I . WA K A H U I A

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I V. R Ā K A U

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V. TE N G A K A U C I V I C S Q U A R E

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02 URBAN SURGERY 2019 TH E H O ME COMPETITION With Tyler Harlen & Jason Tan

SYNOPSIS Urban Surgery reconsiders the traditional understanding of what it means to adapt to an existing home. Living in a modern city often means moving into an existing physical environment where the urban spaces, including our homes, come attached with their own personality and character. As the occupants of these environments we attempt to graft our own personality, character and lifestyle onto these spaces through means of cutting, removing and replacing architectural elements. At this point there is an interesting intersect between past and present. The former occupation becomes a scar, a palimpsest, that helps shape the next occupant’s environment.

I. S I TE A XO

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I I . U R B AN E LE VATI ON

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III. SITE AXO I V. R O O F VA U LT S V. WA L L I N -S I T U

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VI. I N H A B I TA B L E S E C T I O N

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I. K O B E N H AV N T R A C E S A X O

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03 THESIS - KØBENHAVN TRACES 2017-2018 PLA C E -M A K I N G T H R O U G H F O R M : A N I N Q U I RY I N TO ARCHITECTURAL O B JE C T S , EMB O D I E D O C C U PAT I O N AND PLACE Thesis Supervisor: Dr. Simon Twose | Performance Stream VUW School of Architecture Awarded - MArch (prof) Distinction Featured on KooZA/rch, Newport Works

This research operates as a series of iterative experiments through the design of three projects: an installation, a mid-scale building, and a public building. The design research situated in an urban context, the port area of Copenhagen, and specific elements of the site chosen for their opportunities in testing form, occupation and place.

SPLIT IN TO 3 IN TER R ELATED PA R TS

Nº1

Globalisation reduces our sense of belonging through repeatable spatial formulas, returning to an identity of place is significant in activating essences of the city. Avoiding the ever-increasing presence of the term Rem Koolhaas calls the’ generic city’, and allowing for interconnecting of small and public scale architectural conditions for people. Using Scaling as a device to reinterpret architecture and the urban spatial condition of place, the DNA of past and present architectural objects are distilled and extracted from the Copenhagen context then projected back into the drawings. Through the enmeshing of structure, material, light, colour, geometry and spatial perception – through the manipulations of the Copenhagen formal context - this research expands on notions of place and how it is understood.

IN STA LLATION

OBJECT SPACE

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D OM ESTIC SC A LE

OBJECT SPACE BUILDING

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PU B LIC SC A LE

OBJECT BUILDING URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

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THESIS PROJECT

ABSTRACT This proposal is an architectural enquiry into how intertwined formal qualities of surface, volume and geometry affect occupation at different scales. The intention is to design performances that promote a shared agency between the volumetric spatiality of the architectural object and its occupant. The research aims to experiment with this through a meshing of formal tests and spatial perception, which together act an apparatus to activate the research questioning. The results of this research will contribute to understanding how form influences a sense of place.


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I. K A L E I D O S C O P E M O D E L II . V O L U M E T R I C M O D E L I I I . PA P E R S U R FA C E S IV. KA L E I D O S C O P E V I E W I N G V. I N T E R I O R V O I D 18


NÂş1 INSTALLATION SCALE

SCALES

KALIEDOSCOPIC

OBJECT SPACE

The installation experiments performance phenomenons - testing surface materiality and volumetric manipulation through tectonics, to discover possibly research trajectories of form-making towards architectural objects and embodiment. The final design aimed to link these characteristics, proposing an installation that evokes the users’ experience of place through a fragmented visual field of their surroundings.

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THESIS PROJECT

The Installation scale splits into three speculative methods of the form: surface, volumetric and kaleidoscopic. The Kaleidoscope is the final installation, a viewing device to observe superimposed refractions through the overlapping of surfaces and volume. The form and scale were constructed for human-proportions, to embody an optical and bodily movement. The installation is a device used for altering and fragmenting space by rotating, cutting and stretching the visual field.


VI. K A L E I D O S C O P E R E F R A C T I O N S

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I. O B S E RVATO RY M O D E L II. L A K E T E K A P O M A P P I N G

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Nยบ2 DOMESTIC SCALE

SCALES

TEKAPO OBSERVATORY

OBJECT SPACE BUILDING

This design inquiry examines the formal qualities of architectural objects and landscape through the intertwining of scalar. Located on the island surface of Lake Tekapo within the idyllic Mackenzie Basin, the mid-scale assembles an observatory dwelling distilled of context and resonance with the surrounding topography. The design shares an agency between the volumetric spatiality of architectural objects and its research occupants. Resulting in a locality and presence that is specific to its context and visual coexistence within the identity of place.

M OT UARI KI I SL AND

T EKAPO

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THESIS PROJECT

The was chosen for the remote basin and surrounding Southern Alps landscape. Through the design process of remapping, extraction of architectural elements from the surrounding context that are redrawn through analogue and digital back as traces into the dwellings


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THESIS PROJECT

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XIII X. SPATIA L A XO X I. C R OSS SEC TION XII. UND ER B ELLY WOR M ’S EYE XIII. M OD EL C OM PON EN TS XIV. L AKE T EKAPO OB SERVATORY PH YSIC A L M OD E L

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THESIS THESIS DISSERTATION PROJECT

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REFSHALEØEN

VII I. K Ø B E N H AV N U R B A N S I T E II . R E D U C I N G O B JE C T S

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Nº3 URBAN SCALE

SCALES

KØBENHAVN TRACES

OBJECT SPACE BUILDING URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE

The public-scale shifted the thesis to the city of Copenhagen, a location I spent six months in during an exchange. The Danish capital chosen due to its many conditions as an architectural testing ground – to approach the city.

These objects become an assemblage of elements which are duplicated, transformed, and Boolean into parts, interacted with one another, catalogued; collected or stored. And re scaled on to the site through series of iterations and processes. These extractions are a means of generating the initial formal, spatial and materiality – experimented through a process of making. The buildings are assembled as traces of the existing urban fabric, architectural instruments to activate a sense of place within the proposed park context of Refshaleøen.

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THESIS PROJECT

The design research is situated in an urban context, the port area of Copenhagen, and specific elements of the site are chosen for their opportunities in testing form, occupation and place. The island of Refshaleøen was chosen as the site to test this inquiry of architectural objects.


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VI III. K ØBE N H AV N F I G U R E G R O U N D IV. R E F S H A L E Ø E N S I T E A E R I A L VI. K ØB EN H AV N O B JE C T A R C H I P E L A G O VII. R EFSH A LEØEN S I T E M A P W I T H E X I S T I N G P R O G R A M M E

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R E F S HA L EØ EN 01

THEATRE

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RML SPACE LAB

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TV STATION

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BEACHBALL VOLLEY

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WINDMILLS

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AMASS RESTAURANTS

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HALVANDET

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RAINS SHOWROOM

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JS STEEL

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SUPERFORM_LAB

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BIOFOS RENSEANLAEG LYNETTEN

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COPENHAGEN SUBORBITALS

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BANQUET HALL

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SKATE PARK

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ROCKET PAD

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LA BANCHINA

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CABINET MAKER

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COPENHAGEN CABLE PARK

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ART GALLERY

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NYHOLM CENTAL GUARD HOUSE

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KOBENHAVN YACHT SERVICE

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ROYAL DANISH NAVAL ACADEMY

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ANTIQUE HALL

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MARINESTATION KOBENHAVN

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DET KONGELIGE TEATER

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AMAGER BAKKE

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COPENHAGEN PAINTBALL AREANA

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AMAGERVAERKAT HOFOR A/S

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URBAN RANGER CAMP

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THESIS PROJECT

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HOLMEN

PROVESTENEN

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VIII. KØBENHAVN OB J EC T A R C H IPELA GO X. TRACES & TR A J EC TORY ITER ATION S XI. TIVOL I WOR M SEYE A XO XII. TIVOL I SPLIT- WOR M SEYE A XO

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THESIS PROJECT

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THESIS PROJECT

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X I V. F O R T R E S S H O U S I N G 1 X V. F O R T R E S S H O U S I N G 2 XVI. HOUSING WORMSEYE AXO


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XVI. K Ø B E N H AV N T R A C E S TA B L E XVI I . O B JE C T S O F T R A C E S XV I I I . M O D E L C L O S E U P 1 XI X . M O D E L C L O S E U P 2

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XX. K OB EN H AV N T R A C E S M O D E L E L E VAT I O N

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THESIS PROJECT

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I I. VISITO R H O U S E W I T H I N L A N D S C A P E II. SITE MAPPING

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04 LAKE TEKAPO CABINS 2018 FIN A LIS T A A A V I S I O N A RY AWA R D S A U C K LA N D A R C H I T E C T U R E A S S O C I AT I O N With Jason Tan & Tyler Harlen

SYNOPIS Nestled in the Mackenzie Basin on the edge of the idyllic Lake Tekapo, this project imagines a collection of observatory cabins and a visitor house as lens for observing and isolating the southern phenomenon of the Aurora Australis. Situated within the spatial territory of the Dark Night reserve, the largest in the world at 4,367sqkm - a boundary encompassing the Aoraki Mt Cook national park and the settlements of Lake Tekapo, Twizel and Mt Cook. Vast clear skies to frame the natural display and lunar orbit.

The cabins operate as a series of abodes for experiencing the temporal events of the southern lights and preserved Tekapo night-sky. Generating an alluring object distilled of context, through formal operations and materiality of the locale. Formally composed with a figural scalloped roof-line, to reveal particular viewing apertures aligned for observation towards the peripherals and sky. Affecting the internal layout of the sleeping compartments on the mezzanine level and the shared living area, bathroom and kitchen facilities below. Occupants rest as they are immersed within a sublime experience of the night-sky, constantly shifting the spatial conditions of the private spaces.

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The visitor house forms the collective building of the immediate site - its geometry augments the structural tectonics of the elemental gable form and courtyard ring. Towards a building intertwining within the unique landscape and field conditions, operating with various aperture devices at different scalar for recording lunar patterns and temporal moments. The building forms gestures from the MÄ ori Wharenui towards a contemporary reinterpretation of land-form architecture, that embeds within the earth’s undulating surface.

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The picturesque aesthetic of the basin landscape, gives perceptions of dramatic and sparse settlements - with conservation awareness towards both land and sky. This work questions the local context towards alternative architectural typologies distilled of unique territorial conditions and context, also addressing preservation 1:5000and @A4 of architecture landscape environment.

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III. SER IES OF C A B I N S W I T H I N T H E T E K A P O L A N D S C A P E IV. C A BI N S I N T E R I O R F I R S T F L O O R

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Cabins within the Tekapo landscape

CABINS AND VISITOR HOUSE WITHIN THE UNDULATING LAKE EDGE.

NIGHT-SKY AND HORIZON FRAMED WITHIN THE CABINS APERTURES

PATHWAY TOWARDS CABINS ENTRY

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INNER-COURTYARD LENS FOR THE EARTH AND SKY

OUTER EDGE EMBEDDING INTO THE LANDSCAPE AND ECOLOGY

VISITOR HOUSE COMMUNAL HALL

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PR OPOSED U R B A N C O N T E X T - A X O N O M E T R I C

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05 ORIENTAL KIOSK 2018 Adedu Wellington Oriental Bay Pavilion Architecture Competition Entry collaborated with Jason Tan, Tyler Harlen and Callum Leslie

SYNOPSIS This project re-imagines the redundant Band Rotunda harbour site, towards a collective commons for the local ‘bay’ community and

Form, Tectonics + Materiality The previous and current band rotunda provides a historic source of architectural form, tectonic and materiality expression. The unique qualities of the past are distilled and projected as inspiration into the contemporary exhibition and kiosk builtform. The contemporary floor addition continues the semi-circle pavilion shape - with a light weight roof supported by CLT arch timber columns, with an array of openings towards the water edge promenade and direct views onto the oriental waterfront peripherals. The floor consisted of an exhibition and performance space, a glass garden void vertically separates the space and allows soft lighting within the large open area. An external façade wraps the perimeter CLT panels with a scalloped brass metal, this will oxidise and develop a patina due to the close proximity with the sea.

wider public. Intertwining the social and physical experiences of productive making, observing and collecting – to embody and activate the reinvented Kiosk building. Referencing architectural elements of the past site and surrounding, to engage and preserve the local identity with a sense of place. The Oriental Bay Kiosk is a collection of creative spaces set in three parts; the first is dedicated studio and community spaces for the public, second is an exhibition and performance space to present art to the wider community and finally a kiosk booth serving beverages and operating as vendor for a collection of local artistry. Together, these engage the urban waterfront landscape reflecting the building’s physical connection. The band rotunda has had various reinterpretations on the harbour edge site, from early colonial and art deco to late 20th century additions. The proposal intends to remove the existing rotunda down to the original heritage level, retaining the architectural form and identity. An alternative second level is added through the design process of reinventing and sourcing memories - historical elements of the site and wider Oriental Bay.

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NORTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

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Programme Make + Production The restored heritage level will be converted for artists to generate and create in an open studio space. These will be sided with the Oriental bay community rooms and a visiting artist studio. Allowing for the production of physical and social connections in quieter learning and making space Observation The exhibition gallery allows for observation of installations, performances, visual art, symposiums and musicians. It provides a space for both creators, viewers and collectors to interact within a common public realm. The space allows the production of work to be curated and exhibited towards the public and local Oriental community. Collection The Kiosk booth operates as a small coffee and tea bar, but also as a platform for exploring the connection of multidisciplinary artists, musicians and students. It allows artists to promote and sell their work in an interaction beyond observation and exhibition. Edge seating also surrounds the outer booth, activating the Oriental parade promenade of the building. The idea of a kiosk relates to the previous ‘Oriental Tea Kiosk’ that operated in the early 20th century, regenerating a past identity and hertiage of the Oriental harbour.

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06 SCHOOL OF MUSIC 2015

Arci 312

Design & Structures

Lecturers: Daniele Abreu e Lima & Andrew Charleson Tutor: Nabil Allaf Course Typology: University School of Music

The School of Music located within the Cuba Street quarters, historically the industrial zone of the city has become Wellington’s vibrant urban precinct: a locale for exhibitions, creative businesses, cafÊs and restaurants. The building formally takes reference to the past industrial qualities of low scale saw-tooth factories, and the outer envelope reflects the transforming and intensifying surroundings at an urban-scale. Along with encouraging people to observe into the facade and play with reflection, perception, and transformation from human proximity. The school is split into 4 levels - the ground floor a public atrium space and the upper floors dedicated for study and teaching facilities.

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III. LE E D S T R E E T P E R S P E C T I V E CUBA AND GHUZNEE ST PRECINCT MAP

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V. LE E D S T R E E T P E R S P E C T I V E VI . U R B A N E L E VAT I O N S VII. LE E D S T R E E T P E R S P E C T I V E VIII. A U D I TO R I U M T H E AT R E

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I.C H R ISTC H U R C H M E M O RY VA U LT S I L O C R O S S -S E C T I O N

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07 EARTHQUAKE MUSEUM 2015 Published CCANZ Quarterly Magazine, Volume 58 Issue 3-4 2015. Arci 312

Design & Structures

Lecturer: Daniele Abreu e Lima & Andrew Charleson Tutor: Kadrina Lees

The Earthquake Museum is a collective memory of New Zealand’s historical tectonic activity, its prominent position on reclaimed land demonstrates the potential scale of human geological movement; compared to the immense extent of land displacement through tectonic alteration from continental drift. The museum amalgamates these scales through the exhibition and memorial spaces. Since European settlement in Wellington, the port and adjacent harbour edges have been the focal point of growth. Kumutoto Site 10 or Shed 17 location of the building, intents toward a timeless occupation of the waterfront site - externalising the internal, a building that is paused in a reflection of seismic movement. Approaching the museum visitors pass through the gateway threshold, a distortion in perception is apparent as distinctive shapes and pure forms operate in contrasting proportions. Entering the building, visitors transcend through a hypostyle passage that gradually shifts from a human scale into a space of monumental spatial qualities. The museum and exhibitions engaged in a hyper reality of architectural tectonic conditions, through materially and spaces of the solid concrete structure. Each exhibition follows a linear time line of recorded tectonic activity that has occurred through New Zealand history, each with a programme of common objects and educational significance. Socially engaging, the external form becomes a public and social space within the water edge context, operating as an architectural object-form, public ground space and urban topography. The memory vaults act as a memorial of events for New Zealand Earthquakes. Monumental inform these vaults reflect a water edge typology of port silos; each silo represents collective storage of memories. New Zealand Earthquakes; Napier 1931 and Christchurch 2011 with a series of different artefacts contained within the stacked vaults. The single direction of the vaults allows for connection of all spaces within a sizeable building, meanwhile representing a dedicated area of reflection and displacement into the perspective of events.

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Replicating the original ‘Shed 17’building footprint; 12 metres in height.

The building leans down, becoming a public realm extension to Whitmore Plaza.

Distinctive entry into the museum’s interior.

Dynamic massing opposing, the subtracted element becomes an adjacent podium.

Artefact vaults of Earthquake events added into massing.

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II. AE R I A L V I E W O F M U S E U M II I . M A S S I N G D I A G R A M I V. M U S E U M G AT E S V. M A I N H A L LWAY V I . AT R I U M VII. EXT E R I O R V I E W O F S I L O VA U LT VIII.

VIEWS FROM GALLERIES

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Exhibition Pre Historic Visual Room

Entrance

Foyer

Passage

Podium

Gallery

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Cycle house

Podium

Propylaea

IX. M U S E U M F L O O R P L A N 1 X. CROSS SECTION XI. N A PIE R C I T Y S I L O M E M O RY VA U LT

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Water memorial

Restaurant

Bridge threshold

Main Passage

1931 Silo Vault

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Profile for Jesse Ewart

Jesse Ewart Architecture Portfolio 2020  

Architecture Graduate Portfolio MArch prof (Dist), BAS Victoria University of Wellington, Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts Visit Jessee...

Jesse Ewart Architecture Portfolio 2020  

Architecture Graduate Portfolio MArch prof (Dist), BAS Victoria University of Wellington, Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts Visit Jessee...

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